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A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
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Dark Spots in a Shining Sea of Twaddle
Much is written about slavery and its aftermaths. A large part of this is frenetically modified history issuing from people both excited and poorly read, a comic-book version apparently intended to support agendas of the impenetrably adolescent Left. A few points: First, slavery was always bad, frequently hideous, much worse in the Deep South than... Read More
"I will never be able to hold her again, but I forgive you." So said Nadine Collier, who lost her mother in the massacre at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, offering forgiveness to Dylann Roof, who confessed to the atrocity that took the lives of nine churchgoers at that Wednesday night prayer... Read More
An Excursion into Northern Politics of Race
Race riot in he South, 1863. Wikipedia: "Rioters subjected black men to the most brutal violence: torture, hanging, and burning." Eleven were lynched. The Southern mob depicted here were afraid that if the North won the Civil War, freed slaves would take the jobs of whites. Virginian though I am, a son of the Shenandoah,... Read More
Portrait of Nathaniel Macon, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives
Back in 1975 the Warren County [N.C.] Historical Association initiated a comprehensive project to study the life and legacy of Nathaniel Macon. As a part of this project, both archaeological and architectural studies of his old Buck Spring plantation, near the Roanoke River, were commissioned. Working with the professional staff of the North Carolina Division... Read More
In 1956, 19 Democratic Senators and 82 Democratic House members signed a Southern Manifesto pledging to resist the integration of Southern public schools as ordered by Earl Warren's Supreme Court. Only two GOP House members, both from Virginia, signed. The American South was as solidly Democratic as it was solidly segregationist. The break in the... Read More
A Confession
The Rappahannock. ViFoto My sins creep up on me, sent by the Devil, and beset me by surprise. I know not what to do. A month ago, in Fredericksburg, Virginia, I sat on the banks of the Rappahannock River, upon which as a stripling I had canoed and fished, and reflected on how much I... Read More
Introduction Most Americans who know anything of Robert Lewis Dabney (1820-1898) know him only as the stern chaplain of General “Stonewall” Jackson and the author of a classic biography of the general. Yet, after the War Between the States Dabney became one of the most intransigent and impressive American critics of industrial capitalism of the... Read More
Continuing my series on the American nations (see also A Tentative Ranking of the Clannishness of the “Founding Fathers”; Flags of the American Nations; Sound Familiar?), I take a look at the Cavaliers. The founders of the U.S. Tidewater and Deep South were people of noble blood that originated primarily from southwestern England, in an... Read More
The Confederate flag has become identified not only with a lost cause but with a now publicly condemned one. Confederate flags have been removed from government and educational buildings throughout the South, while Confederate dignitaries whose names and statues once adorned monuments and boulevards are no longer deemed fit for public mention. The ostensible reason... Read More
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Confederate Flag Day, State Capitol, Raleigh, N.C. -- March 3, 2007
[A major oration, previously unpublished, by Prof. Paul Gottfried] Those Southern secessionists whose national flag we are now celebrating have become identified not only with a lost cause but with a now publicly condemned one. Confederate flags have been removed from government and educational buildings throughout the South, while Confederate dignitaries whose names and statues... Read More
The South remains a breed apart. You really have to tip your hat to American academics, who display an imperishable talent for rediscovering the obvious. The major discovery announced this week comes from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where an erudite soul named Scott Keeter, speaking at the school's Center for the... Read More
Topic Classics
Confederate Flag Day, State Capitol, Raleigh, N.C. -- March 3, 2007