The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
Kasimir Edschmid Archives
Kasimir Edschmid • 5 Items / 3 Books, 2 Articles
South America: Lights and Shadows (1932)
A Continent of Contrasts
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Published Reviews
  1. [+]
    Across South America (Review)
    South America: Lights and Shadows, by Kasimir Edschmid
    1. South America: Lights and Shadows by Kasimir Edschmid
    The Saturday Review, October 1, 1932, p. 147
  2. [+]
    Four Travel Books (4 Reviews)
    South America: Lights and Shadows, by Kasimir Edschmid
    1. South America: Lights and Shadows by Kasimir Edschmid
    2. Wayfarer in Denmark by Georg Brochner
    3. Family Holiday by W.R. Calvert
    4. Call of the Southern Cross by A.S. Wadia
    The Bookman (U.K.), October 1932, p. 48
  3. [+]
    Book Notes (4 Reviews)
    The Craft of Writing, by Percy Marks
    1. The Craft of Writing by Percy Marks
    2. Pattern and Variation in Poetry by Chard Powers Smith
    3. South America: Lights and Shadows by Kasimir Edschmid
    4. Sad Indian by Thames R. Williamson
    The New Republic, November 23, 1932, pp. 53-55
  4. [+]
    At a Glance (5 Reviews)
    Travel
    1. English Spring by Charles S. Brooks
    2. Twenty-Four Vagabond Tales by John Gibbons
    3. Gone Abroad by Charles Graves
    4. South America: Lights and Shadows by Kasimir Edschmid
    5. A Pilgrim Artist in Palestine by Peter F. Anson
    The Bookman, October 1932, p. 656
  5. [+]
    Some Recent Books on International Relations (6 Reviews)
    Latin America
    1. Viva Villa! by Edgcumb Pinchon and O.B. Stade
    2. The Crime of Cuba by Carleton Beals
    3. Men of Maracaibo by Jonathan Norton Leonard
    4. South American Memories of Thirty Years by Edward F. Every
    5. South America: Lights and Shadows by Kasimir Edschmid
    6. Haitian Directory by Andre Fils-Aime
    Foreign Affairs, January 1934, p. 352