The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
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Politico Europe reports: President Kaczynski is most memorable outside Poland as the twin brother of fellow politician Lech Kaczynski, who sadly died in the Smolensk air disaster in 2010. Polish state television, which is acting as a cheerleader for Duda, has hit similar tones
The issue of reparations and other compensation has been much in the news of late, most particularly in relationship to possible payments to descendants of slaves in the United States to compensate them for their disadvantages brought about by what is claimed to be a persisting racist culture in the country. There is, of course,... Read More
biowarfaremp
It has been 75 years since the surrender of Nazi Germany and the end of World War II in Europe. Amidst the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Russia postponed its annual Victory Day celebrations last month due to the health crisis as did other former Soviet states, with the sole exception of Belarus which went ahead with... Read More
Boston University's director of the Elie Wiesel archive, Bar-Ilan University’s Institute of Holocaust Research historian Joel Rappel has discovered the origin of the infamous "6,000,000" number: a 1944 meeting of Zionist pioneering organizations in what is now known as the state of Israel. For years, supporters of the Holocaust narrative have held that the number... Read More
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“Fear” is the first word of The Plot against America, the Philip Roth novel which just got re-cycled as an HBO series by David Simon and Ed Burns, creators of The Corner, The Wire, and Generation Kill. “Fear,” Roth tells us, “presides over these memories, a perpetual fear.” The memories in question are Roth’s, of... Read More
Adolf Hitler with Finnish military leader Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim (right). The two held Hitler’s only private conversation preserved in an audio recording. Credit: Lehtikuva Oy.
Hitler should have recorded everything
I have a distinct dislike for the journalistic class as a whole. They do not so much report news as collectively make the news, according to a peculiar pack mentality, which combines commonly-agreed designated good guys and bad guys, but also sometimes brutal and erratic shifts collective opinion, not according to the whims of an... Read More
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All truth-tellers are denounced, and most end up destroyed. Truth seldom serves the agendas of powerful interests. The one historian from whom you can get the unvarnished truth of World War II is David Irving. On the bookjackets of Irving’s books, the question is asked: What is real history? The answer is that real history... Read More
As I write this in late March of 2020, the world is under attack from a deadly strain of coronavirus called COVID-19. Thus far, there have been around 18,000 deaths world-wide, including 550 deaths in the United States where I live. My country has come to a halt: schools and businesses are shut down and... Read More
rosenbaum
American taxpayers still paying for World War 2
The New York Times is reporting somewhat ruefully that “The Mission to Hunt Nazis Has Become a Race Against Time.” The U.S. Government’s zeal in going after alleged former “Nazis” began in 1979 when the Office of Special Investigations (OSI) was established within the Justice Department. In 2002, OSI included 13 attorneys, almost all of... Read More
Easter 1942 French postcard reading: “Our Mother, Europe”
Europe is a continent of such heterogeneity – whether in terms of states, languages, nationalities, or geography – that no one has ever really succeeded in organizing it into a coherent geopolitical whole. This is despite the demand among statesmen, businesses, and even many simple inhabitants for a peaceful and rationalized European space. The nineteenth... Read More
President Roosvelt, Prime Minister Churchill and premier Stalin, at the historic “Big Three” conference in Yalta, February 1945
We’ve heard a lot recently about alleged secret and illegal collaboration by prominent Americans with foreign governments. Collusion is widely regarded as so malign and disgraceful that any official who cooperates with a foreign power in an underhanded way is considered unfit to hold public office. In particular, politicians and media commentators have been charging... Read More
putin-holocaust
Our fundamental disagreement about WWII, Hitler, Jews and race The topic of Russians and Jews is clearly a “hot” one. Over the past few years I wrote several articles on this topic including “Putin and Israel A Complex and Multi-Layered Relationship”, “Why Is Putin "Allowing" Israel to Bomb Syria?”, “Russia, Israel and the Values of... Read More
mengelenj
Holocaust revisionism is perhaps the most institutionally reviled, criminally punished and socially persecuted field of research in modern Western history. Yet, on the much publicized 75th anniversary of the Soviet liberation of Auschwitz, the gatekeepers of the Holocaust continue to give ground, kicking and screaming along the way. The latest example is a new book... Read More
putinnetanyahu
These days, Jerusalem could compete with Davos and Bilderberg. Most distinguished, high and mighty gentlemen have met here, at the Auschwitz Forum in Yad Vashem, The World Holocaust Remembrance Center: kings, presidents, prime ministers; a living proof the Jews have some pull in the world. The British Court of St James was represented by Prince... Read More
Polish \"Neo-Nazi\" Protest
On Friday, January 17, 2020, three thousand salvos shook the earth of the Russian capital city; the sky over Moscow had been emblazoned by glorious fireworks. This was the repeat of the memorable salute given seventy-five years ago, on January 17, 1945 by 24 salvos of 324 heavy cannons at liberation of Warsaw by the... Read More
He was a brilliant front-line commander and a tactical genius whose "intuitive sense of the battlefield made him one of the greatest generals in history." During the First World War, he pioneered the rapid advances and flanking maneuvers that would become his trademark decades later. In August 1914, as a platoon commander, he captured a... Read More
Now that 2019 has ended, it is more than seventy-four years since the end of the Second World War. America’s “Greatest Generation” that actually fought the war and endured it on the home front, is dying off and the remembrance of the conflict is increasingly experienced second hand, if at all. The war has been... Read More
Earlier by Paul Kersey: See FIRST MAN! It Depicts A Time Before America Had To Be Made Great Again—When Whitey Was Indeed On The Moon Forty-three years after Charlton Heston and an all-star cast including Henry Fonda, Glenn Ford, and James Coburn fought the cinematic battle of Midway, director Roland Emmerich has retold the story... Read More
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Old, New, and Improved
I have just finished reading William Shirer’s Berlin Diary. (This may not fascinate you, but I am coming to something.) I first encountered it in high school. It is of course Shirer's account as a correspondent in Germany of the rise of the Nazis. Most of it is well known to the educated. The Nazis,... Read More
Credit: Department of Energy, Office of Public Affairs/Wikimedia Commons
J. Robert Oppenheimer was the scientific head of the U.S. atomic-bomb project during World War II. Oppenheimer was a brilliant physicist whose contributions were essential for the successful development of the atomic bomb. Gen. Leslie Groves, the overall head of what became known as the Manhattan Project, testified that Oppenheimer was an exceptionally hard worker... Read More
In my book The Wandering Who, I delved into the fascinating and well accepted notion that historical thinking is foreign to Judaic thought. It is a recognised historical fact that Jews didn’t produce any historical texts for almost 2 millennia or more precisely, in between Flavius Josephus (37 CE - circa 100 CE) and Heinrich... Read More
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Holocaust is term taken from the Hebrew Bible (in the Greek translation), designating the religious sacrifice of animals that are burned completely on an altar. The first holocaust recorded in the Bible is performed by Noah in Genesis 8. In a fit of rage, Yahweh has said to himself: “I shall rid the surface of... Read More
March 1919 post-WWI military parade.  New York Gov. Al Smith (far left), Bill Hearst (center), Franklin Roosevelt (far right).
One of the more enduring myths accepted as reality in our modern society is that America has a relatively free press. The ruling authorities and their entrenched accomplices promote that lie as diligently as they work to ensure that it never again becomes true. America did have a mostly free and independent press until the... Read More
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Last month, on the 80th anniversary of the start of World War II, the European Parliament voted on a resolution entitled “On the Importance of European Remembrance for the Future of Europe.” The adopted document: For 75 years, we have been told that the war started on September 1st, 1939 when Germany invaded Poland, even... Read More
One of the greatest Serbian heroes of all times: Chetnik General Draza Mihailovich (1943)
This is a very special day for me, because the topics I will be covering are all very dear to my heart and to my entire family. Following the Bolshevik revolution my family and another 1.5 million Russians fled their beloved motherland at the end of the civil war. All our so-called European “allies” immediately... Read More
taylororigins
In late 2006 I was approached by Scott McConnell, editor of The American Conservative (TAC), who told me that his small magazine was on the verge of closing without a large financial infusion. I'd been on friendly terms with McConnell since around 1999, and greatly appreciated that he and his TAC co-founders had been providing... Read More
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One of the delights of revisiting old movies after many years is finding out that you completely misread or misremembered certain scenes. Early on in the first part of Leni Riefenstahl’s Olympia, we have the entry parades of the national teams. When the French team come by, they drag their flag in the dust –... Read More
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Don't know much about history
A friend of mine recently commented that if the current trend to reduce the study of history in schools to easily digestible politically correct soundbites that are being successfully pushed by social justice warriors continues, we will soon be limited to discussing how horrible slavery was, the Stonewall Inn riots and the so-called holocaust. Indeed,... Read More
World War II-era poster celebrating the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor
And the Quest for a New European Spirituality
In November 1940, a six-member delegation of Hitler Youth visited Japan, tasked by Adolf Hitler himself with a single task: “The only thing you need do is thoroughly experience the great spirit of the Japanese people that has arisen in their national polity.”[1] In honor of their visit, the Japanese composed a song entitled Banzai... Read More
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Robert B. Stinnett's DAY OF DECEIT
A Second World War Navy radioman turned journalist, Robert Stinnett was in the National Archives in Belmont, California, researching a campaign-year picture book on George Bush's South Pacific wartime navy career in aerial reconnaissance -- George Bush: His World War II Years (Washington, D.C., Brassey's, 1992) -- and encountered unindexed duplicate copies of Pearl Harbor... Read More
benderskythreat
Some may remember that in 2005 a major media controversy engulfed Harvard President Larry Summers over his remarks at an academic conference. Casually speaking off-the-record at the private gathering, Summers had gingerly raised the hypothetical possibility that on average men might be a bit better at mathematics than women, perhaps partially explaining the far larger... Read More
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In the aftermath of a war, history cannot be written. The losing side has no one to speak for it. Historians on the winning side are constrained by years of war propaganda that demonized the enemy while obscuring the crimes of the righteous victors. People want to enjoy and feel good about their victory, not... Read More
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A couple of years ago I happened to be reading the World War II memoirs of Sisley Huddleston, an American journalist living in France. Although long since forgotten, Huddleston had spent decades as one of our most prominent foreign correspondents, and dozens of his major articles had appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, The New Republic,... Read More
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I love the words, music, and soul of my Israeli-born truth jihadi brother Gilad Atzmon. In fact, I enjoy his company so much that just about every year I take up the largely thankless task of organizing a public event for him here in Israeli-occupied Madison, Wisconsin. Last year the local Israeli Occupation forces got... Read More
dresden_rathaus
Introduction The bombing of Dresden remains one of the deadliest and morally most-problematic raids of World War II. Three factors make the bombing of Dresden unique: 1) a huge firestorm developed that engulfed much of the city; 2) the firestorm engulfed a population swollen by refugees; and 3) defenses and shelters even for the original... Read More
Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop announces Germany’s declaration of war against the Soviet Union. At a meeting room packed with foreign correspondents and journalists representing the German press, he reads the text of the lengthy diplomatic note to the Soviet government, which explains in some detail the reasons for the decision to attack the USSR. His reading of the statement on Sunday morning, June 22, 1941, is broadcast to the world on German radio.
Hitler’s Declaration of War Against the USSR - Two Historic Documents
As dawn was breaking on Sunday morning, June 22, 1941, military forces of Germany, Finland and Romania suddenly struck against the Soviet Union along a broad front stretching hundreds of miles from the Arctic Circle in the far north to the Black Sea in the south. Italy, Hungary, Slovakia, and Croatia quickly joined the campaign... Read More
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We Elected Their Nemesis ... But He Was Ours
Establishment historians claim that U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt never wanted war and made every reasonable effort to prevent war. This article will show that contrary to what establishment historians claim, Franklin Roosevelt and his administration wanted war and made every effort to instigate World War II in Europe. The Germans seized a mass of... Read More
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Fascism in its inception was a distinctly localised phenomenon, growing out of the specific concerns and obsessions of Italians in the immediate post-WWI period. For example, one of the main drivers in the formation of the movement that is little commented on today was the Dalmatian question. During WWI, Italy had been promised Dalmatia --... Read More
Credit: Wikimedia Commons.  CC BY-SA 3.0
On March 21, 1939, while hosting French Prime Minister Édouard Daladier, British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain discussed a joint front with France, Russia and Poland to act together against German aggression. France agreed at once, and the Russians agreed on the condition that both France and Poland sign first. However, Polish Foreign Minister Józef Beck... Read More
Izvestia (Dec 13, 1941) honors Vlasov amongst eight other heroes of the Battle of Moscow. Anybody who has spent any amount of time questioning the standard Soviet narratives about the first half of the 20th century will invariably be called a Vlasovite at some point. So far as neo-Stalinists are concerned, the turncoat general is... Read More
Robert Faurisson and Michael Hoffman at the conference of the Institute for Historical Review, Irvine, California, 2002
Robert Faurisson, Demonized Skeptic who Battled for the Right to Doubt
French Professor Robert Faurisson died of heart failure at his longtime home in Vichy, France on October 21. His life was like something out of Alfred Jarry by way of André Breton, a surreal circus in which clowns and stage magicians, barkers, burlesquers and fire-eaters, incessantly circled and mobbed the one sane person under the... Read More
Jonathan Greenblatt, National Director and CEO of the Anti-Defamation League since 2015. Credit: Gage Skidmore, CC BY-SA 3.0
I've recently taken a bit of a break after three long months of writing in my American Pravda series, during which I finally got around to publishing many of the very surprising discoveries I had made over the last fifteen-odd years. That total came to more than 90,000 words of text, and required me to... Read More
europeandenial
A few years ago I somehow heard about a ferocious online dispute involving a left-leaning journalist named Mark Ames and the editors of Reason magazine, the glossy flagship publication of America's burgeoning libertarian movement. Although I was deep in my difficult programming work, curiosity got the better of me, so I decided to take a... Read More
zionismnazism
Around 35 years ago, I was sitting in my college dorm-room closely reading the New York Times as I did each and every morning when I noticed an astonishing article about the controversial new Israeli Prime Minister, Yitzhak Shamir. Back in those long-gone days, the Gray Lady was strictly a black-and-white print publication, lacking the... Read More
germany-must-perish
Back in Junior High School I became an avid war-gamer, and was fascinated by the military history of the past, especially World War II, the most titanic conflict ever recorded. However, although I much enjoyed reading the detailed accounts of the battles of that war, especially on the Eastern Front that largely determined its outcome,... Read More
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Although my main academic focus was theoretical physics, I always had a very strong interest in history as well, especially that of the Classical Era. Trying to extract the true pattern of events from a collection of source material that was often fragmentary, unreliable, and contradictory was a challenging intellectual exercise, testing my analytical ability.... Read More
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In response to Ron Unz’s “The Remarkable Historiography of David Irving”, this note will pick up on and elucidate the reader-comment to that from James N. Kennett, which stated: “It seemed to me that the problem with his work was not the possible inaccuracy of the details that he included – but the things he... Read More
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Although I've soured on him in recent years, for the first decade and more of Paul Krugman's tenure at the New York Times I regarded him as about the only national columnist worth reading. Certainly many others felt the same way, and Krugman regularly ranked among the most influential liberal voices in the country, gaining... Read More
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For many years I maintained far too many magazine subscriptions, more periodicals than I could possibly read or even skim, so most weeks they went straight into storage, with scarcely more than a glance at the cover. But every now and then, I might casually browse one of them, curious about what I had usually... Read More
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