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Why Have Embassies?
Taliban want to talk but US is reluctant
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President Joe Biden’s departure from Afghanistan was the right thing to do even if it was handled disastrously. And he now has the opportunity to do some other “right things” that are in some ways related to the recently concluded fiasco in Central Asia in that the White House for too long has believed that it has the authority to intervene globally given its often cited authority as both “exceptional” and “Leader of the Free World.” One thinks immediate of the sanctions regime which is used repeatedly to punish foreign governments that do not conform to American and Western European norms on issues like homosexuality, “choice,” and even immigration. The current edition of sanctions, naming individuals, businesses and government entities, runs to hundreds of pages. It is updated and added to regularly by the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control.

It has repeatedly been demonstrated that sanctions do not accomplish anything and they in fact disproportionately punish the most vulnerable people in the country being targeted, depriving them of food and medicine while their leaders have plenty of both. Sanctions do not compel countries to change their foreign and domestic policies and, in fact, frequently generate a measure of sympathy, producing popular support for regimes that are perceived as being unfairly attacked by the United States. Many argue that the authoritarian regime in Cuba has largely survived because many Cubans despise the extensive US imposed sanctions on their country.

So one longs to see an end to sanctions and an increase in face-to-face discussions between representatives of foreign countries to resolve problems without killing people and crippling economies. But sanctions are only one element in America’s ongoing war against the world, which admittedly is going badly. Whenever one gets into discussions about the decline of America’s ability to positively influence developments around the world a number of issues tend to surface. Some critics who look beyond what is being reported in the media or parroted by government spokesmen recognize that it is actually the policies being pursued by the White House and Congress that are out of sync with what is actually happening in Asia, Africa and Latin America, being more driven by often partisan establishment-acceptable narratives than by genuine interests.

The problem starts at the top with certain perceptions about how the United States ought to deal with the world but it is exacerbated at the working level where actual contact with foreigners takes place. The perceptions themselves have unfortunately been shaped by the media and by neocon or neoliberal ideologues to include Condoleezza Rice, Madeleine Albright, Hillary Clinton, Mike Pompeo, John Bolton and the current incumbent Tony Blinken as Secretaries of State and National Security Advisers.

But there is a more serious problem in that many in Washington as well as in the media and among the public do not understand why we should have ambassadors and foreign embassies at all. Ambassadors have existed as interlocutors between communities since ancient Sumer formed the first local governments in Mesopotamia but they became institutionalized and protected in ancient Greece, where hoplite warfare required total mobilization and produced a huge number of fatalities because it was not possible to run away in armor. War was generally speaking catastrophic in the ancient world, with entire defeated populations made into slaves and fields and crops devastated in warfare to induce starvation. Ambassadors were from the beginning granted a special immunity which enabled them to talk to enemy spokesmen to attempt to resolve contentious issues without resort to arms.

Beyond that, in the Middle Ages and ever since, Ambassadors have been sent to reside in foreign capitals to provide some measure of protection for traveling citizens and also to defend other perceived national interests, including trade. Ambassadors are not soldiers, nor are they necessarily the parties of government that ultimately make decisions on what to do when dealing with a foreign nation. They are there to provide a mechanism for exchanging views to create a dialogue while at the same time working with foreign governments to avoid conflict, whether over trade or politics. They should be bridge-builders who explain how American politics function, how the American government works, and at the same time educate Americans on how the country they are based in sees the United States.

By all these metrics, the US diplomatic effort has been a failure and, at the end of the day, the United States taxpayer spends astonishing sums of money to support its global representational and security structures that provide little in return, rarely experiencing any notable successes and letting the reputation of the US decline due to sheer ineptness. But, beyond that, the worst part is the perception that if the White House really dislikes a nation the best way to deal with it is not at all so they opt to close the Embassy and cut off all face-to-face contact.

The United States for many years had no Embassy in Cuba, which only reopened in 2015. It has no Embassy in Iran or in Syria, both countries that the US should be talking to as there is concern over war possibly breaking out in that region, largely due to hostility coming both from Jerusalem and Washington. And the current situation is Afghanistan suggests that the mistake of having no representation will be replicated in dealings with the new government in Afghanistan.

A Taliban spokesman has opened the door to a positive relationship with Washington, based on diplomacy and trade without a military occupation, saying “America should have only a diplomatic presence in Kabul. We have communication channels with them and we expect them to reopen their embassy in Kabul and we also want to have trade relations with them.” But not so fast! Washington is saying something else. Presidential chief of staff Ron Klain was skeptical about recognition for a Taliban government, saying: “I don’t think anytime soon. I don’t know if we will ever recognize their government.” He added that “What we know is that the Taliban says they’re going to form a government, we’ll see what that looks like, we’ll see what kind of credentials they present. More importantly, we’ll see what their conduct is. Do they honor their commitments, to allow freedom of travel? Do they respect human rights?”

Other government sources have revealed that the US has used its leverage over world finance to freeze billions of dollars in Afghan government reserves while also blocking possible International Monetary Fund loans. Secretary of State Antony Blinken has admitted that Washington is using its power over the monetary system to put pressure on the Taliban.

So, the United States is concerned over human rights and freedom to travel in a foreign country, issues that in no way relate to actual US interests, and it is willing to forego direct dialogue with a potentially dangerous adversary just to demonstrate its displeasure. It makes one wonder what kind of idiots are running around loose in Washington. Indeed, stealing Afghanistan’s limited financial resources, which will guarantee an economic crisis for a country which is already miserably poor, while also cutting off all means to direct dialogue to resolves disagreements is a recipe that encourages bad behavior by whatever government manages to take shape in Kabul over the next several weeks. Biden and company should pay attention to the old Sicilian saying, “Keep your friends close, but your enemies even closer!” Or as Winston Churchill put it, “Jaw, jaw, jaw is better than war, war, war.”

For what it’s worth, a group of European Union countries is committed to establishing a joint mission to Kabul which will de facto operate like an Embassy. Its engagement with the new government, which could include foreign aid for the harsh winter that soon will be coming up, will depend on the degree to which the government sends positive signals. Those signals will include respect for the rights of all the Afghan people, media freedom and, most critical, preventing the establishment of any terrorist groups in the country. That is the way to go, a stick and a carrot. Reopening the US Embassy in Kabul to establish a similar dialogue should be a top priority.

Philip M. Giraldi, Ph.D., is Executive Director of the Council for the National Interest, a 501(c)3 tax deductible educational foundation (Federal ID Number #52-1739023) that seeks a more interests-based U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. Website is https://councilforthenationalinterest.org address is P.O. Box 2157, Purcellville VA 20134 and its email is [email protected]

 
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  1. AndrewR says:

    We hear a lot about high Jewish IQ, but the Jews who run ZOG are definitely not bright, and many are quite insane.

    But of course white people are even stupider for allowing these parasitic demons to rule us.

  2. Franz says:

    Secretary of State Antony Blinken has admitted that Washington is using its power over the monetary system to put pressure on the Taliban.

    Absolutely.

    Washington has to keep the price of poppies low enough for what facilities Americans have producing heroin at the same time keeping the minor leagues from gaining a foothold in the global narcotics trade. Can’t let upstarts bid the prices too far down.

    Business as usual, in short.

  3. Al Ross says:

    Thatcher famously told Brits ” I will not treat with terrorists”. but of course in the usual back channels of shadowy “diplomacy”, the Iron Lady did just that.

    She was afraid of being the PM who “lost N.Ireland” , which is almost like a US President being wary of losing Puerto Rico .

    • Replies: @Che Guava
    , @Hibernian
  4. mijj says:
    @AndrewR

    > “We hear a lot about high Jewish IQ”

    .. do we?

  5. JosephB says:

    So, the United States is concerned over human rights and freedom to travel in a foreign country, issues that in no way relate to actual US interests, and it is willing to forego direct dialogue with a potentially dangerous adversary just to demonstrate its displeasure.

    Thank you for the wonderful statement of the problem.

  6. RobinG says:

    ….we’ll see what their conduct is. Do they honor their commitments, to allow freedom of travel? Do they respect human rights.

    The biased and hysterical media blitz that’s in full swing makes it impossible for the public to “see” anything. Take the killing of the pregnant policewoman, immediately attributed to the Taliban. Let’s assume (despite our experience with incubator babies) that it really happened; there are plenty of other suspects, ranging from ISIS-K to a neighbor with a petty grudge. (We recall how false accusations landed innocents in Gitmo.)

    Will the US DOS allow a dispassionate investigation, or use every allegation to demonize their vanquishers? So much of our conduct is based on bitterness and spite. This may get much worse as we continue to decline.

    “The events of 11 September will be remembered as the end of the US empire. This is because all empires collapse when they pursue the arrogance of power.”
    Abdel Bari Atwan, Sept. 11, 2006

    • Replies: @animalogic
    , @moi
  7. Afghanistan is much better off with no US embassy in Kabul. The US regime does not respect the sovereignty of other countries. Its “diplomats” are arrogant agitators who push the same ideologies that have destroyed the US itself onto their host countries.

    This is the farthest thing from a country that should hold itself out as a model for others:

    youtube.com/watch?v=XV8OXbO-iwk

    • Agree: St-Germain
  8. This is pretty good as comedy.

    • Replies: @Maddaugh
    , @moi
  9. Beagle says:

    I’m very cynical on this “withdrawal” to be honest.

    Establishment shills like Graham and Panetta, and quite a few others, are already calling for reentry.

    After years or decades of most Americans and even the DC bubble ignoring Afghanistan, suddenly it’s in the news every day. In some cases, political pundits sound like they did in late 2001 into 2002. The only real bump in attention to Afghanistan in many years was the phony US IC “bounties” scam.

    Could this be a case of psyop reverse psychology? By seeming to fail in withdrawal, the DC War Uniparty renews concern for Afghanistan. They can again defame anyone who opposes permawar as an “isolationist” and point to their own ‘failures’ as consequences. They have a shiny new jihad group to talk about: ISIS-K. There are 13 dead young Americans to motivate the public. And there’s even a ragtag group of freedom fighters, or whatever, holding out in the Panjshir Valley led by the former VP (after Columbia alumnus Ghani hightailed it with a chopper full of cash).

    Hope I’m wrong. But it certainly doesn’t seem very over. Not least, it appears the exit was calculated to produce a hostage crisis. That’s a golden ticket to get back in if it occurs.

  10. Listen up, Dude. It is supremely simple. “forego” means “go before”. Too bad it’s one of your favourite words.

  11. Ghali says:

    Astonishing. The role of Israel and the Jews in shaping U.S. foreign policy and relations with the rest of world not mentioned, not even once. I assume by “neocons”, the author means Zionists and Jews.

    • Agree: moi
    • Replies: @Z-man
  12. Tom Welsh says:

    “They should be bridge-builders who explain how American politics function, how the American government works, and at the same time educate Americans on how the country they are based in sees the United States”.

    That’s something I would pay to see! Just the first bit about “explain how American politics functions”. That’s very easily done: everything is for sale. EVERYTHING.

    And I don’t think Americans would like to hear how most other nations see them. Nohow.

    • Agree: St-Germain
  13. So, the United States is concerned over human rights and freedom to travel in a foreign country, issues that in no way relate to actual US interests

    So what are actual US interests, vital or otherwise, in Afghanistan ? Could you spell them out, Dr Giraldi ?
    As far as I can see, there are no interests. There was never any real evidence linking Osama Bin Laden to the events of 9/11 and hence no reason to invade in the first place. Having finally cut and run, the US must not involve itself at all with the country, have no diplomatic relations with it and, above all, prevent Afghan rapefugees from entering America.

    • Replies: @animalogic
    , @padre
  14. gotmituns says:

    Why Have Embassies?
    ——————————–
    Good question. Our embassies are staffed by 99% useless shitbirds with a stupid diploma sitting around doing nothing all day, every day, and getting paid big bucks to do this nothing they get paid for.

    • Replies: @GMC
    , @carroll price
    , @Notsofast
  15. @RobinG

    “So much of our conduct is based on bitterness and spite.”
    Yes, there you have it.
    “We lost — & by Christ, are you going suffer for it! ”

    • Replies: @carroll price
  16. @Verymuchalive

    What are US interests in Afghanistan?
    Easy — the same “interests” as anywhere else; that is, the unequivocal right to come in & exploit everything as far as they can or want to.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  17. One thinks immediate of the sanctions regime which is used repeatedly to punish foreign governments that do not conform to American and Western European norms on issues like homosexuality, “choice,” and even immigration.

    Dr. Giraldi, you are too kind. What is the traditional Islamic world supposed to think of a country that ran up “gay pride month” LGBTQ rainbow flags at its many foreign embassies just before abused Afghans finally wrote fins to this farce in Kabul last month? The sane regions of the planet need their U.S. embassies like they need a fresh dose of bubonic plague. Our State Department and its affiliated NGOs represent decadent cultural subversion and predatory corporate interests, but certainly not the interests of mainstream American people.

    We’d be better off shuttering all our foreign diplomatic — and military — posts until we put an end to the elite official squalor here in the divided and bankrupt heartland of the dying empire. As things stand now, our diplomatic presence abroad, instead of winning friends and influencing people, only gives the United States a bad name.

  18. padre says:
    @Verymuchalive

    Perhaps you forgot why they came there! The resources that Afghanistan has in abundance, while US has next no none!

  19. Robjil says:

    An glaring example of the failure of enforced vaccination.

    https://humansarefree.com/2021/09/portugal-and-sweden-banned-travellers-from-israel.html

    Sweden became the second European Union country to ban Israeli residents from entry due to a rise in COVID-19 cases in Israel, despite the country being one of the most vaccinated countries in the world.

    Portugal on Wednesday became the first EU country to ban travel from Israel due to a rise in cases. Both countries are following the EU’s recommendation to remove Israel from its list of green countries.

  20. The first speech of the Taliban representative at the United Nations should be interesting.

  21. Any Amerikastani embassy is a spy centre and colour revolution attempt HQ. Absolutely the best thing for Afghanistan would be no Amerikastani embassy at all.

    • Agree: moi, GMC
  22. Maddaugh says:
    @Priss Factor

    Priss, what you see here is the destructive nature of Social Media. Every fucking dickhead who dropped out of elementary school is now a commentator. They have a following who listen to this shit all day.

    Then brainwashed with all this bilge they become a caller and end up like the Joker in your clip. They end up calling someone with sense. Once they are asked to define some of their comments you get “Well, Ah, Am, well you know, I..I..I.. ah ”

    The stupidity that manifests these days is mid boggling ! China taking over is the nightmare of pussy whites and westerners and the wet dream of some miscellaneous nobody gooks and slopes.

    But it aint going to happen. People wasting their time listening to all this tripe ought to put their time to better use. Take a nap, beat their Johnson or bark at the moon. Its more fun than being misguided and miserable at the thought that some slanty eyes, buck tooth, 5ft 4 in people are going to rule the world.

  23. GMC says:
    @gotmituns

    I’ve been to a few US Embassies and a few foreign ones too – In the US, Ukrainian, Moldovan, Russian, and the US Embassies are top of the line =\$\$\$ – and well staffed with nationals from the host country. All the Embassies { US and foreign } provided a good service for what I needed, but like I said – all the people I have had helping me were nationals that spoke English. The only time I saw a US official was in Kiev and he helped me out with a US domestic document I needed, and he was cool – not an asshole like I think Ambassador PyRat turned out to be, with his boss Cookies Nuland.

    As far as the extra large size of those US Embassies – they are housing a lot more than a few diplomats – and that’s where your ” useless shitbirds” { probably CIA/Mossad etc. } come into play – g

  24. Robjil says:

    What we know is that the Taliban says they’re going to form a government, we’ll see what that looks like, we’ll see what kind of credentials they present. More importantly, we’ll see what their conduct is. Do they honor their commitments, to allow freedom of travel? Do they respect “human rights”?

    Travel and human rights are denied to millions of Americans who can not or do not want to take the limited choice of vaccines that are available in the US.

    Yet, this basic human right to go (travel) to a museum is denied in NYC, the largest city in the US in 2021. The Taliban is not denying their people anything like that. This barbaric action by the NYC officials is stone age thinking.
    Museums are a place for citizens to learn. It is taking knowledge from its citizens. Tax paying New Yorkers who do not take the jab from these experimental vaccines, a few months old, are denied the basic human right to go their museums. Museums are safe. Everyone wears a mask. No hugging or close contact. It is a place to study and learn, it is not an entertainment center.

    https://hyperallergic.com/670479/youll-need-to-be-vaccinated-to-visit-nyc-museums-and-galleries/

    Visitors and workers at New York City’s cultural institutions, including museums and galleries, will have to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination as part of a vaccine mandate for public indoor settings.

    • Replies: @Insouciant
  25. Z-man says:

    The Jew controlled Financiers are going to put a strangle hold on the Afghan economy, what there is of one anyway. Anything going against the globohomo agenda must be crushed even if it would actually be counter to the goal of moderating the Taliban.

    • Replies: @moi
    , @Miro23
  26. @padre

    It would have been a lot cheaper to buy them at fair market prices. Same is true for Iraqi oil.

    These have been profiteering operations and they have exhausted their environment to support them. Once ceased, they can be revealed. And will be.

    It’s already happening. We are living in historic times. The internet changed everything, the institutions will catch up. I am very optimistic.

    • Replies: @RobinG
  27. moi says:
    @RobinG

    The problem really is fundamental–Americans are psychologically unbalanced dicks. Once you understand that, you understand America. Praise sweet Jesus for the rise of China and its great sage Confucius.

  28. moi says:
    @Z-man

    So true. Jew Blinken and the other Jews in the Administration will make sure of that.

  29. moi says:
    @Priss Factor

    This Brit effer talking to GG is even dumber than your average American.

  30. The withdraw was due to deals mad Taliban, which doesn’t quite make sense when there was a totally different Afghanistan government in place. So why did the US shut the fancy and pricey embassy if they were willing to talk and deal with the Taliban? Everything about Afghanistan and the US these days seems off. Any ideas who was intended recipient for those left behind weapons? And why was the whole discombobulated mess on twitter and instagram? Its almost like the people behind Biden wanted this bad optics for some reason.

    • Replies: @Zumbuddi
  31. Z-man says:
    @Ghali

    Yes, they go hand in hand, the CABAL.

  32. Weaver says:

    Great article, but I’d go further: Remove all embassies. If China gets angry at the US, send them a text message. If the Taliban wants to talk, video conference. Just my thoughts.

    A great way to avoid war is to not declare war. A great way to settle nearly all trade disputes is to not use sanctions. US government spending needs to be cut. It doesn’t do anything, money is just spent. Pay out UBI, reduce all other spending.

  33. @padre

    What resources, precisely?
    Afghanistan has been a shithole of humanity for centuries. Whatever minor resources it has would not compensate for the expense.

    • Replies: @augusto
    , @Buck Ransom
  34. @Robjil

    The museums, yes, and also the libraries.

    Librarians, that is, those grey, formless entities that dwell in the “Staff” room of the public library, seem to use that space to get high on their own “pure air.”
    When an old biddy told a young mother-with-masked 3 year old-in-tow that it was harmful for the child to wear a mask, Librarian was summoned, old biddy was accused of “harassment.” Old biddy left the building but Librarian called police, who further accosted Old biddy, threatening to tow her car!

    I witnessed this as I was borrowing The Accursed, Joyce Carol Oates’s gothic novel starring Woodrow Wilson, then (1906) president of Princeton.

    This passage that Wilson wrote to his wife from Bermuda (where he was engaged in an affair with Mrs. Peck) is on point. Woodrow recounts a conversation about Wilson’s book, A History of the American People, that he had with “Count von Gneist (one identity of the spectral demon of Oates’ story), concerning Wilson’s

    “stated belief that the American people are blessed by God, elevated above the common run of humankind by a ‘guardian destiny’ & intended–nay, obliged– to spread our ideals throughout the world. That is, Christianity and Democracy. . . .”

    He continued:

    “Ellen, . . .it is common knowledge [now] & since the time of McKinley, that the United States is charged by God with the evangelical mission of spreading Christian democracy throughout the world, and opening the markets of the East as well–by diplomacy if possible, by power otherwise. ‘We are a sort of pure air blowing in world politics, destroying ancient illusions, and cleaning places of morbid miasmic gases,’ I explained [to Count Gneist]. . . .
    We debated whether it was an “American” obligation or rather more an “Anglo-Saxon” one . . .”

    Wilson was the son of a Presbyterian minister and on several occasions spoke of his proud Scottish ancestry — “a Campbell of Argyll” — which Wilson differentiated from “European stock.”

    That’s a whole other conversation — whether the chorus of Jew-critics on Unz forum might need to expand their repertoire and acknowledge that some — many — of the obnoxious habits and policies of “America” have their origin in “Anglo” conceits such as Woodrow Wilson’s.

    • Thanks: RobinG
    • Replies: @Robjil
  35. @Beagle

    In its weakened state, I doubt Uncle Sam is up for another 9/11, which is what it would take to redo Afghanistan.

  36. @gotmituns

    It’s generally understood that US embassies are staffed by CIA trained personnel.

    • Replies: @Philip Giraldi
  37. @animalogic

    Easy — the same “interests” as anywhere else; that is, the unequivocal right to come in & exploit everything as far as they can or want to.

    That deluded mindset means ignoring your own vital interests and degrading – in every sense of the word – your own military. It ends in financial and moral bankruptcy and dissolution. It’s happening to the Disunited States of America. The end is very near.

  38. anonymous[139] • Disclaimer says:

    Leaving Afghanistan may have been the right thing to do but it was done for the wrong reasons, probably to husband resources for its next war and not out of any moral considerations of which there are none. America doesn’t do diplomacy, it does force. It has worked for it all these years so that’s all it knows. Diplomacy is for sissies according to American belief. Look at American culture and see how addicted it is to glamorization of violence and how everything is seen in two dimensional terms of good vs bad. As long as the US keeps getting its way by bombing, subverting, sanctioning there’s little incentive for it to change its ways.

  39. Zumbuddi says:
    @Old and Grumpy

    Re “bad optics”
    Biden at Dover and the branded “dignified transfer” —

    The choreography of military in camo, wearing what looked like soft suede booties & marching toe-first. Then the weird Swan Lake group pose as each casket moved into black cargo van

    The event was cheesy and low class.

  40. denk says:

    Why have embassies ?

    i’D answer with another question..

    Why is there no coup in USA ?

    eVEN provide the answer…

    cuz there aint no US embassy in Washington DC

  41. Notsofast says:
    @gotmituns

    embassies are necessary to give legal immunity to spies and for drug trafficking as well as money laundering.

  42. @Beagle

    With the Chinese and Russians moving in to help peacefully rebuild the country, a new intervention by a collapsing US military doesn’t seem likely. But, if clowns like girly-boy Graham and Panetta got their way, they’d get their asses handed to them on a platter, as happened when the Russian Air Force moved into Syria, at Assad’s request, to prevent the fall of its secular government. The now exceedingly well-armed Taliban, thanks to the incompetent Biden Regime’s leaving billions of dollars in military hardware behind, should channel Clint Eastwood in Dirty Harry: “Go ahead, make my day.”

  43. I say let’s open up the embassy back again and see where it takes us… you will never know until we’ve tried it.

  44. augusto says:

    We recall that also Putin in his first years in power wanted to talk, tried to talk , time and again went mid way to negotiate . To no avail since the empire had its own reasons and plans.
    The ourburst of decision was made public in the Munich speech in 2007.
    What followed was a period of russian buying time activity while the Kremlin still addressed the exceptionalistans and Nato “our partners”. Seemed comic but was a must.
    The Taliban are in a time waste interim. Seems odd and ominous.

  45. augusto says:
    @Verymuchalive

    ‘ you say it does not compensate the expense’,but El Salvador, Guatemala and haiti were deemed pretty much the same, and also did not compensate the expense… but uncle samueal did invade, meddle and\or kept pilfering them on their bananas whilst it was still profitable…
    Sure there was a place where the script was interrupted by sudden revolt: the sierra Maestra em 1958.
    \uncle beast felt the pain butt and didnot forgive it to this date.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  46. Robjil says:
    @Insouciant

    many — of the obnoxious habits and policies of “America” have their origin in “Anglo” conceits such as Woodrow Wilson’s.

    Yes, that is possible. The main problem with our present rulers is that one can not speak, write or even acknowledge their rule over us. No other rulers in the history of mankind has ever done this. It prevents any reformation of our present rulers. It creates the extreme tyranny in the west that we see today which keeps rolling to higher and higher levels without any boundaries.

    Any ethnic group that goes to the top of society should be fair play for criticism. That is the way the world works since the beginning of time. No ethnic group that goes to top should be given carte blanche to do anything that they want.

    Top people in any government should be called out for their agendas or any ethnic biases. Top people should never be given “victim status” in which one can not speak, write or even acknowledge their ethnic biases. This special silent treatment of “victim status” of Top people of the west is destroying our planet now faster than that any climate change could do.

  47. Emslander says:

    Our first Ambassadors, John Adams and Benjamin Franklin, had an eight-month turnaround in communications with Washington. Any negotiations were carried out by those ambassadors with full powers. They could negotiate and conclude treaties without input from their governments. In matters of practical efficiency, they had to have this authority.

    It is why the US Constitution requires final approval of any such treaties by the US Senate. It was the last-ditch quality control mechanism. Ambassadors were very important people with very great power.

    A clerk at any level of the US government can now communicate by text message with his counterpart in another government. Embassies and Ambassadors have no communication role in matters of representation. They actually get in the way of real work. Their numbers ought to be vastly reduced.

  48. Miro23 says:
    @Z-man

    The Jew controlled Financiers are going to put a strangle hold on the Afghan economy, what there is of one anyway. Anything going against the globohomo agenda must be crushed even if it would actually be counter to the goal of moderating the Taliban.

    I can’t see anything good coming from the US. The Chinese are already in talks with the Afghans to incorporate Afghanistan in their regional development projects and the Afghans want to participate.

  49. RobinG says:
    @Randy Dazzler

    It would have been a lot cheaper to buy them at fair market prices. Same is true for Iraqi oil.

    AGREE, ABSOLUTELY.

    These have been profiteering operations and they have exhausted their environment to support them.

    YES, profiteering operations, but not sure how you mean this. Except for the non-US purchase of poppy-product, it’s only been draining the US Treasury and citizens, don’t you think?

    • Replies: @TG
    , @Randy Dazzler
  50. @Verymuchalive

    Afghanistan: It’s not just about the opium anymore.

    Glad to help.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    , @RobinG
  51. At
    https://theweek.com/afghanistan/1004013/afghanistan-terrorism
    it is written:
    “In 2001, the Taliban’s sole demand was amnesty.”

    In 2021, did the President or someone else thought of demanding amnesty instead of disrupting tens of thousands of families only to bring cheap labor?

  52. Agent76 says:

    June 6, 2018 Why the US shouldn’t build more foreign bases

    The United States maintains almost 800 military bases in over 70 countries, which far exceeds our modern day security requirements.

    https://www.defensenews.com/opinion/commentary/2018/06/06/why-the-us-shouldnt-build-more-foreign-bases/

    Dec 7, 2015 The U.S. School That Trains Dictators & Death Squads

    On November 22, thousands gathered at the gates of Fort Benning, GA at the 25th annual protest of the School of the Americas to memorialize the tens of thousands of people who lost their lives at the hands of the U.S. Empire’s brutally repressive juntas it used to rule Latin America by force.

  53. @augusto

    Real Empires do not get involved in places like El Salvador, Guatemala, and especially Haiti. Did the British Empire do so ? Only morons would. That’s why the American “Empire”, ending shortly, will be very short-lived.

  54. arami says:

  55. Don’t we already have the world’s largest embassy in Iraq? Now there’s diplomacy for you!

  56. Che Guava says:
    @Al Ross

    That is a nice line, but a totally incorrect analogy.

  57. @Buck Ransom

    I am very skeptical of this ” Afghanistan; treasure trove of metals” line being pushed by certain people. As a geologist, I can say that prior to the 1979 Soviet invasion considerable geological surveys were undertaken, but the results were disappointing.
    I could be completely mistaken, but I doubt it.

  58. arami says:

    CIA Stories: Death Squads in Afghanistan

  59. Anonymous[833] • Disclaimer says:

    Washington thinks it has the prerogative to run every country on the face of the Earth, deciding all its crucial policies, its national leaders, who it can trade with, what resources it can develop and to whom it must sell them at a massive discount. When a few countries manage to buck this criminal delusion they are isolated and incessantly attacked in the ways that the author mentioned. Why, “we” will not even give them the dignity of communication, because control of their own destiny is not open for discussion. If ever successfully bucked by a country that “we” define as an “enemy,” open to all manner of abuse, Washington reacts like a petulant child, picks up its football and stalks away mad. Washington will do this to impoverished shitholes led by tin pot dictators or to the most formidable opponents on the planet whom they created from would-be friends like Russia and China. It’s what the world gets when the most vile, amoral, self-entitled bastion of arrogance assumes it runs every square inch of habitable terrain on this planet because of its intrinsic superiority and boundless altruism. Sind wir nicht die Meister Rasse? Ja, wir sind die Meister Rasse.

    • Agree: Realist
  60. some_loon says:
    @Philip Giraldi

    carroll price says:
    September 7, 2021 at 2:16 pm GMT • 4.9 hours ago ↑
    @gotmituns
    It’s generally understood that US embassies are staffed by CIA trained personnel.

    Bullshit

    Is it more accurate to say The Company is staffed with Foggy Bottom schooled people? With or without the striped-pants or alternative lifestyles?

    I do understand that there us some tension, sometimes public, between the two functions, but of course there is also a great deal of coordination. Maybe each gets exaggerated by turns, here and elsewhere.

    This would be true whether their missions were truly in furtherence of US interests or something other than that.

  61. Anastasia says:

    What is wrong with this author. World wars were started over the death of one man but in Afghanistan they admit to hundreds of Americans left there and others already killed. People don’t give a hoot if Americans are killed so long as it is not them. They all sicken me. There is no value to the individual lids so long as it is not them and so long as “they feel” the bombers are not great enough to comprise of what THEY FEEL is above an “acceptable loss”. Keep me far away from these ghouls

    • LOL: Thim
  62. TG says:
    @RobinG

    “draining the US Treasury and it’s citizens” not quite.

    That 2.3 trillion (ish) spent on Afghanistan enabled a whole lot of profit for politically connected defense contractors. Sure, a few pennies went to corrupt local politicians to grease the skids but a whole lot of was surely siphoned off by western interests.

    All those high-tech weapons left behind? So what. A lot of money was made on selling those weapons to the Pentagon. They could be blown up and buried in a ditch now for all that anyone cares.

    The point was not to extract wealth from Afghanistan, but to use Afghanistan to extract wealth from the US taxpayer (which does not include the super rich because they often don’t pay ANY taxes).

    • Replies: @Orville H. Larson
  63. anonymous[248] • Disclaimer says:

    Can’t they just use Zoom? Who needs an embassy.

  64. @Philip Giraldi

    Things must have changed since as late as 2012 when US Embassy personnel were heavily involved in the overthrow of Ukraine’s elected president, Victor Yanukovych. Not to speak of the US Embassy being used as headquarters for the overthrow of Iran’s Mossadeq in 1953 and Guatemala’s Arbenz in ’54.

    Or, am I confusing US Embassy personnel with CIA operatives who just happen to be working out of the same building?

    • Replies: @arami
    , @Philip Giraldi
  65. @TG

    “That 2.3 trillion (ish) spent on Afghanistan enabled a whole lot of profit for politically connected defense contractors. . . .

    “The point was not to extract wealth from Afghanistan, but to use Afghanistan to extract wealth from the US taxpayer . . .”

    Major General Smedley (“Old Gimlet Eye”) Butler, USMC nailed it when he wrote “War Is A Racket.”

  66. arami says:
    @Carroll Price

    You are right. The empire and its colonies, like Britain, France, sometimes they send their intelligence agents to countries like Iran, to make connections with the opposition groups and collect information on sensitive locations, to obtain sensitive information on that country. This was routine under the shah, a US puppet, as well. As Al Ahmad, a famous and an influential writer during 1960s in Iran said:
    The US makes connection with the opposition groups even if they are satisfied with the established ‘leader’, a country like Iran, to exert control over the country. The Shah, like his father, let into power by the foreign countries, Britain, and later the US. Therefore, everyone knew that part of the ambassador job was to obtain information in order to be informed and influential in that countries affair. They don’t care if the current ‘leader’ is their puppet, they want to know every political force in that country to be used and manipulated if is needed.

    The case of Iran is very interesting. Recently in Iran, they aired ‘Gondo’ a TV series where is the most attractive series that have been broadcast on radio and television these days and has a large audience. In the Gando series, you often hear a name ‘Charlotte’, who is a British intelligence officer in Tehran in this series. Charlotte is actually Jane Marriott, a senior MI6 officer who served as deputy ambassador to Tehran.

    Jane Marriott played an important role by using diplomatic cover to create a spy network with a “special mission” in Tehran and succeeded in forming this network. Jane, however, was unaware that the IRGC was riding on her and her entire team from the beginning. .

    She entered Iran as ‘Charlotte Lopez Varone Waller’ a high-ranking officer of MI6, who was stopped and confronted by IRGC intelligence forces in 2016, while spying on Kurdish military bases in Kurdistan, along with a member of the French embassy.

    https://www.mashreghnews.ir/news/1264904/

    It is worth mentioning that some media outlets mistakenly introduced this spy as Kylie Morgilbert, while Kylie Morgilbert is an Israeli spy and Shalot Lopez is a British spy.

    • Replies: @RobinG
  67. @Carroll Price

    The CIA station is almost always a small portion of the Embassy staff…most often not even considered diplomats but rather technical staff.

    • Replies: @carroll price
  68. RobinG says:
    @arami

    It’s certainly true that Robert Stephen Ford, US Amb. to Syria from 2010 to 2014, met regularly with opposition activists in their homes.

    • Replies: @arami
  69. arami says:
    @RobinG

    Agree.

    The British ambassador to Iran from 2018 to mid 2021 was Robert Macaire.

    Macaire was arrested on 11 January 2020 during protests in Tehran about the shooting down of Flight 752 to Ukraine, but released shortly after.

    He was filmed while he was among the protesters making film.

  70. @RobinG

    YES, profiteering operations, but not sure how you mean this. Except for the non-US purchase of poppy-product, it’s only been draining the US Treasury and citizens, don’t you think?

    No, not only. It is also a tremendous real material resource drain.

    Let me explain, let’s follow the money. Money originates in government spending, so please read this first, it’s an important prerequisite for how I frame the following argument:

    https://www.unz.com/trall/the-collapse-of-the-u-s-government/#comment-4883814

    Okay, so now let’s isolate the flow that is labeled Military Contract Spending. This is a very large flow. This is money flowing directly out of the Treasury (or created in the trust of God) into the private sector primarily in the corporate layer. This money is then split roughly into, paying for supplies, paying for labor, paying taxes and fees, and profit. The money for supplies pretty much splits into the same set, and again, and again, as you follow links down the supply chain. Taxes and fees are fairly negligible and since they are returning to the Treasury, they could actually be taken off the top.

    That leaves labor and profit. Wages and dividends (net overall).

    Okay, let’s get one thing straight: Companies do not come into existence, nor do they exist for, creating jobs. Yet that is how they are sold, and this kind of federal government spending will cause local governments to bend their rules to entice the business to their locale because it brings the jobs, wages, and attendant tax revenue.

    In the meanwhile, the industry to produce the goods at the material level require natural resource input (or recycled)

    Phew.

    Now, consider just the wage portion of that paid out to personnel. This is not the full amount, and likely a smaller proportion than most people realize.

    Suppose, instead of all that contracting happening, the wage money was simply distributed out to the same personnel without them having to do a thing. And the same level of local taxes were given to the local governments. No resources extracted or consumed, and no profits paid out to the rentier class.

    The nation is better served by the second option by far.

    When you intentionally instigate, or abet, international conflict for the purpose of obtaining that profit, that is called profiteering, specifically war profiteering. It is a high crime, even if the participants can claim every part of it is technically legal.

    The second aspect of your comment having to do with the poppies. That is a different kettle of fish. There we allegedly have black covert ops doing a little side hustle to augment their budget for even more unsupervised shenanigans. This is, of course, an even higher crime.

    • Replies: @RobinG
  71. @ PG,

    Whenever one gets into discussions about the decline of America’s ability to positively influence developments around the world a number of issues tend to surface.”

    Can you name a few of those “positively influence developments…?

    I’m looking hard at it/them, but don’t see any.

    I’ve seen the graves of those who died in Europe [WWI &WWII], but didn’t find/see anything positive in it/them. They were brave [and sometimes scared], but they represented themselves [as their remains do], not the US.

  72. RobinG says:
    @Randy Dazzler

    Well, you’ve had your say, but TG was more to the point.

  73. ricpic says:

    So nothing is to be asked of the Taliban.

    How about they let those planes filled with Americans take off?

    AFTER that we can come to the table and discuss projects of mutual benefit to both Afghanistan and the United States.

    • Replies: @carroll price
    , @anon
  74. @Philip Giraldi

    I assume that one of the “technical” staff’s duties would be coaching Embassy staff personnel on what to be on the look-out for, along with which questions to ask, followed by routine debriefing sessions. Which to my limited way of thinking amounts to US Ambassadors being CIA trained.

  75. @ricpic

    How about if the US first releases billions of dollars of frozen Afghan funds deposited in foreign banks under US/Israeli control.

    • Agree: Z-man
  76. SafeNow says:

    The flat deck of a C-17 flips, to reveal palletized rollers. Pallets of, ahem, whatever, can be conveniently rolled onboard. I can’t prove it, but I think the narrative will be that, a long time ago, the concept of development aid for Afghanistan was discussed with Afghan leaders; it was THEN understood that, concurrent with the final winding-down of the war, development aid would commence. How can it be anything but this? After all, the alternative would be that the US is paying a cash bounty to release hostages and prevent a haven for super-bad guys.

    So that’s the plan. Invent a fictitious cover story. Right up our alley. More specifics? Sure. 50% down in cash, 50% in kind over a few years to build infrastructure. Total package, \$100 billion, a nice round number.

  77. Hibernian says:
    @Al Ross

    Eventually, PR will be either a State, with Congressional representation, or independent. N. Ireland will be a part of the Republic of Ireland.

  78. @RobinG

    Of course.

    I did leave out all the missing arms and legs, eyes, and stuff, and life long suffering, unnecessary trauma, suffering families, damaging communities, and a loss of some of the finest young people of a generation.

    Next time, when you ask a question that requires a full answer, I’ll try to produce a Cliff’s version. Sorry I wasn’t quicker.

    “Only” indeed. Please, Marie Antoinette had a better look.

    I happened to make this point about butter recently: “They could be blown up and buried in a ditch now for all that anyone cares.” Look for it.

    It would have cost more, and more innocent civilian lives, but they aren’t Americans so they don’t count. Ain’t nothing like traumatizing a whole country with the fear of death raining down from above any day, any time.

    Just to fatten some back accounts so “Winning!” can be exclaimed the loudest, to uproarious laughter.

    Sleep with that image tonight.

    • Replies: @Randy Dazzler
  79. anon[222] • Disclaimer says:
    @Beagle

    Their overriding concern is internal security. That concern is heightened by Chinese suspicion that the US will use jihadist elements to destabilize the Chinese state, especially through its porous western and southern borders. One of the Chinese strategists I met during the late 2015 sessions was retired Admiral Luo Yuan, then the head of a military think tank. Admiral Luo told me that Chinese intelligence had tracked jihadists trained by then-US Commander in Iraq David Petraeus as they infiltrated back into China. 

    From this, Admiral Luo told me, China concluded that the US planned to use Uighur terrorists to destabilize China. I disputed the assertion; Petraeus was interested in bailing out the Bush administration and his own career prospects, in my view. Admiral Luo didn’t buy my explanation.— https://asiatimes.com/2021/09/afghan-debacle-cedes-eurasia-to-the-dragon-and-bear/

    David Petraeus was also on BBC hoping that civil war would engulf Afghanistan and would be a better alternative to Taliban takeover .

  80. anon[222] • Disclaimer says:
    @ricpic

    US bombed the airport delaying the evacuation . Qatar and Turkey fixed it days later .

  81. @Randy Dazzler

    I’ll try to produce a Cliff’s version.

    Sorry, I meant Twitter or Texting length.

    Honestly, a short attention span world is not moving you any faster. Certainly not deeper.

  82. AKINDLE says:

    Funny me, I thought embassies were only good for giving out visas to non-Whites and further DIEversify the US..

  83. Phil L says:

    The Taliban are a bunch of terrorists, uncivilized goons, and animals who have the morals of an alley cat.

    Let’s not elevate them to some higher species which they are not.

  84. denk says:

    The Guinea coup has FUS fingerprint all over it.

    Now we heard Congo might be reneging on its deal with China as well…

    The Democratic Republic of Congo is reportedly reviewing a \$6 billion infrastructure-for-minerals deal with Chinese investors as part of a broader review of mining contracts, Reuters reported on August 28.

    The move was attributed by some analysts to Western pressure to go after Chinese companies, the report said.

    [1]

    Translation;;
    The Chinese believe FUKUS is behind this Congo reversal as well.

    I second that.

    It wouldnt be the first time they tried to drive China outta their Africa you know ?

    Ironically, after this declaration of victory, La Republique, a Congolese daily newspaper revealed that some Western embassies funded the Congolese opposition to get the population to rise up against the Kabila regime: \$ 500,000 in total to sow unrest and riots in the capital Kinshasa and throughout Congo
    ……………
    The \$9 billion Congo-China infrastructures for minerals deal was opposed by the United States and other Western powers through the IMF, the World Bank, the African Development Bank and the Paris Club of Lenders until it was reduced to \$6 billion. The Nigeria-China oil infrastructures for oil also failed due to the United States and other Western powers’ pressure pilled on the Nigerian government through Western multinational oil companies. All the proxy wars waged by Africom in Congo, Sudan, Central African Republic, Mali also target China’s presence in Africa and to create a difficult environment for China-Africa relations to thrive. All these strategies will backfire!

    So we are not surprised that Chinese shops, stores and properties belonging to Chinese nationals were looted in Kinshasa. In fact, Chinese traders are often accused by Western media of engaging in unfair competition in Africa, not just in Congo, and of killing local industries.

    [2]

    [1]
    https://www.globaltimes.cn/page/202109/1233515.shtml

    [2]
    https://www.globalresearch.ca/washington-drives-an-imperial-wedge-between-congo-and-china/5429886

  85. Fr. John says:
    @AndrewR

    “We hear a lot about high Jewish IQ, but the Jews who run ZOG are definitely not bright, and many are quite insane.”

    Well, yes. But they rule the USA, so who’s the REAL fool?

    Doubt me? Over 75% of Senile Joe’s Cabinet are of the (((Tribe))). Hmmm.
    The Media is owned by (((them))). Hmmmm.
    And who makes up the majority of non-White Admittants to Ivy League schools? Ummm, (((yeah))).

    It’s almost as if we were a Zionist puppet gov’t or something….

    At least one gun-toting American sees through this charade. Damn, if only the rest of us could….

    “They [Taliban] want to rule, they want money. Yes, they want aid. And they want gas pipelines to run through Afghanistan from Turkmenistan to Pakistan (something they’ve wanted for a long time), and they want mining of the precious metals and gems, and they want a cut of all of that money. They want to live in big homes like rich people, and they want to sit in front of cameras and look important.

    And guess what – they’ll get it. Leaving Americans in Afghanistan is the perfect pretext for the State Department to return so that “diplomatic solutions to our problems can be worked out.” The State Department wants to recognize the Taliban. They’re another Muslim people to court, and the State Department has never seen an America-hating Muslim people they don’t love.”

    https://www.captainsjournal.com/2021/09/02/state-department-still-blocking-americans-from-leaving-afghanistan/

  86. @RobinG

    Well, you’ve had your say, but TG was more to the point.

    I found TG’s reply correct, pithy even, but incomplete.

    Upon rereading, I didn’t really address “exhausted their environment to support them.”, and I misinterpreted your “only” somewhat, reading it more as being strictly financial. Yes “drain” needed elaboration. Outside your “only”, is still the devastation suffered by the target opportunity zone, i.e. foreign country being invaded. That counts too, bigly.

    The factors that have led to the exhaustion:

    1) Host nation tapped, financial/productive capacity wise. (Redo the ‘financial’ and the ‘productive’ is freed.)

    2) Capable cannon fodder is running in short supply.

    3) The American people are learning the truth.

    4) Other profiteering operations are being exposed (e.g. the Pandemic response)

    5) The rest of the world has had enough and are now in a position to do something about it

    This sets the stage for internal turmoil within the USA. This is the intention, and the online (cyber) arm of that campaign has been in operation for a long time and the intensity is stepping up.

    My aim here has been to point all this out, and provide a solution to the financial crisis that has been deliberately engineered precisely to bring this about.

    Yes, I’ve had my say. I am now only responding to replies to any of my postings. I’ve covered the ideas I wanted to present.

    To paraphrase the Talking Heads: “Say something twice, why say it again.”

    So, to finish a hanging single:

    King David’s (acting as the state) big sin was to assume the people belonged to him. The purpose for him taking the census was to find out how many fighting men he would have coming available. 1 Samual 8 explains why this goes against God’s word.

    The people, and King David, paid a very heavy price for this.

    Now, what does this say about mandatory vaccines?

    What does it say about the state sticking its nose into the abortion issue?

    Please understand, people who want to employ the state to prohibit abortion (or mandate it in cases) are committing King David’s sin to even a greater degree. It is a mortal sin, left standing, not just a grievous one. You won’t pass the gate.

    Now, I’m pretty sure I’ve covered every theme at least twice.

  87. Jim H says:

    One is rather surprised that in listing the functions of embassies, Philip Giraldi does not include spying.

    US embassies are nests of spies, and so are those of our adversaries. Lack of US embassies in Iran and Syria result in the US flying blind, while the Russians have excellent on-the-ground intelligence.

    This works in reverse as well. Israel’s embassy in Washington DC, plus its implausibly numerous eight (8) consulates in other US cities, represent the largest espionage threat to the United States since the US pared back the number of Russian ‘diplomats.’

    Expelling Israeli spies by drastically restricting the number of accredited Israeli diplomats is the second most important national security measure the US could take — second only to rooting out dual citizens, zionists and Israel-Firsters salted all through the cabinet and the executive branch.

    Israel is our misfortune.

    • Replies: @RobinG
    , @Philip Giraldi
  88. RobinG says:
    @Jim H

    Absolutely agree, except for this: “….represent the largest espionage threat to the United States since the US pared back the number of Russian ‘diplomats.’ ” IMO, even at full strength the Russians were much less of a threat than the Israelis. [Could be because of the countless thousands (millions?) of sayanim embedded throughout. How many Jonathan Pollards, ready and willing?]

  89. @Jim H

    Quite right Jim – I should have mentioned that without an Embassy having reporting FSOs while also providing cover for spies the US frequently knows little about what is happening in the country. Washington has to rely on information re places like Syria and Iran from expats with agendas or other unreliable sources because it has no embassies in those places.

    • Replies: @arami
  90. arami says:
    @Philip Giraldi

    Agree.

    US is wasting its money on Iranian traitors pose as ‘oppositions’, while filling their pockets with the tax payers’ money, obtaining good good paid jobs, or obtaining ‘visa’ for their made up or exaggerated information to keep their ‘superiors’ at the state department happy pretending they are doing important works helping the west to topple Iranian government. The Iranian ‘opposition’ is FAKE and has no CREDIBILITY.

    The CIA outlet, voice of america, has no influence on the population of these countries. You are wasting tax payers’ money on liars who spread propaganda to make money off you to buy a house in New York worth of \$2M dollars that you are not able to buy, and laugh at you.

    Some of these traitors are given more than \$500,000 for their propaganda brought to this country by the Tribe to be used as propagandist against Iran, yet the same person in many cases supports IR of Iran, not to break all the ‘bridges’ knowing that US cannot be trusted forever.

  91. @Beagle

    I agree with your assessment, but it also seems that many Americans and military soldiers will not fall for that scam again. It also seems that many soldiers are quitting ASAP, due to that embarrassment there, and the vaxxes being forced on them now. Both are more than enough reasons for many to quit.
    Going back into Afghanistan will expose those behind it, and may reveal the reasons for doing so?

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