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One of the few good things to come out of the government-mandated shutdown is that many parents have started homeschooling their children. Many of these parents are likely to continue homeschooling after the government schools reopen.

Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) did its part to encourage homeschooling when it unveiled “guidelines” for schools to follow when they reopen. Among the CDC’s guidelines are that schools put tape on the hallways, directing children which direction to walk and how much distance to keep between themselves and their classmates. The CDC also recommends children do not share electronic devices or learning aids. The guidelines even say children should wear masks at school.

The CDC’s guidelines instruct schools to close playgrounds and cafeterias, and to cancel all field trips and assemblies. Instead, students are to spend all day at their desks, not even leaving classrooms for lunch or recess.

The CDC’s guidelines may not have the force of law, but it is likely most government schools will adopt them in order to ensure continued access to federal funding. Schools will do this even though children are at a very low risk of being seriously harmed by coronavirus. In fact, by forbidding children from going outside to play, exercise, and get sunshine, the guidelines actually endanger children’s health. The guidelines also harm children by limiting their ability to interact with their fellow students and develop social skills.

Opponents of homeschooling claim that homeschooled children lack proper socialization. Like many attacks on homeschooling, the claim that homeschoolers are not “socialized” is the opposite of the truth. Education researcher Corey DeAngelis recently told journalist John Stossel in a Reason interview that “children who are homeschooled get much better academic and social results than kids in government schools.” Mr. DeAngelis pointed out that “homeschoolers score about 30 percent higher on the SAT test than kids in regular schools.”

Parents looking for a homeschooling program that includes an introduction to the ideas of liberty should consider my homeschool curriculum. My homeschool curriculum provides students with a solid education in history, literature, mathematics, and the sciences. It also gives students the opportunity to create their own websites and internet-based businesses. The curriculum is designed to be self-taught, with students helping, and learning from, each other via online forums.

Starting in fourth grade, students are required to write at least one essay a week. Students also take a course in public speaking.

The curriculum teaches history from a pro-liberty perspective, and the economics section is taught from the Austrian viewpoint. But, unlike government schools, the curriculum does not compromise education quality or distort facts in pursuit of a political agenda.

Students using my homeschooling program develop a love of learning, study superior communication skills, and gain real-world business experience. They also develop the critical thinking skills necessary to see through the lies peddled by government officials and their sycophants in the mainstream media. The skills and knowledge students gain will enable them to succeed in whatever careers they choose to pursue.

Parents interested in giving their children a well-rounded homeschool education that includes sound economics and the history and philosophy of liberty can get more information about my curriculum by going to RonPaulCurriculum.com.

(Republished from The Ron Paul Institute by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Coronavirus, Disease, Public Schools 
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  1. Peak Stupidity has agreed from Day 1 of this Infotainment Panic-Fest that this was one of a few silver linings to come out of it.* I had not read till just here and now that this social stupidity and the ban on recess was coming to schools this fall. That’s taking this stupidity to the highest level. I think the requirement of mask wearing may be the last straw for me.

    Thank you especially, Dr. Paul, for creating the curriculum. We are considering homeschooling more now than before, and we would check out your curriculum first. You do a great public service with it.

    .

    * See School’s out For Ever! , Arts & Crafts, and Wynken, Blynken, and Nod . The last one is about the benefit of more sleep for the children with our family making it 8A wake-up versus 6:30A.

  2. Anonymous[240] • Disclaimer says:

    I have an autistic son, and no illusions about being able to replace teachers and therapists. I don’t see any poetry in the forced homeschooling.

    • Replies: @paranoid goy
  3. A123 says:

    Large public schools have all sorts of problems. Teacher’s unions, poor student discipline, high overhead, etc. The disastrous Common Core experiment has made them worse.

    However, not every parent is cut out for home schooling.

    As a vision, I would love to see “Small Local” schools with 3-4 paid teachers, 40-50 students, plus some unpaid parent volunteers. The educational experience would be similar to home schooling.

    PEACE 😷

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  4. Does it teach them the truth about Jews?

  5. As I said a long time ago …

    Schools, like banks, only grow more toxic as they get larger. We don’t need gun control, we need school control. Break the damned things up to better fit their local communities. In fact, in the era of cyber-everything, why can’t we just ban schools? It would be easier than rounding up the guns.

    https://www.unz.com/pbuchanan/protect-kids-or-confiscate-guns/#comment-2216028

    Now, more than ever, it is time to ban schools

    • Agree: Brás Cubas
  6. @A123

    That would work fine, A123! I’m sure more people than you and I have thought about this, but thoughts always end in “how many minutes will the school be in operation before some city, state, or Feral organization shuts it all down due to … any old thing.” Right now, anything that is not explicitly permitted is prohibited… unless, of course, you have big pull from friends in Washington, FS.

    • Agree: A123
  7. A123 says:

    Right now, anything that is not explicitly permitted is prohibited…

    Yes. That is a good one line summary of the problem.

    A small group of parents should be able to come together to make a small group school. But government makes that hard (or impossible). “Charter” schools could have filled this need. Then bureaucracy and teachers unions screwed those up…..

    PEACE 😷

    • Replies: @Curmudgeon
    , @VinnyVette
  8. Douglas says:

    Developing social skills at a public school isn’t something that will harm children. This same thing is thrown at homeschooled children. One man asked my daughter if she was harming my grandchildren by keeping them out of public school for homeschooling because they will miss socializing. She laughed and brought up the great liberal LGBTQ shit the children are missing.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  9. Biff says:

    I agree with this message.

  10. Yeah, but many of them are not.

  11. @Anonymous

    My left foot is smaller than my right, I don’t see any sense in selling shoes by the pair. Please shove your shoe sizing guide, there is no poetry there.

    • LOL: Brás Cubas
  12. @A123

    So private, for profit, “Charter” schools subsidized by the taxpayers are OK, but pubic schools are not?

    It wasn’t the teachers’ unions that created the curriculum, it was the politicians. Try to blame the bureaucracy all you want, but the bureaucracy carries out political direction and policy. Neither the unions or bureaucracy created the idea for SJW crap taught in schools today, nor did they create common core. Whether they support it, is irrelevant. The regional governments, with federal interference created the mess education is in today.

    University used to be for the best and brightest, now it’s a commodity. The focus isn’t on educating, it’s about producing a lot of revenue so people can get a worthless piece of paper. It’s about filling stadium’s and arenas with people to generate more revenue while pretending to educate “athletes”, many of which are functionally illiterate.

    • Replies: @A123
  13. @A123

    Won’t happen successfully. A small group of Karen’s and Becky’s would be constantly cat fighting about curriculum, how long the school day should be, how long the school year should be, what will be served for lunch “Karen’s super premo gourmet cassaroles, or “Becky’s tofu pasta surprise” … It is completely untenable! Great on paper, not a working proposition in today’s world.

  14. A123 says:
    @Curmudgeon

    So private, for profit, “Charter” schools subsidized by the taxpayers are OK, but pubic schools are not?

    I am for what works.

    Public schools used to work, decades ago. Now, many school districts are failing.

    Charter schools were supposed to provide an alternative. The unions associated with Public schools saw them as a threat. They used their dues to politically oppose Charter schools. In many areas this effort was successful and Charters were dragged down to Public school levels of performance.

    It wasn’t the teachers’ unions that created the curriculum, it was the politicians. Try to blame the bureaucracy all you want, but the bureaucracy carries out political direction and policy.

    You should use the more accurate term School Board, not vague characterizations of politicians/bureaucrats. School unions (Teacher, Maintenance, etc.) concentrate their efforts on School Boards. The overwhelming number of School Board members are union members and/or have family union members.

    Neither the unions or bureaucracy created the idea for SJW crap taught in schools today, nor did they create common core.

    Unions were heavily involved in writing & promoting the SJW Common Core fiasco. Of course, there were additional co-conspirators. All those who pushed the failed Common Core curriculum must be held accountable, and the unions deserve a huge portion of the blame.

    PEACE 😷

    • Replies: @Curmudgeon
  15. TG says:

    Hm. Well for those parents with the time and skill to do home-schooling right, more power to them.

    However, for many of my colleagues with young children at home, being forced to home school their kids while still working their real day professional job from home is anything but a walk in the park.

    I will agree that yes, the vast majority of home schooled children are very well socialized. But I have a encountered a few (a very few) that behave as if they had been raised in a closet… With home schooling it ALL depends on the parents. Most parents that home school are, I think, diligent and careful to make sure their kids are engaged in a lot of out-of-home activities. But of course, there is no law that says they have to, and their are exceptions…

    As far as freedom goes, yes, but be careful what you wish for. Would you really like it if a bunch of Muslims decided to “home school” their kids in jihadist indoctrination centers? Or a bunch of LGBQTXYZ-whatevers decided to home school their kids in… well, I can’t even say it here. There are worse things than regulated government curricula, really.

    • Agree: paranoid goy
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  16. @TG

    You are very reasonable in this comment, TG, but that’s just it – those who cannot make time for homeschooling need to figure something else out. I’d advise (don’t chide me for this, as she was a different person 2 decades back) Elizabeth Warren’s The Two-Income Trap. Perhaps some of these power couples would be better off in a lot of ways, not even losing a whole lot financially, if the woman stayed home. Oh, she might just be a lot happier and easier to live with to boot!

    Now, regarding:

    Would you really like it if a bunch of Muslims decided to “home school” their kids in jihadist indoctrination centers?

    Knowing some of the heavily Moslem areas, such as Dearbornistan, it’s likely they are doing the same thing on the tax-payers dime as we speak. At least, let’s not pay for this. (There are better ideas, of course.)

  17. @A123

    I can’t comment about where you live, but my school board is elected. There are dozens of politicians who use school boards as the first rung on the political ladder. The school board doesn’t create the curriculum, they administer it. They may be able to tweak the curriculum here and there, but not fundamentally alter it. Even Charter Schools are required to teach the curriculum. They are generally more successful, like all private schools, because they can choose who attends. I can guarantee you they aren’t taking bois from the ‘hood.

    You need to separate unions from union members who are politically active. The people participating in developing government policies are there as people not necessarily representative of the organization that employs them. That is the same for business and unions. They are often identified as Joe Blow from X, but they are there to represent a wider political audience. These people are appointed to reflect the government’s views, irrespective of the topic. The odd time a token “opposition” is tossed in, providing (s)he is not too rammy. They only write what the appointing authority wants to hear. This is no different than businesses hiring consultants, who have been described as people asking to borrow your watch to tell you the time.

    I agree, public schools have many problems, but many of those problems exist because school boards have been slowly stripped of authority by higher levels of government. That is not only through education policy (including curriculum), but through a myriad of other factors such as court decisions, and policies, such as immigration that are completely out of their control. Even the Blacks have found out they did better, overall, when they were in mostly homogeneous black schools. Adding a dozen other nationalities and races creates problems, hence the dumbing down.

    Everything is political these days, unfortunately. The days of those elected – at every level – actually looking at the greater public good are long gone.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @A123
  18. @Curmudgeon

    We disagree about 1/2 the time, but great comment, Curmudgeon!

    • Thanks: Curmudgeon
    • Replies: @gsjackson
  19. A123 says:
    @Curmudgeon

    You need to separate unions from union members who are politically active. The people participating in developing government policies are there as people not necessarily representative of the organization that employs them.

    I believe we concur on this point. The intent of my comments are:

    — NOT looking at individual teachers.
    — Talking about about the unions, which in many jurisdictions are funded by mandatory dues.

    I can’t comment about where you live, but my school board is elected. There are dozens of politicians who use school boards as the first rung on the political ladder.

    In many jurisdictions (including mine), the single most important factor in being elected to the school board is receiving the highly coveted “union endorsement”. Occasionally voters will rebel against the union’s choice, but this is atypical.

    The school board doesn’t create the curriculum, they administer it. They may be able to tweak the curriculum here and there, but not fundamentally alter it.

    School boards have the power, but rarely the will, to address problems with the curriculum. If a school board wants to eliminate the failed Common Core, they can. Boards purchase text books, testing products, and other materials that define the cirriculum. It would take several years of concerted effort, but a board can weed out Common Core contamination.

    You hit the key point earlier. Aspiring pro-Union, DNC “first rung” politicians will never reach the “next rung” if they offend the establishment power that endorses candidates. This powerful intimidation tool is used to keep school board members in line with SJW orthodoxy.

    Everything is political these days, unfortunately. The days of those elected – at every level – actually looking at the greater public good are long gone.

    I still cling to hope that we can recapture the ideals of the “public good”.

    The darkest hours were those when the Globalists owned both parties. GW Bush and Obama shared the same vision and offered identical policies.

    Christian Populism is the antithesis of SJW Globalism. Battles are being won. In five months there will be:
    — Healthy & economically successful Red States
    — Crippling unemployment & recession in Blue States

    This November, U.S. citizens will have a chance (possibly their last chance) to end SJW Globalist oppression and recapture the “public good”.

    PEACE 😷

    • Replies: @Curmudgeon
  20. @A123

    I seems to me that you can’t differentiate between the unions, whose mandate is to represent employees in terms and conditions of employment, from the members who are politically active. I can guarantee you that union members are not a monolithic bloc, politically speaking. There are plenty of “conservatives” seeking corporate endorsement via being a “respected member of the business community”, in the same way others seek out union endorsement.
    If a union chooses to support a political party, there has to be some mechanism for deciding that, whether at the membership level or the executive level. If the majority of membership objects, there has to be some sort of mechanism for them to overturn that. It’s really no different than a corporation. I am aware that some of companies in my investment portfolio make political donations. I don’t get asked as a shareholder whether I want that. Unless the CEO has extraordinary discretionary spending, that decision would be made by the board.
    I worked in several unionized jobs and ran for office in one, when I saw things I didn’t like. In many ways, unions are a mirror image of corporations. Some are reliable, some not. Some play by the “rules” some not. I’ve never met a business manager or business agent who is interested in seeing members unemployed, or would do something to harm membership. My observation over the years, was that the unions with the worst reputations have memberships that are engaged only when contract talks begin. Volunteering their time for the union doesn’t work for most people. That leaves running the majority of the business to the handful who are politically engaged and connected. In a similar vein, I don’t vote on every notice I get from my investment portfolio, and therefore am not “engaged”. I can’t complain if I didn’t vote.

    On the political side, there isn’t a political party of any importance, anywhere in “the West” that has any integrity. They are all globalist shills pitching a different version of the same product. Having said that, the odd time individual politicians go rogue, but they usually don’t last long.

    • Replies: @A123
  21. A123 says:
    @Curmudgeon

    I seems to me that you can’t differentiate between the unions, whose mandate is to represent employees in terms and conditions of employment, from the members who are politically active.

    Go up and read my comment again, I explicitly stated:

    The intent of my comments are:

    — NOT looking at individual teachers.
    — Talking about about the unions, which in many jurisdictions are funded by mandatory dues.

    The cash and political power wielded by the union leaders are the problem. Teacher Unions align with the DNC 90%+ of the time, and they works against the interests of students and taxpayers.

    PEACE 😷

  22. gsjackson says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Am very surprised to read this since I can’t recall ever disagreeing with either of you.

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