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The Mandalorian
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On December 20th, J. J. “Death Star” Abrams and Disney Corp. will complete the destruction of the Star Wars saga that many of us have loved since childhood, while raking in untold millions by cynically exploiting nostalgia for the mythos they are desecrating. So pass the popcorn, because I’ll be right there, dear readers, to review it for you.

But the Disney-Star Wars marriage has not been entirely fruitless. Seventy-five percent—soon to be 80 percent—of their movies have been disasters, but Rogue One is a pretty good film.

And now we have The Mandalorian, the first live-action Star Wars TV series, which is a collaboration between Dave Filoni—the producer of the two excellent animated Star Wars series, The Clone Wars and Star Wars: Rebels—and John Favreau, director of such movies as Elf, Iron Man, Iron Man 2, Cowboys and Aliens, and the recent remakes of The Jungle Book and The Lion King.

Both Filoni and Favreau are pretty much creatures of the modern mass media. They probably believe all the tenets of political correctness. But in Filoni’s animated series, his love of Star Wars and geek/bro energy pretty much kept the worst excesses of SJWism at bay. Favreau is the wild card here, for he is half-Jewish and pretty much a Disney Corporation insider. Let’s hope the Force triumphs over the Schwartz, lest The Mandalorian be reduced to another Disney-Star Wars farce.

The Mandalorian is basically a Space Western, which is a fantastic tack but also a dangerous one because the bar has been set impossibly high by Joss Whedon’s Firefly, which is not just a Space Western but one of the best science fiction series of all time.

The Space Western is a good fit for the Star Wars franchise, because the original Star Wars drew upon elements of Akira Kurosawa’s The Hidden Fortress, and samurai and cowboy films are easily convertible, since the underlying warrior ethos is the same (Seven Samurai = The Magnificent Seven, Yojimbo = A Fistful of Dollars).

The title character is the Mandalorian with No Name played by Chilean-born actor Pedro Pascal (Oberyn Martell in Game of Thrones), with a low, husky, ultra-cool Clint Eastwood voice. The Mandalorian people were introduced as early as The Empire Stikes Back. At least Boba Fett wears Mandalorian armor. But they were developed extensively in Filoni’s two animated series as a people with a warrior-aristocratic ethos and a loose, feudal form of government. In the new series, we learn that they suffered greatly under the Empire, were scattered around the galaxy, and have adopted crypsis to survive. (Favreau’s fingerprints?) They follow a tradition and an honor code (“This is the way”). Like ronin (masterless samurai) and American gunslingers, they work as freelance wielders of violence (mercenaries, bounty hunters).

The Mandalorian with No Name is a bounty hunter, a profession introduced in the first trilogy. Here we learn that it is governed by a guild with its own code of conduct and technologies (bounty pucks, which are basically wanted posters, and tracking fobs).

The first season of The Mandalorian has eight episodes, five of which have aired at the time of this writing. The opening three-episode story arc is utterly compelling, introducing the lead characters and their universe, and hooking us in. The story takes place shortly after the fall of the Empire, when law and order have broken down in the galactic rim (the Wild West) and both criminals and bounty hunters thrive.

The Mandalorian with No Name accepts a particularly lucrative unofficial bounty from a former high imperial officer (Werner Herzog, whose accent departs from the British norm for the Empire) guarded by a contingent of Storm Troopers, their armor somewhat worse for wear. After a series of trials, the Mandalorian with No Name captures the bounty, which turns out to be an adorable Yoda baby—a baby of the same species as Yoda. The Mandalorian delivers the baby and collects his bounty. But then he has second thoughts. The baby is strong with the Force, but he is obviously not a criminal, whereas the Imperials clearly are clearly up to no good. So the Mandalorian returns, shoots up their base, rescues the baby, and they embark upon some Lone Wolf and Cub-style adventures. It is great television.

The fourth episode, however, is a big letdown. The Mandalorian lands on a planet where he promptly gets his ass whooped by a strang, independent, Xena-warrior princess badass wahman. But then he teams up with her to protect Diversity Village (there’s even a blonde child) from a band of marauders. It is basically a ripoff of Seven Samurai. I say “ripoff” rather than “homage,” because Star Wars already paid homage to Seven Samurai in a much better episode of The Clone Wars.

The fifth episode is much better but still rather light stuff, leaning heavily on nostalgia. The Mandalorian visits Tattooine, specifically Mos Eisley, and yes, even that specific cantina, where he asks around for work. He meets a rookie bounty hunter played by Jake Cannavale, who looks exactly like his father without any visible input from his mother, who boasts of being the daughter of Jewish director Sidney Lumet (Network) and the grand-daughter of black(ish) singer Lena Horne. Their bounty is an assassin played by Ming-Na Wen. The highlight of the episode is Amy Sedaris as a ship mechanic with a strong maternal instinct for the little green fellow. The plot is quite predictable.

The Mandalorian is off to an erratic but promising start. I like the basic premise of a Space Western. I like the character of the Mandalorian with No Name. I like the fact that it is set in the Star Wars universe. But I especially like how different this series is in style from the rest of the Star Wars canon.

Lucas’s films are extremely busy, and with the development of CGI, they only got busier. The same is true with Filoni’s animated series and the Disney movies. The Mandalorian is not so busy, which adds a sense of realism when one bumps into a droid or an alien monster. Even the Mos Eisley cantina is not so crowded. The special effects are also quite outstanding.

Another important stylistic change is the music. It is not John Williams, or imitation John Williams. Instead, Swedish composer Ludwig Göransson has created quintessential Space Western music by simply melding Ennio Morricone and electronica. His score is tasteful, tuneful, and catchy, with moments of deep feeling and epic grandeur. He even incorporates Williamsesque themes without ever sounding like Williams. I love John Williams’ Star Wars scores, but if Williams had scored this series, even he would have used a completely different sound.

I also liked the color palate of the first three episodes, which leaned heavily on chrome, magenta, and dark greens, like something went wrong with the technicolor.

When Death Star Abrams’s new technological terror is unleashed this month, I am predicting a huge flop. It may be the last big-screen Star Wars we get for a long time to come. So let’s hope The Mandalorian becomes the great series hinted at in the first three episodes. It is nice to know that at least part of the Star Wars saga is in the hands of Dave Filoni, a talented storyteller guided by a genuine love of Lucas’s vision and with a demonstrated talent for carrying it forward—as opposed to envious mediocrities like Jar Jar Abrams and Rian Johnson, whose transparent motivation is to mechanically repeat Lucas’s original trilogy, this time as farce.

 
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  1. Rahan says:

    Best thing about the series so far is the one-minute artistic summary/impression of each episode at the end.

    Feels like a cross of Samurai Jack and Michael Moorcock.

  2. Dumbo says:

    I don’t really care for any Star Wars themed movies. Even the originals I think are overrated. The only interesting thing that seemed interesting in this Mandalorian series was the casting of Werner Herzog.

    On December 20th, J. J. “Death Star” Abrams and Disney Corp. will complete the destruction of the Star Wars saga that many of us have loved since childhood

    The trailer hints at the death/destruction of C3PO, thus completing the death (in pathetic ways) of all original characters, with perhaps the only exception of Chewbacca. So basically J.J.’s trilogy has the purpose of simply killing all old characters, but for what? It’s not very likely that they will make a new trilogy with Mary Sue, Magic Black and Chubby Asian, but who knows, Disney is capable of anything.

    Anyway, even though I appreciated the original trilogy as a child, I haven’t seen the prequels and saw only the first Star Wars reboot (hated it), but I am not one of those people who are obsessed with Star Wars. Actually I don’t get the excessive love of such movies. It’s just a dumb space opera.

  3. Big Daddy says:

    Star Wars is junk.

    Lynch is idiosyncratic and usually wrong in his critiques, Blue Velvet excepted. I fail to grasp what his artistic and intellectual standards are.

    Movies are by far the greatest artistic medium as they can combine such a huge variety of inputs to tell a story, i.e. picture, sound, location, music, speech, actors expressions, sets, and camera angles just to name a few.

  4. Dumbo says:

    Movies are by far the greatest artistic medium as they can combine such a huge variety of inputs to tell a story, i.e. picture, sound, location, music, speech, actors expressions, sets, and camera angles just to name a few.

    Quantity isn’t quality. Actually the fact that it is a sort of summation of different arts makes it pretty hard to make great artistic films, because they depend on someone (or a group of people that get along well) who can master very different skills: composition, dramaturgy, photography, music, editing, etc. Very few can do that: people like Chaplin and Welles come to mind. Otherwise even good films can be uneven: great photography but weak story, good actors but banal visuals, etc.

    Lynch is idiosyncratic and usually wrong in his critiques, Blue Velvet excepted. I fail to grasp what his artistic and intellectual standards are.

    He seems to like popular films such as The Dark Knight and Star Wars, but did not like Joker which was actually a bit above average for the super-hero genre. So far the only consistent thing about him is that he likes anything by David Lynch (duh).

  5. KarlS says:

    I’ve watched 5 episodes of The Mandalorian and my question is: when is somebody going to change Baby Yoda’s diaper??

  6. VICB3 says:

    Episode 4 was both PC treacle as well as a blatant commercial for the Baby Yoda doll.

    PC because here we have a multi-ethnic village full of people wearing simple and drab homespun mucking in the dirt with hand tools, and all in harmony with nature and each other. Ahhh, the simple life! And amidst this Old Hippy/Leftist/Radical-Environmentalist wet-dream, forget the fact that they have advanced technology (and access to more) in the form of droids et al to do the work for them 24/7 as well as live in something better that wooden shacks.

    What are they? A religious cult, the Star Wars version of the Amish?

    Then we’re shown that one of the villagers, a woman, has a “past” and can shoot accurately. Ex-Imperial whatever? It’s never explored. She’s just there to do the “Woman in Charge” thing as well as hit up the main character. (Hey, he could have kept his helmet on!) But what the hell, they got the whole “Big Strong Woman of Color” thing out of the way.

    And all the male villagers are just weak and useless of course. What are they growing and eating? Soy? You’d think that they would have hunted down the dog faced whatevers with the AT-ST Scout-Walker* a long time ago. Or throw up defenses. Or something, anything, rather than just continue to grub in the mud and eat whatever it is that has made them into self-evident eunuchs.**

    On second thought, comparing them to Amish is insulting to the Amish. Amish men would have done something to solve the problem already.

    And then there’s the whole little kids and Baby Yoda thing. There they are, the improbably cute and multi-ethnic Our Gang giggling away as they pose -Pose! -around the green and adorable linear descendant of those long haired Scandinavian Troll Dolls that used to be all over the place. “Can I feed him? Can I play with him?”

    “Can I have one Mommy? Pleeze!!!”

    Hurrah for product placement! “Just in time for Christmas!!” Except the Disney fucked up someplace on the supply chain and evidently the Baby Yoda dolls – “It walks! It smiles! It even levitates stuff!!” – won’t make it to the shelves until January or so.***

    Maybe Disney can sell Mom and Dad a “Guaranteed Baby Yoda Gift Certificate” inside a” Levitating Baby Carriage” shaped envelope to throw down under the tree and keep the little tykes mollified until that happy day.

    In all, Episode 4 was a disappointment because it wall all so predictable and Corporate. Episode 5 picked up the slack a bit. OK, a lot. But I can’t help but to nurse a fear that some committee – selected more for their ethnic and PC bona fides than their smarts – will succeed running this series into the ground as it gains in popularity. Episode 4 was a foretaste of the damage they might cause.

    And I hope not. Because the Madalorian really is pretty good.

    For now anyway.

    Just a thought.

    VicB3

    *OK, I admit it; I’m a bit of a Star Wars vehicle Geek.

    **Maybe that’s why the “Woman in Charge” was hitting up the Mandalorian? Hypergamy and all that.

    ***I guess some heads are gonna’ roll at Mauswitz on this screw-up, all PR posturing about how it was all “planned” to the contrary.

    • Replies: @S
  7. peterike says:

    Joss Whedon’s Firefly, which is not just a Space Western but one of the best science fiction series of all time.

    I really don’t get the mad fan boy love for a show that was at best mediocre. Ok, it had a lot of cute girls (not counting the Hispano-Negress), but that’s about it.

    • Replies: @Glaivester
  8. Star Western?

    Who needs it?

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  9. When the Western was serialized as TV fare, it lost its mystique. It was no longer special in the living room. It needed the big screen. Its ubiquity killed it.

    STAR WARS was special as an event. There was the wait and anticipation.\

    Now, it’s just another tv show.

    Zzzzzzzzzzzz

    • Replies: @Prester John
  10. Tusk says:

    Who /Yeed/ here?

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  11. It was a pedestrian pseudo-Western until Baby Yoda; the moment Baby Yoda was a thing I closed VLC player and resolved never to download another episode.

    Baby Yoda is a bigger meta-insult than Jar Jar Binks; it is irredeemable and irremediable.

    To give some idea of how low my standards are: I watched three entire episodes of ‘Sense-8’ before pulling the pin, and the entire first series of ‘Impulse‘.

  12. @Tusk

    I /reeeeeed/.

    REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

    • Replies: @Tusk
  13. @Priss Factor

    Star Wars – where cool old guns are repurposed to Blasters!

    • Replies: @Alfa158
  14. Alfa158 says:
    @Joe Stalin

    Good catch by Ian. The MG42’s repurposed to blaster rifles in the early Star Wars were a lot easier to spot.

    In any event, they at least finally did something with Bobba Fett, the second most unnecessary character after Jar Jar Binks, in the series. It initially looked like the menacing, masked, bounty hunter was intended to be as significant character and then after producing huge numbers of action figures he got faded away into a mute background player.

    • Replies: @SOL
  15. In reality there are only two-and-a-half actual Star Wars movies — the series emotionally and formally ends, reaches its tonic resolution, after the destruction of Jabba the Hut’s airship and the reunion of Our Gang, who then sail off merrily into the sunset. Luke got to prove himself as a super-monk Jedi, Leia got to show some skin, Luke gets to cop a final feel as they escape, Han and Leia are a couple, we’re done here. Nobody cares what happens to Vader. It’s only $$$ that kept the thing going on and on and on in a perpetual zombie-walk after that.

    The purpose and real undercurrent of the Star Wars mythos was never about defeating the evil Empire, it was about the formation of Our Gang, the surrogate family for nerds. If they haven’t already done it (and I’m sure they have), somebody should do a Star Wars version of the famous Norman Rockwell Thanksgiving painting, because that’s all this really ever was.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin
  16. SOL says:

    There are three episodes in the first season so we shall see if they return to the level of the first three or are closer to the middle two. I thought the acting in episode 5 was very poor — none of the minor characters were believable as inhabitants of a universe recovering from the collapse of the Empire (and its attendant lawlessness and violence that the writers seem to think is prevalent as the “Republic” slowly rebuilds). And the multiethnic village of episode 4 was just ridiculous and takes the red-pilled viewer back to disbelief.

  17. SOL says:
    @Alfa158

    Yes, it may be the case that much of The Mandalorian is taken from the story originally written for the Boba Fett movie.

  18. neutral says:

    I am predicting a huge flop

    I really hated the Last Jedi, but I think it will not be flop. it still has a massive reputation that will pull in the masses. The true believer SJWs will obviously flock to this, as well as the normies that see that as a must see pop culture “sci fi”. Even amongst the people that hated it, many will end up paying to see what it is about.

  19. Pheasant says:
    @Dumbo

    ‘But for what’

    They had to pay Lucas royalties for using the original characters.

    Disney is a SJW company that is slowly going bankrupt.

  20. FvS says:
    @Big Daddy

    You read his The Leopard review?

  21. Let’s hope the Force triumphs over the Schwartz

    THE COMBINATION IS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

  22. ANON[317] • Disclaimer says:

    Joss Whedon’s Firefly, which is not just a Space Western but one of the best science fiction series of all time.

    Welp there goes the credibility.

    Firefly was proto-SJW dross. Seriously. Lost of girlz power with some t&a to placate the boyz. Just get some free goyfeed porn and do it right FFS. Total degenerate garbage.

    And The Mandalorian is crap. Herzog must have lost his mind to join the show and baby yoda needs to be roast over a spit and served with sauerkraut.

  23. DanFromCT says:

    I realize bringing up Stars Wars in the company of men must be a joke in the way talking about video gaming would be, but I didn’t get it.

    • Replies: @Dave Bowman
  24. Anon[398] • Disclaimer says:

    Star Wars is for SJWs and POC now. It’s garbage.

    • Replies: @Epigon
  25. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    The purpose of The Star Wars mythos was/is to sell action figurines, Priness Leia costumes and, once upon a time, lunch boxes.

    It’s the 21st century.

    Remember: Consoome product. Get excited for next product.

    • Agree: Sunshine
  26. Giwu-Ger says:

    The author fails to point out the obvious. Lynch loses me when he honestly tries to analyse each episode and constructs comparisons with Lone Wolf and Cub and Firefly, elegant masterpieces for a more civilized age.

    Now I had pretty much exactly the same thoughts and feelings when watching the Mandalorian. Episode four made Xena spring also to my mind. But that is far more than TV devotees can hope for, these days. Simple fun is where it’s most political these days.

    SW may have cracked the blockbuster code long ago. Its heirs were not cut from the same mythological cloth. People love their Wookies and Droids because it’s the most compelling quasi religious saga that resonated with them since their childhood. They’ll gladly accept any addition to their canon, really anything – as long as it’s not explicitly heretical.
    What are the new movies but a gnostic reading of the original trilogy?
    Leia should have been the chosen one (fittingly, she has also been resurrected)!
    You shall never win without mindless diversity!
    etc

    Even a non-political SW sitcom (if that is even possible) would be truly entertaining, successful and beloved by millions. The masses are starved for simple bread and cloud city circuses. Xena is an early christmas miracle, praise the force.

  27. Kim says:

    Adult males discussing this rubbish? Shouldn’t you all be watching NFL while wearing your favorite cuck-jerseys?

    • Troll: Sol
  28. “Star Wars” I, II and III were, at times, mesmerizing. They should have stopped after III. By that point it became all about $$$s, thus the Dark Side prevailed.

  29. @Priss Factor

    As I noted elsewhere, they should have closed the books after “Return of the Jedi”–a perfect ending with Darth Vader circling back to Aniken Skywalker while coming to terms with his son.

    • Agree: anonynous
  30. Perhaps this is paranoid or over reading into motivations, but does anyone ever get the idea that the cultural masters are trying to destroy any franchise or modern mythos that doesn’t share their origins?

    Comic book movies are brilliant, appeal to audiences and we have to have more and more of them, usually with handsome white male leads with actual star quality (uh for the time being.) of course, it’s common knowledge among this readership that almost every comic book character, sans maybe Wonder Woman and silver hawk, was created by a certain kind of person….

    Now the competing modern pantheons: Star Trek and Star Wars are being attempted but each time with a worsening plot and stiff necked obedience to “wokeism,” running wahmen, all youthful whites males are evil, etc. Even in Rogue One, agree the one shining light among them, the male lead was not all that. The solo guy was okay, but who would accept a black Han Solo? That one was written into the dna of the franchise. It’s true at a Freudian level that all these sorts of myth are primarily of the “destiny child” form, wherein a young male identifies with the lead character. Constantly casting the lead as female or nonwhite alienates the primary fan base.

    Star Wars is a whale that will take multiple harpoons to kill, but it’s getting there. Likewise with Star Trek, but there again the star trek movies were never all that good, and it was primarily conceived as a tv series.

    Does anyone think there could be a method to this madness? Due to the financial failures, the execs will throw up their hands and say “apparently people just don’t want to see Star Wars and Star Trek! Let’s do Spider-Man again!” Maybe it’s paranoia on my part; maybe comic books were always a low genre that is simply easy to get right, but the level of dialogue and acting seem much higher in those, particularly for the iron man character.

    • Replies: @Happy Tapir
    , @Wade
  31. Epigon says:
    @Anon

    Star Wars has always been garbage.
    Everything past the novelty of Episode IV is plothole- and incosistency-riddled utter rubbish.

    If you’re older than 14 and like Star Wars, you’re a failure.

  32. Epigon says:

    the first live-action Star Wars TV series, which is a collaboration between Dave Filoni—the producer of the two excellent animated Star Wars series, The Clone Wars and Star Wars: Rebels

    Due to having a young cousin, I had the unpleasant experience of having to watch episodes of this obnoxious crap with him.

    It is unbearably retarded – every single episode reeked of naive, cheesy tropes and unbelievably fake dialogues. I hope my cousin will come to his senses by the time he enters puberty.

    The plot and the whole setting are mind-bogglingly stupid. An adult capable of enjoying it should seek professional psychiatric help.

    • Agree: Che Guava
    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
  33. anon[198] • Disclaimer says:

    but I am not one of those people who are obsessed with Star Wars. Actually I don’t get the excessive love of such movies. It’s just a dumb space opera.

    Same. I liked the originals well enough but disliked everything after – the prequels, the mainline Disney movies, Rogue One – all flawed or highly overrated. Didn’t bother with extended universe stuff, either. Came off as glorified fan fic because it basically is. Seriously, read the story of how Han Solo happened to come by the Millennium Falcon. It’s laughable. Read any Star Wars Chuck Wendig book. Ugh: https://www.amazon.com/Aftermath-Star-Wars-Trilogy/dp/1101885920

    My theory is that Star Wars and other pop culture stuff has replaced religion in the minds of most people. It basically is a religion to many. That means an inability to judge things objectively. Plus lots of trolls and priests interpreting liturgy. Go to YouTube and check out all the Star Wars fan vids, some with millions of views, interpreting every fan theory about Darth Vader and the characters and themes of Star Wars. This is a religion. A cult. I agree with the author that Abrams and Johnson are both mediocrities, at least as writers (both are technically competent directors), but the amount of hate they’ve received from Star Wars fanboys is just embarrassing. THIS is what our society has devolved into?

    Oh, no you didn’t. You disrespected the Force (TM) abilities of Jedi masters Popo Maldoritian and Cleto Dar’Kulu. Heresy. Draw boy. Draw that lightsaber and throw down! In the name of Invaderous Zim, we ask absolution. In the name of the Force (TM), begone Sith Lord (TM) !

    • Replies: @Happy Tapir
  34. @Happy Tapir

    I’m not saying that I dislike comic books by the way. I have affection for every dweeb genre.

  35. Carlos43 says:

    Star wars wants the 70’s back but its never going to happen.

    The movie came out 8 years after the moon landings when space was still a big thing and nobody had seen special effects like that.

    Fast forward 2019 until the aliens arrive space will stay a minority interest and if you want special effects just put on a computer game.

    There just feeding off the 40/50 year olds who may watch it out of some misplaced loyalty, leaving the cinema sad with their indifferent borred kids wondering what the fuss is about.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  36. anonynous says:

    Dumbo says:
    December 11, 2019 at 7:56 am GMT • 200 Words
    I don’t really care for any Star Wars themed movies. Even the originals I think are overrated.

    I respond:

    I disagree. I remember when the 1st Star Wars movie came out I was about ~ 13 years old. The movie was so different from anything that had been made since the mid 1960s. It was like the terrible > 1965 cultural revolution hadn’t happened – and here was a Space Western with a Princess in distress – OK, she was an opinionated, feisty princess – but a traditional damsel in distress never the less – It might as well have been Robin Hood With Errol Flynn and Olivia D.

    The bad guy was a very realistic bad guy who wore Black Darth Vadar – it was good against evil where yeah, evil was kinda of cool in a Roman Empire, NS STORMTROOPER way – the bad guys included evil, but efficient NS Stormtroopers. It was like we were back in the 1940s and America was a good country fighting bad people and bad things – not a world of 60s drug counter culture, Midnight Cowboy, feminist BS, faggotry – there was no feminism or faggotry in the first 3 Star Wars.

    And then…..

    There was the 20 year layoff – the franchise went to pot, Disney Inc got taken over by Michael Eisner and other stereotypical Hollywood Jews – who did to Star Wars what they always do to anything positive, traditional White European, White European American.

    It is what it is.

    Thanks for the memories.

    • Agree: Old Prude
  37. Che Guava says:

    I generally like, though in generral do not agree with Trevor’s reviews.

    However, that he is prsrenting the Kurosawa origimals as eaxchangeable with the Hollowood copies, .

    That sucks, as you should well knnw.

  38. @Epigon

    Unfortunately, I also have a family member infected by the mental illness of Star Wars. Even worse, he is already past puberty.

    I think you or your extended family will have to urgently intervene. ASAP. Seriously.

    I think that being into many video games and arguably even many forms of ANIME is un-ironically superior to Star Wars fandom …

    • Replies: @Epigon
  39. The Mandalorian with No Name accepts a particularly lucrative unofficial bounty from a former high imperial officer (Werner Herzog, whose accent departs from the British norm for the Empire.)

    Herzog’s interesting voice sounds close to Boo Berry.

  40. S says:
    @VICB3

    Hurrah for product placement! “Just in time for Christmas!!” Except the Disney fucked up someplace on the supply chain and evidently the Baby Yoda dolls – “It walks! It smiles! It even levitates stuff!!” – won’t make it to the shelves until January or so.***

    One would have thought they’d have learned this lesson long ago. 😉

  41. @anon

    That’s basically correct. Things like Star Wars, Dune(of which Star Wars is a vulgarization for the masses), lord of the rings, Star Trek, etc. serve the same spiritual function that religion and myth did for early man. It’s a psychological vacuum that must be filled. In fact the very theme of Star Wars is spiritual resurgence amidst technological dystopia. There is hot debate in star trek and Star Wars circles about what is canonical, what should be accepted as a part of the wider mythos. Sound familiar? Not unlike the early Christians separating which gospels were canonical from the apocrypha such as the gospel of Saint Thomas!

  42. Epigon says:
    @TheTotallyAnonymous

    Even worse, he is already past puberty.

    I think you or your extended family will have to urgently intervene. ASAP. Seriously.

    Not necessarily.
    As a kid, I liked Star Wars movies and this thing – https://youtu.be/wLdlwZUO5mo?t=5243

    Look at me now.

    I think that being into many video games and arguably even many forms of ANIME is un-ironically superior to Star Wars fandom …

    I am a vehement opponent of anime, manga and other crap.

    However, I genuinely believe that multiplayer FPS, RTS and autism simulators such as ANNO, EU/HOI mods, AGEOD helped me develop my brain, analytical skills when I was growing up. In particular, I started playing AoE and therefore, learning English, before I even went to school.
    The catch is to be moderate about it, never let it infringe on your social life and let it go once you can experience real life and real life “quests”.

    • Agree: TheTotallyAnonymous
    • Replies: @silviosilver
  43. Anon[398] • Disclaimer says:

    When I was in high school, nerds who loved Star Wars were shoved into lockers. And why not today?

  44. Liu Bei says:

    The Mossadorian escorting the super weapon away from the imperials to bring peace to the galaxy. May the teekum be olam.

    Follow each new riveting episode as he meets a talented POC, strong wahman, or fellow tribe member to guide him along his way (I.e the ol’ yenta Trevor seems to like so much).

  45. Tusk says:
    @Kratoklastes

    Ron needs to add a ‘Based’ button.

    • Agree: NobodyKnowsImADog
  46. Ivy Mike says:

    The Star Wars movies are terrible, built around endless (endlessly boring) chase scenes and cheesy/bad special effects. Why are movies so bad?

    • Replies: @Dave Bowman
  47. anonymous[327] • Disclaimer says:

    More Firefly episodes, cancel Fox exec responsible for FF’s demise.

    • Agree: Old Prude
  48. americangoy says: • Website

    Rogue One was supposed to be a war movie, just set in a fantasy star wars universe world setting.
    Of course, Disney being the power mad tribals that they are, could not leave alone, and had to edit, cut and add “kid friendly” scenes to the film (some of the “wacky humor with the droid” scenes are so jarring and out of place, it should be obvious to all that it is so).

    That the movie is STILL ok-ish is a testament to the original script and the original idea for the film.

    To me, Rogue One is everything that Disney Star Wars SHOULD have been – NEW stories, set in the SW universe, with new heroes and villains. But of course, that would not milk the nostalgia….

    …but wait, the nostalgia was NOT milked. We are all wrong. The nostalgia was KILLED. All the old heroes were killed off, especially the straight White Males. The more beloved an old hero was, the more denigrated, mixed with mud, trashed his character became in the “new and improved” SW.

    So no, not nostalgia. Agenda. Again.

    Now we have Admiral Gender Studies with purple hair, putting a (boo!) straight White male in his place (as it should be, forever and ever, amen or whatever cultural jewish marxists say). Incidentally, the male spy cum Xwing pilot cum superbadasshero was RIGHT in his criticism of her incredibly stupid, nonsensical plan. But no matter – he was a male, and White, and HAD to get his comeuppance from the strong, independent woohhhhman.

    When I watched Blade as a young kid, I did not notice any agenda or racial issues or pushing a narrative. It was not black guy killing White guys – it was a superhero vampire hunter, half vampire himself, fighting for humans. There were no politics except for in millieu vampire politics shown in the movie.

    When I watched Ripley kick azz and take names, I did not care that she was a strong independent woohmman. She was not a caricature, and neither were the males she was coopering with.

    Now… now all movies, ALL MEDIA, MUST push the AGENDA.

    Male, especially White, is evil.
    Woman can never be wrong. Always good. Sometimes helped by magical, super intelligent black man.

    But… looking back at the original SW, did you notice…. that the Empire was made up of all White males (assume stormtroopers in their white costumes were all White too, like the officers), and the rebels were a hodgepodge of multi culti….. Maybe…. maybe the agenda was already there.

    Our enemies play the long game. 10 years, 20, perhaps even 50 or a century to them is just a unit of time, a stepping stone to their goals.

    Meanwhile we are being infantile, writing very long comments and essays and making youtube rant movies about (so called) “our” hobbys, movies, and popular media…. which NEVER was ours. It was always jewish.

    Superheroes – it is basically jewish supermen doing tikkun olam, and their great moral dilemma – do they help the goyim masses, they being super strong, super smart, that they are above normal humans…. or do they just abuse their position? That is what stan lee did with the XMEN…. excuse me, x persons.

    Anyway, instead of watching jewish crap and writing long winded fartings about it, perhaps you should read the second greatest English writer works, Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski’s THE HEART OF DARKNESS, on which lucas based his idiotic pablum.

    • Agree: Sunshine
  49. @Dumbo

    I watched, in this sequence, The Empire Strikes Back (left me unmoved), Return Of The Jedi (hated every minute), and fifteen minutes of the reboot Star Wars. Fifteen minutes was enough.

  50. anon[301] • Disclaimer says:

    But… looking back at the original SW, did you notice…. that the Empire was made up of all White males

    That’s true, but the rebels in the original movie were almost all white, too. So, I don’t think there was a political message in it. A New Hope was filmed in the UK, IIRC, so that’s a consequence of the demographics back then (sad, that’s what Britain was and that’s what we’ve all lost). Same for Alien, Aliens, Willow, etc. The UK was the New Zealand of the era. Witness the glorious medal scene at the end of A New Hope. Nearly all the rebel forces are white guys. Glorious. That changed only after “American” media demanded more “inclusion” to a property made by and for our group.

    However, this criticism is well taken for the modern Disney movies, and I’m sure it’s intentional. That’s obvious if you review some of the rhetoric of those involved with the making of The Force Awakens. IIRC, they compared the First Order to white supremacists, code for Trump voters (America First, First Order … get it?). The racial disparity between the protagonists and antagonists is also jarring; the former are insanely diverse (few white men, though) while the latter are all racist white male / notsee caricatures. Worse, this flies in the face of history. A real rebellion as you saw in Star Wars would likely be unicultural, and the Empire itself would be the mulitcultural oppressor; this dynamic has been true throughout history. It’s the opposite of what you see in these latest films. Also, the overuse of British accents in these movies is very noticeable. I’m not even even British, but I was offended by it. The accent is code for “white” which is why the First Order uses it so often.

    These movies are peppered with Left Coast political dogma. The original film featured a farmboy white male, Luke Skywalker, as the hero. That character very much could have been any white male from Arkansas to most of California at that time in history (California was majority white in 1980, that’s crazy). Demography is destiny, I guess. You now live in an era where the “new Americans” are determined to appropriate the things you created for you people for their tribe. That’s probably why so few new things are made anymore — nothing original at least. The vast majority of best-selling new books are written by whites; the same is true for movie scripts, video game treatments … the best directors, etc. If you’re white, why would you want to create something that will only be stolen from you and appropriated by others to be used as racist propaganda against your group? Easier to do remakes or move on to other stuff in that environment. Not to say that all Hollywood movies are trash. There are rare gems, but the downturn in the number of popular, critically acclaimed new properties is noticeable, just like the accents in The Force Awakens.

  51. @Dumbo

    The reason Disney has so throughly killed all the original characters has to do with licensing rights. Lucas still gets a small piece of merchandizing from toy sales of the characters he created. Disney focused on introducing thier own Star Wars characters so they wouldn’t have to pay Lucas. Same reason the theme park focused only on the new characters.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
  52. @Big Daddy

    Movies are by far the greatest artistic medium as they can combine such a huge variety of inputs to tell a story, i.e. picture, sound, location, music, speech, actors expressions, sets, and camera angles just to name a few.

    I wouldn’t agree- although this is an interesting question (actually, Wagner thought in similar ways about Gesammtkunstwerk).

    It seems that powers of various modes of expression (words, sounds, pictures/colors, ..) are clearly separated & by combining them you won’t get anything superior, but basically- inferior (just consider opera, which is clearly inferior, in its best examples, to drama as regards dramatization & emotional power in depiction of human condition).

    Movies are best in depiction of action, of rendering of atmosphere of a certain age (costumes, manner of speech etc.). But, in most other fields, film language is sorely lacking. For instance, brilliant acting & music are the only tools in description of horror, when Hoskins’ character realizes he’s being driven away by the IRA gang to be executed. His grimaces are the most film language can come up with, while a good novelist could extract pages & pages about the same scene.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  53. Old Prude says:
    @Carlos43

    Agree. In the late 70s, as a teen, from nothing there came Star Wars and it was awesome. It got progressively less awesome (no pun intended). But its impact on a young teenage boy when it burst on scene cannot be overstated.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  54. Dumbo says:
    @Dr. Addadictome

    Will figurines of Mary Sue, Magic Black and Chubby Asian be really popular?
    And doesn’t Disney have to pay to Lucas anyway for Stormtroopers, Millenium Falcon and X-wings, which are basically the only possible “cool” toys remaining?

  55. @Bardon Kaldian

    The Long Good Friday (1980) is a great gangster film.

    “His grimaces are the most film language can come up with”

    The long take on the doomed crime lord’s face at the end of the film works because Bob Hoskins was a tremendously skilled actor. The indignation and anger gives way to acceptance of his fate.

    “while a good novelist could extract pages & pages about the same scene.”

    As you know, film is vision and sound. Fiction is intensely interior and cerebral. For storytellers, both mediums contain strengths and weaknesses.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  56. @Old Prude

    Agree. Age-wise, I was the perfect demo for the first three Star Wars films. I lost interest when Lucas unveiled his new line of plush toys in Return of the Jedi.

  57. @SunBakedSuburb

    Agreed on all points. Just, wanted to say that film is not, per se, a richer & more potent artistic medium.

    Where film (and TV series) is evidently more powerful are “visual” scenes, or a combination of motion pictures, music, dialogs, camera movements & angles, … For instance, no literature can be as impressive as the opening scenes of “Saving Private Ryan”, or, to stick with Spielberg, “Jaws”- evidently superior to the Peter Benchley’s novel.

    On the other hand, when we have both novels & movies, in most cases novels win (and I’m not talking about “classics” like Henry Fielding, Henry James, Melville or Hardy): although I like the following movies, novels are, I’d say, richer: Straw Dogs, Little Big Man, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Johnny Got His Gun, I Am Legend, ..

  58. Wade says:
    @Happy Tapir

    Perhaps this is paranoid or over reading into motivations, but does anyone ever get the idea that the cultural masters are trying to destroy any franchise or modern mythos that doesn’t share their origins?

    No, you’re not paranoid or over reading into things. MCU Thor’s directory Taika Waititi has come out and stated this exact thing. Some fan on Twitter made the following complaint about Taika’s new “Love and Thunder” Thor sequel coming out which will be turning Thor into a female:

    It is due TO YOUR MARVEL WORK THAT THIS MESS IS POSSIBLE. YOUR WRITING RUINED #THOR, HIS MYTHOS AND HIS CHARACTER. SO NO I DO NOT WANT TO SEE THIS FILM IF WE ARE TRULY GETTING A JANE FOSTER THOR.

    To which Taika replied:

    I’ll ruin your mythos in a minute, baby.

    So you’re pretty much spot on.

  59. Please do a playthrough and review of Jedi: Fallen Order, staring the aggressively ginger Cal Kestis (portrayed by Cameron Monaghan) and his Slavic-accented, albino, Human/Zabrak hybrid space goth gf Merrin.

  60. Pericles says:
    @Dumbo

    thus completing the death (in pathetic ways) of all original characters, with perhaps the only exception of Chewbacca.

    Surely Kathleen Kennedy and her bold cast of diverse women writers won’t dare to kill the dog??

  61. @Big Daddy

    Movies are by far the greatest artistic medium as they can combine such a huge variety of inputs to tell a story, i.e. picture, sound, location, music, speech, actors expressions, sets, and camera angles just to name a few.

    If you think reading Crime and Punishment is powerful, wait till you read it while I play Taylor Swift albums and occasionally dribble cold water down your shirt.

  62. @DanFromCT

    Personally, I’d love to think it was an elaborate joke.

    Sadly, I don’t think it is.

  63. @Epigon

    If you’re older than 14 and like Star Wars, you’re a failure.

    Spot-on. I read this review for one reason only (and still regretted the time-waste) – I had been wondering for a few days what the token office gay (and SJW, and Trump-hater, and Boris Johnson-hater, and Paki-lover) had been talking about when he was gushing to friends how much he was looking forward to watching the Mandalorian. Then I saw this review. Now I know.

    Hard to believe how much money a talent-free, propagandizing, toxic Jew Hollywood is still making by flogging mind-rotting teen garbage to billions of adults worldwide who are plenty old enough to know better. Thank Christ I wasn’t born with shit for brains, like so many obviously were.

    • Replies: @Chris Mallory
  64. @Ivy Mike

    Why are movies so bad

    My money’s on the infinite talentlessness of Hollywood Jews.

  65. The latest Star Wars films have the quality of Soviet propaganda, totally obnoxious levels of childish political messaging. Unwatchable.

  66. Glaivester says: • Website
    @peterike

    I never got into Firefly. I am still upset that they cancelled Crusade before airing the first episode.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  67. Mr. Anon says:
    @Epigon

    Star Wars has always been garbage.
    Everything past the novelty of Episode IV is plothole- and incosistency-riddled utter rubbish.

    I agree. Star Wars (the original movie, I mean- when it was called just that – no “Episode IV”) was good for what it was: an exciting, middle-brow adventure story for boys – along the lines of 20,000 Leagues Beneath the Sea or The Land That Time Forgot. All the movies after the first one were crap.

  68. @Dave Bowman

    Man you virtue signal with the best of them.

  69. @Epigon

    Edgelord without cultural taste reveals himself. Jew?

  70. @Glaivester

    I watched a few episodes years ago. I thought it was okay and I could’ve kept watching, but I got distracted and never went back. I tried watching again earlier this year, and I think I lasted about ten minutes. People have a right to their likes and dislikes, but I have to confess I’m mystified by what Greg Johnson finds so super awesome about Firefly.

  71. @Epigon

    I am a vehement opponent of anime, manga and other crap.

    Why so vehemently opposed?

    Manga’s never attracted me even slightly, but I’ve watched a few anime movies (before I even knew there was a special term for them).

    I had a slight thing for samurai/ninja stuff as a kid, and I thought Ninja Scroll was terrific. I find it still watchable as an adult.

    Akira, Wicked City, Ghost in the Shell are pretty good, but I doubt I will ever watch any of them again, but I can’t see any reason to be horrified by them either.

  72. Dumbo says:

    Speaking of movies, the trailer for the new Nolan movie, “Tenet”, just came out. It’s not possible to say at this point what it is about, but it looks like a mixture between Memento and Inception. The main character is a black dude, and it appears to have a very multicultural cast.

    Steve Sailer has this idea that Nolan is “right wing”, but I think it’s based on very thin evidence. I don’t know what are his political views. If anything, Dark Knight and Dark Knight Rises were kind of neo-conish, with terrorism menaces and all. Dunkirk was, I don’t know what was the point of the movie, to be honest. Kind of nationalistic, I suppose, but it didn’t impress me all that much.

  73. pierog says:

    > the Star Wars saga that many of us have loved since childhood

    look at this guy, he loves product

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