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Seattle Inspector General Urges Seattle Police Department Eliminate Traffic Stop for Minor Violations Over "Racial Fairness" Reasons... I.E. Too Many Non-Whites Arrested
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Just make it illegal to arrest black people and People of Color (POC).

Please.

End the games. End the charade. Law and order is dead. Just admit what’s happening. [Seattle inspector general sends police chief a letter “urging” SPD to eliminate traffic stops for minor violations, Law Enforcement Today, May 22, 2021]:

In a recent letter to Seattle Police Chief Adrian Diaz, the city’s inspector general stated that Seattle police should “strongly consider” eliminating traffic stops for minor, civil, and non-dangerous violations.

According to reports, Seattle Inspector General Lisa Judge stated that such stops should be “discontinued for the safety of both officers and the public and for racial fairness.”

As inspector general, Judge is charged by law with helping to ensure the fairness and integrity of the police system in its delivery of law enforcement services. In her letter, Judge wrote that traffic stops should be limited to offenses that create a danger to the public.

Examples of this include reckless driving, DUI, school zone violations, and other similar circumstances.

Judge framed her “recommendation” as a “request,” but then went on to argue that routine traffic stops for minor civil offenses, such as an expired license tabs or a burned-out taillight can at times result in unnecessary deaths, both to motorists and police officers.

In her letter, Judge cited the recent cases of 20-year-old Daunte Wright who was fatally shot by police during a traffic stop and Darian Jarrot, a New Mexico state police officer who was fatally shot during a traffic stop by a driver with an assault rifle. She wrote:

“Many in law enforcement acknowledge traffic stops are inherently dangerous, with officers approaching unknown persons, often in darkened vehicles, sometimes in remote areas, without knowing whether that person may try to harm them to avoid being arrested.”

She added:

“Many in the community believe traffic stops are inherently dangerous for different reasons, especially for people of color.”

Judge wrote that traffic stops for minor violations are a “significant infringement on civil liberty” and should be reserved for cases when a person is engaged in criminal conduct that harms others. She wrote:

“Stops for government-created requirements like car tabs, with nothing but a potential monetary penalty, do not justify the risk to community or to officers.”

She stated in her letter that routine traffic stops are the most common form of face-to-face interactions between police and the community and can impact how community members form negative opinions of the police, which can in turn influence public trust in the department. She wrote:

“Moreover, research has consistently shown that black and Latino experiences during traffic stops are different from those of white persons.”

She added:

“I have discussed these issues with others in city leadership and I believe there is support for exploring alternatives to traffic enforcement in ways that do not involve routine stops for minor violations.”

Complaints about “racial fairness” should immediately end all arrests of non-whites for any crime.

Such is nature of where we are in 2021, right?

Equity means abandoning all norms governing civilized society, because such norms fail to factor in the contributions of non-white criminals.

 
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  1. one day last year i walked to my car from work over broken glass, drug paraphernalia, human excrement and an empty shell casing(!) to discover that i had gotten a parking ticket.

    never had the concept of anarcho-tyranny been displayed so starkly to me.

    • Thanks: eah
    • Replies: @Detroit Refugee
    @ravin' lunatic

    That sounds like Lot B at Ford’s “Mustang Plant”.
    Stepped over all of that plus used rubbers, soiled drawers, empty alcohol containers of every type imaginable, every fast food joint in Mi’s bag full of trash, etc. etc. etc.

    , @Wielgus
    @ravin' lunatic

    Reminds me of an anecdote told by the actor Keanu Reeves in the 1990s.
    He said that a little before his career took off, he was staying at an apparently fairly high-class hotel, I think in France. He came back late and the reception desk made trouble over the fact that he was wearing jeans.
    Then he got into a lift in the hotel and a woman propositioned him - she was a prostitute. Reeves suspected that she paid a bribe at the desk to be let into the hotel to seek customers. Blue jeans were a problem, ladies of the night were not.

    Replies: @ravin' lunatic

  2. “Judge wrote that traffic stops for minor violations are a “significant infringement on civil liberty” and should be reserved for cases when a person is engaged in criminal conduct that harms others. ”

    How about we only charge for misdemeanors rather than felonies or should felonies count only 3/5 of their full sentence for blacks? 😉

    • Replies: @nokangaroos
    @Lancelot_Link

    The most cursory glance at criminality vs. incarceration stats shows this already is
    the unwritten law of the land.

  3. Ted Bundy was arrested due to a traffic stop. In fact, Traffic stops are the most common contact between law enforcement and civilians.

    Having expired tags is likely to not even get you a ticket unless they’ve been expired for a very long time.

    I guess it’s just legal to drive around with no license plates or insurance is you are black now.

    • Agree: DMZABO
    • Replies: @loren
    @ClownWorld

    similar in NYC, they began to enforce laws on street crime and that really stopped crime.

    , Seattle Inspector General Lisa Judge--fat and ugly. I checked.

    , @RoatanBill
    @ClownWorld

    Why does a vehicle need a gov't approved license plate? Couldn't the manufacturer put one on to uniquely identify a vehicle in case of criminality?

    Why do you have to keep paying and paying for the gov't plate? Why do you need to renew your license for a fee every so often? Did you forget how to drive in between?

    Did you ever see a horse with a license plate in the old days before vehicles? Why do we need a gov't license to drive? Wouldn't a sign off from a drivers program be enough?

    Why is the insurance industry favored with a gov't mandate to purchase their product? If there's an accident, shouldn't the courts adjudicate such matters?

    I ask this of you specifically since you appear to be in favor of gov't mastery over a slave population.

    Replies: @UNIT472, @Hangnail Hans, @loren, @Jim in Jersey, @Adam Smith

    , @SCuba Steve
    @ClownWorld


    Ted Bundy was arrested due to a traffic stop.
     
    Also, the “Son Of Sam” killer (David Berkowitz) was finally caught because he got a parking ticket.
    , @TNC
    @ClownWorld

    “I guess it’s just legal to [ ] if you are black now”

    Still works

    , @Libre
    @ClownWorld

    They are the only contact with police and that's why many people hate police. Heck if it weren't for traffic stops, I don't think Id hate them at all.

  4. Actually, I think she’s kinda on the right track here. Maybe we should NOT be getting pulled over for stupid shit, regardless of color. The technology is there to send you a freaking letter to tell you you’re expired or your car needs to be fixed. Send proof to the DMV, just like they demand for SNAP. You have X number of days to comply. Actually, here’s an idea–send proof of fixed shit or your SNAP and or welfare/unemployment gets shut off. Sorted. No arrests, no BIPOCS/Cops murdered. All is well. No?

    Then maybe we can put REAL criminals in jail. Oh, and ditch the stupid drug laws, too. Darwin Awards. BoooooooooooYaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!!!!!

    • Replies: @Supervisor
    @Pissedoffalese

    They won't starve people for being scofflaws, so the EBT thing is a non-starter.
    Likewise, they will not penalize "poor folks" for ignoring notices regarding broken tail lights and expired tags.
    It's just what it sounds like: a different justice system for negroes. They'll have to raise taxes to make up the lost revenues from fines and registration fees. Insurance rates will go up because their will.be more accidents in unsafe cars, but that's the price of becoming a third-world country.

  5. More and more, the pleading is that civilized norms have to be dropped for the sake of the precious oppressed minorities, who can’t be expected to abide by them.  Rules are only for YT.

    Is “Judge” an (((ethnic))) surname?

    • Replies: @Libre
    @Mr. Rational

    Is robbing people on the highway for a broken taillight civilized? Especially when there are real criminals running around? Traffic stops should be illegal to perform unless an immediate danger, or every murder, take, etc has been solved. And in that case, the officer should be loaned to a jurisdiction with an unsolved case.

    There goes my reply limit.

  6. So it’s better to not stop a criminal with a assault rifle for a minor traffic violation because they/them may act criminally with an assault rifle right there, right then?

    One could possibly support the reasoning of this peculiar trolley exercise in ethical logic it if the potential perp would let loose later in a mob-on-mob or black-on-black event.

    Still kinda adventurous thinking.

    Wait! What if it’s one of the AR-15 toting Red Profs of Charlotteville?

    Judge wrote that traffic stops for minor violations are a “significant infringement on civil liberty”

    Definitely a new one. I hope that statement was followed by a suitable explanation of the reasoning.

  7. And poor old Whitey will bear the brunt of this cat lady’s “request”. Got to make those monthly quotas somehow…

  8. Cop unions love this woke policy of “don’t stop people of color” because since 99 percent of crime is perped by people of color police will have incident free shifts – easy job just drive aimlessly around wealthy tree lined neighborhoods for the entire shift ignore all reports from the hood and go home then demand big raises and new benefits for zero enforcement of the penal code. Easy peasy!

    • Agree: DMZABO
  9. Da noo maff.

    19 minus 61 = black violence

    https://www.wtkr.com/news/19-year-old-charged-with-murder-after-missing-chesapeake-woman-found-dead

    19-year-old charged with murder after missing Chesapeake woman found dead

    Posted at 10:29 PM, May 22, 2021

    and last updated 7:35 PM, May 24, 2021

    CHESAPEAKE, Va. – A 19-year-old has been charged in connection to the death of a Chesapeake woman who was found dead after being reported missing.

    61-year-old Laura Miles, who was reported missing under suspicious circumstances, was found dead on May 17 in a wooded area in the 4600 block of Taylor Road.

    On Saturday, police charged 19-year-old Chesapeake man Raheem Lamont Cherry in Miles’ death.

    Cherry is being charged with 1st-degree murder, robbery and abduction. On Monday officials said he is also being charged with Concealment of a Dead Body.

    Police say Cherry lived at the Taylor Pointe Apartments, which is located right across the street from the wooded area where Miles’ body was dumped.

    Miles’ black truck was also found a short walk away from where Cherry lived.

    Court documents reveal Cherry just moved to the area from Richmond in March and was working at McDonald’s for three days prior to his arrest.

    He is currently being held in the Chesapeake City Jail.

    Police say the homicide is currently under investigation.

    • Replies: @AR in Illinois
    @Lancelot_Link

    I gaur-an-tee he raped her before he killed her too. That might've even been the motive, the robbery afterward was just convenient. F'n savages.

    , @Boy the way Glenn Miller played
    @Lancelot_Link


    Court documents reveal Cherry just moved to the area from Richmond in March and was working at McDonald’s for three days prior to his arrest.
     
    If only there was a $15.00 an hour minimum wage, he would have lived straighter than a preacher.

    -sarc button-
    , @Detroit Refugee
    @Lancelot_Link

    What a complete POS! Had to kill her and more than likely raped her. What the McDonalds gig couldn’t suffice? Not to mention the lifetime of freebies he was literally raised on. Nope, the largesse of the host country and people wasn’t enough. So this is what the ungrateful give us in return.

  10. fkng dindus try obeying laws, like others

    • Agree: DMZABO
  11. The idea is not without merit but the traffic stop is an important police investigative tool. The police use it selectively as a ‘reason’ can almost always be found and the police can then detect the odor of alcohol, marijuana or just look around the interior of the car for indications of drug usage, firearms etc. If the police officers suspicions are correct ( and they usually are as they know who the criminals are in their communities) it can get dangerous if there is a gun under the seat or in the waistband of an occupant of the car but what’s the alternative. Let thugs go about their business unmolested?

    • Replies: @Chris Mallory
    @UNIT472

    Citizens have the right to be armed, so a firearm in a vehicle is none of a government employee's business. All gun laws are unconstitutional.

    Allowing pampered, tax fattened thugs to accost citizens on the public roads is more dangerous than allowing the private thugs to go about their business.

    , @Feryl
    @UNIT472

    Also, people with open warrants are often busted during "routine" traffic stops (which as you suggest are key to policing in a car-heavy culture).

  12. https://www.beaconjournal.com/story/news/2021/05/22/family-friends-slain-mcdonalds-worker-call-end-gun-violence-downtown-akron-shawn-fann/5201014001/

    Before the walk back to Second Baptist Church, Shawn Fann Sr. said perspectives on guns and their usage have to change for improvement to take take place.

    “The root of the problem [is] society has got us programmed that guns are good,” he said.

  13. HT says:

    Every study I have ever seen says that, as with more serious violent crimes, blacks are more likely also to violate traffic laws than other groups. That is just part of their general dysfunctional behavior. Eliminating enforcement rules for people who have the worst behavior is a recipe for disaster but that is exactly what they are doing.

    • Agree: DMZABO
    • Replies: @SCuba Steve
    @HT

    Until our society accepts that they are different and they behave different, this crap will continue...and every difference in outcome will be blamed on “racism” (ie blamed on white people).

    Cops are in a no-win situation now. Either go after the lawbreakers (who are disproportionately black) and be called racist, or back off of black lawbreakers and be blamed for rising crime rates.

    Replies: @Cauchemar du Singe

    , @Polistra
    @HT

    Yep. Until and unless they learn to join the rest of civilized society they should actually be policed more, not less. Policing them even less than we now do will guarantee that their behavior degenerates even further. I would grant that it's a bit of a dilemma though, given that a large number of them display no ability whatever of joining civilized society.

  14. How many people, white, black or any other color, will renew their license plate if they know they will pay no penalty for letting it expire?

    • Replies: @Raccoon
    @Bill H.

    People! A lot of you are making an obvious mistake - Seattle Inspector General Lisa Judge is not calling for ALL minor traffic infringements to be ignored, just those that affect blacks and latinos.

    As a result of the quota system of traffic tickets (ask any cop!) it will be Whitey who bears the increased police ticketing, so that the numbers (and the revenue) will not be affected.

    Indeed, Lisa Judge said: “Moreover, research has consistently shown that black and Latino experiences during traffic stops are different from those of white persons.

    PK is absolutely correct when he says "Complaints about “racial fairness” should immediately end all arrests of non-whites for any crime."

    We are headed straight for that scenario at frightening speed - just watch out that we don't get ticketed for that frightening speed...

    , @RoatanBill
    @Bill H.

    Can you supply a valid reason why a plate has to expire?

    Isn't it there so as to identify a vehicle that was part of some crime?

    Does the tiny dated plastic stick on tag in any way obscure or make the rest of the plate invisible?

  15. N-logic shining brightly! These “people” are not like us and DON’T belong in civil society. Blame Whitey for EVERYTHING because they can’t/won’t conform to laws, hence your higher levels of contacts and resultant bad outcomes during interactions with the Po-po.
    So tired of all of this. If they would just let us leave them, which millions of us are constantly doing every day, things would work out for all. But, they have to always follow us and get in our faces. This shit can’t go on much longer.

  16. ig, you can suck dick – obey the “traffic” law or walk

  17. Honestly, I’m pleased with this. Our cops were getting annoying as all Hell with their tickets. They steal too much money from us.

    Also, I’m a firm believer in replacing fines with either jail sentences or nothing anyway. Either it matters enough the punishment should be equal and harsh for everyone, rich, middle, and poor (and no one can “pay” their way out of punishment), or it’s not an actual offense.

    Weregild is an okay additional sentence, though.

    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
    @Boomthorkell



    I’m a firm believer in replacing fines with either jail sentences or nothing anyway.
     
    I'm a firm believer in replacing jail sentences with fines, and/or hard labor with restitution.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

  18. @ClownWorld
    Ted Bundy was arrested due to a traffic stop. In fact, Traffic stops are the most common contact between law enforcement and civilians.

    Having expired tags is likely to not even get you a ticket unless they've been expired for a very long time.

    I guess it's just legal to drive around with no license plates or insurance is you are black now.

    Replies: @loren, @RoatanBill, @SCuba Steve, @TNC, @Libre

    similar in NYC, they began to enforce laws on street crime and that really stopped crime.

    , Seattle Inspector General Lisa Judge–fat and ugly. I checked.

  19. @ClownWorld
    Ted Bundy was arrested due to a traffic stop. In fact, Traffic stops are the most common contact between law enforcement and civilians.

    Having expired tags is likely to not even get you a ticket unless they've been expired for a very long time.

    I guess it's just legal to drive around with no license plates or insurance is you are black now.

    Replies: @loren, @RoatanBill, @SCuba Steve, @TNC, @Libre

    Why does a vehicle need a gov’t approved license plate? Couldn’t the manufacturer put one on to uniquely identify a vehicle in case of criminality?

    Why do you have to keep paying and paying for the gov’t plate? Why do you need to renew your license for a fee every so often? Did you forget how to drive in between?

    Did you ever see a horse with a license plate in the old days before vehicles? Why do we need a gov’t license to drive? Wouldn’t a sign off from a drivers program be enough?

    Why is the insurance industry favored with a gov’t mandate to purchase their product? If there’s an accident, shouldn’t the courts adjudicate such matters?

    I ask this of you specifically since you appear to be in favor of gov’t mastery over a slave population.

    • Replies: @UNIT472
    @RoatanBill

    Prior to the auto governments didn't need to build roads. A municipal government may have put in cobblestone streets but that was about it save for a few 'turnpikes' that charged a fee to use. With the advent of motor vehicles governments got into paved road construction in a big way and some way to pay for them was necessary thus annual auto registration fees and fuel taxes. Its not unreasonable. In some states you don't have to buy auto insurance. You can post a bond with the DMV to insure you can pay for any damage your vehicle may cause. Since most people don't have a couple of hundred thousand dollars laying around they buy insurance instead. Again not an unreasonable requirement.

    The drivers license has become our defacto identity card as it very difficult to fake or obtain one fraudulently but you aren't required to get one unless you want to operate a motor vehicle on state highways.

    Replies: @RoatanBill

    , @Hangnail Hans
    @RoatanBill

    Be glad you're not in a state with annual property tax on cars...

    Replies: @RoatanBill

    , @loren
    @RoatanBill

    Could the manufacturer put one on to uniquely identify a vehicle in case of criminality?
    good idea.

    I ask this of you specifically since you appear to be in favor of gov’t mastery over a slave population.
    do you build and maintain roads and traffic signals?

    no gov = chaos. big gov = problems. since (((1913))).

    Replies: @RoatanBill

    , @Jim in Jersey
    @RoatanBill


    ...Why?
     
    Anything you pay to the government is a tax. It is never used for the purpose you think it is and as long as you’re willing to continue paying, they will stand there with their hand out.

    You shouldn’t need a license to travel the streets and highways if your own country. Nor should ‘registration’ be a continual thing, if needed at all.
    , @Adam Smith
    @RoatanBill

    Good afternoon Bill,

    “Driving” is regulated occupation for hire. Everyone has a constitutionally protected right to use their automobile on the highways and byways of this once great nation for travel. Free people do not ask for permission to travel as free people have no master.

    The state has, in essence, converted our constitutional right to travel by automobile into a privilege and sold it back to us for it's own benefit and profit. This is an unconstitutional taking of our right to travel. The state, courts, prosecutors, judges, police, insurance companies and every other person and corporation involved are running a criminal protection racket to extort money from us.

    There are too many examples too list, but here are a few...


    “The use of the highways for the purpose of travel and transportation is not a mere privilege, but a common and fundamental Right of which the public and the individual cannot be rightfully deprived.”

    Chicago Motor Coach vs. Chicago, 169 NE 221;
    Ligare vs. Chicago, 28 NE 934;
    Boon vs. Clark, 214 SSW 607;
    25 Am.Jur. (1st) Highways Sect.163
     

    “The Right of the Citizen to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, either by horse drawn carriage or by automobile, is not a mere privilege which a city can prohibit or permit at will, but a common Right which he has under the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

    Thompson vs. Smith, 154 SE 579
     

    “… For while a Citizen has the Right to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, that Right does not extend to the use of the highways, either in whole or in part, as a place for private gain. For the latter purpose, no person has a vested right to use the highways of the state, but is a privilege or a license which the legislature may grant or withhold at its discretion.”

    State vs. Johnson, 243 P. 1073;
    Cummins vs. Homes, 155 P. 171;
    Packard vs. Banton, 44 S.Ct. 256;
    Hadfield vs. Lundin, 98 Wash 516
     

    “Heretofore the court has held, and we think correctly, that while a Citizen has the Right to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, that Right does not extend to the use of the highways, either in whole or in part, as a place of business for private gain.”

    Willis vs. Buck, 263 P. l 982;
    Barney vs. Board of Railroad Commissioners, 17 P.2d 82
     

    “The right of the citizen to travel upon the highway and to transport his property thereon, in the ordinary course of life and business, differs radically and obviously from that of one who makes the highway his place of business for private gain in the running of a stagecoach or omnibus.”

    State vs. City of Spokane, 186 P. 864
     

    “It is not contended by any one that the city would have the right to prevent the appellant from riding in his automobile on any street in the city … for the streets were built (sic) for that purpose.”

    Green v San Antonio, 178 SW 6;
    Hadfield-Respondent’s Brief, Pg 32.
     

    “The statutory requirement that licenses be procured for motor vehicles used upon the highways is based on the servitude put on the highways by such use and the advantage which the improved highways may afford the business in which the motor vehicle is employed.”

    Patterson vs. Southern Ry. Co., 198 S.E. 364, 214 N.C. 38.
     

    “No statutory duty lies to apply for, or to possess a driver license for personal travel and transportation as defendant is not within the class of persons for whose benefit or protection the statute was enacted.”

    Routh v. Quinn, 20 Cal 2d 488.
     

    “Where a private statute exists of which the intent is regulation of commercial common carriers, the particular agency enforcing that private statute, shall not apply it by trickery and deceit, to persons who are not noticed by the statute as persons regulated and taxed, nor should it permit any party to do so in violation of a person’s right to stay out of compelled license/contract, when he is not a person subject to the statute, unless clearly within its words.”

    State v. Ebershart, 179 P 853, 246 P 2d 1011.
     

    18 U.S. Code § 31. Definitions

    (6) Motor vehicle.—
    The term “motor vehicle” means every description of carriage or other contrivance propelled or drawn by mechanical power and used for commercial purposes on the highways in the transportation of passengers, passengers and property, or property or cargo.

    (10) Used for commercial purposes .— The term “used for commercial purposes” means the carriage of persons or property for any fare, fee, rate, charge or other consideration, or directly or indirectly in connection with any business, or other undertaking intended for profit.

    https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/31
     

    “Where rights secured by the Constitution are involved, there can be no rule making or legislation which would abrogate them.”

    Miranda vs. Arizona, 384 US 436, 491
     

    “The claim and exercise of a constitutional Right cannot be converted into a crime.”

    Miller vs. U.S., 230 F. 486, 489
     

    “There can be no sanction or penalty imposed upon one because of this exercise of constitutional Rights.”

    Snerer vs. Cullen, 481 F. 946
     

    “We know of no inherent right in one to use the highways for commercial purposes. The highways are primarily for the use of the public, and in the interest of the public, the state may prohibit or regulate ... the use of the highways for gain.”

    Robertson vs. Dept. of Public Works, supra.
     

    “The word “automobile” connotes a pleasure vehicle designed for the transportation of persons on highways.”

    American Mutual Liability Ins. Co., vs. Chaput, 60 A.2d 118, 120; 95 NH 200
     

    “A motor vehicle or automobile for hire is a motor vehicle, other than an automobile, used for the transportation of persons for which remuneration is received.”

    International Motor Transit Co. vs. Seattle, 251 P. 120
     

    “The term “travel” and “traveler” are usually construed in their broad and general sense ... so as to include all those who rightfully use the highways viatically (when being reimbursed for expenses) and who have occasion to pass over them for the purpose of business, convenience, or pleasure.”

    25 Am.Jur. (1st) Highways, Sect.427, Pg. 717
     

    “The automobile is not inherently dangerous.”

    Cohens vs. Meadow, 89 SE 876;
    Blair vs. Broadmore, 93 SE 532
     

    “With regard particularly to the U.S. Constitution, it is elementary that a Right secured or protected by that document cannot be overthrown or impaired by any state police authority.”

    Connolly vs. Union Sewer Pipe Co., 184 US 540;
    Lafarier vs. Grand Trunk R.R. Co., 24 A. 848;
    O'Neil vs. Providence Amusement Co., 108 A. 887
     

    “The right to travel is part of the Liberty of which a citizen cannot deprived without due process of law under the Fifth Amendment. This Right was emerging as early as the Magna Carta.”

    Kent vs. Dulles, 357 US 116 (1958)
     

    “The distinction between the Right of the Citizen to use the public highways for private, rather than commercial purposes is recognized ...”

    “Under its power to regulate private uses of our highways, our legislature has required that motor vehicle operators be licensed. Undoubtedly, the primary purpose of this requirement is to insure, as far as possible, that all motor vehicle operators will be competent and qualified, thereby reducing the potential hazard or risk of harm, to which other users of the highways might otherwise be subject. But once having complied with this regulatory provision, by obtaining the required license, a motorist enjoys the privilege of travelling freely upon the highways ...”

    Washington A.G.O. 59-60 No. 88, Pg. 11
     

    “Moreover, a distinction must be observed between the regulation of an activity which may be engaged in as a matter of right and one carried on by government sufferance of permission.”

    Davis vs. Massachusetts, 167 US 43;
    Pachard vs. Banton, supra.
     

    “Any claim that this statute is a taxing statute would be immediately open to severe Constitutional objections. If it could be said that the state had the power to tax a Right, this would enable the state to destroy Rights guaranteed by the constitution through the use of oppressive taxation. The question herein, is one of the state taxing the Right to travel by the ordinary modes of the day, and whether this is a legislative object of the state taxation.

    The views advanced herein are neither novel nor unsupported by authority. The question of taxing power of the states has been repeatedly considered by the Supreme Court. The Right of the state to impede or embarrass the Constitutional operation of the U.S. Government or the Rights which the Citizen holds under it, has been uniformly denied.”

    McCulloch vs. Maryland, 4 Wheat 316
     

    "The state cannot diminish Rights of the people."

    Hurtado vs. California, 110 US 516
     

    "The courts are not bound by mere form, nor are they to be misled by mere pretenses. They are at liberty -- indeed they are under a solemn duty -- to look at the substance of things, whenever they enter upon the inquiry whether the legislature has transcended the limits of its authority. If, therefore, a statute purported to have been enacted to protect ... the public safety, has no real or substantial relation to those objects or is a palpable invasion of Rights secured by the fundamental law, it is the duty of the courts to so adjudge, and thereby give effect to the Constitution."

    Mulger vs. Kansas, 123 US 623, 661
     

    "Complete freedom of the highways is so old and well established a blessing that we have forgotten the days of the Robber Barons and toll roads, and yet, under an act like this, arbitrarily administered, the highways may be completely monopolized, if, through lack of interest, the people submit, then they may look to see the most sacred of their liberties taken from them one by one, by more or less rapid encroachment."

    Robertson vs. Department of Public Works, 180 Wash 133, 147.
     

    It is the duty of the courts to be watchful for the Constitutional rights of the citizen and against any stealthy encroachments thereon."

    Boyd vs. United States, 116 US 616
     

    "Personal liberty largely consists of the Right of locomotion -- to go where and when one pleases -- only so far restrained as the Rights of others may make it necessary for the welfare of all other citizens. The Right of the Citizen to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, by horse drawn carriage, wagon, or automobile, is not a mere privilege which may be permitted or prohibited at will, but the common Right which he has under his Right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Under this Constitutional guarantee one may, therefore, under normal conditions, travel at his inclination along the public highways or in public places, and while conducting himself in an orderly and decent manner, neither interfering with nor disturbing another's Rights, he will be protected, not only in his person, but in his safe conduct."

    II Am.Jur. (1st) Constitutional Law, Sect.329, p.1135
     

    Replies: @RoatanBill, @Abolish_public_education

  20. While I’m here….

    • Replies: @SCuba Steve
    @Mr. Rational

    To the simian mind, “obeying the traffic laws” = “y’all be drivin’ like bitches n sheeit”.

    , @AnalogMan
    @Mr. Rational

    Why?

    Couldn't watch long enough to discover the point. Negro ride-along. Not entertaining, not edifying, just ugly, even when you can't see them.

    Replies: @Mr. Rational

    , @Polistra
    @Mr. Rational

    DWB they call it. I see this all the time. Always it's them.

    Meanwhile we get pulled over for going five over the limit.

  21. @UNIT472
    The idea is not without merit but the traffic stop is an important police investigative tool. The police use it selectively as a 'reason' can almost always be found and the police can then detect the odor of alcohol, marijuana or just look around the interior of the car for indications of drug usage, firearms etc. If the police officers suspicions are correct ( and they usually are as they know who the criminals are in their communities) it can get dangerous if there is a gun under the seat or in the waistband of an occupant of the car but what's the alternative. Let thugs go about their business unmolested?

    Replies: @Chris Mallory, @Feryl

    Citizens have the right to be armed, so a firearm in a vehicle is none of a government employee’s business. All gun laws are unconstitutional.

    Allowing pampered, tax fattened thugs to accost citizens on the public roads is more dangerous than allowing the private thugs to go about their business.

  22. @Lancelot_Link
    "Judge wrote that traffic stops for minor violations are a “significant infringement on civil liberty” and should be reserved for cases when a person is engaged in criminal conduct that harms others. "

    How about we only charge for misdemeanors rather than felonies or should felonies count only 3/5 of their full sentence for blacks? ;)

    Replies: @nokangaroos

    The most cursory glance at criminality vs. incarceration stats shows this already is
    the unwritten law of the land.

  23. @ClownWorld
    Ted Bundy was arrested due to a traffic stop. In fact, Traffic stops are the most common contact between law enforcement and civilians.

    Having expired tags is likely to not even get you a ticket unless they've been expired for a very long time.

    I guess it's just legal to drive around with no license plates or insurance is you are black now.

    Replies: @loren, @RoatanBill, @SCuba Steve, @TNC, @Libre

    Ted Bundy was arrested due to a traffic stop.

    Also, the “Son Of Sam” killer (David Berkowitz) was finally caught because he got a parking ticket.

    • Agree: GomezAdddams
  24. They don’t strive for excellence, they just try and bring you down to their level.

  25. @Mr. Rational
    While I'm here....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzO6pMIqLFI

    Replies: @SCuba Steve, @AnalogMan, @Polistra

    To the simian mind, “obeying the traffic laws” = “y’all be drivin’ like bitches n sheeit”.

    • Agree: Detroit Refugee
  26. @RoatanBill
    @ClownWorld

    Why does a vehicle need a gov't approved license plate? Couldn't the manufacturer put one on to uniquely identify a vehicle in case of criminality?

    Why do you have to keep paying and paying for the gov't plate? Why do you need to renew your license for a fee every so often? Did you forget how to drive in between?

    Did you ever see a horse with a license plate in the old days before vehicles? Why do we need a gov't license to drive? Wouldn't a sign off from a drivers program be enough?

    Why is the insurance industry favored with a gov't mandate to purchase their product? If there's an accident, shouldn't the courts adjudicate such matters?

    I ask this of you specifically since you appear to be in favor of gov't mastery over a slave population.

    Replies: @UNIT472, @Hangnail Hans, @loren, @Jim in Jersey, @Adam Smith

    Prior to the auto governments didn’t need to build roads. A municipal government may have put in cobblestone streets but that was about it save for a few ‘turnpikes’ that charged a fee to use. With the advent of motor vehicles governments got into paved road construction in a big way and some way to pay for them was necessary thus annual auto registration fees and fuel taxes. Its not unreasonable. In some states you don’t have to buy auto insurance. You can post a bond with the DMV to insure you can pay for any damage your vehicle may cause. Since most people don’t have a couple of hundred thousand dollars laying around they buy insurance instead. Again not an unreasonable requirement.

    The drivers license has become our defacto identity card as it very difficult to fake or obtain one fraudulently but you aren’t required to get one unless you want to operate a motor vehicle on state highways.

    • Replies: @RoatanBill
    @UNIT472

    I have absolutely no problem paying for what I use. If roads needed funding, then naturally they need to be paid for. Bonds are the usual mechanism for funding gov't projects and the bond holders assume the risk and reward.

    Ask yourself how often the roads have been paid for many times over. Infrastructure in the US is rated very poorly by civil engineering societies. The money is being siphoned off but the infrastructure is crumbling.

    Vehicle insurance is a money making scam. No fault legislation was intended as a windfall for the insurance mafia.

    Insurance provides the moral hazard that makes people do stupid things knowing some other entity will foot the bill. If people had no insurance, they would drive more carefully knowing they'd be on the hook for damages if they caused the accident.

    I'm a pilot. I can fly a plane without insurance. I also never have to renew my pilots license. Don't you think it takes more skill to fly a plane than to drive a car? Why are only ground vehicles required to have insurance? The answer is simple - it would cost the gov't more money to go after the small number of pilots than they could get from them. The gov't is milking the driving population for profit.

  27. @HT
    Every study I have ever seen says that, as with more serious violent crimes, blacks are more likely also to violate traffic laws than other groups. That is just part of their general dysfunctional behavior. Eliminating enforcement rules for people who have the worst behavior is a recipe for disaster but that is exactly what they are doing.

    Replies: @SCuba Steve, @Polistra

    Until our society accepts that they are different and they behave different, this crap will continue…and every difference in outcome will be blamed on “racism” (ie blamed on white people).

    Cops are in a no-win situation now. Either go after the lawbreakers (who are disproportionately black) and be called racist, or back off of black lawbreakers and be blamed for rising crime rates.

    • Agree: Cauchemar du Singe
    • Replies: @Cauchemar du Singe
    @SCuba Steve

    Proper Biology/Genetic based taxonomic re-classification of Blacks, and the consequent change in Law and Culture, would solve The Black Problem.
    This, not with the current Federal artifice of "Union".
    The Balkanization of this failed republic and fractured Union will see White affinity states where Blacks are seen for what they are, and are not; hence, banned from entry.
    This also applies to their current (((Puppetmasters))).

  28. @RoatanBill
    @ClownWorld

    Why does a vehicle need a gov't approved license plate? Couldn't the manufacturer put one on to uniquely identify a vehicle in case of criminality?

    Why do you have to keep paying and paying for the gov't plate? Why do you need to renew your license for a fee every so often? Did you forget how to drive in between?

    Did you ever see a horse with a license plate in the old days before vehicles? Why do we need a gov't license to drive? Wouldn't a sign off from a drivers program be enough?

    Why is the insurance industry favored with a gov't mandate to purchase their product? If there's an accident, shouldn't the courts adjudicate such matters?

    I ask this of you specifically since you appear to be in favor of gov't mastery over a slave population.

    Replies: @UNIT472, @Hangnail Hans, @loren, @Jim in Jersey, @Adam Smith

    Be glad you’re not in a state with annual property tax on cars…

    • Replies: @RoatanBill
    @Hangnail Hans

    I'm no longer in any US state; I'm an expat.

    Haven't had vehicle insurance in 16 years because it's not mandatory. Ask yourself how much you've paid in those 16 years, and for what.

    I still put up with vehicle registration and the plates scam because all gov'ts institute what any other gov't has managed to get away with, if they can.

    If people would only realize that gov't is the criminal element they pretend to protect us from, things would be different. Even Jimmy Buffett had a line in one of his songs something like 'we are the people our parents warned us about'. He just didn't go far enough up the chain of command.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

  29. @RoatanBill
    @ClownWorld

    Why does a vehicle need a gov't approved license plate? Couldn't the manufacturer put one on to uniquely identify a vehicle in case of criminality?

    Why do you have to keep paying and paying for the gov't plate? Why do you need to renew your license for a fee every so often? Did you forget how to drive in between?

    Did you ever see a horse with a license plate in the old days before vehicles? Why do we need a gov't license to drive? Wouldn't a sign off from a drivers program be enough?

    Why is the insurance industry favored with a gov't mandate to purchase their product? If there's an accident, shouldn't the courts adjudicate such matters?

    I ask this of you specifically since you appear to be in favor of gov't mastery over a slave population.

    Replies: @UNIT472, @Hangnail Hans, @loren, @Jim in Jersey, @Adam Smith

    Could the manufacturer put one on to uniquely identify a vehicle in case of criminality?
    good idea.

    I ask this of you specifically since you appear to be in favor of gov’t mastery over a slave population.
    do you build and maintain roads and traffic signals?

    no gov = chaos. big gov = problems. since (((1913))).

    • Replies: @RoatanBill
    @loren

    big gov = problems.

    Have you ever seen anything but big overbearing gov't? There's no such thing as small gov't. Gov't is organized crime against the citizenry with the added benefit of them being able to write the laws that the dolts demand be enforced by rogue cops and a military full of amoral swine.

    Gov'ts murdered over 200,000,000 people in the 20th century with their insane wars and other atrocities. Gov't is institutionalized violence on a scale that no other entity can match.

    Anarchists did not try to carry out genocide against the Armenians in Turkey; they did not deliberately starve millions of Ukrainians; they did not create a system of death camps to kill Jews, gypsies, and Slavs in Europe; they did not fire-bomb scores of large German and Japanese cities and drop nuclear bombs on two of them; they did not carry out a 'Great Leap Forward' that killed scores of millions of Chinese; they did not attempt to kill everybody with any appreciable education in Cambodia; they did not launch one aggressive war after another; they did not implement trade sanctions that killed perhaps 500,000 Iraqi children.
    In debates between anarchists and statists, the burden of proof clearly should rest on those who place their trust in the state. Anarchy's mayhem is wholly conjectural; the state's mayhem is undeniably, factually horrendous.
    Robert Higgs

  30. @Boomthorkell
    Honestly, I'm pleased with this. Our cops were getting annoying as all Hell with their tickets. They steal too much money from us.

    Also, I'm a firm believer in replacing fines with either jail sentences or nothing anyway. Either it matters enough the punishment should be equal and harsh for everyone, rich, middle, and poor (and no one can "pay" their way out of punishment), or it's not an actual offense.

    Weregild is an okay additional sentence, though.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

    I’m a firm believer in replacing fines with either jail sentences or nothing anyway.

    I’m a firm believer in replacing jail sentences with fines, and/or hard labor with restitution.

    • Replies: @Boomthorkell
    @Hangnail Hans

    My issue with fines, of course, is that it encourages petty trials and associates punishment with payment when punishment should cost us time, which is equal and painful. How would you change the current system of fines & jail, etc.?

    Hard Labor and/or Restitution is good, so long as something is done to ensure future crimes are not committed by the individual.

    I actually despise jail and prison. I much prefer reform and death/ brain rewiring as escalating punishments.

  31. Hey Curse, liberal and conservative honkees are having a great time with each other on George Floyd Day!

    https://worldstar.com/video.php?v=wshh3un9gCW4s82JmENK

  32. @Lancelot_Link
    Da noo maff.

    19 minus 61 = black violence

    https://www.wtkr.com/news/19-year-old-charged-with-murder-after-missing-chesapeake-woman-found-dead

    19-year-old charged with murder after missing Chesapeake woman found dead

    Posted at 10:29 PM, May 22, 2021

    and last updated 7:35 PM, May 24, 2021

    CHESAPEAKE, Va. - A 19-year-old has been charged in connection to the death of a Chesapeake woman who was found dead after being reported missing.

    61-year-old Laura Miles, who was reported missing under suspicious circumstances, was found dead on May 17 in a wooded area in the 4600 block of Taylor Road.

    On Saturday, police charged 19-year-old Chesapeake man Raheem Lamont Cherry in Miles' death.

    Cherry is being charged with 1st-degree murder, robbery and abduction. On Monday officials said he is also being charged with Concealment of a Dead Body.

    Police say Cherry lived at the Taylor Pointe Apartments, which is located right across the street from the wooded area where Miles’ body was dumped.

    Miles’ black truck was also found a short walk away from where Cherry lived.

    Court documents reveal Cherry just moved to the area from Richmond in March and was working at McDonald’s for three days prior to his arrest.

    He is currently being held in the Chesapeake City Jail.

    Police say the homicide is currently under investigation.

    Replies: @AR in Illinois, @Boy the way Glenn Miller played, @Detroit Refugee

    I gaur-an-tee he raped her before he killed her too. That might’ve even been the motive, the robbery afterward was just convenient. F’n savages.

  33. OKC bomber caught the same way over a minor traffic violation. Seattle is a dump and getting dumpier(?) every day. Leftist voters deserve the dump they want

    • Replies: @SCuba Steve
    @dixonsyder

    The serial rapist “The Beast of Jersey” was also caught after fleeing from a traffic stop. He was a respected citizen who had not been under suspicion before.

    Replies: @Jim in Jersey

  34. Why would any White, Asian or Hispanic continue supporting any government which sets standards of law and order based around orcs’ criminal incompetence?

    We owe Segregationists of old a ginormous apology, though they might also apologize to their descendants for failing to sufficiently demonstrate why Segregation was–and is–wise and necessary.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Sick of Orcs

    Well, I suppose that you might be a little ignorant of history. The segregationists did resist. But the National Guard had loaded M-16's pointed at them with bayonets attached to them to do some hand to hand combat killing of "white supremacists." The whites were yelling and protesting but that's all they did because they would've had their blood spilled right there. I didn't see any of the whites with loaded firearms to try to stop the enforced integration. That was in the 1950's. This country has been destroyed for a long time. Before you were even born. The time to fight back and take back the attempted commie control was then, not now. Back then the white commies only had the threat of bloodshed available to them. They didn't control everything back then. They control everything now. The white commies who run this country knew how to gain control. They knew the best way to take control of any country for communism is not by shedding blood but by educating them. See Mao's redbook. While white Americans slept an enemy sowed discord between the parents and their children right under their noses and they didn't even see it. It produced the hippie counter culture and a near revolution with an underlying theme. Hatred for the country you live in. I wonder where they got that from? Certainly not from their parents I'm sure. From the change agents in the schools. They were "educated," i.e. indoctrinated into the commie cult. Well, when the 1960's ended so did the war in Vietnam (1975 to be exact). When we ran with our tail between our legs the VC came in and started killing and enslaving and torturing, etc. the Saigonians to the tune of a million people. Any outrage from the peanut gallery, i.e. the hippies, news media, professors, liberals, etc.? Of course there was, white Americans and our troops are evil and commie Vietnamese are good. Sound familiar? It's like a broken record.

  35. @ravin' lunatic
    one day last year i walked to my car from work over broken glass, drug paraphernalia, human excrement and an empty shell casing(!) to discover that i had gotten a parking ticket.

    never had the concept of anarcho-tyranny been displayed so starkly to me.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee, @Wielgus

    That sounds like Lot B at Ford’s “Mustang Plant”.
    Stepped over all of that plus used rubbers, soiled drawers, empty alcohol containers of every type imaginable, every fast food joint in Mi’s bag full of trash, etc. etc. etc.

  36. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. Two things blacks should never have the privilege of owning, firearms and car keys. They just don’t know how to act responsibly.

    • Agree: SCuba Steve
  37. @Mr. Rational
    While I'm here....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzO6pMIqLFI

    Replies: @SCuba Steve, @AnalogMan, @Polistra

    Why?

    Couldn’t watch long enough to discover the point. Negro ride-along. Not entertaining, not edifying, just ugly, even when you can’t see them.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
    @AnalogMan

    It was something you might want to share with less-realistic friends and family, to illustrate WHY orcs get cited so often for traffic violations.  One more drip of truth to add to the cognitive dissonance, and hopefully help them end their break with reality.

  38. @HT
    Every study I have ever seen says that, as with more serious violent crimes, blacks are more likely also to violate traffic laws than other groups. That is just part of their general dysfunctional behavior. Eliminating enforcement rules for people who have the worst behavior is a recipe for disaster but that is exactly what they are doing.

    Replies: @SCuba Steve, @Polistra

    Yep. Until and unless they learn to join the rest of civilized society they should actually be policed more, not less. Policing them even less than we now do will guarantee that their behavior degenerates even further. I would grant that it’s a bit of a dilemma though, given that a large number of them display no ability whatever of joining civilized society.

  39. The fat cat lady says enforcement should be “discontinued for the safety of both officers and the public and for racial fairness.”

    Notice: “Safety of the officers” meaning her pets tend to shoot cops.

    “Moreover, research has consistently shown that Black and Latino experiences during traffic stops are different from those of white persons.”

    Yeah, because ‘white persons’ tend to obey the law, and not resist arrest–notice she doesn’t mention Asians. Mentioning Asians might interrupt the Get Whitey Narrative.

    • Replies: @SCuba Steve
    @Polistra


    notice she doesn’t mention Asians. Mentioning Asians might interrupt the Get Whitey Narrative.
     
    I don’t think the Left knows what to do with Asians. Asian success gives lie to their claims that “racist whitey” won’t let anyone else succeed. Higher Asian intelligence means they should be harder to fool with propaganda then non-Asian minorities. Their success in business and life means the Democrat party has less to offer them in exchange for their support.

    I may be wrong, but it doesn’t seem like this recent effort to bring Asians into the “hate whitey” fold that began in earnest after the tug-parlor shootings has been the success the Left was hoping for. The focus it has brought to crimes against Asians has shown that nearly all of them are committed by blacks. Even the CNN douche got caught admitting as much on hidden camera.

  40. @Mr. Rational
    While I'm here....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzO6pMIqLFI

    Replies: @SCuba Steve, @AnalogMan, @Polistra

    DWB they call it. I see this all the time. Always it’s them.

    Meanwhile we get pulled over for going five over the limit.

  41. @Bill H.
    How many people, white, black or any other color, will renew their license plate if they know they will pay no penalty for letting it expire?

    Replies: @Raccoon, @RoatanBill

    People! A lot of you are making an obvious mistake – Seattle Inspector General Lisa Judge is not calling for ALL minor traffic infringements to be ignored, just those that affect blacks and latinos.

    As a result of the quota system of traffic tickets (ask any cop!) it will be Whitey who bears the increased police ticketing, so that the numbers (and the revenue) will not be affected.

    Indeed, Lisa Judge said: “Moreover, research has consistently shown that black and Latino experiences during traffic stops are different from those of white persons.

    PK is absolutely correct when he says “Complaints about “racial fairness” should immediately end all arrests of non-whites for any crime.”

    We are headed straight for that scenario at frightening speed – just watch out that we don’t get ticketed for that frightening speed…

  42. @ravin' lunatic
    one day last year i walked to my car from work over broken glass, drug paraphernalia, human excrement and an empty shell casing(!) to discover that i had gotten a parking ticket.

    never had the concept of anarcho-tyranny been displayed so starkly to me.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee, @Wielgus

    Reminds me of an anecdote told by the actor Keanu Reeves in the 1990s.
    He said that a little before his career took off, he was staying at an apparently fairly high-class hotel, I think in France. He came back late and the reception desk made trouble over the fact that he was wearing jeans.
    Then he got into a lift in the hotel and a woman propositioned him – she was a prostitute. Reeves suspected that she paid a bribe at the desk to be let into the hotel to seek customers. Blue jeans were a problem, ladies of the night were not.

    • Replies: @ravin' lunatic
    @Wielgus

    my story gets even worse, if you care to hear.

    i got my ticket because the overpass where i had been parking for work for years had recently been zoned for no-parking, because people had begun to live there in old, broken-down camper vans.

  43. breitbart >
    Amazon is officially acquiring the legendary Hollywood studio MGM in a blockbuster billion deal that will boost the Silicon Valley giant’s already sizable presence in Hollywood and give a competitive edge to its Prime Video streaming service.

    In an announcement Wednesday morning, Amazon and MGM said they have entered into a definitive merger agreement under which Amazon will acquire MGM for a purchase price of $8.45 billion. The deal is still subject to regulatory approval..

    comment there> I’m Jeff (Amazon, WholeFoods, BlueOrigin, MGM, WaPo(cia) Bezos
    and I approve this message.

  44. Lock Step” = Lockdown
    In 2010, ten years before the coronavirus pandemic, the Rockefeller Foundation published a white paper called “Scenarios for the Future of Technology and International Development.”
    On page 18 of this white paper is the “Lock Step” scenario. This scenario deals with a zoonotic viral pandemic that wipes out millions of people across the globe.
    Oddly enough, China is predicted and praised as the model country to have handled the pandemic effectively.
    In their MSM China is publicly vilified as an “authoritarian regime,” but in their white papers China is secretly and covetously praised for it. Is the anti-China bashing nothing more than fake Jewish dialectics then?
    One year after the outbreak of the planned pandemic, America’s small business owners and middle class has been gutted, while China’s has recovered and is getting stronger day by day with no lockdowns since spring of 2020 and no mandatory mask rule in public except on public transit (i.e., taxi, bus, train and airports). Is China going off-script and off the reservation, I wonder?
    Actually, not just in America but in the entire world, this planned pandemic and its lockdowns has gutted small business owners and the middle class. Red China is the only exception, as was predicted in “Scenarios for the Future of Technology and International Development” in 2010.
    “A new influenza strain — originating from wild geese — was extremely virulent and deadly. Even the most pandemic-prepared nations were quickly overwhelmed when the virus streaked around the world, infecting nearly 20 percent of the global population and killing 8 million in just seven months, the majority of them healthy young adults. The pandemic also had a deadly effect on economies: international mobility of both people and goods screeched to a halt, debilitating industries like tourism and breaking global supply chains. Even locally, normally bustling shops and office buildings sat empty for months, devoid of both employees and customers.
    “The pandemic blanketed the planet — though disproportionate numbers died in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Central America, where the virus spread like wildfire in the absence of official containment protocols. But even in developed countries, containment was a challenge. The United States’s initial policy of “strongly discouraging” citizens from flying proved deadly in its leniency, accelerating the spread of the virus not just within the U.S. but across borders. However, a few countries did fare better — China in particular. The Chinese government’s quick imposition and enforcement of mandatory quarantine for all citizens, as well as its instant and near-hermetic sealing off of all borders, saved millions of lives, stopping the spread of the virus far earlier than in other countries and enabling a swifter post-pandemic recovery.
    “China’s government was not the only one that took extreme measures to protect its citizens from risk and exposure. During the pandemic, national leaders around the world flexed their authority and imposed airtight rules and restrictions, from the mandatory wearing of face masks to body-temperature checks at the entries to communal spaces like train stations and supermarkets. Even after the pandemic faded, this more authoritarian control and oversight of citizens and their activities stuck and even intensified. In order to protect themselves from the spread of increasingly global problems — from pandemics and transnational terrorism to environmental crises and rising poverty — leaders around the world took a firmer grip on power.”

  45. @AWM
    https://citizenfreepress.com/breaking/carjacker-gets-run-over-by-driver-body-goes-flying/

    Replies: @AR in Illinois

    Made my day, comments are great too!!

  46. @RoatanBill
    @ClownWorld

    Why does a vehicle need a gov't approved license plate? Couldn't the manufacturer put one on to uniquely identify a vehicle in case of criminality?

    Why do you have to keep paying and paying for the gov't plate? Why do you need to renew your license for a fee every so often? Did you forget how to drive in between?

    Did you ever see a horse with a license plate in the old days before vehicles? Why do we need a gov't license to drive? Wouldn't a sign off from a drivers program be enough?

    Why is the insurance industry favored with a gov't mandate to purchase their product? If there's an accident, shouldn't the courts adjudicate such matters?

    I ask this of you specifically since you appear to be in favor of gov't mastery over a slave population.

    Replies: @UNIT472, @Hangnail Hans, @loren, @Jim in Jersey, @Adam Smith

    …Why?

    Anything you pay to the government is a tax. It is never used for the purpose you think it is and as long as you’re willing to continue paying, they will stand there with their hand out.

    You shouldn’t need a license to travel the streets and highways if your own country. Nor should ‘registration’ be a continual thing, if needed at all.

  47. @Hangnail Hans
    @RoatanBill

    Be glad you're not in a state with annual property tax on cars...

    Replies: @RoatanBill

    I’m no longer in any US state; I’m an expat.

    Haven’t had vehicle insurance in 16 years because it’s not mandatory. Ask yourself how much you’ve paid in those 16 years, and for what.

    I still put up with vehicle registration and the plates scam because all gov’ts institute what any other gov’t has managed to get away with, if they can.

    If people would only realize that gov’t is the criminal element they pretend to protect us from, things would be different. Even Jimmy Buffett had a line in one of his songs something like ‘we are the people our parents warned us about’. He just didn’t go far enough up the chain of command.

    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
    @RoatanBill


    Ask yourself how much you’ve paid in those 16 years, and for what.
     
    Uncounted thousands, much of it going to pay for uninsured black and hispanic drivers. And of course to line the insurers' pockets. Multiply that by a couple hundred million drivers, and it probably adds up to quite a sum.

    Congrats on being an expat. Wish I were.

    Replies: @europeasant, @Bite Moi

  48. @loren
    @RoatanBill

    Could the manufacturer put one on to uniquely identify a vehicle in case of criminality?
    good idea.

    I ask this of you specifically since you appear to be in favor of gov’t mastery over a slave population.
    do you build and maintain roads and traffic signals?

    no gov = chaos. big gov = problems. since (((1913))).

    Replies: @RoatanBill

    big gov = problems.

    Have you ever seen anything but big overbearing gov’t? There’s no such thing as small gov’t. Gov’t is organized crime against the citizenry with the added benefit of them being able to write the laws that the dolts demand be enforced by rogue cops and a military full of amoral swine.

    Gov’ts murdered over 200,000,000 people in the 20th century with their insane wars and other atrocities. Gov’t is institutionalized violence on a scale that no other entity can match.

    Anarchists did not try to carry out genocide against the Armenians in Turkey; they did not deliberately starve millions of Ukrainians; they did not create a system of death camps to kill Jews, gypsies, and Slavs in Europe; they did not fire-bomb scores of large German and Japanese cities and drop nuclear bombs on two of them; they did not carry out a ‘Great Leap Forward’ that killed scores of millions of Chinese; they did not attempt to kill everybody with any appreciable education in Cambodia; they did not launch one aggressive war after another; they did not implement trade sanctions that killed perhaps 500,000 Iraqi children.
    In debates between anarchists and statists, the burden of proof clearly should rest on those who place their trust in the state. Anarchy’s mayhem is wholly conjectural; the state’s mayhem is undeniably, factually horrendous.
    Robert Higgs

  49. @UNIT472
    @RoatanBill

    Prior to the auto governments didn't need to build roads. A municipal government may have put in cobblestone streets but that was about it save for a few 'turnpikes' that charged a fee to use. With the advent of motor vehicles governments got into paved road construction in a big way and some way to pay for them was necessary thus annual auto registration fees and fuel taxes. Its not unreasonable. In some states you don't have to buy auto insurance. You can post a bond with the DMV to insure you can pay for any damage your vehicle may cause. Since most people don't have a couple of hundred thousand dollars laying around they buy insurance instead. Again not an unreasonable requirement.

    The drivers license has become our defacto identity card as it very difficult to fake or obtain one fraudulently but you aren't required to get one unless you want to operate a motor vehicle on state highways.

    Replies: @RoatanBill

    I have absolutely no problem paying for what I use. If roads needed funding, then naturally they need to be paid for. Bonds are the usual mechanism for funding gov’t projects and the bond holders assume the risk and reward.

    Ask yourself how often the roads have been paid for many times over. Infrastructure in the US is rated very poorly by civil engineering societies. The money is being siphoned off but the infrastructure is crumbling.

    Vehicle insurance is a money making scam. No fault legislation was intended as a windfall for the insurance mafia.

    Insurance provides the moral hazard that makes people do stupid things knowing some other entity will foot the bill. If people had no insurance, they would drive more carefully knowing they’d be on the hook for damages if they caused the accident.

    I’m a pilot. I can fly a plane without insurance. I also never have to renew my pilots license. Don’t you think it takes more skill to fly a plane than to drive a car? Why are only ground vehicles required to have insurance? The answer is simple – it would cost the gov’t more money to go after the small number of pilots than they could get from them. The gov’t is milking the driving population for profit.

  50. I’ll try again and leave out any personal commentary. From Seattle.gov: “Lisa was an ACLU approved trainer for court ordered training on Fourth Amendment law and anti-bias training for the Maricopa County Sheriff’s office. She got her Juris Doctor from the University of Arizona. She and her wife Kimberly enjoy spending time with their son and furry kids.”

    • Replies: @Raccoon
    @Non PC Infidel

    One of THOSE, hey?

  51. @RoatanBill
    @ClownWorld

    Why does a vehicle need a gov't approved license plate? Couldn't the manufacturer put one on to uniquely identify a vehicle in case of criminality?

    Why do you have to keep paying and paying for the gov't plate? Why do you need to renew your license for a fee every so often? Did you forget how to drive in between?

    Did you ever see a horse with a license plate in the old days before vehicles? Why do we need a gov't license to drive? Wouldn't a sign off from a drivers program be enough?

    Why is the insurance industry favored with a gov't mandate to purchase their product? If there's an accident, shouldn't the courts adjudicate such matters?

    I ask this of you specifically since you appear to be in favor of gov't mastery over a slave population.

    Replies: @UNIT472, @Hangnail Hans, @loren, @Jim in Jersey, @Adam Smith

    Good afternoon Bill,

    “Driving” is regulated occupation for hire. Everyone has a constitutionally protected right to use their automobile on the highways and byways of this once great nation for travel. Free people do not ask for permission to travel as free people have no master.

    The state has, in essence, converted our constitutional right to travel by automobile into a privilege and sold it back to us for it’s own benefit and profit. This is an unconstitutional taking of our right to travel. The state, courts, prosecutors, judges, police, insurance companies and every other person and corporation involved are running a criminal protection racket to extort money from us.

    There are too many examples too list, but here are a few…

    [MORE]

    “The use of the highways for the purpose of travel and transportation is not a mere privilege, but a common and fundamental Right of which the public and the individual cannot be rightfully deprived.”

    Chicago Motor Coach vs. Chicago, 169 NE 221;
    Ligare vs. Chicago, 28 NE 934;
    Boon vs. Clark, 214 SSW 607;
    25 Am.Jur. (1st) Highways Sect.163

    “The Right of the Citizen to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, either by horse drawn carriage or by automobile, is not a mere privilege which a city can prohibit or permit at will, but a common Right which he has under the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

    Thompson vs. Smith, 154 SE 579

    “… For while a Citizen has the Right to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, that Right does not extend to the use of the highways, either in whole or in part, as a place for private gain. For the latter purpose, no person has a vested right to use the highways of the state, but is a privilege or a license which the legislature may grant or withhold at its discretion.”

    State vs. Johnson, 243 P. 1073;
    Cummins vs. Homes, 155 P. 171;
    Packard vs. Banton, 44 S.Ct. 256;
    Hadfield vs. Lundin, 98 Wash 516

    “Heretofore the court has held, and we think correctly, that while a Citizen has the Right to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, that Right does not extend to the use of the highways, either in whole or in part, as a place of business for private gain.”

    Willis vs. Buck, 263 P. l 982;
    Barney vs. Board of Railroad Commissioners, 17 P.2d 82

    “The right of the citizen to travel upon the highway and to transport his property thereon, in the ordinary course of life and business, differs radically and obviously from that of one who makes the highway his place of business for private gain in the running of a stagecoach or omnibus.”

    State vs. City of Spokane, 186 P. 864

    “It is not contended by any one that the city would have the right to prevent the appellant from riding in his automobile on any street in the city … for the streets were built (sic) for that purpose.”

    Green v San Antonio, 178 SW 6;
    Hadfield-Respondent’s Brief, Pg 32.

    “The statutory requirement that licenses be procured for motor vehicles used upon the highways is based on the servitude put on the highways by such use and the advantage which the improved highways may afford the business in which the motor vehicle is employed.”

    Patterson vs. Southern Ry. Co., 198 S.E. 364, 214 N.C. 38.

    “No statutory duty lies to apply for, or to possess a driver license for personal travel and transportation as defendant is not within the class of persons for whose benefit or protection the statute was enacted.”

    Routh v. Quinn, 20 Cal 2d 488.

    “Where a private statute exists of which the intent is regulation of commercial common carriers, the particular agency enforcing that private statute, shall not apply it by trickery and deceit, to persons who are not noticed by the statute as persons regulated and taxed, nor should it permit any party to do so in violation of a person’s right to stay out of compelled license/contract, when he is not a person subject to the statute, unless clearly within its words.”

    State v. Ebershart, 179 P 853, 246 P 2d 1011.

    18 U.S. Code § 31. Definitions

    (6) Motor vehicle.—
    The term “motor vehicle” means every description of carriage or other contrivance propelled or drawn by mechanical power and used for commercial purposes on the highways in the transportation of passengers, passengers and property, or property or cargo.

    (10) Used for commercial purposes .— The term “used for commercial purposes” means the carriage of persons or property for any fare, fee, rate, charge or other consideration, or directly or indirectly in connection with any business, or other undertaking intended for profit.

    https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/31

    “Where rights secured by the Constitution are involved, there can be no rule making or legislation which would abrogate them.”

    Miranda vs. Arizona, 384 US 436, 491

    “The claim and exercise of a constitutional Right cannot be converted into a crime.”

    Miller vs. U.S., 230 F. 486, 489

    “There can be no sanction or penalty imposed upon one because of this exercise of constitutional Rights.”

    Snerer vs. Cullen, 481 F. 946

    “We know of no inherent right in one to use the highways for commercial purposes. The highways are primarily for the use of the public, and in the interest of the public, the state may prohibit or regulate … the use of the highways for gain.”

    Robertson vs. Dept. of Public Works, supra.

    “The word “automobile” connotes a pleasure vehicle designed for the transportation of persons on highways.”

    American Mutual Liability Ins. Co., vs. Chaput, 60 A.2d 118, 120; 95 NH 200

    “A motor vehicle or automobile for hire is a motor vehicle, other than an automobile, used for the transportation of persons for which remuneration is received.”

    International Motor Transit Co. vs. Seattle, 251 P. 120

    “The term “travel” and “traveler” are usually construed in their broad and general sense … so as to include all those who rightfully use the highways viatically (when being reimbursed for expenses) and who have occasion to pass over them for the purpose of business, convenience, or pleasure.”

    25 Am.Jur. (1st) Highways, Sect.427, Pg. 717

    “The automobile is not inherently dangerous.”

    Cohens vs. Meadow, 89 SE 876;
    Blair vs. Broadmore, 93 SE 532

    “With regard particularly to the U.S. Constitution, it is elementary that a Right secured or protected by that document cannot be overthrown or impaired by any state police authority.”

    Connolly vs. Union Sewer Pipe Co., 184 US 540;
    Lafarier vs. Grand Trunk R.R. Co., 24 A. 848;
    O’Neil vs. Providence Amusement Co., 108 A. 887

    “The right to travel is part of the Liberty of which a citizen cannot deprived without due process of law under the Fifth Amendment. This Right was emerging as early as the Magna Carta.”

    Kent vs. Dulles, 357 US 116 (1958)

    “The distinction between the Right of the Citizen to use the public highways for private, rather than commercial purposes is recognized …”

    “Under its power to regulate private uses of our highways, our legislature has required that motor vehicle operators be licensed. Undoubtedly, the primary purpose of this requirement is to insure, as far as possible, that all motor vehicle operators will be competent and qualified, thereby reducing the potential hazard or risk of harm, to which other users of the highways might otherwise be subject. But once having complied with this regulatory provision, by obtaining the required license, a motorist enjoys the privilege of travelling freely upon the highways …”

    Washington A.G.O. 59-60 No. 88, Pg. 11

    “Moreover, a distinction must be observed between the regulation of an activity which may be engaged in as a matter of right and one carried on by government sufferance of permission.”

    Davis vs. Massachusetts, 167 US 43;
    Pachard vs. Banton, supra.

    “Any claim that this statute is a taxing statute would be immediately open to severe Constitutional objections. If it could be said that the state had the power to tax a Right, this would enable the state to destroy Rights guaranteed by the constitution through the use of oppressive taxation. The question herein, is one of the state taxing the Right to travel by the ordinary modes of the day, and whether this is a legislative object of the state taxation.

    The views advanced herein are neither novel nor unsupported by authority. The question of taxing power of the states has been repeatedly considered by the Supreme Court. The Right of the state to impede or embarrass the Constitutional operation of the U.S. Government or the Rights which the Citizen holds under it, has been uniformly denied.”

    McCulloch vs. Maryland, 4 Wheat 316

    “The state cannot diminish Rights of the people.”

    Hurtado vs. California, 110 US 516

    “The courts are not bound by mere form, nor are they to be misled by mere pretenses. They are at liberty — indeed they are under a solemn duty — to look at the substance of things, whenever they enter upon the inquiry whether the legislature has transcended the limits of its authority. If, therefore, a statute purported to have been enacted to protect … the public safety, has no real or substantial relation to those objects or is a palpable invasion of Rights secured by the fundamental law, it is the duty of the courts to so adjudge, and thereby give effect to the Constitution.”

    Mulger vs. Kansas, 123 US 623, 661

    “Complete freedom of the highways is so old and well established a blessing that we have forgotten the days of the Robber Barons and toll roads, and yet, under an act like this, arbitrarily administered, the highways may be completely monopolized, if, through lack of interest, the people submit, then they may look to see the most sacred of their liberties taken from them one by one, by more or less rapid encroachment.”

    Robertson vs. Department of Public Works, 180 Wash 133, 147.

    It is the duty of the courts to be watchful for the Constitutional rights of the citizen and against any stealthy encroachments thereon.”

    Boyd vs. United States, 116 US 616

    “Personal liberty largely consists of the Right of locomotion — to go where and when one pleases — only so far restrained as the Rights of others may make it necessary for the welfare of all other citizens. The Right of the Citizen to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, by horse drawn carriage, wagon, or automobile, is not a mere privilege which may be permitted or prohibited at will, but the common Right which he has under his Right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Under this Constitutional guarantee one may, therefore, under normal conditions, travel at his inclination along the public highways or in public places, and while conducting himself in an orderly and decent manner, neither interfering with nor disturbing another’s Rights, he will be protected, not only in his person, but in his safe conduct.”

    II Am.Jur. (1st) Constitutional Law, Sect.329, p.1135

    • Replies: @RoatanBill
    @Adam Smith

    I read through your list of cases and disagree with the judgement and rationale of many of them. As long as my taxes and fees support the roads, I have the right to travel on them regardless of my intentions. Specifically, If I have a business need to use the roads, the gov't has no right to intervene and demand they have the final word on it via licensing 'drivers'.

    The Constitution specifically disallows a 'title of nobility'. That's what licensing is. It allows one to do what the other is prevented from doing via some bullshit law.

    Also note how the court cases haven't rid the states of their licensing scam. The entire legal system is corrupt to the core.

    For over 10 years, I fought speeding tickets in court after I got a $300 fine for 85 in a 55 on the outskirts of DFW heading to Louisiana. I joined the National Motorists Association and purchased their binder on how to fight tickets. For that time period, I got roughly 4 speeding tickets a year and only lost once in court. As a business owner, my time was my own so I delighted in forcing jury trial that I knew would cost the municipality money and inconvenience the ignoramuses that vote as they are the ones doing jury duty. Getting the cop onto the witness stand and then proving he didn't know how to properly use the radar gun was my go to method of getting a not guilty verdict. I used my electrical engineering credentials to get the court to grant me expert status and the judge had to tell the jury of it.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    , @Abolish_public_education
    @Adam Smith

    Any claim that this statute is a taxing statute would be immediately open to severe Constitutional objections.

    Tell that to Justice Roberts, who used the “It’s just a tax.” rationale as a basis to rule in favor of the ObamaCare mandate.

    I can begrudgingly agree that some of these mandates fall within the government’s power to tax, but ObamaCare was such a giant nuisance that there’s no way that it should have been imposed without first securing permission from the States, in the form of a constitutional amendment; the same goes for MediCare, etc.

    Legal arguments bore me. It’s true that taxes automatically trigger clashes with civil rights. So long as the taxes are tiny, we can view them as “infringements”. It’s noteworthy that infringements on gun rights are specifically prohibited.

  52. @AnalogMan
    @Mr. Rational

    Why?

    Couldn't watch long enough to discover the point. Negro ride-along. Not entertaining, not edifying, just ugly, even when you can't see them.

    Replies: @Mr. Rational

    It was something you might want to share with less-realistic friends and family, to illustrate WHY orcs get cited so often for traffic violations.  One more drip of truth to add to the cognitive dissonance, and hopefully help them end their break with reality.

    • Agree: SCuba Steve
    • Thanks: AnalogMan
  53. For everyone’s amusement, hope Blue Juice chimes in on this.
    U.S. News & World Report this week released its annual list of best vacation spots in the United States, and Chicago is among them.

    • Replies: @Detroit Refugee
    @Female in FL

    HaHaHaHa!
    At this point in time, anyone vacationing in Chicago along the beautiful Lake Michigan shores, can’t say they weren’t warned of the danger.

    That would be great if Blue Juice could comment.
    I suspect he’s gonna be busy this holiday weekend.
    The black man gone be kilt by da udder black man.

    En masse

    Replies: @europeasant

  54. @SCuba Steve
    @HT

    Until our society accepts that they are different and they behave different, this crap will continue...and every difference in outcome will be blamed on “racism” (ie blamed on white people).

    Cops are in a no-win situation now. Either go after the lawbreakers (who are disproportionately black) and be called racist, or back off of black lawbreakers and be blamed for rising crime rates.

    Replies: @Cauchemar du Singe

    Proper Biology/Genetic based taxonomic re-classification of Blacks, and the consequent change in Law and Culture, would solve The Black Problem.
    This, not with the current Federal artifice of “Union”.
    The Balkanization of this failed republic and fractured Union will see White affinity states where Blacks are seen for what they are, and are not; hence, banned from entry.
    This also applies to their current (((Puppetmasters))).

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  55. @Hangnail Hans
    @Boomthorkell



    I’m a firm believer in replacing fines with either jail sentences or nothing anyway.
     
    I'm a firm believer in replacing jail sentences with fines, and/or hard labor with restitution.

    Replies: @Boomthorkell

    My issue with fines, of course, is that it encourages petty trials and associates punishment with payment when punishment should cost us time, which is equal and painful. How would you change the current system of fines & jail, etc.?

    Hard Labor and/or Restitution is good, so long as something is done to ensure future crimes are not committed by the individual.

    I actually despise jail and prison. I much prefer reform and death/ brain rewiring as escalating punishments.

  56. @RoatanBill
    @Hangnail Hans

    I'm no longer in any US state; I'm an expat.

    Haven't had vehicle insurance in 16 years because it's not mandatory. Ask yourself how much you've paid in those 16 years, and for what.

    I still put up with vehicle registration and the plates scam because all gov'ts institute what any other gov't has managed to get away with, if they can.

    If people would only realize that gov't is the criminal element they pretend to protect us from, things would be different. Even Jimmy Buffett had a line in one of his songs something like 'we are the people our parents warned us about'. He just didn't go far enough up the chain of command.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

    Ask yourself how much you’ve paid in those 16 years, and for what.

    Uncounted thousands, much of it going to pay for uninsured black and hispanic drivers. And of course to line the insurers’ pockets. Multiply that by a couple hundred million drivers, and it probably adds up to quite a sum.

    Congrats on being an expat. Wish I were.

    • Replies: @europeasant
    @Hangnail Hans

    "Uncounted thousands, much of it going to pay for uninsured black and hispanic drivers. "

    You would not believe how many drivers in my town drive without licenses and/or insurance. The numbers in the vibrant areas are especially bad.

    I had had two cars stolen in front of my house. That's probably not too bad in the 30 years that I've lived here. One car was never found and the other was crashed and totaled. Who pays?

    My son recently had his parked car crashed into. Driver borrowed the pickup from relative during the midnight hours and was probably drunk as he crossed the median into the opposite lane, parking areas. The perps car used to be insured but not for the last 3 months. My son's car was totaled. Who pays?

    See that's the problem where there are many people who are of a criminal mindset. Civilization can only tolerate so many criminals before we turn into a Detroit.

    , @Bite Moi
    @Hangnail Hans

    Hangnail Hans.------------Excuse me Mr. Hans. Could you ask Paul to let me out of "moderation" long enough to pee?

  57. @Lancelot_Link
    Da noo maff.

    19 minus 61 = black violence

    https://www.wtkr.com/news/19-year-old-charged-with-murder-after-missing-chesapeake-woman-found-dead

    19-year-old charged with murder after missing Chesapeake woman found dead

    Posted at 10:29 PM, May 22, 2021

    and last updated 7:35 PM, May 24, 2021

    CHESAPEAKE, Va. - A 19-year-old has been charged in connection to the death of a Chesapeake woman who was found dead after being reported missing.

    61-year-old Laura Miles, who was reported missing under suspicious circumstances, was found dead on May 17 in a wooded area in the 4600 block of Taylor Road.

    On Saturday, police charged 19-year-old Chesapeake man Raheem Lamont Cherry in Miles' death.

    Cherry is being charged with 1st-degree murder, robbery and abduction. On Monday officials said he is also being charged with Concealment of a Dead Body.

    Police say Cherry lived at the Taylor Pointe Apartments, which is located right across the street from the wooded area where Miles’ body was dumped.

    Miles’ black truck was also found a short walk away from where Cherry lived.

    Court documents reveal Cherry just moved to the area from Richmond in March and was working at McDonald’s for three days prior to his arrest.

    He is currently being held in the Chesapeake City Jail.

    Police say the homicide is currently under investigation.

    Replies: @AR in Illinois, @Boy the way Glenn Miller played, @Detroit Refugee

    Court documents reveal Cherry just moved to the area from Richmond in March and was working at McDonald’s for three days prior to his arrest.

    If only there was a $15.00 an hour minimum wage, he would have lived straighter than a preacher.

    -sarc button-

  58. @Lancelot_Link
    Da noo maff.

    19 minus 61 = black violence

    https://www.wtkr.com/news/19-year-old-charged-with-murder-after-missing-chesapeake-woman-found-dead

    19-year-old charged with murder after missing Chesapeake woman found dead

    Posted at 10:29 PM, May 22, 2021

    and last updated 7:35 PM, May 24, 2021

    CHESAPEAKE, Va. - A 19-year-old has been charged in connection to the death of a Chesapeake woman who was found dead after being reported missing.

    61-year-old Laura Miles, who was reported missing under suspicious circumstances, was found dead on May 17 in a wooded area in the 4600 block of Taylor Road.

    On Saturday, police charged 19-year-old Chesapeake man Raheem Lamont Cherry in Miles' death.

    Cherry is being charged with 1st-degree murder, robbery and abduction. On Monday officials said he is also being charged with Concealment of a Dead Body.

    Police say Cherry lived at the Taylor Pointe Apartments, which is located right across the street from the wooded area where Miles’ body was dumped.

    Miles’ black truck was also found a short walk away from where Cherry lived.

    Court documents reveal Cherry just moved to the area from Richmond in March and was working at McDonald’s for three days prior to his arrest.

    He is currently being held in the Chesapeake City Jail.

    Police say the homicide is currently under investigation.

    Replies: @AR in Illinois, @Boy the way Glenn Miller played, @Detroit Refugee

    What a complete POS! Had to kill her and more than likely raped her. What the McDonalds gig couldn’t suffice? Not to mention the lifetime of freebies he was literally raised on. Nope, the largesse of the host country and people wasn’t enough. So this is what the ungrateful give us in return.

  59. @Female in FL
    For everyone’s amusement, hope Blue Juice chimes in on this.
    U.S. News & World Report this week released its annual list of best vacation spots in the United States, and Chicago is among them.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee

    HaHaHaHa!
    At this point in time, anyone vacationing in Chicago along the beautiful Lake Michigan shores, can’t say they weren’t warned of the danger.

    That would be great if Blue Juice could comment.
    I suspect he’s gonna be busy this holiday weekend.
    The black man gone be kilt by da udder black man.

    En masse

    • Agree: Female in FL
    • Replies: @europeasant
    @Detroit Refugee

    Memorial day here will be very active especially downtown. The police are on 12 hour shifts and a 9 o'clock curfew has been imposed. This is all in honor of St Floyd the new black martyr which we'll be hearing about for the next 50 years.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee

  60. @Non PC Infidel
    I'll try again and leave out any personal commentary. From Seattle.gov: "Lisa was an ACLU approved trainer for court ordered training on Fourth Amendment law and anti-bias training for the Maricopa County Sheriff's office. She got her Juris Doctor from the University of Arizona. She and her wife Kimberly enjoy spending time with their son and furry kids."

    Replies: @Raccoon

    One of THOSE, hey?

  61. @Adam Smith
    @RoatanBill

    Good afternoon Bill,

    “Driving” is regulated occupation for hire. Everyone has a constitutionally protected right to use their automobile on the highways and byways of this once great nation for travel. Free people do not ask for permission to travel as free people have no master.

    The state has, in essence, converted our constitutional right to travel by automobile into a privilege and sold it back to us for it's own benefit and profit. This is an unconstitutional taking of our right to travel. The state, courts, prosecutors, judges, police, insurance companies and every other person and corporation involved are running a criminal protection racket to extort money from us.

    There are too many examples too list, but here are a few...


    “The use of the highways for the purpose of travel and transportation is not a mere privilege, but a common and fundamental Right of which the public and the individual cannot be rightfully deprived.”

    Chicago Motor Coach vs. Chicago, 169 NE 221;
    Ligare vs. Chicago, 28 NE 934;
    Boon vs. Clark, 214 SSW 607;
    25 Am.Jur. (1st) Highways Sect.163
     

    “The Right of the Citizen to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, either by horse drawn carriage or by automobile, is not a mere privilege which a city can prohibit or permit at will, but a common Right which he has under the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

    Thompson vs. Smith, 154 SE 579
     

    “… For while a Citizen has the Right to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, that Right does not extend to the use of the highways, either in whole or in part, as a place for private gain. For the latter purpose, no person has a vested right to use the highways of the state, but is a privilege or a license which the legislature may grant or withhold at its discretion.”

    State vs. Johnson, 243 P. 1073;
    Cummins vs. Homes, 155 P. 171;
    Packard vs. Banton, 44 S.Ct. 256;
    Hadfield vs. Lundin, 98 Wash 516
     

    “Heretofore the court has held, and we think correctly, that while a Citizen has the Right to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, that Right does not extend to the use of the highways, either in whole or in part, as a place of business for private gain.”

    Willis vs. Buck, 263 P. l 982;
    Barney vs. Board of Railroad Commissioners, 17 P.2d 82
     

    “The right of the citizen to travel upon the highway and to transport his property thereon, in the ordinary course of life and business, differs radically and obviously from that of one who makes the highway his place of business for private gain in the running of a stagecoach or omnibus.”

    State vs. City of Spokane, 186 P. 864
     

    “It is not contended by any one that the city would have the right to prevent the appellant from riding in his automobile on any street in the city … for the streets were built (sic) for that purpose.”

    Green v San Antonio, 178 SW 6;
    Hadfield-Respondent’s Brief, Pg 32.
     

    “The statutory requirement that licenses be procured for motor vehicles used upon the highways is based on the servitude put on the highways by such use and the advantage which the improved highways may afford the business in which the motor vehicle is employed.”

    Patterson vs. Southern Ry. Co., 198 S.E. 364, 214 N.C. 38.
     

    “No statutory duty lies to apply for, or to possess a driver license for personal travel and transportation as defendant is not within the class of persons for whose benefit or protection the statute was enacted.”

    Routh v. Quinn, 20 Cal 2d 488.
     

    “Where a private statute exists of which the intent is regulation of commercial common carriers, the particular agency enforcing that private statute, shall not apply it by trickery and deceit, to persons who are not noticed by the statute as persons regulated and taxed, nor should it permit any party to do so in violation of a person’s right to stay out of compelled license/contract, when he is not a person subject to the statute, unless clearly within its words.”

    State v. Ebershart, 179 P 853, 246 P 2d 1011.
     

    18 U.S. Code § 31. Definitions

    (6) Motor vehicle.—
    The term “motor vehicle” means every description of carriage or other contrivance propelled or drawn by mechanical power and used for commercial purposes on the highways in the transportation of passengers, passengers and property, or property or cargo.

    (10) Used for commercial purposes .— The term “used for commercial purposes” means the carriage of persons or property for any fare, fee, rate, charge or other consideration, or directly or indirectly in connection with any business, or other undertaking intended for profit.

    https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/31
     

    “Where rights secured by the Constitution are involved, there can be no rule making or legislation which would abrogate them.”

    Miranda vs. Arizona, 384 US 436, 491
     

    “The claim and exercise of a constitutional Right cannot be converted into a crime.”

    Miller vs. U.S., 230 F. 486, 489
     

    “There can be no sanction or penalty imposed upon one because of this exercise of constitutional Rights.”

    Snerer vs. Cullen, 481 F. 946
     

    “We know of no inherent right in one to use the highways for commercial purposes. The highways are primarily for the use of the public, and in the interest of the public, the state may prohibit or regulate ... the use of the highways for gain.”

    Robertson vs. Dept. of Public Works, supra.
     

    “The word “automobile” connotes a pleasure vehicle designed for the transportation of persons on highways.”

    American Mutual Liability Ins. Co., vs. Chaput, 60 A.2d 118, 120; 95 NH 200
     

    “A motor vehicle or automobile for hire is a motor vehicle, other than an automobile, used for the transportation of persons for which remuneration is received.”

    International Motor Transit Co. vs. Seattle, 251 P. 120
     

    “The term “travel” and “traveler” are usually construed in their broad and general sense ... so as to include all those who rightfully use the highways viatically (when being reimbursed for expenses) and who have occasion to pass over them for the purpose of business, convenience, or pleasure.”

    25 Am.Jur. (1st) Highways, Sect.427, Pg. 717
     

    “The automobile is not inherently dangerous.”

    Cohens vs. Meadow, 89 SE 876;
    Blair vs. Broadmore, 93 SE 532
     

    “With regard particularly to the U.S. Constitution, it is elementary that a Right secured or protected by that document cannot be overthrown or impaired by any state police authority.”

    Connolly vs. Union Sewer Pipe Co., 184 US 540;
    Lafarier vs. Grand Trunk R.R. Co., 24 A. 848;
    O'Neil vs. Providence Amusement Co., 108 A. 887
     

    “The right to travel is part of the Liberty of which a citizen cannot deprived without due process of law under the Fifth Amendment. This Right was emerging as early as the Magna Carta.”

    Kent vs. Dulles, 357 US 116 (1958)
     

    “The distinction between the Right of the Citizen to use the public highways for private, rather than commercial purposes is recognized ...”

    “Under its power to regulate private uses of our highways, our legislature has required that motor vehicle operators be licensed. Undoubtedly, the primary purpose of this requirement is to insure, as far as possible, that all motor vehicle operators will be competent and qualified, thereby reducing the potential hazard or risk of harm, to which other users of the highways might otherwise be subject. But once having complied with this regulatory provision, by obtaining the required license, a motorist enjoys the privilege of travelling freely upon the highways ...”

    Washington A.G.O. 59-60 No. 88, Pg. 11
     

    “Moreover, a distinction must be observed between the regulation of an activity which may be engaged in as a matter of right and one carried on by government sufferance of permission.”

    Davis vs. Massachusetts, 167 US 43;
    Pachard vs. Banton, supra.
     

    “Any claim that this statute is a taxing statute would be immediately open to severe Constitutional objections. If it could be said that the state had the power to tax a Right, this would enable the state to destroy Rights guaranteed by the constitution through the use of oppressive taxation. The question herein, is one of the state taxing the Right to travel by the ordinary modes of the day, and whether this is a legislative object of the state taxation.

    The views advanced herein are neither novel nor unsupported by authority. The question of taxing power of the states has been repeatedly considered by the Supreme Court. The Right of the state to impede or embarrass the Constitutional operation of the U.S. Government or the Rights which the Citizen holds under it, has been uniformly denied.”

    McCulloch vs. Maryland, 4 Wheat 316
     

    "The state cannot diminish Rights of the people."

    Hurtado vs. California, 110 US 516
     

    "The courts are not bound by mere form, nor are they to be misled by mere pretenses. They are at liberty -- indeed they are under a solemn duty -- to look at the substance of things, whenever they enter upon the inquiry whether the legislature has transcended the limits of its authority. If, therefore, a statute purported to have been enacted to protect ... the public safety, has no real or substantial relation to those objects or is a palpable invasion of Rights secured by the fundamental law, it is the duty of the courts to so adjudge, and thereby give effect to the Constitution."

    Mulger vs. Kansas, 123 US 623, 661
     

    "Complete freedom of the highways is so old and well established a blessing that we have forgotten the days of the Robber Barons and toll roads, and yet, under an act like this, arbitrarily administered, the highways may be completely monopolized, if, through lack of interest, the people submit, then they may look to see the most sacred of their liberties taken from them one by one, by more or less rapid encroachment."

    Robertson vs. Department of Public Works, 180 Wash 133, 147.
     

    It is the duty of the courts to be watchful for the Constitutional rights of the citizen and against any stealthy encroachments thereon."

    Boyd vs. United States, 116 US 616
     

    "Personal liberty largely consists of the Right of locomotion -- to go where and when one pleases -- only so far restrained as the Rights of others may make it necessary for the welfare of all other citizens. The Right of the Citizen to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, by horse drawn carriage, wagon, or automobile, is not a mere privilege which may be permitted or prohibited at will, but the common Right which he has under his Right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Under this Constitutional guarantee one may, therefore, under normal conditions, travel at his inclination along the public highways or in public places, and while conducting himself in an orderly and decent manner, neither interfering with nor disturbing another's Rights, he will be protected, not only in his person, but in his safe conduct."

    II Am.Jur. (1st) Constitutional Law, Sect.329, p.1135
     

    Replies: @RoatanBill, @Abolish_public_education

    I read through your list of cases and disagree with the judgement and rationale of many of them. As long as my taxes and fees support the roads, I have the right to travel on them regardless of my intentions. Specifically, If I have a business need to use the roads, the gov’t has no right to intervene and demand they have the final word on it via licensing ‘drivers’.

    The Constitution specifically disallows a ‘title of nobility’. That’s what licensing is. It allows one to do what the other is prevented from doing via some bullshit law.

    Also note how the court cases haven’t rid the states of their licensing scam. The entire legal system is corrupt to the core.

    For over 10 years, I fought speeding tickets in court after I got a $300 fine for 85 in a 55 on the outskirts of DFW heading to Louisiana. I joined the National Motorists Association and purchased their binder on how to fight tickets. For that time period, I got roughly 4 speeding tickets a year and only lost once in court. As a business owner, my time was my own so I delighted in forcing jury trial that I knew would cost the municipality money and inconvenience the ignoramuses that vote as they are the ones doing jury duty. Getting the cop onto the witness stand and then proving he didn’t know how to properly use the radar gun was my go to method of getting a not guilty verdict. I used my electrical engineering credentials to get the court to grant me expert status and the judge had to tell the jury of it.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @RoatanBill

    Good morning Bill,

    I agree with just about everything you're saying, especially the part about the entire legal system being corrupt to the core. (I don't think a license is a title of nobility per se, as titles of nobility are hereditary. I think the license has more to do with franchise and partnership.) I understand why you would disagree with the judgment and rationale of many of these cases. (I do too.) I was simply pointing out how the courts have ruled on this and how the legal system has (mis)used the commerce clause as a way to tax and regulate the people.

    As I read the original statutes and the cases about them, so called “drivers licenses” were only meant for “drivers” of “motor vehicles” or more specifically those who put extraordinary use on the highways as a source of private gain. This means dump truck companies, taxi's, bus companies, and common carriers for hire. Under my interpretation this would not apply to a farmer with a dump truck but only to companies who use the highways as their primary source of profit. It wouldn't apply to a traveling salesman, or to anyone who uses the highways to get to and from work. It probably makes sense that a company like Walmart or Werner Trucking should pay more to maintain the roads, as they tear them up more than your average traveler in an automobile, but this is achieved through fuel taxes more than anything else under the present scheme. Unfortunately they have used this rationale as a means to essentially take the right to travel by automobile from the people, even if the orphaned right remains.

    It's criminal that they have misapplied the statutes to apply to people who have a constitutional right to use the highways. The whole thing is a racket and really rotten to the core. Good job forcing the court to take it to trial and taking a little bit out of the municipalities coffers. If more people did this they would stop using traffic tickets as a means of raising revenue.

    In your previous comment you asked “Why does a vehicle need a gov’t approved license plate?” and “Why do you have to keep paying and paying for the gov’t plate?”

    It is my belief that the registration scheme is used to take lawful ownership of the automobile away from the people and place superior title to said automobile in the hands of the state. If you owned the car, they couldn't regulate it like they do and they couldn't search it on the side of the road without a warrant. If you owned the car you would have a right to use it without a license. By gaining superior title to all the cars in the land the state can use their value as collateral for debt, and the registration fee is simply the interest payment on that portion of the debt obligation. The registration scheme is really a way to take lawful title from the people.

    There once was a gentleman from Idaho, who took his right to travel case to the state supreme court. The judge asked him who owned the vehicle. He answered that he did. The court asked him if he had any proof of ownership to which he replied “My name is here on this certificate of title where it says owner”. (Or something to that effect) The judge then asked if he had any other way to prove that he owned the vehicle. The man said no. Then the judge said, “If you could prove that you owned the car, we would have a very different case before us today”. If the gentleman from Idaho had shown the court his bill of sale he might have won his right to travel by automobile case that day. Though, like you say, the courts are so corrupt that it is foolish to expect a fair trial.

    I hope you have a great day Bill.

    Replies: @RoatanBill

  62. • LOL: Lancelot_Link
    • Replies: @Detroit Refugee
    @loren

    Their lives mean squat to each other.
    It’s all just one big lie to pound us into submission and more importantly to extort them “GIBS”!

    , @AR in Illinois
    @loren

    It looks like most of our group in the comments too.

    Replies: @loren

  63. @Polistra
    The fat cat lady says enforcement should be “discontinued for the safety of both officers and the public and for racial fairness.”

    Notice: “Safety of the officers” meaning her pets tend to shoot cops.

    “Moreover, research has consistently shown that Black and Latino experiences during traffic stops are different from those of white persons.”

    Yeah, because 'white persons' tend to obey the law, and not resist arrest--notice she doesn't mention Asians. Mentioning Asians might interrupt the Get Whitey Narrative.

    Replies: @SCuba Steve

    notice she doesn’t mention Asians. Mentioning Asians might interrupt the Get Whitey Narrative.

    I don’t think the Left knows what to do with Asians. Asian success gives lie to their claims that “racist whitey” won’t let anyone else succeed. Higher Asian intelligence means they should be harder to fool with propaganda then non-Asian minorities. Their success in business and life means the Democrat party has less to offer them in exchange for their support.

    I may be wrong, but it doesn’t seem like this recent effort to bring Asians into the “hate whitey” fold that began in earnest after the tug-parlor shootings has been the success the Left was hoping for. The focus it has brought to crimes against Asians has shown that nearly all of them are committed by blacks. Even the CNN douche got caught admitting as much on hidden camera.

  64. @loren
    color us surprised

    https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2021/05/25/four-black-men-suspected-in-shooting-of-blms-sasha-johnson/

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee, @AR in Illinois

    Their lives mean squat to each other.
    It’s all just one big lie to pound us into submission and more importantly to extort them “GIBS”!

  65. @Bill H.
    How many people, white, black or any other color, will renew their license plate if they know they will pay no penalty for letting it expire?

    Replies: @Raccoon, @RoatanBill

    Can you supply a valid reason why a plate has to expire?

    Isn’t it there so as to identify a vehicle that was part of some crime?

    Does the tiny dated plastic stick on tag in any way obscure or make the rest of the plate invisible?

  66. That’s a pretty picture of Seattle, above, but one taken at street level, showing the streets of downtown, now become homeless camps for the mentally ill, who shoot up and defecate in plain view, would give a more accurate representation of how things now are.

    I used to enjoy traveling on business to Seattle, but now it’s fallen into the same class as St. Louis or Baltimore and is now just Philadelphia with fresh salmon. The city’s decline was initiated by Seattle’s previous mayor, Ed Murray, continued under the current mayor, Jenny Durkin, and will accelerate when she’s replaced as mayor by Indian immigrant and far-left socialist Kshwama Sawant.

    Amazing how whatever radical Democrats touch turns to ***t.

    • Agree: SCuba Steve
  67. @Hangnail Hans
    @RoatanBill


    Ask yourself how much you’ve paid in those 16 years, and for what.
     
    Uncounted thousands, much of it going to pay for uninsured black and hispanic drivers. And of course to line the insurers' pockets. Multiply that by a couple hundred million drivers, and it probably adds up to quite a sum.

    Congrats on being an expat. Wish I were.

    Replies: @europeasant, @Bite Moi

    “Uncounted thousands, much of it going to pay for uninsured black and hispanic drivers. ”

    You would not believe how many drivers in my town drive without licenses and/or insurance. The numbers in the vibrant areas are especially bad.

    I had had two cars stolen in front of my house. That’s probably not too bad in the 30 years that I’ve lived here. One car was never found and the other was crashed and totaled. Who pays?

    My son recently had his parked car crashed into. Driver borrowed the pickup from relative during the midnight hours and was probably drunk as he crossed the median into the opposite lane, parking areas. The perps car used to be insured but not for the last 3 months. My son’s car was totaled. Who pays?

    See that’s the problem where there are many people who are of a criminal mindset. Civilization can only tolerate so many criminals before we turn into a Detroit.

    • Agree: Hangnail Hans
  68. @Detroit Refugee
    @Female in FL

    HaHaHaHa!
    At this point in time, anyone vacationing in Chicago along the beautiful Lake Michigan shores, can’t say they weren’t warned of the danger.

    That would be great if Blue Juice could comment.
    I suspect he’s gonna be busy this holiday weekend.
    The black man gone be kilt by da udder black man.

    En masse

    Replies: @europeasant

    Memorial day here will be very active especially downtown. The police are on 12 hour shifts and a 9 o’clock curfew has been imposed. This is all in honor of St Floyd the new black martyr which we’ll be hearing about for the next 50 years.

    • Replies: @Detroit Refugee
    @europeasant

    One thing is for certain, next week Paul and all of us in general will have many stories and articles to share/discuss.

  69. @RoatanBill
    @Adam Smith

    I read through your list of cases and disagree with the judgement and rationale of many of them. As long as my taxes and fees support the roads, I have the right to travel on them regardless of my intentions. Specifically, If I have a business need to use the roads, the gov't has no right to intervene and demand they have the final word on it via licensing 'drivers'.

    The Constitution specifically disallows a 'title of nobility'. That's what licensing is. It allows one to do what the other is prevented from doing via some bullshit law.

    Also note how the court cases haven't rid the states of their licensing scam. The entire legal system is corrupt to the core.

    For over 10 years, I fought speeding tickets in court after I got a $300 fine for 85 in a 55 on the outskirts of DFW heading to Louisiana. I joined the National Motorists Association and purchased their binder on how to fight tickets. For that time period, I got roughly 4 speeding tickets a year and only lost once in court. As a business owner, my time was my own so I delighted in forcing jury trial that I knew would cost the municipality money and inconvenience the ignoramuses that vote as they are the ones doing jury duty. Getting the cop onto the witness stand and then proving he didn't know how to properly use the radar gun was my go to method of getting a not guilty verdict. I used my electrical engineering credentials to get the court to grant me expert status and the judge had to tell the jury of it.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    Good morning Bill,

    I agree with just about everything you’re saying, especially the part about the entire legal system being corrupt to the core. (I don’t think a license is a title of nobility per se, as titles of nobility are hereditary. I think the license has more to do with franchise and partnership.) I understand why you would disagree with the judgment and rationale of many of these cases. (I do too.) I was simply pointing out how the courts have ruled on this and how the legal system has (mis)used the commerce clause as a way to tax and regulate the people.

    As I read the original statutes and the cases about them, so called “drivers licenses” were only meant for “drivers” of “motor vehicles” or more specifically those who put extraordinary use on the highways as a source of private gain. This means dump truck companies, taxi’s, bus companies, and common carriers for hire. Under my interpretation this would not apply to a farmer with a dump truck but only to companies who use the highways as their primary source of profit. It wouldn’t apply to a traveling salesman, or to anyone who uses the highways to get to and from work. It probably makes sense that a company like Walmart or Werner Trucking should pay more to maintain the roads, as they tear them up more than your average traveler in an automobile, but this is achieved through fuel taxes more than anything else under the present scheme. Unfortunately they have used this rationale as a means to essentially take the right to travel by automobile from the people, even if the orphaned right remains.

    It’s criminal that they have misapplied the statutes to apply to people who have a constitutional right to use the highways. The whole thing is a racket and really rotten to the core. Good job forcing the court to take it to trial and taking a little bit out of the municipalities coffers. If more people did this they would stop using traffic tickets as a means of raising revenue.

    In your previous comment you asked “Why does a vehicle need a gov’t approved license plate?” and “Why do you have to keep paying and paying for the gov’t plate?”

    It is my belief that the registration scheme is used to take lawful ownership of the automobile away from the people and place superior title to said automobile in the hands of the state. If you owned the car, they couldn’t regulate it like they do and they couldn’t search it on the side of the road without a warrant. If you owned the car you would have a right to use it without a license. By gaining superior title to all the cars in the land the state can use their value as collateral for debt, and the registration fee is simply the interest payment on that portion of the debt obligation. The registration scheme is really a way to take lawful title from the people.

    There once was a gentleman from Idaho, who took his right to travel case to the state supreme court. The judge asked him who owned the vehicle. He answered that he did. The court asked him if he had any proof of ownership to which he replied “My name is here on this certificate of title where it says owner”. (Or something to that effect) The judge then asked if he had any other way to prove that he owned the vehicle. The man said no. Then the judge said, “If you could prove that you owned the car, we would have a very different case before us today”. If the gentleman from Idaho had shown the court his bill of sale he might have won his right to travel by automobile case that day. Though, like you say, the courts are so corrupt that it is foolish to expect a fair trial.

    I hope you have a great day Bill.

    • Replies: @RoatanBill
    @Adam Smith

    Although titles of nobility were hereditary in Europe, they also offered those with titles the legal ability to do things others couldn't. IMO I think that was what the framers were really after.

    Yes, the great and wonderful Commerce Clause that lets the Fed Gov stick its nose into absolutely everything and the supreme quacks go along.

    From your prose, I get the feeling you have professional legal expertise. You add nuance to what I would miss.

    It's understandable that those that get greater use of the roads should pay a greater price to maintain them and as you state, the fuel tax is a rational and not at all inconvenient way of getting the funds. The larger the vehicle, the more it ultimately causes damage to the roads due to weight and the weight leads directly to fuel consumption so that method of collection is a crude but reasonable approximation for how to apportion payments.

    I had never considered registration as a quasi ownership scheme, but it makes sense. In that regard, even a fully paid for home or property is never really owned by the purported owner, but by the state as delinquent real estate taxes would attest. They will come and collect their property or equivalent in currency.

    I'm aware of rumors where a mortgage holder got complete title to the home without paying off the mortgage because he showed the court that the loan funds were instantiated at the time of the loan being given and therefore the bank never provided their part of the bargain or some such argument. I'd like to know if that rumor is true. I know for fact that a female Fed Ex freight pilot fought the IRS on a tax evasion charge and won in court by convincing the jury that there is no law that states the average person is required to pay the income tax. I wish these types of things could be nailed down as fact or fiction so the average person has a better understanding of what is and is not possible.

    BTW - I never signed a speeding ticket after I joined the NMA and wised up. I always demanded to be 'immediately taken to a magistrate' as the law stated and the cop usually just threw the ticket into the vehicle and left because I wouldn't touch it. There were traffic stops that got the local chief of police involved in the smaller podunk towns surrounding the DFW area because I wasn't at all cooperative. I wouldn't do that today because the cops are all drunk on power now.
    I wrote all my own motions patterned after the samples I got from the NMA. I got one speeding ticket case dismissed on speedy trial grounds, got one cop fired for not having a signed oath of office on file and operating outside of his jurisdiction by claiming I'd sue the city and him for kidnapping because he wasn't a legal officer of the law at the time. I also had the entire court room laughing on one occasion. The judge proclaimed that we were going to have a judge trial on such and such date when I interrupted that we would be having a jury trial as was my right under Texas law. He reiterated that we would have a judge trial and I objected stating I want some entertainment value for my time and wanted the jury as my audience. The other folks waiting for their time with the judge roared in laughter. I got the jury trial.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

  70. @loren
    color us surprised

    https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2021/05/25/four-black-men-suspected-in-shooting-of-blms-sasha-johnson/

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee, @AR in Illinois

    It looks like most of our group in the comments too.

    • Replies: @loren
    @AR in Illinois

    good.

    meanwhile,
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/atlanta-defund-the-police-backer-has-car-stolen-by-kids-in-broad-daylight-reports/ar-AAKqIE1?ocid=msedgntp

  71. @Adam Smith
    @RoatanBill

    Good morning Bill,

    I agree with just about everything you're saying, especially the part about the entire legal system being corrupt to the core. (I don't think a license is a title of nobility per se, as titles of nobility are hereditary. I think the license has more to do with franchise and partnership.) I understand why you would disagree with the judgment and rationale of many of these cases. (I do too.) I was simply pointing out how the courts have ruled on this and how the legal system has (mis)used the commerce clause as a way to tax and regulate the people.

    As I read the original statutes and the cases about them, so called “drivers licenses” were only meant for “drivers” of “motor vehicles” or more specifically those who put extraordinary use on the highways as a source of private gain. This means dump truck companies, taxi's, bus companies, and common carriers for hire. Under my interpretation this would not apply to a farmer with a dump truck but only to companies who use the highways as their primary source of profit. It wouldn't apply to a traveling salesman, or to anyone who uses the highways to get to and from work. It probably makes sense that a company like Walmart or Werner Trucking should pay more to maintain the roads, as they tear them up more than your average traveler in an automobile, but this is achieved through fuel taxes more than anything else under the present scheme. Unfortunately they have used this rationale as a means to essentially take the right to travel by automobile from the people, even if the orphaned right remains.

    It's criminal that they have misapplied the statutes to apply to people who have a constitutional right to use the highways. The whole thing is a racket and really rotten to the core. Good job forcing the court to take it to trial and taking a little bit out of the municipalities coffers. If more people did this they would stop using traffic tickets as a means of raising revenue.

    In your previous comment you asked “Why does a vehicle need a gov’t approved license plate?” and “Why do you have to keep paying and paying for the gov’t plate?”

    It is my belief that the registration scheme is used to take lawful ownership of the automobile away from the people and place superior title to said automobile in the hands of the state. If you owned the car, they couldn't regulate it like they do and they couldn't search it on the side of the road without a warrant. If you owned the car you would have a right to use it without a license. By gaining superior title to all the cars in the land the state can use their value as collateral for debt, and the registration fee is simply the interest payment on that portion of the debt obligation. The registration scheme is really a way to take lawful title from the people.

    There once was a gentleman from Idaho, who took his right to travel case to the state supreme court. The judge asked him who owned the vehicle. He answered that he did. The court asked him if he had any proof of ownership to which he replied “My name is here on this certificate of title where it says owner”. (Or something to that effect) The judge then asked if he had any other way to prove that he owned the vehicle. The man said no. Then the judge said, “If you could prove that you owned the car, we would have a very different case before us today”. If the gentleman from Idaho had shown the court his bill of sale he might have won his right to travel by automobile case that day. Though, like you say, the courts are so corrupt that it is foolish to expect a fair trial.

    I hope you have a great day Bill.

    Replies: @RoatanBill

    Although titles of nobility were hereditary in Europe, they also offered those with titles the legal ability to do things others couldn’t. IMO I think that was what the framers were really after.

    Yes, the great and wonderful Commerce Clause that lets the Fed Gov stick its nose into absolutely everything and the supreme quacks go along.

    From your prose, I get the feeling you have professional legal expertise. You add nuance to what I would miss.

    It’s understandable that those that get greater use of the roads should pay a greater price to maintain them and as you state, the fuel tax is a rational and not at all inconvenient way of getting the funds. The larger the vehicle, the more it ultimately causes damage to the roads due to weight and the weight leads directly to fuel consumption so that method of collection is a crude but reasonable approximation for how to apportion payments.

    I had never considered registration as a quasi ownership scheme, but it makes sense. In that regard, even a fully paid for home or property is never really owned by the purported owner, but by the state as delinquent real estate taxes would attest. They will come and collect their property or equivalent in currency.

    I’m aware of rumors where a mortgage holder got complete title to the home without paying off the mortgage because he showed the court that the loan funds were instantiated at the time of the loan being given and therefore the bank never provided their part of the bargain or some such argument. I’d like to know if that rumor is true. I know for fact that a female Fed Ex freight pilot fought the IRS on a tax evasion charge and won in court by convincing the jury that there is no law that states the average person is required to pay the income tax. I wish these types of things could be nailed down as fact or fiction so the average person has a better understanding of what is and is not possible.

    BTW – I never signed a speeding ticket after I joined the NMA and wised up. I always demanded to be ‘immediately taken to a magistrate’ as the law stated and the cop usually just threw the ticket into the vehicle and left because I wouldn’t touch it. There were traffic stops that got the local chief of police involved in the smaller podunk towns surrounding the DFW area because I wasn’t at all cooperative. I wouldn’t do that today because the cops are all drunk on power now.
    I wrote all my own motions patterned after the samples I got from the NMA. I got one speeding ticket case dismissed on speedy trial grounds, got one cop fired for not having a signed oath of office on file and operating outside of his jurisdiction by claiming I’d sue the city and him for kidnapping because he wasn’t a legal officer of the law at the time. I also had the entire court room laughing on one occasion. The judge proclaimed that we were going to have a judge trial on such and such date when I interrupted that we would be having a jury trial as was my right under Texas law. He reiterated that we would have a judge trial and I objected stating I want some entertainment value for my time and wanted the jury as my audience. The other folks waiting for their time with the judge roared in laughter. I got the jury trial.

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @RoatanBill

    Good morning Bill,
    I hope you're having a great day.

    Glad to hear you had some fun standing up for our rights and successfully held some of these people to account. It would be nice if more people were willing to put up some fight against these bastards. Thank you.

    Also, thanks for the compliment. I'm no professional, but I have spent many years studying American Jurisprudence.


    Although titles of nobility were hereditary in Europe, they also offered those with titles the legal ability to do things others couldn’t. IMO I think that was what the framers were really after.
     
    I too think this is what the framers were after. Too bad the crown persisted and achieved their goals. They fundamentally changed America during reconstruction and more so with the federal reserve act. It's been all down hill since. For years America has been a full part of what used to be called the British Empire. The Saker calls it the anglo-zionist empire which is not a bad way to describe it. Interestingly the only title of nobility commonly used in America is esquire. I think all BAR attorneys should be registered as foreign agents. They work for the crown, not for America.

    I’m aware of rumors where a mortgage holder got complete title to the home without paying off the mortgage because he showed the court that the loan funds were instantiated at the time of the loan being given and therefore the bank never provided their part of the bargain or some such argument. I’d like to know if that rumor is true.
     
    I believe you are referring to First National Bank of Montgomery v. Daly also called the “Credit River decision”. “Jerome Daly was an attorney in Minnesota and also the defendant in an unlawful detainer action in the justice of the peace court in Credit River Township (Scott County) where Martin V. Mahoney was the justice of the peace. In this case, First National Bank of Montgomery vs. Jerome Daly, the bank was seeking possession of property that it had already foreclosed the mortgage on. The jury decided against the bank. The landowner's defense had been that the bank had not lent him any actual money, but had simply created credit on its books, and therefore, since nothing of value had been advanced by the bank, it was not entitled to the property that had been given as security for the loan.”

    Money: Made from “Thin Air” (The Credit River Decision)

    Credit River Case Minnesota State Law Library

    The Credit River Case by Thomas L. Olsen

    It's a very intriguing case. The people involved are pretty interesting. Daly convinced a jury that there was no lawful consideration offered by the bank because the banker simply created the loan with a book keeping entry. The local banker testified that this was standard procedure. Some people say Judge Mahoney was poisoned by the local bankers someone for his ruling and his support for hard money. Daly was later disbarred for his transgressions against the banking system. As far as I know, his win was overturned by the state.

    I had never considered registration as a quasi ownership scheme, but it makes sense. In that regard, even a fully paid for home or property is never really owned by the purported owner, but by the state as delinquent real estate taxes would attest. They will come and collect their property or equivalent in currency.
     
    If you truly owned the property, to whom would you pay “taxes”?

    Most (if not all) states used to have an allodial title clause in their state constitutions. Most states have repealed these clauses but Arkansas and Minnesota (and possibly others) still have them. Land held in allodium is land without a superior title holder. Or as lawdictionary.org explains “Land held absolutely in one's own right, and not of any lord or superior ; land not subject to feudal duties or burdens. An estate held by absolute ownership, without recognizing any superior to whom any duty is due on account thereof.”

    Article 2, Section 28 of the Arkansas state Constitution says “All lands in this State are declared to be allodial; and feudal tenures of every description, with all their incidents, are prohibited.” (you'll find it on page 31)

    The 15th Bill of Right of the Minnesota constitution states “All lands within this state are declared to be allodial, and feudal tenures of every description, with all their incidents, are prohibited. Leases and grants of agricultural land for a longer period than twenty one years hereafter made in which shall be reserved any rent or service of any kind shall be void.” (page 3 this time)

    Nevada also has some provision for some sort of allodial title scheme. I've also heard of Texans perfecting their patent and successfully claiming their allodial title rights.

    Aside from mortgage holders who don't own their property, most people hold their land in Fee Simple which is the highest from of tenant property. Most people do not realize that “property tax” is a feudal practice. This was something the framers looked to do away with. Americans after the revolution had gained their sovereignty. Originally each American was a sovereign in their own right, on par with the King of England. The system has since been turned on it's head. Allodial title to land is important because no man can truly be free on another man's land. If you want a system of limited “government” allodial title is one essential ingredient for a free people to achieve this goal.

    I am of the opinion that when the U.S. went bankrupt in 1933 the people masquerading as “government” needed collateral to continue receiving loans from the international banking cartel. It was at this point that the “government” pledged everyones labor and property as collateral for the debt. The so called property tax is really just the interest payment on the value of the debt collateralized by the house or land. Some say there is a hidden federal lien on all the land, but I do not know this for sure. I've also heard about different people winning against the IRS in different ways. Some people have had seemingly great success just by saying “Show me the law” and repeating it ad nauseam. Some of these wins seem more like folklore than fact, though every so often it does happen. You can beat city hall. I think people in power try to discourage others from trying these sorts of things by not reporting or misreporting such things.

    I too wish these types of things could be nailed down as fact or fiction so the average person has a better understanding of what is and is not possible. I wish the regime we find ourselves victims of wasn't so corrupt. It's unfortunate that the “governments” of the world are all criminal enterprises.

    I hope you have a great day Bill.

    Replies: @RoatanBill

  72. @Hangnail Hans
    @RoatanBill


    Ask yourself how much you’ve paid in those 16 years, and for what.
     
    Uncounted thousands, much of it going to pay for uninsured black and hispanic drivers. And of course to line the insurers' pockets. Multiply that by a couple hundred million drivers, and it probably adds up to quite a sum.

    Congrats on being an expat. Wish I were.

    Replies: @europeasant, @Bite Moi

    Hangnail Hans.————Excuse me Mr. Hans. Could you ask Paul to let me out of “moderation” long enough to pee?

    • LOL: Hangnail Hans
  73. @Adam Smith
    @RoatanBill

    Good afternoon Bill,

    “Driving” is regulated occupation for hire. Everyone has a constitutionally protected right to use their automobile on the highways and byways of this once great nation for travel. Free people do not ask for permission to travel as free people have no master.

    The state has, in essence, converted our constitutional right to travel by automobile into a privilege and sold it back to us for it's own benefit and profit. This is an unconstitutional taking of our right to travel. The state, courts, prosecutors, judges, police, insurance companies and every other person and corporation involved are running a criminal protection racket to extort money from us.

    There are too many examples too list, but here are a few...


    “The use of the highways for the purpose of travel and transportation is not a mere privilege, but a common and fundamental Right of which the public and the individual cannot be rightfully deprived.”

    Chicago Motor Coach vs. Chicago, 169 NE 221;
    Ligare vs. Chicago, 28 NE 934;
    Boon vs. Clark, 214 SSW 607;
    25 Am.Jur. (1st) Highways Sect.163
     

    “The Right of the Citizen to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, either by horse drawn carriage or by automobile, is not a mere privilege which a city can prohibit or permit at will, but a common Right which he has under the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

    Thompson vs. Smith, 154 SE 579
     

    “… For while a Citizen has the Right to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, that Right does not extend to the use of the highways, either in whole or in part, as a place for private gain. For the latter purpose, no person has a vested right to use the highways of the state, but is a privilege or a license which the legislature may grant or withhold at its discretion.”

    State vs. Johnson, 243 P. 1073;
    Cummins vs. Homes, 155 P. 171;
    Packard vs. Banton, 44 S.Ct. 256;
    Hadfield vs. Lundin, 98 Wash 516
     

    “Heretofore the court has held, and we think correctly, that while a Citizen has the Right to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, that Right does not extend to the use of the highways, either in whole or in part, as a place of business for private gain.”

    Willis vs. Buck, 263 P. l 982;
    Barney vs. Board of Railroad Commissioners, 17 P.2d 82
     

    “The right of the citizen to travel upon the highway and to transport his property thereon, in the ordinary course of life and business, differs radically and obviously from that of one who makes the highway his place of business for private gain in the running of a stagecoach or omnibus.”

    State vs. City of Spokane, 186 P. 864
     

    “It is not contended by any one that the city would have the right to prevent the appellant from riding in his automobile on any street in the city … for the streets were built (sic) for that purpose.”

    Green v San Antonio, 178 SW 6;
    Hadfield-Respondent’s Brief, Pg 32.
     

    “The statutory requirement that licenses be procured for motor vehicles used upon the highways is based on the servitude put on the highways by such use and the advantage which the improved highways may afford the business in which the motor vehicle is employed.”

    Patterson vs. Southern Ry. Co., 198 S.E. 364, 214 N.C. 38.
     

    “No statutory duty lies to apply for, or to possess a driver license for personal travel and transportation as defendant is not within the class of persons for whose benefit or protection the statute was enacted.”

    Routh v. Quinn, 20 Cal 2d 488.
     

    “Where a private statute exists of which the intent is regulation of commercial common carriers, the particular agency enforcing that private statute, shall not apply it by trickery and deceit, to persons who are not noticed by the statute as persons regulated and taxed, nor should it permit any party to do so in violation of a person’s right to stay out of compelled license/contract, when he is not a person subject to the statute, unless clearly within its words.”

    State v. Ebershart, 179 P 853, 246 P 2d 1011.
     

    18 U.S. Code § 31. Definitions

    (6) Motor vehicle.—
    The term “motor vehicle” means every description of carriage or other contrivance propelled or drawn by mechanical power and used for commercial purposes on the highways in the transportation of passengers, passengers and property, or property or cargo.

    (10) Used for commercial purposes .— The term “used for commercial purposes” means the carriage of persons or property for any fare, fee, rate, charge or other consideration, or directly or indirectly in connection with any business, or other undertaking intended for profit.

    https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/31
     

    “Where rights secured by the Constitution are involved, there can be no rule making or legislation which would abrogate them.”

    Miranda vs. Arizona, 384 US 436, 491
     

    “The claim and exercise of a constitutional Right cannot be converted into a crime.”

    Miller vs. U.S., 230 F. 486, 489
     

    “There can be no sanction or penalty imposed upon one because of this exercise of constitutional Rights.”

    Snerer vs. Cullen, 481 F. 946
     

    “We know of no inherent right in one to use the highways for commercial purposes. The highways are primarily for the use of the public, and in the interest of the public, the state may prohibit or regulate ... the use of the highways for gain.”

    Robertson vs. Dept. of Public Works, supra.
     

    “The word “automobile” connotes a pleasure vehicle designed for the transportation of persons on highways.”

    American Mutual Liability Ins. Co., vs. Chaput, 60 A.2d 118, 120; 95 NH 200
     

    “A motor vehicle or automobile for hire is a motor vehicle, other than an automobile, used for the transportation of persons for which remuneration is received.”

    International Motor Transit Co. vs. Seattle, 251 P. 120
     

    “The term “travel” and “traveler” are usually construed in their broad and general sense ... so as to include all those who rightfully use the highways viatically (when being reimbursed for expenses) and who have occasion to pass over them for the purpose of business, convenience, or pleasure.”

    25 Am.Jur. (1st) Highways, Sect.427, Pg. 717
     

    “The automobile is not inherently dangerous.”

    Cohens vs. Meadow, 89 SE 876;
    Blair vs. Broadmore, 93 SE 532
     

    “With regard particularly to the U.S. Constitution, it is elementary that a Right secured or protected by that document cannot be overthrown or impaired by any state police authority.”

    Connolly vs. Union Sewer Pipe Co., 184 US 540;
    Lafarier vs. Grand Trunk R.R. Co., 24 A. 848;
    O'Neil vs. Providence Amusement Co., 108 A. 887
     

    “The right to travel is part of the Liberty of which a citizen cannot deprived without due process of law under the Fifth Amendment. This Right was emerging as early as the Magna Carta.”

    Kent vs. Dulles, 357 US 116 (1958)
     

    “The distinction between the Right of the Citizen to use the public highways for private, rather than commercial purposes is recognized ...”

    “Under its power to regulate private uses of our highways, our legislature has required that motor vehicle operators be licensed. Undoubtedly, the primary purpose of this requirement is to insure, as far as possible, that all motor vehicle operators will be competent and qualified, thereby reducing the potential hazard or risk of harm, to which other users of the highways might otherwise be subject. But once having complied with this regulatory provision, by obtaining the required license, a motorist enjoys the privilege of travelling freely upon the highways ...”

    Washington A.G.O. 59-60 No. 88, Pg. 11
     

    “Moreover, a distinction must be observed between the regulation of an activity which may be engaged in as a matter of right and one carried on by government sufferance of permission.”

    Davis vs. Massachusetts, 167 US 43;
    Pachard vs. Banton, supra.
     

    “Any claim that this statute is a taxing statute would be immediately open to severe Constitutional objections. If it could be said that the state had the power to tax a Right, this would enable the state to destroy Rights guaranteed by the constitution through the use of oppressive taxation. The question herein, is one of the state taxing the Right to travel by the ordinary modes of the day, and whether this is a legislative object of the state taxation.

    The views advanced herein are neither novel nor unsupported by authority. The question of taxing power of the states has been repeatedly considered by the Supreme Court. The Right of the state to impede or embarrass the Constitutional operation of the U.S. Government or the Rights which the Citizen holds under it, has been uniformly denied.”

    McCulloch vs. Maryland, 4 Wheat 316
     

    "The state cannot diminish Rights of the people."

    Hurtado vs. California, 110 US 516
     

    "The courts are not bound by mere form, nor are they to be misled by mere pretenses. They are at liberty -- indeed they are under a solemn duty -- to look at the substance of things, whenever they enter upon the inquiry whether the legislature has transcended the limits of its authority. If, therefore, a statute purported to have been enacted to protect ... the public safety, has no real or substantial relation to those objects or is a palpable invasion of Rights secured by the fundamental law, it is the duty of the courts to so adjudge, and thereby give effect to the Constitution."

    Mulger vs. Kansas, 123 US 623, 661
     

    "Complete freedom of the highways is so old and well established a blessing that we have forgotten the days of the Robber Barons and toll roads, and yet, under an act like this, arbitrarily administered, the highways may be completely monopolized, if, through lack of interest, the people submit, then they may look to see the most sacred of their liberties taken from them one by one, by more or less rapid encroachment."

    Robertson vs. Department of Public Works, 180 Wash 133, 147.
     

    It is the duty of the courts to be watchful for the Constitutional rights of the citizen and against any stealthy encroachments thereon."

    Boyd vs. United States, 116 US 616
     

    "Personal liberty largely consists of the Right of locomotion -- to go where and when one pleases -- only so far restrained as the Rights of others may make it necessary for the welfare of all other citizens. The Right of the Citizen to travel upon the public highways and to transport his property thereon, by horse drawn carriage, wagon, or automobile, is not a mere privilege which may be permitted or prohibited at will, but the common Right which he has under his Right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Under this Constitutional guarantee one may, therefore, under normal conditions, travel at his inclination along the public highways or in public places, and while conducting himself in an orderly and decent manner, neither interfering with nor disturbing another's Rights, he will be protected, not only in his person, but in his safe conduct."

    II Am.Jur. (1st) Constitutional Law, Sect.329, p.1135
     

    Replies: @RoatanBill, @Abolish_public_education

    Any claim that this statute is a taxing statute would be immediately open to severe Constitutional objections.

    Tell that to Justice Roberts, who used the “It’s just a tax.” rationale as a basis to rule in favor of the ObamaCare mandate.

    I can begrudgingly agree that some of these mandates fall within the government’s power to tax, but ObamaCare was such a giant nuisance that there’s no way that it should have been imposed without first securing permission from the States, in the form of a constitutional amendment; the same goes for MediCare, etc.

    Legal arguments bore me. It’s true that taxes automatically trigger clashes with civil rights. So long as the taxes are tiny, we can view them as “infringements”. It’s noteworthy that infringements on gun rights are specifically prohibited.

  74. @europeasant
    @Detroit Refugee

    Memorial day here will be very active especially downtown. The police are on 12 hour shifts and a 9 o'clock curfew has been imposed. This is all in honor of St Floyd the new black martyr which we'll be hearing about for the next 50 years.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee

    One thing is for certain, next week Paul and all of us in general will have many stories and articles to share/discuss.

  75. anon[189] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sick of Orcs
    Why would any White, Asian or Hispanic continue supporting any government which sets standards of law and order based around orcs' criminal incompetence?

    We owe Segregationists of old a ginormous apology, though they might also apologize to their descendants for failing to sufficiently demonstrate why Segregation was--and is--wise and necessary.

    Replies: @anon

    Well, I suppose that you might be a little ignorant of history. The segregationists did resist. But the National Guard had loaded M-16’s pointed at them with bayonets attached to them to do some hand to hand combat killing of “white supremacists.” The whites were yelling and protesting but that’s all they did because they would’ve had their blood spilled right there. I didn’t see any of the whites with loaded firearms to try to stop the enforced integration. That was in the 1950’s. This country has been destroyed for a long time. Before you were even born. The time to fight back and take back the attempted commie control was then, not now. Back then the white commies only had the threat of bloodshed available to them. They didn’t control everything back then. They control everything now. The white commies who run this country knew how to gain control. They knew the best way to take control of any country for communism is not by shedding blood but by educating them. See Mao’s redbook. While white Americans slept an enemy sowed discord between the parents and their children right under their noses and they didn’t even see it. It produced the hippie counter culture and a near revolution with an underlying theme. Hatred for the country you live in. I wonder where they got that from? Certainly not from their parents I’m sure. From the change agents in the schools. They were “educated,” i.e. indoctrinated into the commie cult. Well, when the 1960’s ended so did the war in Vietnam (1975 to be exact). When we ran with our tail between our legs the VC came in and started killing and enslaving and torturing, etc. the Saigonians to the tune of a million people. Any outrage from the peanut gallery, i.e. the hippies, news media, professors, liberals, etc.? Of course there was, white Americans and our troops are evil and commie Vietnamese are good. Sound familiar? It’s like a broken record.

    • Agree: Alden
  76. @UNIT472
    The idea is not without merit but the traffic stop is an important police investigative tool. The police use it selectively as a 'reason' can almost always be found and the police can then detect the odor of alcohol, marijuana or just look around the interior of the car for indications of drug usage, firearms etc. If the police officers suspicions are correct ( and they usually are as they know who the criminals are in their communities) it can get dangerous if there is a gun under the seat or in the waistband of an occupant of the car but what's the alternative. Let thugs go about their business unmolested?

    Replies: @Chris Mallory, @Feryl

    Also, people with open warrants are often busted during “routine” traffic stops (which as you suggest are key to policing in a car-heavy culture).

    • Agree: SCuba Steve
  77. @ClownWorld
    Ted Bundy was arrested due to a traffic stop. In fact, Traffic stops are the most common contact between law enforcement and civilians.

    Having expired tags is likely to not even get you a ticket unless they've been expired for a very long time.

    I guess it's just legal to drive around with no license plates or insurance is you are black now.

    Replies: @loren, @RoatanBill, @SCuba Steve, @TNC, @Libre

    “I guess it’s just legal to [ ] if you are black now”

    Still works

  78. Good. Traffic stops are unconstitutional. Unfortunately, despite having carriages detained by British troops, the framers thought it was so absurd, they didn’t even conceive of mentioning the right to travel in the bill of rights. It was a given, well apparently not.

  79. @ClownWorld
    Ted Bundy was arrested due to a traffic stop. In fact, Traffic stops are the most common contact between law enforcement and civilians.

    Having expired tags is likely to not even get you a ticket unless they've been expired for a very long time.

    I guess it's just legal to drive around with no license plates or insurance is you are black now.

    Replies: @loren, @RoatanBill, @SCuba Steve, @TNC, @Libre

    They are the only contact with police and that’s why many people hate police. Heck if it weren’t for traffic stops, I don’t think Id hate them at all.

  80. @Mr. Rational
    More and more, the pleading is that civilized norms have to be dropped for the sake of the precious oppressed minorities, who can't be expected to abide by them.  Rules are only for YT.

    Is "Judge" an (((ethnic))) surname?

    Replies: @Libre

    Is robbing people on the highway for a broken taillight civilized? Especially when there are real criminals running around? Traffic stops should be illegal to perform unless an immediate danger, or every murder, take, etc has been solved. And in that case, the officer should be loaned to a jurisdiction with an unsolved case.

    There goes my reply limit.

  81. @Pissedoffalese
    Actually, I think she's kinda on the right track here. Maybe we should NOT be getting pulled over for stupid shit, regardless of color. The technology is there to send you a freaking letter to tell you you're expired or your car needs to be fixed. Send proof to the DMV, just like they demand for SNAP. You have X number of days to comply. Actually, here's an idea--send proof of fixed shit or your SNAP and or welfare/unemployment gets shut off. Sorted. No arrests, no BIPOCS/Cops murdered. All is well. No?

    Then maybe we can put REAL criminals in jail. Oh, and ditch the stupid drug laws, too. Darwin Awards. BoooooooooooYaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!!!!!

    Replies: @Supervisor

    They won’t starve people for being scofflaws, so the EBT thing is a non-starter.
    Likewise, they will not penalize “poor folks” for ignoring notices regarding broken tail lights and expired tags.
    It’s just what it sounds like: a different justice system for negroes. They’ll have to raise taxes to make up the lost revenues from fines and registration fees. Insurance rates will go up because their will.be more accidents in unsafe cars, but that’s the price of becoming a third-world country.

  82. @dixonsyder
    OKC bomber caught the same way over a minor traffic violation. Seattle is a dump and getting dumpier(?) every day. Leftist voters deserve the dump they want

    Replies: @SCuba Steve

    The serial rapist “The Beast of Jersey” was also caught after fleeing from a traffic stop. He was a respected citizen who had not been under suspicion before.

    • Replies: @Jim in Jersey
    @SCuba Steve

    While I understand where you’re coming from, I don’t think you’re going to convince anyone that we should all suffer the occasional stop and search (that’s what it is, after all) because once every five thousand or so it bears fruit and a criminal is caught.

    When cops stop me for going 30 in a 25, it’s for revenue, not the prospect of getting a criminal off the street.

    Pulling suspicious looking people over is an easy way to approach police work. It’s also lazy, intrusive and wrong.

    None of which is what we’re talking about though. Being discussed is the fact we’re moving toward a dual-race justice system where blacks and whites are held to separate standards.

    Replies: @SCuba Steve

  83. @RoatanBill
    @Adam Smith

    Although titles of nobility were hereditary in Europe, they also offered those with titles the legal ability to do things others couldn't. IMO I think that was what the framers were really after.

    Yes, the great and wonderful Commerce Clause that lets the Fed Gov stick its nose into absolutely everything and the supreme quacks go along.

    From your prose, I get the feeling you have professional legal expertise. You add nuance to what I would miss.

    It's understandable that those that get greater use of the roads should pay a greater price to maintain them and as you state, the fuel tax is a rational and not at all inconvenient way of getting the funds. The larger the vehicle, the more it ultimately causes damage to the roads due to weight and the weight leads directly to fuel consumption so that method of collection is a crude but reasonable approximation for how to apportion payments.

    I had never considered registration as a quasi ownership scheme, but it makes sense. In that regard, even a fully paid for home or property is never really owned by the purported owner, but by the state as delinquent real estate taxes would attest. They will come and collect their property or equivalent in currency.

    I'm aware of rumors where a mortgage holder got complete title to the home without paying off the mortgage because he showed the court that the loan funds were instantiated at the time of the loan being given and therefore the bank never provided their part of the bargain or some such argument. I'd like to know if that rumor is true. I know for fact that a female Fed Ex freight pilot fought the IRS on a tax evasion charge and won in court by convincing the jury that there is no law that states the average person is required to pay the income tax. I wish these types of things could be nailed down as fact or fiction so the average person has a better understanding of what is and is not possible.

    BTW - I never signed a speeding ticket after I joined the NMA and wised up. I always demanded to be 'immediately taken to a magistrate' as the law stated and the cop usually just threw the ticket into the vehicle and left because I wouldn't touch it. There were traffic stops that got the local chief of police involved in the smaller podunk towns surrounding the DFW area because I wasn't at all cooperative. I wouldn't do that today because the cops are all drunk on power now.
    I wrote all my own motions patterned after the samples I got from the NMA. I got one speeding ticket case dismissed on speedy trial grounds, got one cop fired for not having a signed oath of office on file and operating outside of his jurisdiction by claiming I'd sue the city and him for kidnapping because he wasn't a legal officer of the law at the time. I also had the entire court room laughing on one occasion. The judge proclaimed that we were going to have a judge trial on such and such date when I interrupted that we would be having a jury trial as was my right under Texas law. He reiterated that we would have a judge trial and I objected stating I want some entertainment value for my time and wanted the jury as my audience. The other folks waiting for their time with the judge roared in laughter. I got the jury trial.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    Good morning Bill,
    I hope you’re having a great day.

    Glad to hear you had some fun standing up for our rights and successfully held some of these people to account. It would be nice if more people were willing to put up some fight against these bastards. Thank you.

    Also, thanks for the compliment. I’m no professional, but I have spent many years studying American Jurisprudence.

    Although titles of nobility were hereditary in Europe, they also offered those with titles the legal ability to do things others couldn’t. IMO I think that was what the framers were really after.

    I too think this is what the framers were after. Too bad the crown persisted and achieved their goals. They fundamentally changed America during reconstruction and more so with the federal reserve act. It’s been all down hill since. For years America has been a full part of what used to be called the British Empire. The Saker calls it the anglo-zionist empire which is not a bad way to describe it. Interestingly the only title of nobility commonly used in America is esquire. I think all BAR attorneys should be registered as foreign agents. They work for the crown, not for America.

    I’m aware of rumors where a mortgage holder got complete title to the home without paying off the mortgage because he showed the court that the loan funds were instantiated at the time of the loan being given and therefore the bank never provided their part of the bargain or some such argument. I’d like to know if that rumor is true.

    I believe you are referring to First National Bank of Montgomery v. Daly also called the “Credit River decision”. “Jerome Daly was an attorney in Minnesota and also the defendant in an unlawful detainer action in the justice of the peace court in Credit River Township (Scott County) where Martin V. Mahoney was the justice of the peace. In this case, First National Bank of Montgomery vs. Jerome Daly, the bank was seeking possession of property that it had already foreclosed the mortgage on. The jury decided against the bank. The landowner’s defense had been that the bank had not lent him any actual money, but had simply created credit on its books, and therefore, since nothing of value had been advanced by the bank, it was not entitled to the property that had been given as security for the loan.”

    Money: Made from “Thin Air” (The Credit River Decision)

    Credit River Case Minnesota State Law Library

    The Credit River Case by Thomas L. Olsen

    It’s a very intriguing case. The people involved are pretty interesting. Daly convinced a jury that there was no lawful consideration offered by the bank because the banker simply created the loan with a book keeping entry. The local banker testified that this was standard procedure. Some people say Judge Mahoney was poisoned by the local bankers someone for his ruling and his support for hard money. Daly was later disbarred for his transgressions against the banking system. As far as I know, his win was overturned by the state.

    I had never considered registration as a quasi ownership scheme, but it makes sense. In that regard, even a fully paid for home or property is never really owned by the purported owner, but by the state as delinquent real estate taxes would attest. They will come and collect their property or equivalent in currency.

    If you truly owned the property, to whom would you pay “taxes”?

    Most (if not all) states used to have an allodial title clause in their state constitutions. Most states have repealed these clauses but Arkansas and Minnesota (and possibly others) still have them. Land held in allodium is land without a superior title holder. Or as lawdictionary.org explains “Land held absolutely in one’s own right, and not of any lord or superior ; land not subject to feudal duties or burdens. An estate held by absolute ownership, without recognizing any superior to whom any duty is due on account thereof.”

    Article 2, Section 28 of the Arkansas state Constitution says “All lands in this State are declared to be allodial; and feudal tenures of every description, with all their incidents, are prohibited.” (you’ll find it on page 31)

    The 15th Bill of Right of the Minnesota constitution states “All lands within this state are declared to be allodial, and feudal tenures of every description, with all their incidents, are prohibited. Leases and grants of agricultural land for a longer period than twenty one years hereafter made in which shall be reserved any rent or service of any kind shall be void.” (page 3 this time)

    Nevada also has some provision for some sort of allodial title scheme. I’ve also heard of Texans perfecting their patent and successfully claiming their allodial title rights.

    Aside from mortgage holders who don’t own their property, most people hold their land in Fee Simple which is the highest from of tenant property. Most people do not realize that “property tax” is a feudal practice. This was something the framers looked to do away with. Americans after the revolution had gained their sovereignty. Originally each American was a sovereign in their own right, on par with the King of England. The system has since been turned on it’s head. Allodial title to land is important because no man can truly be free on another man’s land. If you want a system of limited “government” allodial title is one essential ingredient for a free people to achieve this goal.

    I am of the opinion that when the U.S. went bankrupt in 1933 the people masquerading as “government” needed collateral to continue receiving loans from the international banking cartel. It was at this point that the “government” pledged everyones labor and property as collateral for the debt. The so called property tax is really just the interest payment on the value of the debt collateralized by the house or land. Some say there is a hidden federal lien on all the land, but I do not know this for sure. I’ve also heard about different people winning against the IRS in different ways. Some people have had seemingly great success just by saying “Show me the law” and repeating it ad nauseam. Some of these wins seem more like folklore than fact, though every so often it does happen. You can beat city hall. I think people in power try to discourage others from trying these sorts of things by not reporting or misreporting such things.

    I too wish these types of things could be nailed down as fact or fiction so the average person has a better understanding of what is and is not possible. I wish the regime we find ourselves victims of wasn’t so corrupt. It’s unfortunate that the “governments” of the world are all criminal enterprises.

    I hope you have a great day Bill.

    • Replies: @RoatanBill
    @Adam Smith

    You would have gotten along with a friend of mine, Richard 'Dick' Simkanin. Too bad the Feds caused his death while in prison for federal tax evasion.

    All he wanted was for someone to show him the law that claims he owes federal taxes, but no such law was ever produced. IRS regulations are now the substitute for laws enacted by a legislature.

    Alex Jones had about the best description of what happened to Dick but even he had many thinks wrong. There are numerous stories about his fight with the IRS including the full page ads he took out in national news papers stating he wasn't going to withhold taxes from his employees till the IRS produced the law that said it was legal.

    Thank you for the details on some of those cases. I'll keep a copy in my file for reference.

  84. @Adam Smith
    @RoatanBill

    Good morning Bill,
    I hope you're having a great day.

    Glad to hear you had some fun standing up for our rights and successfully held some of these people to account. It would be nice if more people were willing to put up some fight against these bastards. Thank you.

    Also, thanks for the compliment. I'm no professional, but I have spent many years studying American Jurisprudence.


    Although titles of nobility were hereditary in Europe, they also offered those with titles the legal ability to do things others couldn’t. IMO I think that was what the framers were really after.
     
    I too think this is what the framers were after. Too bad the crown persisted and achieved their goals. They fundamentally changed America during reconstruction and more so with the federal reserve act. It's been all down hill since. For years America has been a full part of what used to be called the British Empire. The Saker calls it the anglo-zionist empire which is not a bad way to describe it. Interestingly the only title of nobility commonly used in America is esquire. I think all BAR attorneys should be registered as foreign agents. They work for the crown, not for America.

    I’m aware of rumors where a mortgage holder got complete title to the home without paying off the mortgage because he showed the court that the loan funds were instantiated at the time of the loan being given and therefore the bank never provided their part of the bargain or some such argument. I’d like to know if that rumor is true.
     
    I believe you are referring to First National Bank of Montgomery v. Daly also called the “Credit River decision”. “Jerome Daly was an attorney in Minnesota and also the defendant in an unlawful detainer action in the justice of the peace court in Credit River Township (Scott County) where Martin V. Mahoney was the justice of the peace. In this case, First National Bank of Montgomery vs. Jerome Daly, the bank was seeking possession of property that it had already foreclosed the mortgage on. The jury decided against the bank. The landowner's defense had been that the bank had not lent him any actual money, but had simply created credit on its books, and therefore, since nothing of value had been advanced by the bank, it was not entitled to the property that had been given as security for the loan.”

    Money: Made from “Thin Air” (The Credit River Decision)

    Credit River Case Minnesota State Law Library

    The Credit River Case by Thomas L. Olsen

    It's a very intriguing case. The people involved are pretty interesting. Daly convinced a jury that there was no lawful consideration offered by the bank because the banker simply created the loan with a book keeping entry. The local banker testified that this was standard procedure. Some people say Judge Mahoney was poisoned by the local bankers someone for his ruling and his support for hard money. Daly was later disbarred for his transgressions against the banking system. As far as I know, his win was overturned by the state.

    I had never considered registration as a quasi ownership scheme, but it makes sense. In that regard, even a fully paid for home or property is never really owned by the purported owner, but by the state as delinquent real estate taxes would attest. They will come and collect their property or equivalent in currency.
     
    If you truly owned the property, to whom would you pay “taxes”?

    Most (if not all) states used to have an allodial title clause in their state constitutions. Most states have repealed these clauses but Arkansas and Minnesota (and possibly others) still have them. Land held in allodium is land without a superior title holder. Or as lawdictionary.org explains “Land held absolutely in one's own right, and not of any lord or superior ; land not subject to feudal duties or burdens. An estate held by absolute ownership, without recognizing any superior to whom any duty is due on account thereof.”

    Article 2, Section 28 of the Arkansas state Constitution says “All lands in this State are declared to be allodial; and feudal tenures of every description, with all their incidents, are prohibited.” (you'll find it on page 31)

    The 15th Bill of Right of the Minnesota constitution states “All lands within this state are declared to be allodial, and feudal tenures of every description, with all their incidents, are prohibited. Leases and grants of agricultural land for a longer period than twenty one years hereafter made in which shall be reserved any rent or service of any kind shall be void.” (page 3 this time)

    Nevada also has some provision for some sort of allodial title scheme. I've also heard of Texans perfecting their patent and successfully claiming their allodial title rights.

    Aside from mortgage holders who don't own their property, most people hold their land in Fee Simple which is the highest from of tenant property. Most people do not realize that “property tax” is a feudal practice. This was something the framers looked to do away with. Americans after the revolution had gained their sovereignty. Originally each American was a sovereign in their own right, on par with the King of England. The system has since been turned on it's head. Allodial title to land is important because no man can truly be free on another man's land. If you want a system of limited “government” allodial title is one essential ingredient for a free people to achieve this goal.

    I am of the opinion that when the U.S. went bankrupt in 1933 the people masquerading as “government” needed collateral to continue receiving loans from the international banking cartel. It was at this point that the “government” pledged everyones labor and property as collateral for the debt. The so called property tax is really just the interest payment on the value of the debt collateralized by the house or land. Some say there is a hidden federal lien on all the land, but I do not know this for sure. I've also heard about different people winning against the IRS in different ways. Some people have had seemingly great success just by saying “Show me the law” and repeating it ad nauseam. Some of these wins seem more like folklore than fact, though every so often it does happen. You can beat city hall. I think people in power try to discourage others from trying these sorts of things by not reporting or misreporting such things.

    I too wish these types of things could be nailed down as fact or fiction so the average person has a better understanding of what is and is not possible. I wish the regime we find ourselves victims of wasn't so corrupt. It's unfortunate that the “governments” of the world are all criminal enterprises.

    I hope you have a great day Bill.

    Replies: @RoatanBill

    You would have gotten along with a friend of mine, Richard ‘Dick’ Simkanin. Too bad the Feds caused his death while in prison for federal tax evasion.

    All he wanted was for someone to show him the law that claims he owes federal taxes, but no such law was ever produced. IRS regulations are now the substitute for laws enacted by a legislature.

    Alex Jones had about the best description of what happened to Dick but even he had many thinks wrong. There are numerous stories about his fight with the IRS including the full page ads he took out in national news papers stating he wasn’t going to withhold taxes from his employees till the IRS produced the law that said it was legal.

    Thank you for the details on some of those cases. I’ll keep a copy in my file for reference.

  85. @SCuba Steve
    @dixonsyder

    The serial rapist “The Beast of Jersey” was also caught after fleeing from a traffic stop. He was a respected citizen who had not been under suspicion before.

    Replies: @Jim in Jersey

    While I understand where you’re coming from, I don’t think you’re going to convince anyone that we should all suffer the occasional stop and search (that’s what it is, after all) because once every five thousand or so it bears fruit and a criminal is caught.

    When cops stop me for going 30 in a 25, it’s for revenue, not the prospect of getting a criminal off the street.

    Pulling suspicious looking people over is an easy way to approach police work. It’s also lazy, intrusive and wrong.

    None of which is what we’re talking about though. Being discussed is the fact we’re moving toward a dual-race justice system where blacks and whites are held to separate standards.

    • Replies: @SCuba Steve
    @Jim in Jersey


    I don’t think you’re going to convince anyone that we should all suffer the occasional stop and search (that’s what it is, after all) because once every five thousand or so it bears fruit and a criminal is caught.
     

    When cops stop me for going 30 in a 25, it’s for revenue, not the prospect of getting a criminal off the street.

     

    Well which is it? If it is simply revenue collection then it doesn’t make sense to call it an intrusive “stop and search”, does it? If the cops are just collecting money then they aren’t interested in the prospect of catching criminals, are they?

    It is also “revenue collection” that you don’t have to consent to. Just stop driving 30 in a 25. Or get your legislature to abolish the traffic codes.

    None of which is what we’re talking about though. Being discussed is the fact we’re moving toward a dual-race justice system where blacks and whites are held to separate standards.
     
    And why are you telling me that? I’m not the one who hijacked this thread and turned it into a sovereign-citizen circlejerk. 😁

    Replies: @Bite Moi, @Jim in Jersey

  86. @Jim in Jersey
    @SCuba Steve

    While I understand where you’re coming from, I don’t think you’re going to convince anyone that we should all suffer the occasional stop and search (that’s what it is, after all) because once every five thousand or so it bears fruit and a criminal is caught.

    When cops stop me for going 30 in a 25, it’s for revenue, not the prospect of getting a criminal off the street.

    Pulling suspicious looking people over is an easy way to approach police work. It’s also lazy, intrusive and wrong.

    None of which is what we’re talking about though. Being discussed is the fact we’re moving toward a dual-race justice system where blacks and whites are held to separate standards.

    Replies: @SCuba Steve

    I don’t think you’re going to convince anyone that we should all suffer the occasional stop and search (that’s what it is, after all) because once every five thousand or so it bears fruit and a criminal is caught.

    When cops stop me for going 30 in a 25, it’s for revenue, not the prospect of getting a criminal off the street.

    Well which is it? If it is simply revenue collection then it doesn’t make sense to call it an intrusive “stop and search”, does it? If the cops are just collecting money then they aren’t interested in the prospect of catching criminals, are they?

    It is also “revenue collection” that you don’t have to consent to. Just stop driving 30 in a 25. Or get your legislature to abolish the traffic codes.

    None of which is what we’re talking about though. Being discussed is the fact we’re moving toward a dual-race justice system where blacks and whites are held to separate standards.

    And why are you telling me that? I’m not the one who hijacked this thread and turned it into a sovereign-citizen circlejerk. 😁

    • Replies: @Bite Moi
    @SCuba Steve

    SCuba Steve-------Lots of locations,i hesitate to call them towns,rely on traffic tickets to fund local government.These "traffic hells" are best avoided if possible.Yes,blacks are disproportionately stopped in these areas,because a 90% + black town can't generate any tax revenue.One great example is Pine Lawn,a black town a few miles from the one and only Fergusen.

    , @Jim in Jersey
    @SCuba Steve


    Just stop driving 30 in a 25. Or get your legislature to abolish the traffic codes.
     
    I know, we’ll just install reasonable, responsible elected officials.

    Great ideas. Submit or try the impossible.
  87. @SCuba Steve
    @Jim in Jersey


    I don’t think you’re going to convince anyone that we should all suffer the occasional stop and search (that’s what it is, after all) because once every five thousand or so it bears fruit and a criminal is caught.
     

    When cops stop me for going 30 in a 25, it’s for revenue, not the prospect of getting a criminal off the street.

     

    Well which is it? If it is simply revenue collection then it doesn’t make sense to call it an intrusive “stop and search”, does it? If the cops are just collecting money then they aren’t interested in the prospect of catching criminals, are they?

    It is also “revenue collection” that you don’t have to consent to. Just stop driving 30 in a 25. Or get your legislature to abolish the traffic codes.

    None of which is what we’re talking about though. Being discussed is the fact we’re moving toward a dual-race justice system where blacks and whites are held to separate standards.
     
    And why are you telling me that? I’m not the one who hijacked this thread and turned it into a sovereign-citizen circlejerk. 😁

    Replies: @Bite Moi, @Jim in Jersey

    SCuba Steve——-Lots of locations,i hesitate to call them towns,rely on traffic tickets to fund local government.These “traffic hells” are best avoided if possible.Yes,blacks are disproportionately stopped in these areas,because a 90% + black town can’t generate any tax revenue.One great example is Pine Lawn,a black town a few miles from the one and only Fergusen.

  88. @SCuba Steve
    @Jim in Jersey


    I don’t think you’re going to convince anyone that we should all suffer the occasional stop and search (that’s what it is, after all) because once every five thousand or so it bears fruit and a criminal is caught.
     

    When cops stop me for going 30 in a 25, it’s for revenue, not the prospect of getting a criminal off the street.

     

    Well which is it? If it is simply revenue collection then it doesn’t make sense to call it an intrusive “stop and search”, does it? If the cops are just collecting money then they aren’t interested in the prospect of catching criminals, are they?

    It is also “revenue collection” that you don’t have to consent to. Just stop driving 30 in a 25. Or get your legislature to abolish the traffic codes.

    None of which is what we’re talking about though. Being discussed is the fact we’re moving toward a dual-race justice system where blacks and whites are held to separate standards.
     
    And why are you telling me that? I’m not the one who hijacked this thread and turned it into a sovereign-citizen circlejerk. 😁

    Replies: @Bite Moi, @Jim in Jersey

    Just stop driving 30 in a 25. Or get your legislature to abolish the traffic codes.

    I know, we’ll just install reasonable, responsible elected officials.

    Great ideas. Submit or try the impossible.

  89. @Wielgus
    @ravin' lunatic

    Reminds me of an anecdote told by the actor Keanu Reeves in the 1990s.
    He said that a little before his career took off, he was staying at an apparently fairly high-class hotel, I think in France. He came back late and the reception desk made trouble over the fact that he was wearing jeans.
    Then he got into a lift in the hotel and a woman propositioned him - she was a prostitute. Reeves suspected that she paid a bribe at the desk to be let into the hotel to seek customers. Blue jeans were a problem, ladies of the night were not.

    Replies: @ravin' lunatic

    my story gets even worse, if you care to hear.

    i got my ticket because the overpass where i had been parking for work for years had recently been zoned for no-parking, because people had begun to live there in old, broken-down camper vans.

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