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Many commentators are interpreting the reopenings as signaling the end of the pandemic. Many of these commentators are those who deny the reality or seriousness of Covid-19, or deny the need for, or effectiveness of, the closedowns and social distancing and the need for, or usefulness of, masks.

The pandemic and the official responses have aroused suspicions that it is all a plot to further advance the police state that has been advancing on us since 9/11. Others stress that it is a manufactured opportunity for Bill Gates’ mass vaccination program and multi-billion dollar profits for Big Pharma. Whether or not the pandemic is a contrived plot, it is certainly being used to advance various agendas, including conflict with China.

These suspicions and beliefs have dangers of their own as they promote a lack of caution. For example, the belief that the crisis is over or was never real can leave us unprepared for a second wave as can the belief that the virus is burning out or mutating to a less dangerous form. These beliefs are not supported by the experience with the Spanish Flu. The second wave was more deadly than the first as the virus had mutated to a more dangerous form ( https://www.history.com/news/spanish-flu-second-wave-resurgence ). See also Pale Rider by Laura Spinney.

The notion that the pandemic is a contrived crisis is inconsistent with its worldwide extent and with the data compiled and reported by Johns Hopkins University. As of the present time prior to a possible second wave there are more than 5,690,000 cases and 355,000 deaths. Of all countries the US has the highest number of cases and deaths ( https://sputniknews.com/world/202005281079438354-covid-19-live-updates-coronavirus-global-death-toll-surpasses-355000-case-count-nears-57-million/ ).

Moreover, many people remain sick. The US with 1.7 million infected, 100,000 fatalities and 391,508 recovered, has 1.2 million still sick with the virus. Yes, I know, there are data problems including under- and over-reporting. Nevertheless, we know from the pressure the virus put on medical care and funeral services in heavily infected areas, such as Wuhan, New York City, and northern Italy, that the numbers are large.

Another misconception is that the young are more or less unaffected by the virus and should be free to go about. According to the World Health Organization’s Regional Director for Africa, “In terms of those who are infected [in Africa], younger people tend to be the majority who are infected, people between the ages of 25 up to about 45 years” ( https://sputniknews.com/world/202005281079438354-covid-19-live-updates-coronavirus-global-death-toll-surpasses-355000-case-count-nears-57-million/ ). Moreover, just because the young have a lower mortality rate does not mean they should be free to move about and spread the virus among those with a higher mortality rate. Public policy can never be built upon narcissistic selfishness.

As we know little about the virus, and as the low-cost effective treatment of HCQ/zinc is under attack for being in the way of vaccination schemes and Big Pharma’s profits, greed can keep people dying until we accept Big Pharma’s profit-driven agenda.

For stating the obvious, conspiracy theorists will say that I am part of the conspiracy and morons will say that I favor a permanent lockdown, whereas what I actually advocate is caution.

We need caution both about the health danger of the disease and the danger of its use for agendas that do not serve the public interest. When we know so little about the virus, caution is the safest policy.

(Republished from PaulCraigRoberts.org by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Coronavirus 
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  1. I sir are one of those commentators, you’ve lived your life, let us live ours and not in abject poverty and with the freedom you enjoyed in your prime! The crisis never was a crisis as we now know.

    • Agree: jsinton
    • Replies: @Harry Huntington
  2. @VinnyVette

    Vinny
    You really do not appreciate the full entailment of your comment. Taken to its logical end, we should dump Social Security and Medicare because the taxes for those programs burden the young. Indeed, in a world of finite things, medical care provided to the elderly is zero sum. The goods spent on medical care cannot at the same time be spent educating the youth or letting younger folks take Disney vacations.

    The reality is Dr. Roberts is correct. We need caution. We need to show respect and concern for the elderly, those with preexisting conditions, and those with other vulnerabilities to the virus.

    Your logic is terrifying. Private equity has already embraced your thinking: they take over a company and fire everyone over age 45. Private equity’s logic has wrecked American business. Folks like you are wrecking the little bit of human decency we have left.

    • Agree: animalogic
    • Replies: @VinnyVette
    , @VinnyVette
    , @76239
  3. @Harry Huntington

    No economy, no tax revenue to support those programs, no goods and services to even provide or protect the elderly…. Your comment is devoid of any perspective! Of course boomers only care about themselves, not whoever is alive after they’re gone and what is left for them! Enjoy the decline Boomer!
    Where was all this “safety” during the free sex and drug addled 60’s and 70’s of your youth… Boomer!

    • Replies: @animalogic
  4. Dutch Boy says:

    Keeping people indoors is a horrible strategy based on no science. Sunlight is viricidal and promotes the production of Vitamin D by the skin and Vitamin D is critical in preventing the worst effects of viral infections. Higher Vitamin D levels of nations closely correlate with lower mortality rates from Covid-19. Governor Cuomo has admitted that most Covid patients admitted to hospitals were sequestered at home before admission. In addition, as Dr. Roberts notes, a cheap and effective treatment for Covid exists (Hydroychloroquine, zinc +- azithromycin) but has been resisted by our medical/political authorities.
    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2020/05/28/vitamin-d-levels-at-home.aspx?cid_source=prnl&cid_medium=email&cid_content=art1HL&cid=20200528Z1&et_cid=DM547485&et_rid=881554510

    • Replies: @animalogic
  5. @VinnyVette

    I just watched a video yesterday on Peak Prosperity which featured the writer of a book called “Generations.” His thesis is that throughout history there has been a continual sequence of four generations and the last four generations hold true to the pattern.

    The first generation is primarily interested in stopping chaos so it tends to be authoritarian and community minded. The second generation rejects these to things to a certain extent and is much more individualistic. The third generation really gets on board with no authority and is highly individualistic. The last generation suffers from essentially chaos and gets begins to get back on board with the idea of authority and community. It was an interesting thesis.

    In his model, the first generation was the so-called “greatest generation” that lived through the great depression and WW2. The second was the boomers. The third was the Gen Xers and the fourth are the millennials.

    You do seem to have the traits of Gen Xers who want no authority and extreme individualism.

    I guess us boomers are going to have to count on millennials to help us out. I guess the lesson for us boomers is to bypass Gen Xers all together.

    • Agree: Harry Huntington
  6. jsinton says:

    It all boils down to the one question PCR has tactfully ignored: How many virus deaths are enough to justify imploding the economy? Some people say “just one”. I’m on the side of if we don’t forget about the virus and try to salvage the economy, then many more people will die from the downstream consequences of poverty, neglect, abuse, drugs, suicide on the order of several magnitudes. If you’re afraid of the virus, then quarantine yourself. But there will never be a substitute for herd immunity. It’s inevitable no matter what happens. We allowed the closing down of the economy to “flatten the curve” because we were afraid of overloaded hospitals. That never happened. So now what? Do we continue paying for people to stay home and send the overdue bills to the grandchildren? Has everyone lost their mind? Everyone is crazy, except for me?

    • Replies: @davidgmillsatty
  7. @jsinton

    My brother who is a PhD, and spent 30 plus years in the microbiology department of a university basically says that this virus is very localized.

    Some places are very bad and some places not bad at all. The places that are hardest hit have a legitimate argument that not only are lockdowns necessary, we didn’t lock down near fast enough or hard enough and made no attempts at containment when we should have been doing everything to contain the virus.

    The places that have so far been unscathed have a legitimate argument that the lockdowns have hurt them far worse than the virus.

    Another friend of mine suggested it is a bit like a tornado or a hurricane or some other natural disaster. If you are in the wrong place you get hit real bad and if not you remain unscathed.

    That being the case, a “policy of one size fits all” is the wrong policy. Everything needs to be tailored to individual locales. The problem is how to do that on a national scale. And in the US there is not much sense of community on this. Parts of the country that are hit hard in terms of public health and economically, don’t seem to be getting any support from the rest of the country which has also had hard economic suffering, seemingly without justification, since their public health was only minimally disturbed.

    I have been an advocate for this proposition as a possible solution. If the government is going to take away the right of people who are able to work and make an income or a profit, the fifth amendment requires the government to justly compensate those people for what it has taken from them. But we certainly won’t get government to do that in this case in an equitable way. The government has taken care of the big banks and the big corporations but has not taken care of small business or the workers who have been out of work.

    • Thanks: jsinton
  8. anon[397] • Disclaimer says:

    “Enjoy the decline Boomer!

    “Where was all this ‘safety’ during the free sex and drug addled 60’s and 70’s of your youth… Boomer!”

    Oh, Vinny, I agree! The thing is, you sound just like the worst of the self-centered, drug-addled, sex-mad, “It’s-all-about-me” boomers in the period of their own youth. Enjoy *your* decline, X’er!

    • Replies: @Franz
  9. anon[230] • Disclaimer says:

    For stating the obvious, conspiracy theorists will say that I am part of the conspiracy and morons will say that I favor a permanent lockdown,

    No, what I am saying is that you have succumb to confirmation bias which is something we must all must guard against. This is evidenced by the fact that you have used virologists to justify lock downs instead of epidemiologists and those who know something about data analysis and statistics.

    Virologists are not qualified to say how Covid-19 spreads. This is not their expertise.

    whereas what I actually advocate is caution.

    This assumes that the lock down policy which you advocate does not actually make Covid-19 deaths and infections worse – which is clearly not the case.

    Contrary to what virologists and other experts say, the infection data shows that the Covid-19 virus is spread through the air and not by mystical droplets. This means that locking people up in unventilated rooms increases the concentration of the virus and increases Covid-19 infection and death. Whereas, outside, the virus is disbursed so even if you are laying on top of each other, there is no way to get a great enough concentration of Covid-19 to get infected.

    More info can be found at the link below:

    https://www.maurice.nl/covid-19-english/#toggle-id-1

    An excellent interview with Maurice de Hond is below.


    Note that not even Norway, the country most cited by the pro-lockdown crowd, thinks that lockdowns are unnecessary.

    https://www.thelocal.no/20200522/norway-could-have-controlled-infection-without-lockdown-health-chief

  10. anon[180] • Disclaimer says:

    Shut down the economy to save people who are going to die anyway?

    Let people die to save an economy that was going to collapse anyway?

    Lift the lock-down to keep people from committing suicide who were probably going to commit suicide someday anyway?

    • Replies: @Ultrafart the Brave
  11. It’s a wicked strain of one of the more common cold viruses; when in the history of mankind did we ever stop everything to hunker down against a cold. In fact, life pretty much went on through the Black Death.

    This is one where our “leaders” iverreacted for reasons not entirely clear to most of us.

    • Replies: @jsinton
  12. jsinton says:
    @The Alarmist

    I think time will tell us than it’s about twice as bad as a typical yearly “bad” flu epidemic. The kind of epidemic that nobody pays any attention to. Did we over react? We sure did. The whole experience like a race to see how many Constitutional amendments can be violated, and how badly we can hurt the economy. I get a lot of information on the economic side, and it’s BAD. People seem to think by August everything will be back to normal and the economy will come roaring back. I only wish it were true. Nobody EVER tried to shut down an economy like that, all at once, at the same time. Not even during the very worst of times. Everybody seems to not understand how interconnected and fragile the system is, and how we just smashed all the parts. As to the “why”? I think our masters just saw it as an opportunity to “get Trump”, impose more Orwellian control over the rabble, and concentrate even more money into the hands of the few. They’ve overplayed their hand for sure.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  13. meamjojo says:

    “As of the present time prior to a possible second wave there are more than 5,690,000 cases and 355,000 deaths.”

    And? In a typical year about 600k die of the flu worldwide, so we still have quite a way to go to catch-up to the number for something that we DON’T close down economies for or force healthy people to self-quarantine for.

    You might want to read this story about how the state of GA is doing relatively well, despite allowing almost everything to reopen a month ago. But that doesn’t match your personal narrative, so you don’t pay attention to that, instead attempting to fan the flames of fear with gross death numbers without putting the number into context.

    A month after reopening, Georgia coronavirus cases continue slow and steady
    By Eric Levenson, Nick Valencia and Jason Morris, CNN
    Updated 5:09 PM ET, Tue May 26, 2020
    ————-
    A month since Georgia took some of the earliest and most extensive steps to reopen parts of its economy, Covid-19 cases have largely flattened in the state, albeit with a slight recent uptick.

    “The bad news is we are not seeing a reduction in transmission, but I don’t see a spike in transmission,” said Dr. Gerardo Chowell, professor of mathematical epidemiology at Georgia State University’s School of Public Health.

    Data from the Georgia Department of Health shows that the seven-day moving average of coronavirus cases steadily declined from late April until mid-May, a reflection of the earlier stay-at-home order. The moving average of cases then flattened at just over 500 new cases per day, and the totals have risen slightly since May 12.

    ….

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/05/26/us/georgia-coronavirus/index.html

  14. For stating the obvious, conspiracy theorists will say that I am part of the conspiracy and morons will say that I favor a permanent lockdown,

    No, what I am saying is that you have succumb to confirmation bias which is something we must all must guard against. This is evidenced by the fact that you have used virologists to justify lock downs instead of epidemiologists and those who know something about data analysis and statistics.

    Virologists are not qualified to say how Covid-19 spreads. This is not their expertise.

    whereas what I actually advocate is caution.

    This assumes that the lock down policy which you advocate does not actually make Covid-19 deaths and infections worse – which is clearly not the case.

    Contrary to what virologists and other experts say, the infection data shows that the Covid-19 virus is spread through the air and not by mystical droplets. This means that locking people up in unventilated rooms increases the concentration of the virus and increases Covid-19 infection and death. Outside, the virus is dispersed so even if you are laying on top of each other, there is no way to get a great enough concentration of Covid-19 to get infected.

    More info can be found at the link below:

    https://www.maurice.nl/covid-19-english/#toggle-id-1

    An excellent interview with Maurice de Hond is below.

    Note that not even Norway, the country most cited by the pro-lockdown crowd, thinks that lockdowns are unnecessary.

    https://www.thelocal.no/20200522/norway-could-have-controlled-infection-without-lockdown-health-chief

    • Thanks: jsinton
  15. second wave is coming – made ten years ago.

  16. Wow, they finally got to PCR. He held out for so many years, too. RIP, Paul

    Or maybe they kidnapped him and this is a ghost writer.

    I believe it was PCR who coined the term “presstitutes.” I don’t see it mentioned here, and here is where it would be most suiting of all!

  17. Another misconception is that the young are more or less unaffected by the virus and should be free to go about. According to the World Health Organization’s Regional Director for Africa, “In terms of those who are infected [in Africa], younger people tend to be the majority who are infected, people between the ages of 25 up to about 45

    That’s because Africa has the youngest population on earth. Back here in the developed world, a young person is more likely to die from a car accident than Covid-19. In order to improve your analysis, may I humbly suggest reading the 1954 book How To Lie With Statistics which many scientists today are using as a manual to get their manuscripts published rather than a cautionary tale.

    • Replies: @joe2.5
    , @animalogic
  18. Franz says:
    @anon

    Oh, Vinny, I agree! The thing is, you sound just like the worst of the self-centered, drug-addled, sex-mad, “It’s-all-about-me” boomers in the period of their own youth. Enjoy *your* decline, X’er!

    I wouldn’t be so harsh on it, anon.

    It’s what you’d expect when people get all their information from a few “major” news outlets and chattering morons on the net.

    What thousanth of one percent of “boomers” were at Woodstock? The rest who were in the military, or the mills and mines… don’t count? Not if you just run the same flipping hippie clips for fifty years.

    I repeat what I’ve said elsewhere: The current youngsters who are falling for this generation crap don’t seem to realize they’re going to get the same.

    Do young people now want, in their middle & older years, to be called “the Antifa generation” that finally freed the USA from white privilege? Because, folks, there are more clips of Antifa “heroism” now than there ever were of hippies then.

    The powers that be can, and will do it. Don’t help them destroy your future like a tiny number of drugged up goofs did a half-century ago.

    And is anyone else tired of Baby Talk becoming the universal language? (X-er, boomer… how soon before the Goo-Goo generation?)

    • Agree: animalogic
  19. joe2.5 says:
    @RationalRabbit

    Perhaps you remember how to lie with statistics but, with all due respect, I wonder if you can read. Dr Roberts had stipulated in the paragraph below that one that his observation is not about mortality but 1. morbidity, 2. contagion and perpetuation of the epidemic.

    The former, by the way, is plenty bad enough also in the below-50 groups now that we start to discover all the durable damage to various viscera. As for the latter, why don’t you (as I asked some other time here) just take an ax and give your granma forty whacks?

    • Replies: @Ultrafart the Brave
  20. @jsinton

    It’s as if the “leaders” of the West saw China lockdown and get away with it, and instead of criticising the ChiComs instead said, “You can do that? Hey, hold my beer!”

    • Thanks: jsinton
  21. @VinnyVette

    Even IF you are correct about “boomer” attitudes (which are the grain of truth distorted to the point of the grotesque) how or why should that change the (need for) social morality of mutual care? You are a neoliberal whether you realize it or not.

  22. @Dutch Boy

    Yes, there’s plenty of scope to argue the kind & degree of a particular “lockdown”.

  23. @RationalRabbit

    You are confusing contagion with symptoms. Yes, young people are far less likely to suffer symptoms, but that doesn’t alter their capacity to catch then spread the disease.

  24. “In fact, life pretty much went on through the Black Death.”
    Yes, life went on for the 66.6% (roughly) who survived.
    And yes, let’s return to the middle ages — leeches anyone?

  25. @RationalRabbit

    Epidemiologists really don’t know virology. Virologists are the ones who might save my life. Epidemiologists might let me know what my odds are.

  26. 76239 says:
    @Harry Huntington

    “we should dump Social Security and Medicare because the taxes for those programs burden the young”

    Great idea, The programs burden the productive. Tax makers are hurt and tax eaters benefit.

  27. @RationalRabbit

    “This assumes that the lock down policy which you advocate does not actually make Covid-19 deaths and infections worse – which is clearly not the case.”

    There is zero evidence that lockdowns make deaths and infections worse.

    One of the most locked down countries is Japan and it has very few cases and a ridiculously low death rate for its population: 16,700 cases and 867 deaths for a population of 126,500,000.

    • Replies: @Ultrafart the Brave
  28. @76239

    Those of us who get Social Security and Medicare paid our taxes for our benefits. That is usually what happens with life insurance — you pay for it when you are young so you have it when you are old. Same goes for retirement benefits.

    If you don’t want to pay taxes for social security and medicare you won’t have them when you are old.

  29. anon[266] • Disclaimer says:

    How can anyone possibly come down on a generation that gave us one Bush, two Clintons, three Obamas (if you include Valerie Jarrett and Michelle), as well a plethora of stellar members of the current deep state?

    It’s true that the boomers didn’t actually invent sex, as they seemed to think in their day, but they did show us its proper incorporation into our daily satanic rituals.

    Easily the second greatest generation. Comes right in behind all those fallen angels we used to hear about.

  30. @76239

    You misquote me. My comment about social security and medicare spoke to what I said was the implication of another commenter’s argument. In reality we should expand Medicare and put everyone on it from birth until death. We also should increase social security payments to seniors. Social security is simply a retirement system. If we need to pay for this, we can make 401K plans taxable, impose a Tobin tax on currency transactions, and a transactions tax on stock trades.

  31. @anon

    Shut down the economy to save people who are going to die anyway?

    Let people die to save an economy that was going to collapse anyway?

    Lift the lock-down to keep people from committing suicide who were probably going to commit suicide someday anyway?

    Take your paws off me, you damn dirty Corona Chan!

    … no, wait a minute…

    Arrgh! Damn you all! Damn you all to HELL!!!

  32. @davidgmillsatty

    One of the most locked down countries is Japan

    The figures you quote are accurate, but Japan’s lockdown (which has been rolled back now) wasn’t a “lockdown” in the same sense as, eg, some parts of the US. It’s a bit like comparing apples to oranges.

    The Japanese government declared a state of emergency and issued recommended guidelines for its populace to follow, which they accordingly mostly did follow. But the point here is that they had a choice, and made their own decisions based on circumstances and necessity.

    One thing that does stand out (to me, at least) was and is the almost universal wearing of face masks by the Japanese. Incidentally, the Japanese probably don’t have as strong a tendency to farm their old folk into “nursing homes” as do most affluent Western nations. I don’t have any data to clarify the Japanese casualty rate associated with old peoples’ homes, but I do know that a good proportion of Japanese Corona Chan deaths were related to old folk in cruise ships docked in their ports.

    For what it’s worth, the Australian experience was pretty much a (very early) mandatory lockdown, which yielded a similar low Corona Chan death rate to Japan. But a very large proportion of those Australian casualties which did occur, were in just a few “nursing homes”, and a similarly large proportion were (like Japan) linked to a couple of cruise ships.

    My point is that, in the absence of more detailed investigation & analysis, anecdotal evidence actually supports the notion that Corona Chan plus enclosed indoor communities contributed to the fatality rates in Japan & Australia, each of which had dissimilar “lockdown” regimes. Looking to the US, where the reported death rate is about 50 times worse, we read stories where test-positive elderly patients were sent from hospital back to their nursing homes, with subsequent outbreaks at said nursing homes.

    Don’t get me wrong, nothing is black-and-white in all of this. However, it does seem to me that the manner in which lockdowns have been implemented in different places around the world may well have had a bearing on the resultant Corona Chan casualty rates. In a nutshell, some lockdown strategies are better, and other lockdown strategies are not as good.

  33. @joe2.5

    As for the latter, why don’t you (as I asked some other time here) just take an ax and give your granma forty whacks?

    … sounds like that axe needs sharpening.

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