The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 BlogviewTrevor Lynch Archive
Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

David Lynch’s 1992 movie Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me is his prequel to the Twin Peaks series, which ran on ABC from 1990 to 1991. Fire Walk with Me was a flop with critics and moviegoers, except in Japan. This is unjust, because Fire Walk with Me is a very fine movie. I won’t say it is Lynch’s best work. That praise belongs to Blue Velvet alone. But the music to Fire Walk with Me is composer Angelo Badalamenti’s best work ever.

Like many Lynch fans, I was slow to warm to Fire Walk with Me. I never thought it was a bad movie, just an unpleasant one. I missed it in theaters when it was released in 1992 and saw it only on VHS. I bought the DVD, but I don’t think I ever watched it. Then I bought the Blu-ray, which I never watched until after I finally saw the film on the big screen in a film festival. Then it hit me: Fire Walk with Me belongs in a special category of films like Vertigo and Grave of the Fireflies: dark films that are so well-done that it is hard to enjoy them.

I have trouble ranking David Lynch’s work. Blue Velvet is easy to place at the top, Inland Empire at the bottom. But between them, there are only two categories: the mixed, including Dune, Lynch’s Twin Peaks episodes, and Twin Peaks: The Return—and the excellent, which includes everything else Lynch did, including the Twin Peaks pilot and Fire Walk with Me.

There are several reasons why Fire Walk with Me flopped.

First, it wasn’t as light as Twin Peaks. It lacked the quirky characters and offbeat humor of the series. Kyle MacLaughlin and Peggy Lipton both felt this way about the film. So did the critics. So did the viewers. There are two reasons for this effect, one deliberate, one accidental.

The first thirty-three minutes of Fire Walk with Me are set a year before the Twin Peaks pilot in the town of Deer Meadow. Then the movie jumps ahead one year to the last seven days of Laura Palmer’s life.

Lynch conceived Deer Meadow as the anti-Twin Peaks: the people are ugly and unfriendly, the town is cheap and seedy, and the coffee sucks. Hap’s Diner is no RR: the manager is old and unpleasant, the waitress is old and unsavory, and there aren’t any specials. The sheriff, his deputy, and his receptionist are polar opposites of their lovable equivalents in Twin Peaks.

FBI agent Chet Desmond is dispatched to Deer Meadow to investigate the murder of Teresa Banks. Chris Isaak is excellent as Desmond. He is a wholesome-looking, all-American type like MacLaughlin’s Dale Cooper. But Desmond is smug and condescending to his assistant, Sam Stanley (Kiefer Sutherland) and metes out brutal but well-deserved violence to the sheriff (in a deleted scene) and his deputy. (Stanley, however, is a nice guy, which is a pleasant inversion of Cooper’s assistant, Albert Rosenfeld.)

I found the whole sequence extremely droll, especially Harry Dean Stanton as Carl Rodd and Sandra Kinder as Irene the waitress (best line: “It’s what you call a freak accident.”). But apparently others found it off-putting.

Once the setting switched to Twin Peaks, Lynch filmed a number of scenes with favorite characters from the series: Ed and Norma, Lucy and Andy, Truman and Hawk, Pete Martell and Josie, etc. But he had to drop them due to the running time. (The extended and deleted scenes are available on the Blu-ray releases.)

This brings us to the second reason Fire Walk with Me failed. Once Lynch dropped the light moments from the final cut, naturally what remained was quite dark. The series worked because the darkness cast by the murder of Laura Palmer was offset by the lighter characters and subplots. When the Palmer murder was solved, the series became silly and flopped. Fire Walk with Me suffers from the opposite malady: unremitting darkness.

Not only did Lynch drop the lighter elements of the series, he also put on screen what existed only in the backstory of the series: incest, rape, and finally the murder of Laura Palmer. Fire Walk with Me really belongs in the genre of horror, both supernatural and psychological horror, undiluted with the camp elements of slasher flicks. It was just hard for a lot of people to take. This is the view of Al Stroebel, who played the One-Armed Man. People were not prepared for the darkness.

Another reason for the poor reception of Fire Walk with Me is the Christian religiosity of the film. Laura Palmer speaks of being abandoned by a guardian angel, falling through endless space, and bursting into fire. In her bedroom, there is an illustration of children with a guardian angel. Laura looks on in horror as the angel disappears from the picture.

In the terrifying scene in the train car where Laura is murdered, Ronette Pulaski prays: “Father, if I die now, please see me. Don’t look at me. I’m so dirty. I’m not ready. I’m sorry. I’m sorry.” Then Ronette has a vision of an angel. Then her bonds become severed. The One-Armed Man bangs on the door of the train car to get in. Ronette tries to escape, is knocked unconscious, and falls from the train. But she survives.

When Laura is murdered we hear Cherubini’s Requiem. At the very end, Laura and Dale Cooper are in the red room/Black Lodge. Laura is seated. Cooper stands near her protectively, with a benign expression. Then Laura has a vision of an angel, a different angel than the one seen by Ronette. Laura cries but then through her tears begins to smile and laugh. It is a moment of catharsis, of redemption. Laura has died, but her soul was saved from the possession that turned her father into a monster. Again we hear Cherubini’s sublime music. The End.

Most movie critics are allergic to this sort of stuff. It may explain the boos and hisses when the film was screened in Cannes. (Robert Engel, the co-author of the script, denies it happened.)

A fourth element that some found off-putting is the relentless hermeticism of the movie: the blue rose, the mysterious ring, the room above the convenience store, the Red Room, the One-Armed Man, the Little Man from Far Away, Mrs. Tremond/Chalfont and her grandson, the Formica table, Judy, the monkey face, the disappearance of Chet Desmond and brief reappearance of Philip Jeffries (David Bowie), and, of course, the creamed corn. I find it fascinating and plan one day to tie it all together in a commentary, but for a lot of moviegoers, it was a bit much.

Finally, anyone who watched the series knew what was coming in the movie. People who don’t like spoilers couldn’t really look beyond that fact.

ORDER IT NOW

But now that you know what you are getting into, I urge you to give Fire Walk with Me a chance. Ray Wise, Grace Zabriskie, and Sheryl Lee give outstanding performances.

Three sequences are especially riveting.

First, there is Laura Palmer’s dream induced by the mysterious picture given to her by Mrs. Tremond/Chalfont. Lynch is one of cinema’s supreme masters of the dream sequence: more than half of Mulholland Drive is a dying woman’s dream. In Mulholland Drive, Lynch brilliantly constructs a wish-fulfillment dream that collapses in on itself, ultimately because reality is very different. In Fire Walk with Me, the dream’s logic is less psychological than metaphysical. It is revelatory. Laura is remembering and collating experiences, but there is something more: a message from outside her consciousness entirely. The false waking (Laura dreams she has awakened) is particularly effective.

Second, when Leland and Laura Palmer are driving, they are menaced by the One-Armed Man who screams to Laura “It’s your father!” (He also screams to Leland “You stole the corn!”) The revving engines, squealing brakes and tires, and Badalamenti’s keening electronic music will have you on the edge of panic.

Third, there is the terrifying murder, which in terms of technique and effect should be ranked with Hitchcock’s shower scene in Psycho. Again, the music and sound design will take you from hell to heaven and back instantly.

Lynch made Fire Walk with Me because he wanted to go back to the world of Twin Peaks. So did his audience. But instead of delivering damn fine coffee and cherry pie with a scoop of nostalgia on top, the logic of the story led him into a Stygian darkness where the critics and audiences did not want to follow. That’s a shame, because once you walk through the fire, the angels win out in the end.

 
• Category: Arts/Letters • Tags: David Lynch, Hollywood, Movies 
Hide 39 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. ruralguy says:

    Jack London captured in art, the struggles that took place in the Yukon gold rush. His writings weren’t fantasy, he lived the life that he wrote about. Mark Twain captured a long vanished romantic river life on the Mississippi, by describing his experiences there. That wasn’t fantasy. Dashiell Hammett captured the tough-guy world of hard-core detectives that became a rage in the 1940 era film noir films. He lived that life, as a Pinkerton Detective, in the rough town of Butte Montana that he depicted in the best of that genre — Red Harvest. The others that followed him wrote great imitations, but he pioneered it with his writings about his experiences in that field. David Lynch might be skilled in his craft, but to capture the art in life, he needs to live it. If he lived the mundane life of most small towns, he wouldn’t have written about it. His writing is just fantasy, lacking a profound vision or art that is connected to real life.

  2. What’s with all the pervert movies? Are pervert movies “conservative” or “rightist” or something? Why? I thought conservative rightists were all about family values.

    Turns out real conservative family-values, tradition-revering rightists are all dead.

    What we have now is Beavis and Buttheads like you who like perverted shit like David Lynch and wants them some more of it right now.

  3. @ruralguy

    Sick fantasy. Real sick fantasy. Moreover, pandering to and manipulation of a certain kind of mentality. A sick mentality so common in the current dispensation.

    In other words, David Lynch is a frat boy (true fact).

  4. Dumbo says:

    Lynch is good as a creator of images and moods, less so plots. (If plots apply to his work).

    This was always so, from his early short movies. Just watch them and you will see. He can be brilliant but uneven and sometimes incoherent.

    Lots of people put their own “meaning” in his work, interpreting from their personal experience or things that they imagine but are not really there. Of course a lot of Lynch’s work is about archetypes, fairy tales, etc, so they are already full of unconscious meaning. Like Fellini, he was likely a lot into Jung too.

    I think part of the charm and interest of Lynch is really that you can’t understand most of his films – at least, not on a conscious, logical level. The focus is somewhere else than in the story. That can be good, making for a less predictable experience, but sometimes also bad, because in some cases it becomes just a tiresome repetition of obsessions.

    I think his best or most successful work is probably:
    – Mulholland Drive.
    – Large parts of the Twin Peaks universe (but the whole is less than the parts)
    – Blue Velvet (It’s interesting, but… I don’t know. Not my favorite)

    Other films of his have very interesting scenes or characters (i.e. Lost Highway) without having internal coherence or even being very pleasant to watch (although that’s not always the objective).

    • Replies: @Priss Factor
  5. @ruralguy

    David Lynch was born in 1946 in Montana and grew up all around the heartland in the mid-twentieth century. His love of the common folk of the era of his youth is shown throughout h

    • Agree: jamie b.
  6. jamie b. says:

    Two related keys to understanding Lynch. One is that he is extremely dualistic, and evidently believes that beauty and virtue can only be known relative to evil. The other is that he genuinely sees both great beauty and ugliness in the mundane.

  7. Chris Moore says: • Website

    Lynch is the perfect antidote to superficial, fantasy-adled America, where most people cling to delusions, wishful thinking and the phony narratives of an insanely corrupt establishment. His best work (Mulholland Drive, Blue Velvet, Lost Highway, Fire) mix the fantasy America with the real, dark underbelly America. For most people, the effect is disturbing, because they’re forced to careen back and forth between fantasy and cold, hard, ugly reality. Like silly little children, most Americans prefer escapism in both movies and politics — the comforting lie to the ugly truth.

    The genius if Lynch is that he found a way to force the audience to confront reality by smuggling it in within fantasy.

    Joe Biden is Leland Palmer. Most Americans don’t want to face that.

  8. @obwandiyag

    What’s with all the pervert movies? Are pervert movies “conservative” or “rightist” or something? Why? I thought conservative rightists were all about family values.

    Because even family values conservatives need TP for their bungholes.

    • LOL: Talha
  9. MIRACLE MILE is like Lynch + MTV.

    Ken Kesey… man of weird right?

  10. I think Mulholland Drive is the bestest bc Lynch was able to imbue his symbolism with meaning in that film most successfully. He took what he learned in that film and made Fire, which I agree is too unremittingly dark. Not something I would watch again. I would watch Grave of the Fireflues—that’s sad, not twisted. On the other hand the symbolism is cool. The “guardian angel” that protected her was a mental dissociation that allowed her to block from her mind the horror of the incest. She created another character who was doing the raping. When she gets old enough, her logic short circuits the denial and she realizes it must be her father. That’s when the angel vanished from the pic. The freakish characters represent demons in Fire, much like in mulholland drive. I also liked when the hammer bashes the tv at the beginning, meaning now I’m going to show you everything I couldn’t on tv!

  11. I liked Mulholland Drive because it is one of the few movies that really criticizes Hollywood. The whole industry is a sham that lives on the dreams of attractive women that move there from little towns. Amoral and ugly men behind the scenes make decisions for reasons that can have nothing to do with talent and those decisions crush the hopes and dreams of these women.

    Mulholland was probably too weird at the time and went under the radar of Hollywood critics. It’s the most critical film of Hollywood that I have ever seen. You have to watch it a couple times to really get it. A lot of the dreaming is intentionally left to interpretation. I think everyone can agree it is about a failed actress that fantasizes about success but some aspects of the plot aren’t clear. But the more you watch it the more it clicks.

    Fire walk with me is pretty good but only if you have watched the series. If you haven’t then it seems bats–t crazy. How many people have sat through the episodes and paid attention? Probably not many.

    David Lynch makes some good stuff but he also adds a lot of crap. The Twin Peaks 3 was fun but also kind of a mess. There are all kinds of plot holes and it doesn’t have the cohesive feel of the early episodes. The end is excellent, maybe the best ever to a TV series. I will just say that the character in the last scene is not an actor.

    Twin Peaks was ruined by the slow attention spans of Americans. Lynch was under pressure to increase the ratings which is why the revealing of the killer felt rushed and out of sync with the pace of the series. Otherwise it would have been a masterpiece with nothing comparable.

  12. @ruralguy

    David Lynch might be skilled in his craft, but to capture the art in life, he needs to live it. If he lived the mundane life of most small towns, he wouldn’t have written about it. His writing is just fantasy, lacking a profound vision or art that is connected to real life.

    His movies give us a break from those types of connected stories. Most of those stories connected to something real still aren’t very good and as such become routine.

    Art doesn’t have to be a meaningful package that is wrapped perfectly to meet our expectations.

    Movies are all a lie in the first place and he is aware of that. You can’t capture a meaningful experience in 2 hours with a 2 dimensional view.

    • Replies: @ruralguy
  13. ruralguy says:
    @obwandiyag

    Perverted minds want to pervert reality with those thoughts.

  14. ruralguy says:
    @John Johnson

    True, but when thoughts are mildly disconnected from reality, that’s psychological neurosis. When it’s a more severe disconnect, that is psychosis. For many of us who are older, the country was less complex, so we easily learned to cope with problems and reality. Today, many can’t cope, resorting to drugs, fantasy, video games, super-hero movies. It’s psychological immaturity, but understandable, if they are struggling. Others struggle, because they need constant excitement or attention — everything that isn’t fast paced is boring. My children are like that. They can’t tolerate road trips that I enjoyed when I was their age.

    Many people rate super-hero movies as good, but they value it that way because they like the constant action, or because they fantasize about overcoming problems in a superhuman way. But, it’s an immature perspective. To them, they see art-house films as extremely boring. Like my children on a car trip, they simply don’t have the perspective to see things in a mature way. That’s the big problem in today’s world. It’s grown too complex for many to cope, so they resort to immature perspectives. They pervert reality, to deal with it.

  15. Many people rate super-hero movies as good, but they value it that way because they like the constant action, or because they fantasize about overcoming problems in a superhuman way. But, it’s an immature perspective.

    But that isn’t what lynch is selling. It isn’t a fantasy or escape from reality. If anything he forces you to confront aspects of reality that most people don’t want to see.

    His movies have entertainment value but mostly in being different from the norm. Sort of a spectacle for the senses combined with a distorted take on reality like a funhouse mirror. But the reality is still there in the mirror. The story is normally secondary to that distorted image he is trying to convey. It’s very introspective.

    That’s the big problem in today’s world. It’s grown too complex for many to cope, so they resort to immature perspectives. They pervert reality, to deal with it.

    Sure but Lynch isn’t providing a simplified perspective to help people cope. I would never suggest a Lynch movie to someone that had a tenuous grasp on reality.

    • Replies: @ruralguy
  16. @obwandiyag

    So, you disagree with Dr Goebbels, who was so impressed with Fritz Lang that he offered to turn the German film industry over to him personally?

    https://daily.jstor.org/how-fritz-langs-flight-from-nazi-germany-shaped-hollywood/

    • Replies: @Priss Factor
  17. @obwandiyag

    So, you disagree with Dr Goebbels, who was so impressed with Fritz Lang that he offered to turn the German film industry over to him to run personally?

    https://daily.jstor.org/how-fritz-langs-flight-from-nazi-germany-shaped-hollywood/

    • Replies: @Priss Factor
  18. Anonymous[877] • Disclaimer says:

    A so-so movie. The “Pink Room” scene was memorable, though. That music was something else.

    https://hooktube.com/watch?v=7xEnPcYfqjc
    (might need a reload/refresh to start playing).

    This is an extended version of the song:

  19. https://jackheart2014.blogspot.com/2018/02/twin-peaks-return-of-white-queen.html?m=1

    After reading this, I’ve no better an understanding of Twin Peaks but it interesting as hell. Jack Heart is great even if I can’t make much sense of his writing.

    Now I’m going to have to watch all of the Twin Peaks, this movie included.

  20. Twin Peaks: The Return

    I’ll be blunt and be a bull-headed Russian–The Return is a masterpiece. I love Blue Velvet, but everything I love about Lynch, including Dune–TP: The Return, including sound-track is just everything one would want and expects from David Lynch. It is a sublimation of his art and it is a stunning one. The best TV I ever witnessed in my life. Some scenes are simply indescribable, from Naomi Watts’ monologue when paying off mobsters, to Jim Belushi’s:”What kind of neighborhood is that”, to incredible late Harry Dean Stanton’s character, especially when giving 50 bucks to his tenant and forbidding him to mow the lawn for free. It is one non-stop bliss of an incredible art, that also reinforces the whole universe of Twin Peaks, including Fire Walk With Me which I immediately fell in love with, despite some of its disturbing nature, granted, It was also my first experience with TP. The next was, of course, Twin Peaks 2 seasons. I don’t know how Lynch does it, but he is one of the greatest film directors who ever graced this Earth. I, also, found Moira Kelly compelling as Donna. And now that David Bowie is gone, Stanton, Miguel Ferrer, Peggy Lipton and many others, it takes on so much more meaning to return to those movies and TV series time after time. I need to get to RR Diner in Snouqualmie to start my Twin Peaks tour soon.

    • Agree: jamie b.
    • Replies: @Priss Factor
  21. @Peter D. Bredon

    So, you disagree with Dr Goebbels, who was so impressed with Fritz Lang that he offered to turn the German film industry over to him personally?

    That story has been disputed. It’s purely based on Lang’s account, but Lang was an inveterate liar(though a great film-maker, no doubt).

    It’s true Hitler and Goebbels deeply admired the works of Lang(who was half-Jewish), but we only have Lang to go by. Goebbels left a detailed diary of all that happened, and he never mentioned anything about offering the post to Lang.

  22. @Andrei Martyanov

    I watched THE RETURN again yesterday, and I agree it’s one of Lynch’s major works, along with ERASERHEAD and MULHOLLAND DR. In some ways, BLUE VELVET is very impressive but it’s Lynchism reduced to cops and robbers. Or, it’s like LYNCH FOR DUMMIES. It’s too obvious.

    I watched THE RETURN last year and it was so strange because I knew nothing about it. In fact, I thought it was the original TWIN PEAKS(as I didn’t even know the RETURN had been released). I generally don’t like TV stuff, so I never paid attention to Lynch’s TV work. But I finally decided to give TWIN PEAKS a chance and from the library took out THE RETURN thinking it was the original. It was strange because it was in widescreen format when the original came out when the old standard TV format was the thing. Then, the characters looked so much older even though it came out in 1989. And the special effects were too advanced for 1989. I thought, WHAT THE HELL is going on? Also, as I hadn’t seen or read anything about the original TWIN PEAKS, I had no background knowledge of what was happening. So, I’m watching this that was making no sense and yet was so compelling and fascinating. Half way through the series, I did some research and discovered I was watching the freaking sequel.

    Now, my understanding is THE RETURN is pure Lynch whereas the original is maybe 10% Lynch as he took off to finish WILD AT HEART. So, much of the original series is as Salvador Dali hired a bunch of artists to make Daliesque paintings, which can’t be the real thing.

    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
  23. @Peter D. Bredon

    Speaking of Lang, I wonder how much Lynch owes to TESTAMENT OF DR. MABUSE, a kind of proto-Lynchian movie.

  24. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:
    @John Johnson

    I liked Mulholland Drive because it is one of the few movies that really criticizes Hollywood. The whole industry is a sham that lives on the dreams of attractive women that move there from little towns. Amoral and ugly men behind the scenes make decisions for reasons that can have nothing to do with talent and those decisions crush the hopes and dreams of these women.

    But that could be said of any industry or institution. The kind of people who run the Vatican are hardly nobler than the scum who run Hollywood. People who run Harvard and Wall Street are creeps too.

    Also, Lynch seems to suggest that Hollywood is as much a product of our need to dream as a dream factory. Long before Hollywood, people had their fantasies and idols. Why wouldn’t humanity not favor fantasy over reality? It’s like every girl, no matter how fat and ugly, want to see herself as a princess who is wooed by knight in shining armor.

    So, whether it’s the Vatican or Hollywood, it’s about an institution/industry run by people who understand humanity’s need for hopes, dreams, and fantasies. It could be of God and Heaven. It could of glamour and fame.
    But in either case, it’s cynical sons of bitches who rise up the ranks and manipulate/exploit our dreams.

    Of course, in our age of decadence, Hollywood is the new vatican. The age of globo-homo. With the current pope or poop also pushing globo-homo, maybe the vatican will make a comeback as a fashion church.

  25. @John Johnson

    One only can wonder what Lynch could have done with his original plan for “Mulhollamd” which was as an HBO series that ultimately fell through. You can still see some serial TV elements in the finished product that seem disjointed and out of place, like the meeting at the Winkies, or the bit with the clumsy hitman. Or characters that are introduced and seem important, but are never seen again (the cops played by Robert Forster and Bennie Briscoe).

    • Replies: @John Johnson
  26. Another great review, food for thought, lots of tidbits we didn’t know.
    Admittedly, my initial attraction to FWWM was my attraction to Sheryl Lee in all her blonde glory. (For more, I recommend “John Carpenter’s Vampires”). Time flies; I believe I have this on VHS.

    The often ignored “Wild At Heart” is a very watchable Lynch film with lots of wit and not the usual dose of darkness and mental “what does it all mean” challenges. Nicolas Cage and Laura Dern put on a very good show in this one and the film never gets bogged down. It is really a “light” film by Lynch’s standards. Cage doing Elvis is priceless.

    Even better is the masterpiece “Lost Highway”, a film which will give you nightmares and almost predicted the hell which awaited Robert Blake who was playing one of his last roles. The first time that I watched this one (on VHS), I had to re-watch it the next day just to attempt to make sense of things.

    As mentioned by others, the sense of man’s duality is an overt theme here. This film is all about wickedness. Like most of Lynch’s work, the soundtrack glues things together and this film in particular does that with the great Angelo Badalamenti, Barry Adamson, Bowie, Rammstein, Nine Inch Nails (Reznor produced the soundtrack), and Marilyn Manson all playing very creepy music. Very 90’s if you like that kind of vibe. I have just about worn out my CD of this soundtrack.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  27. Dan Schneider Video Interview #35: The Decline of Film Criticism

  28. syonredux says:

    I won’t say it is Lynch’s best work. That praise belongs to Blue Velvet alone.

    Blue Velvet is the Tom Sawyer to Mulholland Drive‘s Huckleberry Finn.The former are quite good, but the latter are masterpieces.

  29. @Hapalong Cassidy

    Or characters that are introduced and seem important, but are never seen again (the cops played by Robert Forster and Bennie Briscoe).

    I was disappointed to see that same problem in the third season of twin peaks. I felt that an entire story arc had been cut around the time of nuclear testing episodes.

    I think the real tragedy is Dune. Just a shame that it was chopped up and injected with generic space quest type scenes. Should have been a mini series as well.

    There is a lot of talk here about Wild at Heart but I really don’t get it. Seems to me that Lynch was just cashing in on that late 80s/early 90s trend of the rebellious violent couple touring Americana. I normally like Nicolas Cage but his acting was off and the dialog was awful. Lost Highway is great though.

  30. Trevor,
    Don’t know if you’re aware of this, but about a year ago a YouTube video went viral that claimed to completely explain Twin Peaks (the original series, the film and the Return). It’s FOUR HOURS LONG, but I’ll be damned, I think he may have nailed it. He literally ties everything together into a highly coherent and consistent theme. Seriously, it is doctoral thesis level good (and extremely entertaining). Guarantee if you give it 30 minutes you will watch the whole damn thing:

    Would love to know your reaction, as none of your analysis is actually inconsistent with the conclusions of the video.

    • Thanks: Jefferson Temple, MEH 0910
    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
  31. @Priss Factor

    Now, my understanding is THE RETURN is pure Lynch whereas the original is maybe 10% Lynch as he took off to finish WILD AT HEART

    Yes, he completed the first season, which was very Lynchian, but once Leland was outed as a killer, against Lynch’s objections, and a vessel for Bob, the mystery was gone and a variety of directors completed remaining episodes. By that time, the focus fully switched to Black-White Lodge dichotomy, but the show lost its immense appeal. It was still good, though, which testifies to a quality of actors’ ensemble. I lost count how many times I watched the Return, but it is a large number, and no surprise that the “What did Lynch mean by that” has become a major industry on Youtube “explaining” The Return–people simply cannot shake off this mystery of Twin Peaks. Lynch, for me personally, killed any interest in TV series because I cannot watch anything else because nothing out there will ever approach, let alone top The Return any time soon, if ever. Many people say it was a spiritual experience and I would say that they have a point.

    So, I’m watching this that was making no sense and yet was so compelling and fascinating.

    Exactly the case with Fire Walk With Me. Same effect with Dune–while Dune purists were outraged by Lynch’s adaptation (Frank Herbert was in love, actually, with the movie) of the book, the universe he created captivated so many, that today this movie is a cult classic.

    • Replies: @kimchilover
  32. @kimchilover

    YouTube video went viral

    Watched it, all 4.5 hours of it. The whole “industry” is now in place on UTube dedicated to The Return.

  33. @Andrei Martyanov

    Tried to hit “Agree” but I haven’t earned the right this month. So allow me to say for the record that I “Agree” with your comment. The Return was, quite simply, the most unexpected and undeserved Gift from Above we’re likely ever to experience again.

    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
  34. @kimchilover

    The Return was, quite simply, the most unexpected and undeserved Gift from Above we’re likely ever to experience again.

    Apart from Angelo Badalamenti’s genius music, Chromatics’ Shadow and, especially, Windswept by Johnny Jewel with the scene of Dougie in his childhood “trap” pointing to a law man’s monument and then trying to touch the police star on a cop–I never thought that I would be able to repeat musical and simply human emotional experience equating this of a first acquaintance with Pink Floyd’s music. Boy, was I wrong, when I saw The Return. The emotional depth, sadness, profundity and a beauty is haunting. I agree with you–it was a Gift. Some stars simply aligned properly, Lynch applied his genius and here we are.

  35. A Japanese version of UNFORGIVEN

  36. @SonOfFrankenstein

    “This film is all about wickedness”

    Cosmic wickedness. Lynch explores the dark heart of man. But his films often feature external evil, creeping out from the inter-dimensional folds.

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments on articles more than two weeks old will be judged much more strictly on quality and tone


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments have been licensed to The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Trevor Lynch Comments via RSS
PastClassics
How America was neoconned into World War IV
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.