The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection$
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
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Lest we forget, it has been nineteen years since the film “Gods and Generals” was released to screens across the United States—to be exact, on February 21, 2003—almost ten years after the release of the blockbuster film, “Gettysburg.” “Gods and Generals” was based on the historical novel by Jeff Shaara, while “Gettysburg” was based on... Read More
There’s a moment in Top Gun: Maverick where you forget you’re watching a movie, and instead realize you are watching the words of poet Alfred Lord Tennyson come to life: Pete “Maverick” Mitchell and Tom “Iceman” Kazansky, enemies turned wingmen/lifelong friends in 1986’s Top Gun, have aged 30 years. Tom Cruise’s iconic Maverick is a... Read More
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You’ve probably seen headlines like “White Supremacists Love The Northman.” The Guardian, The Daily Mail, Paste Magazine and The Mary Sue have used them as clickbait. Of course, director Robert Eggers had no pro-white intensions when he made the movie, claiming instead that he aimed to take Nordic culture back from “Nazis:” “Nazi misappropriation of... Read More
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The Northman is a cinematic depiction of Viking society in the late ninth century. Co-written and directed by Robert Eggers (who previously directed two horror movies) and starring Alexander Skarsgård (who had long been interested in Viking history and mythology and was instrumental in getting Eggers involved), it is a refreshing attempt at historical realism... Read More
Two years ago I wrote, “What is Wrong With White Women?” This still true: Making their behavior even stranger, the Left doesn’t even reward white women for being renegades. Instead, Leftists constantly complain that they are insufficiently woke, hopelessly white, and draw too much attention from black rappers — all at the expense of black... Read More
Rock and Roll unleashed youth culture, and social critics fretted that the boomers(and subsequent generations) would never grow out of their teen years. This has indeed become a problem. But, there was another phenomenon, especially beginning in the 1980s, that fixated on childhood emotions. There was Steven Spielberg who made children’s movies for teens and... Read More
JFK: Destiny Betrayed
The timing of the early March 2022 release of this digital streaming documentary could not be more auspicious. For anyone wanting to understand how we arrived at a new Cold War with the second Irish-Catholic Democratic president in U.S. history, Joseph Biden, spewing belligerent absurdities about Ukraine, Russia, and Vladimir Putin, and leading a charge... Read More
This review contains spoilers. A new horror film, Master, is making waves in the liberal arts scene. It is black woman Mariama Diallo’s first film, and it follows three black women at a prestigious New England college: a freshman (Zoe Renee as Jasmine Moore), an administrator recently promoted to the position of “master” (Regina Hall... Read More
From May 1, 2018 - Relevant to Current Events. In Sergei Eisenstein’s IVAN THE TERRIBLE the characters are less people than architectural motifs with predetermined roles set in stone. Only their eyes — limpid pools with slightest room to maneuver — animate with free will. Consciousness remains suspended between dark depths and preposterous pageantry. In... Read More
My view on videogames is much like Maude's reaction to Harold's penchant for visiting auto scrapyard for fun in the film HAROLD AND MAUDE. What's the attraction? On occasion, I check youtube on the best videogames of the year, and despite advance in graphics and the like, they seem the same old same old, mostly... Read More
Our rulers seem to think all whites live in wealth, security, and comfort. This myth is one of many that make it impossible to have an honest conversation about race. Here are five films about America’s impoverished and decidedly not privileged white underclass. Wanda (1970) A directionless woman meanders through the Pennsyltucky’s dingy and criminal... Read More
Recently a friend of mine asked me to list my ten favorite films about the South and the War Between the States, and to discuss the reasons I would choose them. I had written several columns in the past about cinema that favorably portrayed the Southland and had dealt fairly with the War Between the... Read More
Almost two years ago, I [Chris Roberts] started writing movie recommendations for American Renaissance readers. The quarantines had just begun and I thought people would be spending a lot more time at home for the next month or two. I got the timeframe wrong. For those of you once again stuck at home, I recommend... Read More
Inferior Whites Cannot Play Roles Belonging to their Racial Superiors
If you want to understand the leftists of the twenty-first century, you won’t find a better guide than a writer who died more than seventy years ago. George Orwell (1903–50) exposed the psychology and tactics of leftism in his two greatest books. In Nineteen Eighty-Four (1948), he satirized the way leftists practise the opposite of... Read More
Without myth, we aren’t a people. We’re just consumers. Our rulers appear to want it that way. Friedrich Nietzsche called the state the “coldest of the cold monsters.” He rejected the idea that the state created a people. He championed the Germany of artists and scholars, the German nation defined by culture that predated Bismarck’s... Read More
Earlier: The Great Replacement Comes For Captain America: He’s Now Black. In Marvel Cinematic Universe, Whites Have No Place As expected with supernova films of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Spider-Man: No Way Home had one of the biggest openings ever [‘Spider-Man: No Way Home’ Defeats ‘Infinity War’ & Notches 2nd Highest Domestic Opening At The... Read More
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Larry and Andy Wachowski’s The Matrix (1999) is a science fiction classic. The setting is a devastated Earth in the far future. The premise is that humanity has been enslaved by artificial intelligences. Human beings spend our lives in what are essentially coffins while mechanical vampires drain our energy. We don’t know it, because we... Read More
House of Gucci is a highly entertaining combination of comedy, tragedy, and farce, tracing the decline of the Gucci fashion empire from an Italian family business to a global capitalist brand. House of Gucci would have been the best Martin Scorsese movie in years—if it hadn’t been directed by Ridley Scott. It has all the... Read More
Dune is a great movie, and director Denis Villeneuve has filmed what some called an “unfilmable” story. YouTube commentator “Morgoth’s Review” calls the book a “reactionary masterpiece” and adds that conservative views of Dune say more about the reviewer than anything else. If so, then this may be more about me than the movie, but... Read More
hollywoodboyd
American Western Cinema as an Expression of Older Virtues
Although Hollywood is now considered a monolithic bastion of leftist and “woke” political and cultural sentiment with almost no dissent tolerated, it was not always that way, at least not to the degree that exists today. Go back sixty years ago, and that progressivist uniformity was not as apparent. Certainly, “Tinseltown” was never a haven... Read More
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Gangster movies, like war films and Westerns, are not simply a part of the American cinematic tradition, but a component in the collective psyche of its people. The well-dressed gentleman rogue who sees violence as a necessary part of business, and business as essentially a family or quasi-familial operation, is iconic. Crime, business, and family... Read More
harveymilk
You have to give the Left credit. They never take a day off. The eye of Sauron never blinks. They are frenzied and relentless in their attempts to overthrow our civilization. They softened us up for a long time, rotting away our character and identity by promoting vice, cynicism, and nihilism—all while playing the victim.... Read More
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Howard Hawks’ Red River (1948) is one of the greatest Westerns. Starring John Wayne and Montgomery Clift, Red River is the story of the first cattle drive on the Chisholm Trail from Texas to Abilene, Kansas. In Hawks’ hands, however, a movie about an episode in the history of America’s livestock business becomes mythic, epic,... Read More
On October 24, 1986 (35 years ago this week), the American comedy Soul Man was released in theaters. The film was a box office success, as it debuted at No. 3 on its opening weekend (behind only Crocodile Dundee and The Color of Money). It ultimately grossed $35 million on a $4.5 million budget. The... Read More
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How many of you have ever flown into Auckland Airport (as in New Zealand), assembled your mountain bike, then headed due south, ending up that evening at a nowhere stop that at least had a large pub featuring karaoke night (which had surprisingly good singers)? Further, how many of you, after food and beer, then... Read More
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Denis Villeneuve’s Dune, Part 1 is now in theatres. I can’t recommend it. It isn’t terrible. It is merely mediocre. I found it dull to the eyes, grating to the ears, and a drag on my patience. Villeneuve spends 156 minutes and only gets halfway through the novel. David Lynch told the whole story in... Read More
No show captured American decline as The Sopranos did. Unfortunately, its prequel The Many Saints of Newark is less an analysis of this than another example of decline. America may have deteriorated so much that its rulers can’t even recognize collapse. Instead, they strengthen their support for the disastrous policies that brought us here. The... Read More
No Time to Die is an excellent Bond film. It belongs in the company of Casino Royale and Skyfall and quite self-consciously reaches for the heights of On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, which is arguably the best Bond film ever. I was especially looking forward to No Time to Die because—although it is very much... Read More
When I first saw Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Last Emperor (1987), it struck me as a remake of Doctor Zhivago. Both narratives begin in glamorous and archaic empires that fall to Communist revolutions. Of course, that could just be due to the fact that the Chinese Revolution was something of a remake of the Russian Revolution.... Read More
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David Lean’s epic anti-Communist romance Doctor Zhivago (1965) is a great and serious work of art. Doctor Zhivago was initially panned by the critics—probably not because it is a bad film, but because it was very bad for Communism. Nevertheless, it was immensely popular. It is still one of the highest grossing movies of all... Read More
An upcoming Israeli film that sympathetically portrays a group of Jewish terrorists who attempted to murder millions of German civilians by poisoning their water supply is enjoying uncritical publicity in Zionist media. The film, "Plan A," is based on a true story that director Yoav Paz extensively researched through recently unveiled testimony as well as... Read More
Previously: The Great Replacement Comes To Marvel. Out With The Normal White Men, In With The Gays And Black, Bisexual Women The Great Replacement will not leave anything created by the Historic American Nation untouched. That includes Captain America, the quintessential Historic American. Two years after killing off the most important Marvel Cinematic Universe characters,... Read More
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Brad Bird is the director of three classic animated films: The Iron Giant (1999), The Incredibles (2004), and Ratatouille (2007), as well as the blockbuster sequel The Incredibles 2 (2018). The Incredibles is a superhero film that also pays affectionate homage to the spy movies of the 1960s, especially classic Bond. I also classify The... Read More
Michael Powell’s The Red Shoes (1948) is his greatest work and one of my all-time favorite films. The Red Shoes is a work of art about art. The central characters of The Red Shoes are ballet impresario Boris Lermontov (brilliantly played by Anton Walbrook), ballerina Victoria Page (acted and danced by Moira Shearer), and composer... Read More
One of my all-time favorite movies is The Red Shoes, Michael Powell’s 1948 Technicolor feast about a ballet impresario played by the great Anton Walbrook and his ecstatic, obsessive, and ultimately destructive relationship with his art—and one artist in particular. So you can imagine how eagerly I sought out Powell’s first foray into Technicolor, 1943’s... Read More
Credit: UNIVERSAL PICTURES / Album
The movie The Purge has now become a franchise, comparable to The Fast & the Furious, spawning five films and a television series. It has brought in more than $500 million. It tries to be darkly comic, but the real joke is that it portrays the opposite of what’s happening in the country today, and... Read More
Hollywood & the Nazis, Part Two
All installments in this series available here In the last article, I discussed how in the 1930s, Hollywood was reluctant to make any anti-Nazi movies for a variety of reasons — chiefly that the Nazi government might invoke Article 15 of their film quota law to ban the studio that made it in Germany. So... Read More
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Not every Merchant-Ivory film is a visually lush period drama based on novels by prestigious writers like E. M. Forster and Henry James, but the most memorable ones are, including The Europeans (1979), The Bostonians (1984), A Room with a View (1985), Maurice (1987), and Howards End (1992). Another in this vein is The Remains... Read More
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David Lean’s The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) is not just a great film, it is a nearly perfect one. Even better, it was recognized as such from the start by virtually everyone. The critics lionized it and continue to include it on their “best” lists. The movie business showered it with prizes. Bridge... Read More
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David Lean (1908–1991) directed sixteen movies, fully half of them classics, including three of the greatest films ever made: The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957), Doctor Zhivago (1965), and, greatest of them all, Lawrence of Arabia (1962). Lawrence of Arabia is repeatedly ranked as one of the finest films of all time, and when... Read More
conanbarbarian
Over the years, I caught bits and pieces of John Milius’ 1982 movie Conan the Barbarian—starring Arnold Schwarzenegger as the big lug himself—on cable TV. But I was never tempted to watch the whole film. I finally gave in when I started writing my series on Classics of Right-Wing Cinema, and friends urged me to... Read More
Michael Powell (1905–1990) is one of the tragic geniuses of film: a genius because he is one of the most visually dazzling directors in the history of cinema, tragic because he too often he wasted his talents on inferior scripts, most of them provided by his longtime collaborator, Emeric Pressburger, a Hungarian-Jewish refugee to whom... Read More
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The Searchers (1956) has been acclaimed not just as one of John Ford’s greatest films, and not just as one of the greatest Westerns, but as one of the greatest films of all time. This praise is all the more surprising given that The Searchers is a profoundly illiberal and even “racist” movie, which means... Read More
Cassavetes with his wife, actress Gena Rowlands in 1959. Credit: Wikimedia Commons.
My illness is mostly over, I think. There’s still residual coughing, weak, tremulous breathing and difficulty sleeping, but I’ve been able to walk for miles each day, a restorative act that gets my blood flowing, and, of course, seeing people lifts my spirits. Here in Tirana, there are enough benches and green spaces to rest,... Read More
clockworkorangefilm
For years now, readers have been urging me to review Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange (1971), which adapts Anthony Burgess’ 1962 novel of the same name. I have resisted, because although A Clockwork Orange is often hailed as a classic, I thought it was dumb, distasteful, and highly overrated, so I didn’t want to watch... Read More
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John Ford’s last great film The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) enjoys the status of a classic. I find it a deeply flawed, grating, and often ridiculous film that is nonetheless redeemed both by raising intellectually deep issues and by an emotionally powerful ending that seems to come out of nowhere. The stars of... Read More
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Director Tony Kaye’s anti-skinhead morality tale American History X (1998) is proof that propaganda is far from an exact science. Just as Stanley Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket caused a surge in Marine recruitment, American History X actually increases audience sympathies with neo-Nazi skinheads, despite its best efforts to present them as hateful hypocrites and losers.... Read More
I’ve put aside two hard-hitting essays regarding the ongoing assault on Whites in the United States because I suspect readers need a break from the relentless negative news we’ve all been exposed to. I confess I’m more than guilty of pointing out how rapidly the situation of Whites has become exceedingly bleak, I suffer from... Read More
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Deconstructing a Hero
Dirty Harry (1971) is a compelling neo-noir thriller about San Francisco Police Inspector Harry Callahan (Clint Eastwood), who is increasingly forced to choose between liberal legal norms and bringing a sadistic serial killer known as Scorpio to justice. Once Harry kills Scorpio, the movie ends with him throwing away his badge, symbolizing a momentous decision.... Read More
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Dirty Harry (1971), directed by Don Siegel and starring Clint Eastwood as San Francisco Police Inspector Harry Callahan, is a classic of Right-wing cinema. Dirty Harry was hugely popular with moviegoers, spawning four sequels and a whole genre of films about tough cops whose hands are tied by the system and are forced to go... Read More