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It’s Saigon in Afghanistan
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The end of the 20-year US war on Afghanistan was predictable: no one has conquered Afghanistan, and Washington was as foolish as Moscow in the 1970s for trying. Now, US troops are rushing out of the country as fast as they can, having just evacuated the symbol of the US occupation of Afghanistan, Bagram Air Base.

While perhaps not as dramatic as the “Fall of Saigon” in 1975, where US military helicopters scrambled to evacuate personnel from the roof of the US Embassy, the lesson remains the same and remains unlearned: attempting to occupy, control, and remake a foreign country into Washington’s image of the United States will never work. This is true no matter how much money is spent and how many lives are snuffed out.

In Afghanistan, no sooner are US troops vacating an area than Taliban fighters swoop in and take over. The Afghan army seems to be more or less melting away. This weekend the Taliban took control of a key district in the Kandahar Province, as Afghan soldiers disappeared after some fighting.

The US is estimated to have spent nearly 100 billion dollars training the Afghan army and police force. The real number is likely several times higher. For all that money and 20 years of training, the Afghan army cannot do its job. That’s either quite a statement about the quality of the training, the quality of the Afghan army, or some combination of the two.

Whatever the case, I am sure I am not the only American wondering whether we can get a refund. The product is clearly faulty.

Speaking of money wasted, in April, Brown University’s Cost of War Project calculated the total cost of the Afghanistan war at more than two trillion dollars. That means millions of Americans have been made poorer for a predictably failed project. It also means that thousands of the well-connected contractors and companies that lurk around the US Capitol Beltway pushing war have become much, much richer.

That’s US foreign policy in a nutshell: taking money from middle-class Americans and transferring it to the elites of the US military and foreign policy establishment. It’s welfare for the rich.

Meanwhile, the Costs of War Project also estimated that the war took more than a quarter of a million lives.

The Biden Administration may believe it is saving face by installing a military command of nearly 1,000 troops inside the US Embassy in Kabul, but this is foolish and dangerous. Such a move establishes the US Embassy as a legitimate military target rather than a diplomatic outpost. Has anyone at the Pentagon or the State Department thought this through?

Plans to occupy the airport in Kabul are also unlikely to work. Does anyone think that, having come this far, an emboldened and victorious Taliban are going to sit by as US or allied military occupy the Kabul airport?

Trillions of dollars wasted and millions either killed or displaced from their homes. For nothing. The lessons of Afghanistan are simple: bring all US troops home, defend the United States as necessary, and leave the rest of the world to its own business. We’ve tried it the other way and it clearly doesn’t work.

(Republished from The Ron Paul Institute by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Afghanistan, American Military, Taliban 
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  1. Chris Moore says: • Website

    Speaking of money wasted, in April, Brown University’s Cost of War Project calculated the total cost of the Afghanistan war at more than two trillion dollars. That means millions of Americans have been made poorer for a predictably failed project. It also means that thousands of the well-connected contractors and companies that lurk around the US Capitol Beltway pushing war have become much, much richer.

    But as a free-market libertarian, shouldn’t Ron Paul approve of that phenomenon? After all, if a conspiracy of sharks can both instigate the need for a war and then fulfill that need, isn’t that free-market economics at work?

    No, comes the reply, because it is an artificially created need based on state lies and propaganda.

    Not so. The “free enterprise” media worked hand in glove with the state in a conspiracy to enrich the “free enterprise” military industrial complex. Zionism, Inc. organized and profiteered from the conspiracy.

    It’s a case of fascism, only the racially-minded “dictator” organizing the self-serving conspiracy is ((Jewry)). Hence, it’s really Judeofascism, with Judeophile Zionists an the right and left as profiteering accomplices. It’s not a “dictatorship of the proletariat,” which was the first crypto-Judeofascist attempt to impose its will on the world (from the left), but a dictatorship of Zionists, only actively concealed and enforced by their public-private adherents, who of course want to milk their conspiracy forever, if possible.

    What does Ron Paul have to say about Judeofascists? I doubt he’s ever even uttered the word. He’s a hick “Christian” libertarian who doesn’t allow himself to think such impure thoughts.

    • Agree: Brad Anbro
    • Replies: @R.C.
    , @Jefferson Temple
  2. Dr Paul, money squandered? Since the dollar was linked to oil, the dollars can be printed without fear of inflation. All that talk about future generations paying for it is just bunk.
    American foreign policy in recent decades has never reflected the ordinary American’s hopes and desires.
    Dr Paul, your country has been hijacked by lobbyists and special interests. Most of the current wars are for the zionists, and the armament industries and you know this.
    Imagine the plight of the Afghans who collaborated with the US. Just a few will be protected, the rest will be thrown to these Talibani wolves.

  3. What our country really needs is for the Afghanistan & Iraq war veterans to have their own 21st century “Dewey Canyon III” –

  4. R.C. says:
    @Chris Moore

    You are forgetting that this merger of state and media and tech is innately a violation of government’s primary purpose (per de Tocqueville, no less) to prevent monopolies.
    Once that’s occurred (effective and controlling monopolies) you can call it a fascist set up or a communist one, but it’s not the government ever sought by libertarians. Rather, in both you end up with what America is being aimed at, and rapidly, a despotism where everything that is not prohibited is mandatory. (I forget the source of that last phrase.)
    R.C.

    • Replies: @Chris Moore
    , @Alfa158
  5. Chris Moore says: • Website
    @R.C.

    Once that’s occurred (effective and controlling monopolies) you can call it a fascist set up or a communist one, but it’s not the government ever sought by libertarians.

    A lot of libertarians are nominally Christians. Of course, I argue the main function of Christianity as a cultural force has always been what the Judeofascists call “anti-Semitism,” so they aren’t authentic Christians if they don’t practice “anti-Semitism.” So assuming the libertarianism of the founders was grounded in authentic Christianity (“anti-Semitism”), when libertarianism became philo-Semitic (or at the very least, “tolerant” of Judeofascism) it ceased being libertarianism.

    If you’re not actively and openly opposing Judeofascism, you’re essentially a Judeofascist stooge by acquiescence. You may see yourself as a “libertarian,” but you lack the courage of your convictions.

    That’s the modern day “Christian.” That’s the modern day “libertarian.” That’s Ron Paul, who is an excellent theorist, anti-war spokesman and probably a relatively moral human being, but not moral enough to oppose Judeofascism, or even name it.

    Same goes for the recently deceased Mike Gravel, who had the courage to name 9/11 as an inside job, but lacked the courage to name the Judeofascist and Zionist conspiracy behind it.
    https://www.unz.com/audio/kbarrett_remembering-mike-gravel-no-question-in-my-mind-that-9-11-was-an-inside-job/

    Denial of reality comes easily to those imbued in modern organized religion, including ((Jews)) who find it easy to deny their inherent Judeofascism.

    But even Christian enlightenment thinkers were deeply flawed. If Jefferson were alive today, would he be an open opponent of Judeofascism? I doubt it.

    “Anti-Semitic” traditional Christianity was the best of Christianity when it came to defending the civilization, but all things must pass.

    Nietzsche probably got most things right.

    • Replies: @SonOfFrankenstein
    , @R.C.
  6. @Chris Moore

    My guess is that Dr. Paul knows how the game is being played but is enough of a realist to understand that a man like him would be totally cancelled were he to be as vocal as he might me.

    Sooner or later the dam is going to burst.

    • Agree: Chris Moore
  7. UNIT472 says:

    Let’s hope Kabul is overrun and quickly before Biden can dispense any of that \$3 billion plus in ‘aid’ he has procured and, more importantly, evacuate any of these savages to the US. If the Taliban wants to put their traitors to death or in camps let them. We owe these people nothing.

    • Agree: meamjojo, J.Ross
  8. SafeNow says:

    The military-industrial complex has been baked-in for 70 years of peripheral, useless, costly wars. It will not change. So admit this, and find a new deployment that does kill or maim anyone. I suggest Australia. This would be easy to justify as a China-deterring “presence.” China understands “presence” as it plays bumper-boats with gigantic “coast guard cutters.” Bumper boats will not start a real war, and neither will a deployment consisting of shrimp on the barbie in Australia, with kangaroo-watch patrol duty. p.s. Also spend some money for icebreakers to create a presence in both polar regions.

    • Agree: meamjojo
    • Replies: @SafeNow
    , @animalogic
  9. SafeNow says:
    @SafeNow

    “does NOT”
    Sorry.

  10. the lesson remains the same and remains unlearned: attempting to occupy, control, and remake a foreign country into Washington’s image of the United States will never work.

    It worked with Germany, Japan, Philippines, (South) Korea, Panama, and much of Latin America. Not that it’s a good thing, but there is no general rule on US domination.

    It couldn’t work in Afghanistan because the notion of ‘Afghani’ is illusory. It’s a country of various tribes who are hopelessly backward. So, they were utterly incompetent as collaborators of the US empire. At most, some joined with US forces just to get theirs via corruption.

    Also, given American values, it is difficult for the US to transform a deeply tribal and Muslim country like Afghanistan. US now stands for globo-homo and interracist harlotry. White men stand for cuckery to the Negroes and Jews. Obviously, the US couldn’t push those ‘values’ on the Afghanis as they would have been non-starters. But those are the only ‘values’ left. If the US can’t enforce those, what else is there? Nothing. So, the US just pumped a lot of money to corrupt politicians and dropped a lot of bombs on dry dirt.

    One thing for sure, the US will be bringing 100,000+ refugees from Afghanistan who collaborated with the US.

    This all goes back to 9/11, an anomaly, as the US has been working with radical Muslims against secular Muslim-Arab nations. Jews who run the US fear Arab modernizers like Assad, not ISIS and Alqaeda morons. Not surprisingly, the US was back to War WITH Terror against people like Gaddafi and Assad.

    • Agree: Rahan
  11. meamjojo says:

    Just think of all the money we will save once we are fully out of Afghanistan! We will need a whole lot less munitions. Look for layoffs in the “defense” industry. Yea!

    Let’s get out of SK next.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  12. Lussier says:

    attempting to occupy, control, and remake a foreign country into Washington’s image of the United States will never work.

    I think this presupposes that the goal was actually for some sort of limited time frame intervention to ‘work’.

    This is the work of re-pop ‘transformer’ Neo-Libs/Cons, who have a 100% track record of failing upward, in their own interests. Accepting that, uniquely in this case, the re-branded NeoLibs/Cons had a soft spot for the Afghani’s and were seeking to uplift them into a NWO LBGTQ+++’infinity’ awakening, denies the reality that –

    They have done this many times before, their own working papers tell you what they are actually seeking to bring about with such quagmires, and in every instance they fall into the same, exact cesspool of corruption that they always bring along with omni-present interlocking profiteering shenanigans.

  13. Molip says:

    Trillions of dollars wasted and millions either killed or displaced from their homes. For nothing.

    And the US has the hide to criticize China for combating terrorism by merely re-educating it’s people. I mean, think of what it would do to the arms industry if this very effective method were to become the global norm.

  14. @Rev. Spooner

    I never hear from the Taliban themselves. Where is their English-language website?

    But it would be very smart of them to announce genuine amnesty and forgiveness of Afghans who assisted the American occupying forces.

    The Americans were, after all, for a generation, the rulers of Afghanistan. What’s wrong with obeying your ruler?

    The Taliban have been taught the great value of poppy farms. What else?

    • Replies: @meamjojo
    , @Stevelancs
  15. UK SAS TROOPS TO STAY IN AFGHANISTAN AS US TROOPS PULL OUT & AFGHAN TROOPS FLEE


  16. Alfa158 says:
    @R.C.

    T.H. White novel about King Arthur The Once and Future King. An anthill in the story has carved above every tunnel the slogan: “Everything not Forbidden is Compulsory”.

  17. R.C. says:
    @Chris Moore

    My point was the issue of monopolies, etc. and how if we had a reasonable government, we could expect things like what happened with the breakup of Ma Bell (and not the reconglomeration allowed/instigated by subsequent administrations).
    Re your (side) issue, Zionists are fascistic communists. communistic fascists, and NWO, but, your reply doesn’t even touch on my point.
    R.C.

  18. anonymous[139] • Disclaimer says:

    Could have spent some of those trillions domestically, hiring Americans to fix potholes, maintain bridges, clean the streets, whatever. But no, it’s got to go elsewhere into other pockets. American’s money goes toward anything but Americans. How patriotic is that?

  19. Jokem says:

    The only thing I can say is, then next time Afghanistan harbors people who plan to send an airliner into one of our buildings, they might think carefully about the consequences.

    Other than that, I see no benefit to our 20 years there. It could have been done faster, cheaper and more effectively than we did.

    • Agree: meamjojo
  20. @meamjojo

    Let’s get out of SK next.

    Amen, Meamjojo!

    American troops have been in S. Korea for 68 years since the end of the war (not the same guys, of course). Peak Stupidity discussed how these 25,000 troops could be used to guard the entire US southern border 24/7, with a cost savings due to much lower transportation/logistics costs. See “Border control maintenance vs. defending some Koreans from other Koreans”. The post calculates that it would only take 1/2 of them, in fact.

    I mean, we have a huge trade deficit with South Korea too. Why are we spending this money that could be used for the good of Americans? Any country that pays to keep 25,000 troops 6,000 to 8,000 miles away to defend on group of Koreans from another for 68 years while letting foreigners invade directly across their 1,900 mile border is a STUPID country.

    • Agree: meamjojo, BluEidDvl
    • Replies: @meamjojo
  21. @Rev. Spooner

    While I have no argument with your 2nd paragraph, Reverend, I don’t agree with this part of your comment:

    Since the dollar was linked to oil, the dollars can be printed without fear of inflation.

    Linked to oil and the reserve currency or not, how does that matter? You generate more dollars with a computer, and you dilute the value of them, PERIOD. There already is a lot of inflation. See the Inflation topic key @ Peak Stupidity.

    There are over a dozen examples there of major expenditures in Americans’ household budgets, health care, insurance, car parts, residential building materials, food, tuition, etc, etc. Don’t believe the creative green-eyeshade boys over at the BLS, Rev. Spooner. Believe your own lyin’ eyes instead. I remember prices and I have old bills.

    Now, when the world really does lose confidence in the US dollar, which it will, seeing as how they are making up 1 to 4 or 5 (Flu Manchu, you know!) 1,000,000,000,000’s of \$\$ yearly, hyperinflation could become a reality.

    • Replies: @Rev. Spooner
  22. @Jokem

    Look into this subject. That’s just false-flag propaganda, blaming someone else.

    • Replies: @Jokem
  23. meamjojo says:
    @Ann Nonny Mouse

    The Taliban do have a spokesman – Suhail Shaheen. I have seen interviews with him on BBC & PBS. He speaks hesitant English but does his best to come across as a calm, thoughtful representative although he is probably an eater of babies.

  24. meamjojo says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Wouldn’t it be funny if Biden managed to extricate the USA from Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, SK and a few other majors, something Trump talked big about but of course, never managed to pull off?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  25. @Ann Nonny Mouse

    Link to one Twitter Account here..”Troopers should accept Mujahidin invitation before being hurt or lost. We do not seek their death, they should save their own lives.”

  26. Biff says:
    @Jokem

    The only thing I can say is, then next time Afghanistan harbors people who plan to send an airliner into one of our buildings, they might think carefully about the consequences.

    Afghanistan the Taliban or Osama bin Ladin himself had nothing to do with flying anything, nor into any building.

    • Agree: GMC
  27. @SafeNow

    “So admit this, and find a new deployment that does kill or maim anyone. I suggest Australia.”
    Thank you, but no thank you.
    There is already too much “deployment ” in Australia — Pine Gap & Darwin to name just two — P-Gap would certainly be a target in any nuclear war, possibly even Darwin.
    Again — no thank you.

  28. @meamjojo

    Yes, it would. It’d be a good thing no matter who did it. Of course, Biden would push for all that money saved to be used for “infrastructure”, “racial infrastructure, yeah, that’s the ticket!”

  29. I presume the mainstream news organizations are working closely with the deep state on a ‘Withdrawal Integrity Project’.

    Make the withdrawal not seem like a rout, by suppressing images and information. Keep opinion pieces off topic. Bury it and talk about anything else. Stick to the talking points. Don’t mention Afghanistan, war debt, or casualties after September. Memory hole the last 20 years.

  30. @Jokem

    Look at it this way …

    \$2T cover the net cost of Africans-in-America (not including affirmative action,
    make-work “public service” and Sibbyl Rites) for three years;
    accomplishing absolutely nothing in Afghanistan over 20 years is an
    incomparably better investment.

  31. @Achmed E. Newman

    Let me use an analogy to explain this.
    Take a huge boulder and throw it in your bathtub. You will see dramatic results.
    Take the same boulder and throw it in a swimming pool, there will be waves and splashes but nothing to dramatic.
    Now take the very same boulder and throw it in large lake. The ripples will not bother you.
    The boulder represents Monetary Easing i.e money printing.
    The size of the water body where the boulder is thrown represents the acceptance of the national currency.
    The USA has been printing for decades without serious consequences but now they have a competitor in China.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  32. @Chris Moore

    No, Ron Paul’s libertarian thinking cannot justify the Afghanistan debacle because the US was never attacked or threatened by the Taliban. ZOG came up with a lie about AQ and bin Laden launching 9/11 under Taliban protection. The last 20 years have been a violation of the non-aggression principle; the core of libertarian philosophy.

    I cannot say why Paul doesn’t ever address the JQ. Maybe out of respect for Mises and Rothbard. (And Unz?) Or because he had to deal with nasty allegations of racism in the past. I suspect he prefers to take the high road and call out individuals and corporations and nations who are bad actors, and avoid the hornet nest of blaming an entire ethnicity. He surely knows that a lot of non-Jews are in on the government grift too.

    Also, TJ was a lot smarter than you give him credit for. Had he been heeded, there would be no strong central government to be hijacked by any group. And mass immigration of Jews was still a century or so away.

  33. @Rev. Spooner

    The boulder this year, Reverend, is something like \$4,000,000,000,000. That is the same as the value of all the good farmland in the United States.

    You’ve got the same goods out there being manufactured (mostly in China) and sold, an M2 money supply of \$20 Trillion, a debt at \$26 Trillion or so, with more debt added on at \$1 Trillion a year on normal years and the \$4 or more Trillion in Kung Flu hysteria years. This is like throwing a 200 lb boulder into the wading pool each year.

    Goods and services are, and will more quickly, go up in price. This is assuming the people DO still have faith in the currency. That won’t last too much longer. I have bet my finances accordingly.

  34. Good points… Though the scariest thing is the US isn’t withdrawing from the Middle East in order to save money and actually invest in the USA… It is shifting resources to further try to intimidate Russia and China.

  35. Phipps says:

    The Jews knew the attacks were coming but did not tell their government in Washington D.C. about it.
    (Brit Hume made that clear in a 9-11 report of his.) The Israeli-Occupied Government in Washington D.C. knows that the main reason for the attacks of 9-11 were related to its pro-Israel foreign policy — but that, of course, was deleted from all 9-11 reports. The Jew-owned media squelched that fact as well. So as long as the Jews own the media and the government, we super-stupid Goyim can expect more wars for Israel. (Iran is the next war for Israel, I am sure.)

  36. You know what would be useful? A history of public opinion about the war? It seems as though people realize Afghanistan was a failed cause… 17 years ago. So why are we still there now? If I was China, and I really wanted to get back at America, I’d survey public opinion about these various wars and contrast with actual policy.

    • Replies: @Jokem
    , @Achmed E. Newman
  37. Jokem says:
    @Cho Seung-Hui

    I have to say it was failed in the way it was executed.

  38. @Cho Seung-Hui

    If I was China, and I really wanted to get back at America, I’d survey public opinion about these various wars and contrast with actual policy.

    I don’t see how that would “get back” at anyone, Mr. Hui. The American elites in the Feral Gov’t already know how regular Americans feel about all this. They don’t care. Americans, in turn, know that the elites don’t care what they think.

    • Replies: @Jokem
  39. Jokem says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I don’t believe that is true. I think most Americans are ambivalent about it. Their main focus is their own lives – keeping their job, family and marriage together. As we move more toward a command economy and politicizing human relationships, such things get harder and harder; so more energy is needed to keep those things going.

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