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The Ruinously Expensive American Military
Pay and benefits are out of control
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America’s Republican politicians complain that “entitlements,” by which they mean pensions and medical care, are leading the country to bankruptcy even as they fatten the spending on the Pentagon, which now takes 12 percent of the overall budget. And it should be noted that while workers contribute to the social programs during all their years of employment, the money that goes to the military comes straight out of the pockets of taxpayers before being wasted in ways that scarcely benefit the average citizen unless one seriously thinks that folks over in Syria, Iran and Afghanistan actually do threaten the survival of the United States of America.

I was in a Virginia supermarket the other day checking out when the woman behind the cash register in a perky voice asked me “Will you give $5 to support our troops?” I responded “No. Our troops already get way too much of our money.” She replied, “Hee, hee that’s a funny joke” and I said “It’s not a joke.” Her face dropped and she signaled to her boss over in customer service and asked her to take over, saying that I had been rude.

If there is any group in the United States that exceeds the sheer greed of our politicians it is the military, which believes itself to be “entitled” as a consequence of its role in the global war on terror. I am a veteran who began service in a largely draftee army in which we were paid “twenty-one dollars a day once a month” as the old World War 2 song goes. When we got out, the GI Bill gave us $175 a month to go back to college, which did not cover much.

Today’s United States has 2,083,000 soldiers, sailors, marines and airmen on active duty plus reserves. Now that the military is an all-volunteer rather than a conscript force, it is understandable that pay and benefits should be close to or equivalent to civilian pay scales. Currently, a sergeant first class with 10 years in service gets paid $3968 a month. A captain with ten years gets $6271. That amounts to $47,616 and $75,252 a year respectively plus healthcare, food, housing, cost of living increases and bonuses to include combat pay.

Though there are several options for retirement, generally speaking a soldier, sailor Marine or airman can retire after 20 years with half of his or her final “high three” pay as a pension, which means an 18-year-old who enlists right out of high school will be 38 and if he or she makes sergeant first class (E-7) he or she will be collecting $2338 a month or more for a rest of his or her life adjusted for cost of living,

Many Americans would be astonished at the pensions that general officers and admirals receive, particularly since 80% of them also land in “retirement” generously remunerated positions with defense contractors either in active positions soliciting new contracts from their former peers or sitting on boards. General David Petraeus, whom The Nation describes as the “general who lost two wars,” pulls in a pension of $220,000 even though he was forced to resign as CIA Director due to passing classified information to his mistress. He is also chairman of a New York City based company KKR Global, which is part of a private equity firm Kohlberg, Kravis Roberts. He reportedly is paid in six figures plus bonuses for “oversee[ing] the institute’s thought leadership platform focused on geopolitical and macro-economic trends, as well as environmental, social, and governance issues.”

It apparently is difficult to take money away from general and flag officers. An Air Force four-star general named Arthur Lichte was reduced in rank to a two-star in 2017 after he was found guilty of having raped a lower ranking woman officer. His pension went down from $216,000 to $156,000 due to the reduction. Normally, however, America’s 1,000 general and flag officers can look forward to comfortable retirements.

But on top of that rather generous bit of cash there are the considerable other benefits, as the old recruiting sergeants would put it, the “bennies.” Military retirees can receive full tuition and expenses at a college or technical school if they choose to go back to school. This is why one sees so many ads for online universities on television – they are trolling for soldier dollars knowing that it’s free money. The retiree will also have access to heavily subsidized medical care for him or herself plus family. The medical care is a significant bonus under the Tricare system, which describes itself on its website as “the gold standard for medical coverage, [that] is government managed health insurance.” A friend who is retired recently had a hip replacement operation that would have cost $39,000 for only a few hundred dollars through Tricare.

What is significant is that even enlisted military personnel can start a second career on top of their pension, given that many of them are still in their thirties. Some that have security clearances can jump into highly paid jobs with defense contractors immediately while others also find places in the bureaucracy with the Department of Homeland Security. Working for the government twice is called “double dipping.”

Some would argue that military personnel deserve what they get because the jobs are by their very nature dangerous, sometimes fatal. Indeed, the number of maimed and PTSD-afflicted soldiers returning from the endless wars is a national tragedy and caring for them should be a top priority. But the truth is that only a very small fraction, by some estimates far less than 20% of Army and Marine personnel in so-called “combat arms,” ever are in danger. Air Force and Navy personnel rarely experience combat at all apart from bombing targets far below or launching cruise missiles against Syrians. It is true that given the volatile nature of war against insurgents in places like Afghanistan many soldiers in support roles can come under fire, but it is far from normal and most men and women in service never experience a gun fired in anger.

Some numbers-crunchers in the Pentagon have already raised the alarm that the current pay, benefits and retirement levels for military personnel is unsustainable if the United States continues its worldwide mission against terrorists and allegedly rogue regimes. And it is also unsustainable if the U.S. seeks to return to a constitutional arrangement whereby the nation is actually defended by its military, not subordinated to it and being bankrupted by its costs.

 
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  1. Thomm says:

    Wait, so this is a lefty Democrat blog now, where The Nation is cited favorably?

    Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don’t make. Sure, some officers are corrupt and the military manages to manufacture demand for its expensive products, but this article goes way too far.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Thomm:

    I usually share your disdain for The Nation magazine. But in the vein of stopped clock correctness twice a day even it can sometimes be correct, witness its editor Steve Cohen's completely admirable efforts to lend sanity and substance to America's Russian foreign policy!
    , @Wally
    "Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don’t make."

    No they don't. Many would be unemployable in the real world.
    Apparently you did not read the article.

    Curiously not mentioned, the billions every year that Congress steals from US taxpayers and gives to "that shitty little country", 'Israel', and the fact that our military does their fighting for them.

    http://68.media.tumblr.com/639563970a638b606f4adb0ef05c778b/tumblr_inline_o7t4eewwJn1r75mb5_500.jpg

    , @jacques sheete

    Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don’t make.
     
    Based on my experience as a young kid, and observations as an old fart, I call BS on that unless "sacrifice" has acquired a new meaning on the street that I'm unaware of.
    , @SteveM

    Sure, some officers are corrupt
     
    "some"? Har-Dee-Har-Har. What percentage of people who separate from the military claim a "service related disability"? With that designation they not only get the retirement benefit bump but also set-asides for government jobs and contracts as well. Based on the number of service related disability claims by veterans, the United States must have the most physically fragile fighting force on the planet.

    And in this age of stupid perpetual wars, every "disabled veteran" is assumed have been shot up in the Middle East when if fact it's more likely they tripped on the steps on the way back from lunch at Fort Leavenworth. That erroneous assumption of a combat related disability is great for milking benefits from a sympathetic public.

    And there's more. Sleep apnea claims as a service related disability by veterans have exploded. Same with PTSD.

    https://www.veteranslawblog.org/sleep-apnea-va-disability-rating/

    https://www.disabilitysecrets.com/resources/disability/veterans-disability/make-ptsd-claim-va.htm

    The web is saturated with advice on how to game the military disability system.

    A vet I knew laughed as he told me he got a disability award for his knee. Only that injury came from playing too much basketball at his U.S. base. Another "disabled veteran" I know does Cross Fit to stay in shape. His most dangerous deployment was to southern Europe where he met his wife. And yes, he advertises his disability on his business web site and does qualify for government contract set-asides.

    Too bad for the taxpayers though. Since the military has been sanctified by the powerful Pentagon/MSM "Warrior-Hero" propaganda engine, challenging out of control military benefits is a political and social third rail.

    , @JustJeff
    That’s some top-notch boomerposting 10/10
    , @Mr. Anon

    Wait, so this is a lefty Democrat blog now, where The Nation is cited favorably?
     
    So which wars did Petraeus win?

    Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don’t make.
     
    Yeah, they have to wear a uniform and get up at 5:00 a.m. So do a lot of plumbers. Most people in the military are not in any more danger from violence than any number of civilians. Being a pizza deliveryman is probably more dangerous than most every military MOS.

    But then why would you know anymore about this topic than about anything else you spout off on?
    , @SanityClaus
    The traitors and murderers calling themselves the Pentagon and National Guard are pledged permanently to serve the BritishEMpire/N.A.T.O. HEROIN MAFIA.
    They wipe their ass with our Declaration of Independence.
    The taxes we pay do not pay for the pentagon. The pentagon can print all the fake money it wants.
    The congress of the U.S. does not appropriate fund for the military.
    The U.S. is ruled by the British Empire through the U.S. military. ONLY the military is recognized as having a right to vote in U.S. elections. Civilians must register to vote. Traitors don't have to register to vote. Permanent war in the service of the BritishEmpire is for stinking rats.
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  2. Anonymous[123] • Disclaimer says:

    US spends 4% of GDP on the military versus 2% in China, France, UK. That’s high but considering how rich the US is, not unbearable. Weak article.

    Read More
    • Replies: @CalDre
    4% of GDP, is it? Not sure about that but I do know it's 30% of federal tax revenue. Military spending is about $1 trillion, if you include all the various categories, per annum; whereas Federal receipts are about $3.3 trillion per annum.

    So about 30% of all Federal tax receipts - 30% of the money stolen from me at gunpoint, which forces me to labor for months every year without pay - goes to corrupt contractors, murderers and war criminals to oppress and murder people and destroy property throughout the world in service to the Evil Empire, including, of course, Jew supremacist Israel.

    So since you think it's so "bearable", you Evil Empire supporter, why don't you kindly give me back my 1 month of stolen labor every year to pay for your beloved Evil Empire's perpetual Campaign of Death, Oppression and Destruction?

    , @LondonBob
    Clearly is if you look at your debt to GDP and deficit.

    Interesting because the US has its history as part of the English tradition of no standing armies, militias, all possible due to the favourable geography of having a strip of water, or moat as Shakespeare put it, to deter potential invaders. The US military really is a WWII and Cold War creation. That the US seems to be the only nation not have benefited from the end of the cold war dividend in reduced military spending is an impressive feat by lobbyists and neocon ideologues.
    , @jacques sheete

    US spends 4% of GDP on the military versus 2% in China, France, UK. That’s high but considering how rich the US is, not unbearable. Weak article.
     
    The US is rich? Living on borrowed, stolen and extorted money and we're rich? The US has become a huge third world strip mall republic, complete with an overstuffed and parasitic military, and you think we're rich?The whole murderous,mendacious, thieving, and morally and financially bankrupt enterprise is poor by any significant measure, so your "reasoning" is what's weak.
    , @bjondo
    Over 50% of the discretionary budget. Like $$ going to the toxic Yid landfill, we don't know actual amounts.
    , @Stonehands

    “...US spends 4% of GDP on the military versus 2% in China, France, UK. That’s high but considering how rich the US is, not unbearable. Weak article...”
    ————————————————————-
    Every productive dollar that’s ever existed has been flushed down the MIC rathole. The whole “budget “is an elaborate ruse to conceal the chains that bind you.
    10’s of trillions disappear with gleeful approval on a regular basis.

    You sound like a typical brainwashed SHYSTER.
     


     
    , @RadicalCenter
    A person or entity whose liabilities outweigh its assets, is not rich.

    This is more true when the entity, like the US Fed Gov, has vastly more liabilities than physical assets, let alone readily marketable assets.

    The fed gov has promised to pay more each year than it has recently taken in as revenue, and more than it has any realistic hope of generating anytime soon.

    The fed gov is in hock more than 20 trillion in the books right now, and over 100 trillion projected forward.

    Yeah the fed gov is rich.

    Looking at average and median private-household net worth will not make the picture much rosier.

    Stop lying or learn math.

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  3. This is how Rome fell.

    Read More
    • Agree: renfro
    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    You're spot on. By the Late Roman Empire, society was divided into 2 groups - the humiliores ( lower classes ) and the honestiores ( upper classes ). Soldiers belonged to the latter group, and most historians consider that the common soldier never had a higher status in any society.
    History doesn't repeat itself exactly, but modern day America has largely followed the Roman route. Certainly, the sheer cost of the Roman Military was a factor in the decline and fall of the Roman Empire.
    The Roman soldier had a much more dangerous period of military service than the risk averse modern American military. Roman veterans certainly earned their benefits.
    , @polaco
    And it was the Roman military attacking and looting it's own cities when the empire was really crumbling and they weren't getting paid.
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  4. Captains with just eight years in service rake in over $100,000 a year with nothing more than a four-year degree in history! Senior enlisted can also make over $100,000 a year with a high school diploma, plus free family health care and zero contributions to retirement. After just four years of service, a married GI is making more than the average American college graduate with 20 years of work experience! I wrote about this several years ago for those who still fall for the draft era “poor GI myth”.

    http://www.g2mil.com/pay.htm

    Note our military spends billions of dollars on recruiting ads, but never mentions high pay. If they did, Congress may end the annual pay boost and lines would form at recruiting stations. Even most “experts” and reporters are confused because military lobbyists use the inflated ECI index (which includes increased health care and workers comp costs) rather than just wages, and pretend housing and food allowances are not income. Even the average military pilot earns twice a much as the average airline pilot, based on facts not Pentagon spin stories.

    This why career servicemen love the military, they are making 2-3 times more than comparable civilians, and they know it! Read my article if you are confused. Then many of these “retirees” leave at age 40 with nice retirement, then get a regular federal job, and put in for every minor ache and pain and get a thousand or more dollars each month in VA tax free “disability” pay. Sleep Apnea (aka snoring) is a popular disability to claim worth up to 50%. Some get 100% disability but you wouldn’t know it if you met them, and still work for Uncle Sam full time! The LA Times reported that after Senator John McCain announced he was fit to run for President, he was getting military retirement, 100% tax free VA disability, his Senator pay and social security retirement!

    Now before some ignorant servicemen whine about those serving in combat zones or deployed on ships, note that fewer than 10% of GIs ever serve in a real combat zone, not the fake ones like Bahrain. They rate their pay, but not those working soft office jobs in Hawaii or San Diego or Florida. Keep in mind that we have a volunteer force, and our military must constant prune the career force since far too many want to stay in as long as possible. No one leaves because of poor pay, but because of political BS.

    Read More
    • Agree: Stan d Mute
    • Replies: @Backwoods Bob
    I've seen articles decrying that first-year married privates are eligible for food stamps. Because their housing, medical, and the cost of living differential are not "income". They're living on more than twice the reported income. So yeah, they have arranged the pay precisely so that they are not subject to any income tax, and are in some cases eligible for food stamps.

    They have rec vehicles they can check out, boats and four-wheelers, snowmobiles and etc., special parks and land reservations, scenic cabins they can stay at with trifling fees or are free. Ours has a golf course that must be staggering for upkeep. Gyms, facilities for parties and events - stuff you'd pay a lot for in the private sector. The subsidized shopping is still there, but is not the huge discount it was at one time, at the bases in this state.

    The state gives them all kinds of benefits like instant residency for hunting and fishing. The stores give them discounts. Military appreciation days.

    And frankly it isn't your STEM people, business and tech fields going into the military. Their next best alternatives are a pittance by comparison. For who you are getting, the quality of recruit, this is well paid.

    I don't mind that so much as having three times the size we need to defend our borders, which is what we should be doing and no more. Foreign entanglements, searching for monsters to destroy, acting as the world police - this is the main problem.

    , @Jeff77450
    Disclaimer, I'm a retired E-8. The following isn't profound but the pay/benefits package of any "nonprofit" isn't determined by market-forces of supply-and-demand to the extent that jobs in private industry are. What's the dollar value of being willing to be underwater in a submarine for 60+ days? I don't know but frankly it sounds like a form of torture to me. How much is long separations from family worth? For missing your child's first steps or first little league game? I don't profess to know but you've got to pay servicemen/women enough for them to be willing to make those sacrifices. The fact that the armed forces have minimum entrance standards re. health, IQ, education, absence of a criminal record "artificially" restricts the labor-pool and thus pushes pay higher.

    In general you get what you pay for. We could reduce the pay/benefits for members of the armed forces but the quality of applicants would drop as well; less so when the economy is bad and jobs are scarce and more so when the economy is good.

    Let's conduct a thought experiment: literally everyone in America decides that serving in the armed forces is for losers or is otherwise too much trouble. So we have no armed forces. What is the end result of that? It probably would not result in amphibious landings on the East & West coasts as suggested in the alternative history tv series _The Man in the High Castle_. The various bad actors of the world, e.g. Russia, China, Iran and N. Korea would proceed to "act out" against their neighbors more so than they already are. Taiwan would almost certainly have to capitulate to China. Our various interests around the world, as well as those of some of our allies, would be attacked or would experience forms of extortion. Strangleholds on strategic trade choke-points. Yes, the free ride that Europe, Japan and others have been enjoying for 73 years would come to an end and they'd have to make some hard choices between "guns and butter," as the economists say. (*That* thought fills me with a malevolent glee). I doubt that Mexico would actually try to retake the Southwest but criminal elements would be emboldened.

    Someone once described the armed forces as "a necessary evil." The armed forces generate *tremendous* waste but I don't see an alternative.
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  5. Dan Hayes says:
    @Thomm
    Wait, so this is a lefty Democrat blog now, where The Nation is cited favorably?

    Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don't make. Sure, some officers are corrupt and the military manages to manufacture demand for its expensive products, but this article goes way too far.

    Thomm:

    I usually share your disdain for The Nation magazine. But in the vein of stopped clock correctness twice a day even it can sometimes be correct, witness its editor Steve Cohen’s completely admirable efforts to lend sanity and substance to America’s Russian foreign policy!

    Read More
    • Replies: @36 ulster
    One can admire Mr. Cohen's efforts to give us some perspective and--yes--sanity on the debate over Russia, and still view a Sovietist rag like THE NATION with contempt. It would seem that he is related to TN only by marriage. (Tip: Cohen usually appears for interviews on Tuesdays on THE JOHN BATCHELOR SHOW ( WABC 770AM) at 10pm EST. Always informative.)
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    AGEED

    I have never read The Nation nor will I, I'm pretty sure. Even so, when you're right you're right. I disagree with Thomm on comment #1. As for the author, Mr. Giraldi, I suppose he could have stuck in "The Nation, that cntrl-left rag, even rightly stated ... blah, blah...", if it makes us feel better (yes, it might ;-}
    , @bjondo
    I've read Cohen is a Russia expert and gives sensible analysis regarding events there. Don't know his views on holocaust, Occupied Palestine.

    His wife, Katrina vanden Heuvel, is part owner, publisher, editor of THE NATION.

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  6. @Carlton Meyer
    Captains with just eight years in service rake in over $100,000 a year with nothing more than a four-year degree in history! Senior enlisted can also make over $100,000 a year with a high school diploma, plus free family health care and zero contributions to retirement. After just four years of service, a married GI is making more than the average American college graduate with 20 years of work experience! I wrote about this several years ago for those who still fall for the draft era "poor GI myth".

    http://www.g2mil.com/pay.htm

    Note our military spends billions of dollars on recruiting ads, but never mentions high pay. If they did, Congress may end the annual pay boost and lines would form at recruiting stations. Even most "experts" and reporters are confused because military lobbyists use the inflated ECI index (which includes increased health care and workers comp costs) rather than just wages, and pretend housing and food allowances are not income. Even the average military pilot earns twice a much as the average airline pilot, based on facts not Pentagon spin stories.

    This why career servicemen love the military, they are making 2-3 times more than comparable civilians, and they know it! Read my article if you are confused. Then many of these "retirees" leave at age 40 with nice retirement, then get a regular federal job, and put in for every minor ache and pain and get a thousand or more dollars each month in VA tax free "disability" pay. Sleep Apnea (aka snoring) is a popular disability to claim worth up to 50%. Some get 100% disability but you wouldn't know it if you met them, and still work for Uncle Sam full time! The LA Times reported that after Senator John McCain announced he was fit to run for President, he was getting military retirement, 100% tax free VA disability, his Senator pay and social security retirement!

    Now before some ignorant servicemen whine about those serving in combat zones or deployed on ships, note that fewer than 10% of GIs ever serve in a real combat zone, not the fake ones like Bahrain. They rate their pay, but not those working soft office jobs in Hawaii or San Diego or Florida. Keep in mind that we have a volunteer force, and our military must constant prune the career force since far too many want to stay in as long as possible. No one leaves because of poor pay, but because of political BS.

    I’ve seen articles decrying that first-year married privates are eligible for food stamps. Because their housing, medical, and the cost of living differential are not “income”. They’re living on more than twice the reported income. So yeah, they have arranged the pay precisely so that they are not subject to any income tax, and are in some cases eligible for food stamps.

    They have rec vehicles they can check out, boats and four-wheelers, snowmobiles and etc., special parks and land reservations, scenic cabins they can stay at with trifling fees or are free. Ours has a golf course that must be staggering for upkeep. Gyms, facilities for parties and events – stuff you’d pay a lot for in the private sector. The subsidized shopping is still there, but is not the huge discount it was at one time, at the bases in this state.

    The state gives them all kinds of benefits like instant residency for hunting and fishing. The stores give them discounts. Military appreciation days.

    And frankly it isn’t your STEM people, business and tech fields going into the military. Their next best alternatives are a pittance by comparison. For who you are getting, the quality of recruit, this is well paid.

    I don’t mind that so much as having three times the size we need to defend our borders, which is what we should be doing and no more. Foreign entanglements, searching for monsters to destroy, acting as the world police – this is the main problem.

    Read More
    • Agree: Mishra
    • Replies: @Tbbh
    Two of my friends own motorcycle dealerships in San Antonio. Gee. I wonder how they can sell so many, compared to dealers in towns without major military bases...
    , @jacques sheete

    Foreign entanglements, searching for monsters to destroy, acting as the world police – this is the main problem.
     
    Yooge problems for sure, but playing Sugar Daddy to Izzie-land is the biggest one of all in terms of dollars as well as moral capital, and it probably dwarfs welfare subsidies to "defense" corporations.
    , @JackOH
    BB, I personally know a couple who are around seventy, very healthy and active, who have parlayed multiple pension-qualifying careers between them in the armed forces, postal service, teaching, and county government, into astounding lifestyles. Harley motorcycle, Winnebago, big house, weekend cottage, cruises, the whole shebang.

    They're very nice people, part of the local Puerto Rican ascendancy, first generation descendants of the Puerto Ricans recruited by the now defunct local steel mills back in the 1950s.

    I'm sure it can be said they worked for what they got, but, still . . . you gotta wonder what's going on.
    , @RadicalCenter
    Commissaries, gyms, and hair salons on bases in the USA must end.

    Pay the soldiers well, but have them live and try to get by in the same economy and world as their employers — WE THE TAXPAYERS.

    Also, require soldiers to live off base and pay their own housing (boosting their cash pay accordingly) OR start counting their housing as taxable income as it would be for the rest of us mere TAXPAYERS.
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  7. Wally says:
    @Thomm
    Wait, so this is a lefty Democrat blog now, where The Nation is cited favorably?

    Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don't make. Sure, some officers are corrupt and the military manages to manufacture demand for its expensive products, but this article goes way too far.

    “Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don’t make.”

    No they don’t. Many would be unemployable in the real world.
    Apparently you did not read the article.

    Curiously not mentioned, the billions every year that Congress steals from US taxpayers and gives to “that shitty little country”, ‘Israel’, and the fact that our military does their fighting for them.

    Read More
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  8. CalDre says:
    @Anonymous
    US spends 4% of GDP on the military versus 2% in China, France, UK. That's high but considering how rich the US is, not unbearable. Weak article.

    4% of GDP, is it? Not sure about that but I do know it’s 30% of federal tax revenue. Military spending is about $1 trillion, if you include all the various categories, per annum; whereas Federal receipts are about $3.3 trillion per annum.

    So about 30% of all Federal tax receipts – 30% of the money stolen from me at gunpoint, which forces me to labor for months every year without pay – goes to corrupt contractors, murderers and war criminals to oppress and murder people and destroy property throughout the world in service to the Evil Empire, including, of course, Jew supremacist Israel.

    So since you think it’s so “bearable”, you Evil Empire supporter, why don’t you kindly give me back my 1 month of stolen labor every year to pay for your beloved Evil Empire’s perpetual Campaign of Death, Oppression and Destruction?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sowhat
    The Mitary Industrial Intelligence Complex is the biggest ripoff SECOND BEHIND THE IRS. Unconstitutional, Illegal, war-mongering, Zionist-backing, bloated, money-sucking posses. If you think that I may despise ALL of them and what they blindly follow, you are correct. There is no fixing this sacrilege; it MUST BE OVERTHROWN! ANYONE, ANYONE who thinks differently is working for them, propagandizing for them, or is an idiot with no hair in his pubic areas. They could all burn and I would laugh...them and those who support them in any way. The system is NOT Constitutional. The idea of patriotism is highjacked by these "hero-warriors, and the Department of Homeland Security and the other twenty or more alphabets departments are all leading up to an ORWELLIAN AMERIKA. Pardon me for the truth. America has died in their lusts. Me? I'll ride out my days in cynicism and disdain.
    , @KA
    1 trillion ? I want to believe you. But isn't it about 700 billions?
    , @Momus
    Your 1 month of stolen labor is repaid you in the form of the social wage.

    Paved roads, free recreational facilities, clean air, relative social order and a myriad of other benefits.
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  9. LondonBob says:
    @Anonymous
    US spends 4% of GDP on the military versus 2% in China, France, UK. That's high but considering how rich the US is, not unbearable. Weak article.

    Clearly is if you look at your debt to GDP and deficit.

    Interesting because the US has its history as part of the English tradition of no standing armies, militias, all possible due to the favourable geography of having a strip of water, or moat as Shakespeare put it, to deter potential invaders. The US military really is a WWII and Cold War creation. That the US seems to be the only nation not have benefited from the end of the cold war dividend in reduced military spending is an impressive feat by lobbyists and neocon ideologues.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hibernian
    I think we benefitted at least a little bit between the end of the Cold War and 911. That was how Bill Clinton ran a slight surplus at least one year.
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  10. TheBoom says:

    For me the pay and benefits aren’t the core problem. We are paying to destabilize the world, kill US citizens, kill civilians, increase terror all for wars that don’t benefit the American citizenry as a whole in any way. At one time they might have been for corporations now they are for Israel.

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    • Replies: @jacques sheete
    "Agree" button on hold for now, and I have nothing to add.
    , @Per/Norway
    sad but true.
    , @Rurik
    sad but true
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  11. @Cloak And Dagger
    This is how Rome fell.

    You’re spot on. By the Late Roman Empire, society was divided into 2 groups – the humiliores ( lower classes ) and the honestiores ( upper classes ). Soldiers belonged to the latter group, and most historians consider that the common soldier never had a higher status in any society.
    History doesn’t repeat itself exactly, but modern day America has largely followed the Roman route. Certainly, the sheer cost of the Roman Military was a factor in the decline and fall of the Roman Empire.
    The Roman soldier had a much more dangerous period of military service than the risk averse modern American military. Roman veterans certainly earned their benefits.

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    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @G.-M. P.
    "Throughout their existence, the Templars remained an independent body, answerable only to the Pope. But it was their affairs away from the Holy land that brought them to preeminence, as international bankers, ironic it was that the pure knights would create the financial banking system so integral to the economic infrastructure throughout Christendom and which ultimately brough them to their downfall."

    https://youtu.be/8B47d_c-ZOs?t=9m35s


    History always repeats itself:


    "Taking Down" British Officials"

    "A quite incredible story out of England has not received much media coverage in the United States. It concerns how the Israeli Embassy in London connived with government officials to “take down” parliamentarians and government ministers who were considered to be critical of the Jewish State."

    "Indeed, wherever one goes – Western Europe, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the United States – there is a well-organized and funded mechanism in place ready, willing and able to go to war to protect Israel."

    http://www.unz.com/pgiraldi/taking-down-british-officials/

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  12. myself says:

    One thing worth wondering about is:

    What is the real “defense burden” (the percentage of our GDP spent on the military) sans bullshit accounting tricks and “reclassification” of expenses.

    For example, if we used accounting methods as used in some of the more efficient, less bloated military establishments of our allies, what would be the actual cost to our economy of our defense spending?

    For all we know, military expenditures may actually be back to Reagan Cold War percentage levels, or slightly more.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Tbbh
    We spend more than the next ten nations, COMBINED. ...To "defend ourselves" from goat herders that can't afford passports or air tickets. 800 bases scattered across the planet. But, thinking about it, folks like somalians have been invading the US...OH. WAIT! Federal refugee programs have been importing somalis. NEVER MIND.

    We fight them there so we can bring them here and put them on welfare/food stamps? Makes perfect sense.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    To the DoD's budget (including "extraordinary" war funding) one would add the Department of Veterans' Affairs ($180 bn) and the nuclear weapons programs ($12bn) of the Department of Energy.

    Some people suggest including elements of the DHS as well, but I think this is bogus.

    States also pay some expenses of the National Guard (this issue is so confusing I don't understand it), and some states operate welfare programs for veterans. I'm not sure if the latter should count.

    So you can add another percentage point of GDP to the official budget.
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  13. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:

    Article didn’t mention the dependency allowance. I looked on military websites to find the amount but you have to be registered military to find the amount

    There is a clothing allowance, why? And the military is heavily affirmative action Hispanic black and female I live near a big VA. Twice a day hundreds of VA employees drive right past my house. Almost all are black. I drive through the VA often. Most everyone I see is black except for the Indian immigrant Drs.

    California vets get some kind of no down payment low interest mortgage. When they retire they can get a loan for $50,000 to use for setting up a business or buying rental property.

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    • Replies: @Rod1963
    You really don't want affirmative action nurses looking after anymore than those Bombay specials that the VA hires as doctors. It's not a perk, it's just free.

    The VA is a train wreck because of these people. No one wants to say squat because you have to point a finger at all the AA hires and that would get you labeled as a racist.

    And oh they are paid, very, very well. The average RN makes over a $100k at the VA. I know private sector nurses who went to work for the VA because of the pay and bennies. Plus you can't get fired.
    , @J.Ross
    The clothing allowance is for purchase, upkeep, and repair of uniforms. There is a bureaucratic mindset of having things clearly laid out which guarantees a lot of this spending, especially when the time preferences of new enlistees bears out the wisdom of having a specially set aside and clearly labeled clothing allowance. Many good critics with detailed grievamces skip over the governmental addiction to trying to solve reality with longer and longer rulebooks.
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  14. Read
    John Toland, ‘Gods of War’, New York 1985
    to see the amounts McArthur squeezed out of the president of the Phillipines, with the Pentagon knowing.

    Read More
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  15. @Thomm
    Wait, so this is a lefty Democrat blog now, where The Nation is cited favorably?

    Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don't make. Sure, some officers are corrupt and the military manages to manufacture demand for its expensive products, but this article goes way too far.

    Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don’t make.

    Based on my experience as a young kid, and observations as an old fart, I call BS on that unless “sacrifice” has acquired a new meaning on the street that I’m unaware of.

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  16. @Anonymous
    US spends 4% of GDP on the military versus 2% in China, France, UK. That's high but considering how rich the US is, not unbearable. Weak article.

    US spends 4% of GDP on the military versus 2% in China, France, UK. That’s high but considering how rich the US is, not unbearable. Weak article.

    The US is rich? Living on borrowed, stolen and extorted money and we’re rich? The US has become a huge third world strip mall republic, complete with an overstuffed and parasitic military, and you think we’re rich?The whole murderous,mendacious, thieving, and morally and financially bankrupt enterprise is poor by any significant measure, so your “reasoning” is what’s weak.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    Federal Debt $20 trillion, Accumulated Balance of Trade Deficit since 1990 $12 trillion ( unadjusted for inflation ). That's not even including State and Local Debt, never mind Private Debt.
    The only thing preventing complete bankruptcy is that the Dollar is the World's Reserve Currency- for now. Once China and others start dumping US Treasury Bonds, that will be over.
    , @Anonymous
    US is rich and the debt is high. Both can be true at the same time. But taxes are relatively low so if there is a government debt crisis paying down the debt would just involve raising taxes. Just look at GDP per capita US which is very high up there so I don't see how anyone can argue the US is not a very rich country.

    Despite many problems, the US has many advantages like half the world's Ashkenazim who are very good at creating unbeatable new companies. Just look at how the half the 40 riches entrepreneurs under 40 in the US according to Forbes are Jewish. Jews are producing so much innovation in the US that it offsets a lot of the problems like military spending at 4% of GDP and less productive sub-populations.
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  17. Rank ‘Ol Rummie spoke the truth once and it happened one day before the towers were pulled.

    Rumsfeld says $2.3 TRILLION Missing from Pentagon

    “The adversary is closer to home; it’s the Pentagon bureaucracy…”

    - Donald Rumsfeld on Sept. 10, 2001

    PS: For those who don’t know where the missile, err, “plane” hit the Pentagon on 9/11, do a tad of research and tell me, with a straight face, that it was some coincidence.

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  18. @jacques sheete

    US spends 4% of GDP on the military versus 2% in China, France, UK. That’s high but considering how rich the US is, not unbearable. Weak article.
     
    The US is rich? Living on borrowed, stolen and extorted money and we're rich? The US has become a huge third world strip mall republic, complete with an overstuffed and parasitic military, and you think we're rich?The whole murderous,mendacious, thieving, and morally and financially bankrupt enterprise is poor by any significant measure, so your "reasoning" is what's weak.

    Federal Debt $20 trillion, Accumulated Balance of Trade Deficit since 1990 $12 trillion ( unadjusted for inflation ). That’s not even including State and Local Debt, never mind Private Debt.
    The only thing preventing complete bankruptcy is that the Dollar is the World’s Reserve Currency- for now. Once China and others start dumping US Treasury Bonds, that will be over.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    The only thing preventing complete bankruptcy is that the Dollar is the World’s Reserve Currency- for now.
     
    Yup.

    And "The Gweatist Generation" fought WW2 to defend worldwide freedom. I guess they forgot about the Bretton-Woods party.

    We been had, I think.
    , @ohmy
    JS, Since Rumsfeld admitted, the day before 911 when he helped murder 30 forensic accountants plus a handful of Naval Investigators, you are 1 of the few I ever heard mention the stolen money. Since the Clinton administration up to 2016 the number is now $21 $Trillions, from just 2 departments.
    Check out Catherine Fitts @ solari.com
    , @Anonymous
    China has been reducing its holdings in US treasuries. What negative effect has this had so far on the US?
    , @Sandmich
    "Once China and others start dumping US Treasury Bonds, that will be over."
    ---
    That's not how that works; China would basically have to go cold turkey on their trade surplus with the U.S., only then would they not need the Bonds. Fat chance of that happening though. More likely is the U.S. Congress generating more debt than can be sponged up by even the most aggressive debt lovers (like China), and at that point there will be "issues".
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  19. Tbbh says:
    @Backwoods Bob
    I've seen articles decrying that first-year married privates are eligible for food stamps. Because their housing, medical, and the cost of living differential are not "income". They're living on more than twice the reported income. So yeah, they have arranged the pay precisely so that they are not subject to any income tax, and are in some cases eligible for food stamps.

    They have rec vehicles they can check out, boats and four-wheelers, snowmobiles and etc., special parks and land reservations, scenic cabins they can stay at with trifling fees or are free. Ours has a golf course that must be staggering for upkeep. Gyms, facilities for parties and events - stuff you'd pay a lot for in the private sector. The subsidized shopping is still there, but is not the huge discount it was at one time, at the bases in this state.

    The state gives them all kinds of benefits like instant residency for hunting and fishing. The stores give them discounts. Military appreciation days.

    And frankly it isn't your STEM people, business and tech fields going into the military. Their next best alternatives are a pittance by comparison. For who you are getting, the quality of recruit, this is well paid.

    I don't mind that so much as having three times the size we need to defend our borders, which is what we should be doing and no more. Foreign entanglements, searching for monsters to destroy, acting as the world police - this is the main problem.

    Two of my friends own motorcycle dealerships in San Antonio. Gee. I wonder how they can sell so many, compared to dealers in towns without major military bases…

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    • Replies: @Andele
    Tbbh

    Your friends sell so many motorcycles because of the hot San Antonio temperatures , which are very good for riding motorcycles , man .....

    Nothing to do with the US military bases in San Antonio : Lackland , Brooks ,Kelly , Randolph , Sam Houston , Camp Bullis .....

    And , of course , there are so many military bases in San Antonio because of the " mexican threat " , don`t you think so ?
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  20. Tbbh says:
    @myself
    One thing worth wondering about is:

    What is the real "defense burden" (the percentage of our GDP spent on the military) sans bullshit accounting tricks and "reclassification" of expenses.

    For example, if we used accounting methods as used in some of the more efficient, less bloated military establishments of our allies, what would be the actual cost to our economy of our defense spending?

    For all we know, military expenditures may actually be back to Reagan Cold War percentage levels, or slightly more.

    We spend more than the next ten nations, COMBINED. …To “defend ourselves” from goat herders that can’t afford passports or air tickets. 800 bases scattered across the planet. But, thinking about it, folks like somalians have been invading the US…OH. WAIT! Federal refugee programs have been importing somalis. NEVER MIND.

    We fight them there so we can bring them here and put them on welfare/food stamps? Makes perfect sense.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    We spend more than the next ten nations, COMBINED. …To “defend ourselves” from goat herders that can’t afford passports or air tickets. 800 bases scattered across the planet. But, thinking about it, folks like somalians have been invading the US…OH. WAIT! Federal refugee programs have been importing somalis. NEVER MIND.

    We fight them there so we can bring them here and put them on welfare/food stamps? Makes perfect sense.
     

    Yep, we import the third world so they can then engage in welfare fraud and siphon off even more hundreds of millions of dollars to their shithole.

    http://www.fox9.com/news/investigators/millions-of-dollars-in-suitcases-fly-out-of-msp-but-why

    Millions of dollars in suitcases fly out of MSP, but why?

    MINNEAPOLIS (KMSP) - For five months, Fox 9 has been investigating what appears to be rampant fraud in a massive state program.

    This fraud is suspected of costing Minnesota taxpayers as much as $100 million a year.

    The Fox 9 Investigators reporting is based on public records and nearly a dozen government sources who have direct knowledge of what is happening.

    SUITCASES FILLED WITH MONEY

    This story begins at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, where mysterious suitcases filled with cash have become a common carry-on.

    On the morning of March 15, Fox 9 chased a tip about a man who was leaving the country. Sources said he took a carry-on bag through security that was packed with $1 million in cash. Travelers can do that, as long as they fill out the proper government forms...

    ...FOX 9 REPORTED ON THE FRAUD FIVE YEARS AGO

    To better understand the connection between daycare fraud and the surge in carry-on cash, you have to look at the history of this crime.

    Five years ago the Fox 9 Investigators were first to report that daycare fraud was on the rise in Minnesota, exposing how some businesses were gaming the system to steal millions in government subsidies meant to help low-income families with their childcare expenses...

    ...Fox 9 obtained video of Fozia Ali being sworn in as a member of the city of Hopkins Park Board.

    “I will support the constitution of the United States,” she said.

    As she was taking her oath of office, she was also under investigation for wire fraud and theft of public money.

    “So help me God,” she said during the ceremony.

    State and federal agents had already raided Ali’s daycare center in south Minneapolis. The business was suspected of billing the government for more than a million dollars’ worth of bogus childcare services.
     

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  21. DanFromCt says:

    I was in the field and in a number of firefights during my year in Vietnam, 69 – 70, and I find the idea of some store or VA clerk thanking me for my service offensive as all get out because I know these well meaning strangers, who owe me nothing at all, are being played for fools to serve the interests of America’s worst enemy, Israel and its American fifth column. I’m also disgusted by this new breed of soldier who’s less any sort of manly patriot than a skin-headed, “muh brothers, muh mission” wind-up martinet who mistakes the vain daintiness of pumping iron as well as technical superiority’s easy targets for manliness. As for the Pentagon, it’s the mother of all bureaucracies whose leaders but for the costumes are no more warriors than the time-serving hacks in any other bloated bureaucracy, who couldn’t care less, as the facts make clear, about sending young Americans to die and be maimed so the sons of their Israeli masters need not.

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    • Agree: Mike P
    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    Well, that's well written.

    Bravo!
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  22. I used to feel smug after jumping from the US military to banking in the knowledge that my starting pay was several multiples of my military pay and even outstripped that of the JCS heads who I served under.

    Somewhere along the way, probably in the 2000s during the so-called War for Talent, Federal civilian and military pay got a significant uptick well in excess of what the KSAs (Knowledge, Skills, & Abilities) of these folks as measured by OPM and DoD, and there has been no looking back.

    Giraldi might be right that the troops are overpaid, but that is just the tip of the iceberg that is the Military Industrial Security Academic Complex.

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  23. anon[846] • Disclaimer says:

    Defense spending is allegedly 3.6% of GDP ($700B / $19,000B) but is actually over 5% if you factor in the hidden Defense spending. VA benefits, over $100B, nuclear arsenal covered under Dept of Energy (my favorite) over $30B, Defense portion of debt service over $100B, and other places that I’d have to dig up.

    Defense spending is over 30% of the budget, the low ball 15% is only if you include social security and medicare which you should not because that is covered by dedicated payroll taxes. If payroll taxes were eliminated, those programs would go away but the budget deficit would not be impacted. This is a trick that defense consultants play to make Defense spending look smaller.

    Defense spending is over 50% if you also discount our annual debt service, this is why the $1.3T featured $600B for domestic vs $700B for Defense.

    I thought that singling out military pay was a tad mean spirited. Capping pensions that disproportionately benefit Generals who then go onto consulting jobs for Defense contractors and get paid positions on FOX might be a good idea but I didn’t like the tone of this column.

    No serious person who says they care about budget deficits can approach them without looking at Defense Spending.
    - Chris Chuba

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    • Replies: @ohmy
    anon, tell it like it is. Everyone should also know the debt servce cost to our budget is the interest Americans pay. What's 2% of 20 trillions? 40 billions? IDK l, but it's alot. Well that's the federal reserve *a private corp.) income estimate for the yeat, which the share holders, all 6 of them, pay no income tax.
    , @RadicalCenter
    Tough shit that you don’t like his tone. We don’t like being systematically ripped off and told it’s patriotic.

    We should start either taxing the military employees’ housing allowance OR require them to buy their own housing off-base. I’d be fine with increasing cash salary to make up for it. Let’s get an honest number on what their salaries really are and then debate whether they get paid enough.

    And by all means let’s reform and reduce officer pensions. End this last-three-years calculation and require more than 20 years “service” to get half or more of one’s salary as pension. They are desk jobs and they can and should work at least, say, THIRTY years before being able to retire st that level of pension and work elsewhere.

    Military is a wasteful fraudulent untrustworthy bureaucracy like any other in the fed gov — or worse because they get a free pass from a lot of people.
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  24. Johann says:

    One of the disturbing actions of the soldier worshipping conservatives is the Wounded Warrior scam which uses crippled and deformed GIs in ads aimed at the heartstrings of the American public. The fact that so many soldiers are returning from useless wars in dire condition should be the responsibility of the Department of Defense (War) and its Government which is responsible for the mayhem and violence in so many parts of the world not a subject for organized begging which often preys on the suffering of the young.

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  25. Re; Mr. Giraldi’s brave & unspoken words: “(ZUS military) Pay and benefits are way out of control”

    With a long history of planning & implementation, below, presstv explains how radical “citizens” were headhunted & placed in control as to when & how our hallowed ZUS troop commanders do their Jewish job assignments.

    http://www.presstv.com/Detail/2018/05/15/561763/Israel-gained-control-over-US-foreign-policy-by-placing-citizens-in-key-positions

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  26. Anonymous[405] • Disclaimer says:
    @jacques sheete

    US spends 4% of GDP on the military versus 2% in China, France, UK. That’s high but considering how rich the US is, not unbearable. Weak article.
     
    The US is rich? Living on borrowed, stolen and extorted money and we're rich? The US has become a huge third world strip mall republic, complete with an overstuffed and parasitic military, and you think we're rich?The whole murderous,mendacious, thieving, and morally and financially bankrupt enterprise is poor by any significant measure, so your "reasoning" is what's weak.

    US is rich and the debt is high. Both can be true at the same time. But taxes are relatively low so if there is a government debt crisis paying down the debt would just involve raising taxes. Just look at GDP per capita US which is very high up there so I don’t see how anyone can argue the US is not a very rich country.

    Despite many problems, the US has many advantages like half the world’s Ashkenazim who are very good at creating unbeatable new companies. Just look at how the half the 40 riches entrepreneurs under 40 in the US according to Forbes are Jewish. Jews are producing so much innovation in the US that it offsets a lot of the problems like military spending at 4% of GDP and less productive sub-populations.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Among the lots of good comments on the thread so far, yours is kind of an outlier, to put it nicely. No, you cannot be both rich and in debt (6 - 7 X more than your yearly income) at the same time.. There are perhaps different definitions of broke that people or families may use for themselves.

    1) Out of spending cash - got assets, but awaiting more income before any spending can resume. That's not too bad - it just shows lack of foresight or bad luck.

    2) Broke even - got some assets, but owe the same amount - income is about the same as expenditures expected. There are lots like this - they need to buckle down, but will probably be OK.

    3) Flat broke - can't borrow anymore due to bad payment history, even to friends and family - not enough income to pay expenditures or even on this.

    4) Broke like the US Feral Government - borrowing 1/3 of the money for the $4,000,000,000,000 budget each year, as only 2/3 can be collected via personal income/corporate income/excise/etc. taxes (just look near the back of the IRS 1040 instructions - they're not hiding this stuff). Total debt of $20,000,000,000,000 is 5 X the budget each year and 6-7 X the income collected yearly. It is > 100 % of the total GDP. There is no coming out of this hole without financial pain for almost everyone but those with a Challenger or other large/medium-cabin business jet with precious metals stashed on an island or S. American/Oriental country with a runway on your compound with armed guards.

    Just raise taxes? Fuck you too.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Do you realize that $4 Trillion means roughly $200,000 is owed by each actual (not just filing forms) taxpaying family? What do you propose to raise taxes to?

    More on the Feral Gov't portion of the Global Financial Stupidity going on in Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 , and Part 5.

    Do you understand why interest rates are too low for Granny to make more than $350 a month on that half-a-million dollars her late husband had sweated his whole life to save up? The interest rates are held down to under 1% on anything but risky investments, so that the federal interest payments are kept 5-6 % of the budget (again look at the pie charts on the 1040 book - if I were at a different computer, I'd paste that in for you). If the rates were let, by the FED, to rise to normal rates - the time value of money - then the interest payments on the $20 Trillion, in the form of Treasury bond interest rates, would rise to something like 1/4 to 1/3 of the whole budget. Keep in mind, 1/3 of the budget expenditures must be covered by NEW BORROWING! Not good, man, not good.
    , @jacques sheete

    US is rich and the debt is high. Both can be true at the same time. But taxes are relatively low so if there is a government debt crisis paying down the debt would just involve raising taxes. Just look at GDP per capita US which is very high up there so I don’t see how anyone can argue the US is not a very rich country.

    Despite many problems, the US has many advantages like half the world’s Ashkenazim who are very good at creating unbeatable new companies....etc., etc., etc....
     
    Thanks for the laughs. You must be of the Maven-Krugman school of debt. You're all wrong, and it's obviously beyond your understanding that though you can fool almost all of the goyim almost all of the time, you can't fool all of us all the time.

    However, please do keep trying!
    , @bjondo
    Love the Wall St innovations and Fed innovations and reasons to go to warssss. Broke the economy while stealing trillions. Did similar to Russia.

    God bless the Yids.
    , @L.K
    "Despite many problems, the US has many advantages like half the world’s Ashkenazim who are very good at creating unbeatable new companies. Just look at how the half the 40 riches entrepreneurs under 40 in the US according to Forbes are Jewish. Jews are producing so much innovation in the US that it offsets a lot of the problems like military spending at 4% of GDP and less productive sub-populations."

    buhahHAHAHAHAHA....

    another comedian, thanks for the laughs!
    , @Paul C.
    The US could be prosperous if not for the parasitic international central bankers who control its currency. This criminal cartel (zionist/jewish) is siphoning the wealth not only of the US but every nation on earth, which is why they're all in debt. It would defy economics if this were not the case. You would have rich and poor countries, they couldn't all be insolvent, which is what they are.

    Effectively, we're all slaves to this illegal cartel. With an unlimited money supply, or should I say currency supply, since it's not real money, all aspects of society are owned and controlled by them (gov't, courts, education, etc). Our labor keeps the machine going and we're forced to pay over 50% in taxes when you add it all up (federal, state, fica, sales) and another sizable % goes to paying interest (mortgage loans etc).

    All 50 states recognize Commercial law (UCC) which is Admiralty law, leaving us without rights. There's a delicate dance going on to recognize Common law so it's not obvious to all that we're slaves to the bankers. The truth is the US is a corporation and all the federal agencies are corporations too.

    We've been duped. We need to end the Fed immediately and start a new government of the people.

    The bankers are satanic, they create all wars and are trying to put the final pieces in place (disarm the US through false flags, staged by our gov't) for the overthrow of the US and likely depopulation, similar to the Bolshevik Revolution. Once the US goes, they'll have world domination which is what they seek, as outlined in the Protocols of Zion, Morals and Dogma and the Communist Manifesto.

    , @anon
    US has many advantages like half the world’s Ashkenazim who are very good at creating unbeatable new companies. Just look at how the half the 40 riches entrepreneurs under 40 in the US according to Forbes are Jewis


    Sure they serve the interest of the deep state and the State of Israel. Look at FACEBOOK and GOOGLE how they manipulate the information suppress information show Israel in good light and how the family of Singer Marcus Sheldon screw Argentina through FDD and Trump and send money to the settlers and carryout bombing operations against Syria and Iran through US.

    They steal the know how, they steal the information on medications Yes they do good research But when caught of providing secrets to Israel against US's interests , even Stanford University could not talk about the espionage openly.
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  27. JackOH says:

    Good article, Phil. I served in the 1970s, tail end of Vietnam Stateside, and never heard a shot fired in anger. I am grateful for the G. I. benefits I received.

    No institution in a representative democracy ought to be above measured criticism. I have a relative who volunteers at the local VA clinic, and there’s some sketchy evidence that some patients with very good group health insurance benefits are working the system and getting VA treatment to avoid co-pays.

    I personally found David Hackworth’s criticism of the American military fairly persuasive. Deep bureaucratization, tunnel vision, advancing officers for their inoffensiveness and favor-currying chops, the whole mess.

    Plus add the big three already mentioned by some folks above. (1) America’s armed forces are a Petri dish for social engineering, (2) corruption, (3) the political mafia-zation of America’s armed forces so that it’s acting as a White House-directed quasi-mercenary “enforcer” for corporate interests and various other sovereign interests.

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  28. Tom Welsh says:

    “An Air Force four-star general named Arthur Lichte was reduced in rank to a two-star in 2017 after he was found guilty of having raped a lower ranking woman officer”.

    You say he was ***reduced in rank*** for raping a female subordinate?

    Why wasn’t he given 50 lashes, a dishonourable discharge, and a prison sentence? Even a random civilian would get the prison sentence for rape. And for such a senior officer to commit a crime like that is, of course far, far worse.

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    • Replies: @RVBlake
    That was a jolting eye-catcher. So this general still receives a six-figure pension check!? I've often marveled at the moral fiber exhibited by these gilded peacocks, who, when faced with supporting criminal actions by their government, such as invading countries who've done us no harm, click their heels and proceed. Instead of taking an instant retirement, knowing their pensions are secure.
    , @The Scalpel
    Wait a minute! Were you really under the impression that things are fair?
    , @Verymuchalive
    The US military are the equivalent of the Roman Empire's honestiores, or upper classes. As well as the benefits accruing from service, they had special legal treatment, like being exempt from judicial torture. So Arthur Lichte merely gets part of his pension docked for raping a woman. Nothing to see here , mate, move along. Even someone like Chelsea ( " They call her Natasha, but she looks like Elsie" ) Manning spends a mere 7 years in prison and gets the Defence Department to pay for "gender reassignment".
    The point about judicial torture is important as America has recently revived the practice. Would Assange be waterboarded if they got hold of him ? Would he have met a fatal "accident" in custody?
    Who knows ? But don't you even think about doing that to an American serviceman, even one as degenerate as Manning.
    , @anarchyst
    There are two standards...one for enlisted personnel and the other for officers. During the Grenada situation some enlisted personnel and officers were caught attempting to ship captured AK-47 rifles back to the states. The enlisted personnel got "hard time" in Leavenworth while the officers got "letters of reprimand". Double standard, indeed.
    I might have made the military a career, but the disparities in both facilities and treatment of officers vs. enlisted was a real turn-off. I completed my enlistment honorably and returned to civilian life.
    It is my humble opinion (and personal observation) that the commissioned officer rank structure where there is concern for the enlisted troops ends with the rank of colonel. The general staff is more akin to political office than it is to serving in the military and taking care of their military subordinates.
    As to "pay and allowances", when I was active duty (1969-1971) it was not much. In fact, at the time, those of us in uniform were looked down upon and blamed for the prosecution of the Vietnam conflict. Not only that, legislated job programs that were supposed to go to us Vietnam veterans never materialized.
    Yes, the all-volunteer forced made it necessary to increase "pay and allowances" to relatively attractive levels.
    If I had my way, I would bring back the draft with NO college deferments. In fact, the sons and daughters of politicians would get called up first. Service in the IDF doesn't count.
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  29. Israel and their ziocons control every facet of the U.S. gov and have used the U.S. army as a proxy army of Israel to fight and die for Israel in the ME while they sit it out in their ivory towers in Tel Aviv and New York City and London.

    To add to the tragedy millions of civilians have been killed in these wars for Israel in Iraq and Afghanistan and Libya and Syria and Yemen and various other places through out the ME, and all of this carnage for Israel.

    Just like the Roman empire where the rulers paraded their conquering armies through Rome , Trump wants to parade his Israeli proxy armies through D.C. and take their review as a Caligula. Trump is a puppet of the zionists and Netanyahu and his controllers the ROTHCHILDS ie the RED SHIELD which is dripping with Americans blood.

    Orwell was right, the wars never end in OCEANIA and we have become Oceania, and all because of our zionist masters.

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  30. That was a very good article with lots of facts that I was unaware regarding the various forms of compensation. I have not been in the miltary. I will tell you that I have seen how things work on the procurement end, and that is the real shitshow, moneywise. The amount of wasted money in personnel involved in trying to micromanage a contractor, the “generation” of paperwork that must weigh 10X vehicle max-gross-weight in order to sign off on it, and other things, ruin the job for the technician or engineer in any company making stuff for the US military.

    It’s very easy to spend other people’s money. Everyone besides Socialists and Commies probably learned all that during his kindergarten years.

    (BTW, that last sentence of mine brought up the only one (little tiny) thing that I didn’t like about the article. You KEEP USING “his and her”, “he and she”, etc. Enough of that crap, please, Mr. Giraldi. Unz is one of a number of place on-line on which one doesn’t have to be PC. He can write as he pleases. The rest of your English is very professional, so why this?).

    Anyway, great article, just the facts and honest opinion without any hyperbole. Regarding your very last paragraph, BTW, it’s not just that the army is so costly, but if America ever had to defend itself from one of the countries we buy parts from, cough, China, cough, cough, that’ll be a laugh. We are operating on borrowed money, as Jack S (#16) stated, AND foreign supply lines. We’re number 1! Yeah!

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    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    And we need Russian equipment to get into space these days, apparently.

    That would be troublesome even if Russia were an ally, as perhaps they should be.

    It’s worse when our gov chooses to slander, threaten, sanction, and encircle the country on whom we are relying.

    Imagine China refusing to sell us what we need AND Russia refusing to let us use or buy its space equipment.

    For that matter, there’s so much demand for oil and natural gas in India and China — likely to keep increasing, too — Russia eventually may be able to say “we will sell to anyone EXCEPT companies and facilities in the USA, and anyone caught reselling to the USA will join them on the blacklist.” If Iran and, say, Venezuela or Nigeria did the same, watch out.
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  31. @Anonymous
    US is rich and the debt is high. Both can be true at the same time. But taxes are relatively low so if there is a government debt crisis paying down the debt would just involve raising taxes. Just look at GDP per capita US which is very high up there so I don't see how anyone can argue the US is not a very rich country.

    Despite many problems, the US has many advantages like half the world's Ashkenazim who are very good at creating unbeatable new companies. Just look at how the half the 40 riches entrepreneurs under 40 in the US according to Forbes are Jewish. Jews are producing so much innovation in the US that it offsets a lot of the problems like military spending at 4% of GDP and less productive sub-populations.

    Among the lots of good comments on the thread so far, yours is kind of an outlier, to put it nicely. No, you cannot be both rich and in debt (6 – 7 X more than your yearly income) at the same time.. There are perhaps different definitions of broke that people or families may use for themselves.

    1) Out of spending cash – got assets, but awaiting more income before any spending can resume. That’s not too bad – it just shows lack of foresight or bad luck.

    2) Broke even – got some assets, but owe the same amount – income is about the same as expenditures expected. There are lots like this – they need to buckle down, but will probably be OK.

    3) Flat broke – can’t borrow anymore due to bad payment history, even to friends and family – not enough income to pay expenditures or even on this.

    4) Broke like the US Feral Government – borrowing 1/3 of the money for the $4,000,000,000,000 budget each year, as only 2/3 can be collected via personal income/corporate income/excise/etc. taxes (just look near the back of the IRS 1040 instructions – they’re not hiding this stuff). Total debt of $20,000,000,000,000 is 5 X the budget each year and 6-7 X the income collected yearly. It is > 100 % of the total GDP. There is no coming out of this hole without financial pain for almost everyone but those with a Challenger or other large/medium-cabin business jet with precious metals stashed on an island or S. American/Oriental country with a runway on your compound with armed guards.

    Just raise taxes? Fuck you too.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    You use a lot of figures but not the appropriate statistics. What do big aggregate numbers like 200k in debt per family really mean?

    I look at the percentage of tax revenue v. GDP compared to other first world countries. US is actually on the low side by this measure. That means it's possible to raise taxes and only moderately harm the economic growth engine. And no one has addressed the advantages the US economy has in particular having half of the world's Ashkenazim.
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  32. @Anonymous
    US is rich and the debt is high. Both can be true at the same time. But taxes are relatively low so if there is a government debt crisis paying down the debt would just involve raising taxes. Just look at GDP per capita US which is very high up there so I don't see how anyone can argue the US is not a very rich country.

    Despite many problems, the US has many advantages like half the world's Ashkenazim who are very good at creating unbeatable new companies. Just look at how the half the 40 riches entrepreneurs under 40 in the US according to Forbes are Jewish. Jews are producing so much innovation in the US that it offsets a lot of the problems like military spending at 4% of GDP and less productive sub-populations.

    Do you realize that $4 Trillion means roughly $200,000 is owed by each actual (not just filing forms) taxpaying family? What do you propose to raise taxes to?

    More on the Feral Gov’t portion of the Global Financial Stupidity going on in Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 , and Part 5.

    Do you understand why interest rates are too low for Granny to make more than $350 a month on that half-a-million dollars her late husband had sweated his whole life to save up? The interest rates are held down to under 1% on anything but risky investments, so that the federal interest payments are kept 5-6 % of the budget (again look at the pie charts on the 1040 book – if I were at a different computer, I’d paste that in for you). If the rates were let, by the FED, to rise to normal rates – the time value of money – then the interest payments on the $20 Trillion, in the form of Treasury bond interest rates, would rise to something like 1/4 to 1/3 of the whole budget. Keep in mind, 1/3 of the budget expenditures must be covered by NEW BORROWING! Not good, man, not good.

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    • Replies: @jacques sheete
    AEN, thank you for your fine input, but I suspect you're throwing pearls to swine who don't even want to understand.

    Even worse, when they claim that debt is good, they conveniently leave out the part about who it's good for.

    We dumb goyim have repeatedly proven ourselves to be pretty easy marks, but some of us have a clue as to who's paying for it all, and its good to know that a few know who that would be, so thanks again.
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  33. SteveM says:
    @Thomm
    Wait, so this is a lefty Democrat blog now, where The Nation is cited favorably?

    Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don't make. Sure, some officers are corrupt and the military manages to manufacture demand for its expensive products, but this article goes way too far.

    Sure, some officers are corrupt

    “some”? Har-Dee-Har-Har. What percentage of people who separate from the military claim a “service related disability”? With that designation they not only get the retirement benefit bump but also set-asides for government jobs and contracts as well. Based on the number of service related disability claims by veterans, the United States must have the most physically fragile fighting force on the planet.

    And in this age of stupid perpetual wars, every “disabled veteran” is assumed have been shot up in the Middle East when if fact it’s more likely they tripped on the steps on the way back from lunch at Fort Leavenworth. That erroneous assumption of a combat related disability is great for milking benefits from a sympathetic public.

    And there’s more. Sleep apnea claims as a service related disability by veterans have exploded. Same with PTSD.

    https://www.veteranslawblog.org/sleep-apnea-va-disability-rating/

    https://www.disabilitysecrets.com/resources/disability/veterans-disability/make-ptsd-claim-va.htm

    The web is saturated with advice on how to game the military disability system.

    A vet I knew laughed as he told me he got a disability award for his knee. Only that injury came from playing too much basketball at his U.S. base. Another “disabled veteran” I know does Cross Fit to stay in shape. His most dangerous deployment was to southern Europe where he met his wife. And yes, he advertises his disability on his business web site and does qualify for government contract set-asides.

    Too bad for the taxpayers though. Since the military has been sanctified by the powerful Pentagon/MSM “Warrior-Hero” propaganda engine, challenging out of control military benefits is a political and social third rail.

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    • Replies: @ANON
    Same scam, different tactics.

    40 years ago we lived in Annapolis, MD in the lowest tier of a then - New housing development concept.

    Our cramped townhouses were on the scrabble outer ring.

    The most lavish houses were in the inner-ring, on a divided boulevard, extensively landscaped and maintained. At least 3/4 of those homes were owned by "Double-Dippers"-- military retirees collecting military retirement pay while employed as civil servants in Federal gov, with defense contractor consulting on the side.

    "Thank you for your service,"-- in cash, if you please.

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  34. I don’t have a problem with 4% of GDP, but I have a big problem with what we’re getting for our money.

    A quarter million for a four-star general is fine, if the general is any good (almost none of them are by design). In theory a general is equivalent to a division manager in a Fortune 500 company, but COs in the US military have amazingly little power. They’re not even free to hire and fire their own subordinates in most cases. So our senior officers are really paid generously to pretend they are great military commanders.

    The average SAT score at West Point is only 1340 these days. Prior to the Vietnam War I believe West Point was academically competitive with Ivy League schools, or at least that’s what Class of ’68 veteran John T. Reed states.

    The Naval Academy is 1322 and the Air Force Academy is 1370.

    These aren’t bad scores, but clearly these officers aren’t elite academically.

    The enlisted personnel seem adequate in quality thanks to the AFQT, other than women of course. They’re overpaid compared to what is available for them in the private sector.

    The pension system, in addition to being overly generous, has perverse incentives. As any service-member approaches that magical 20 year mark, any kind of independent thinking must disappear (which the military already does so much to eliminate). Want your fat pension? Better shut up and emulate your COs in every way possible. It should just be replaced with a Thrift Savings Plan (gov’t equivalent of a 401k).

    One sixth of the force consists of women. Every last one of them subtracts from the efficacy of the military.

    One sixth of personnel are officers, which is far too many officers.

    Then you have all the unnecessary EO officers, JAGs, and other political commissars.

    I don’t have an issue with the various recreational perks in the armed forces as they contribute to espirit de corps. The private sector could use more of this, honestly.

    The GI Bill is also politically objectionable as we should not be giving money to The Enemy (colleges in this case).

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    • Replies: @Thomm

    One sixth of the force consists of women. Every last one of them subtracts from the efficacy of the military.
     
    Now this is true. Any country that engages in this sort of fiction is one where no men in their right minds should join the military.
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  35. This is the price a mercantile republic pays for an all volunteer fighting force.

    When you have less than 5% of the population serving in the military and commitments all over the globe, then you need to be prepared to pay for those professional services (yes, the military is a profession like any other).

    If you’re prepared to go back to a draft force, then we can start talking about changes to the pay and benefit system.

    Personally, I think service of some kind, be it military or community, ought to be a requirement to vote. Service guarantees citizenship.

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    • Replies: @The Scalpel
    I do not mind community service, but I object to military service and I do not want to vote. Voting gives legitimacy to a system that I oppose. I was born in the geographical area now ruled by the government of the United States of America. Perhaps, LT Dan, you would be in favor of a status such as non-citizen resident. I was born in this area by a quirk of fate, not any choice on my part. I do not usually agree with US government policy, nor do I want the US government to represent me or "protect" me. It would be just for me to pay less taxes since I do not desire and would gladly refuse most of the "services" the government provides, especially those noted in the above article.
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  36. 36 ulster says:
    @Dan Hayes
    Thomm:

    I usually share your disdain for The Nation magazine. But in the vein of stopped clock correctness twice a day even it can sometimes be correct, witness its editor Steve Cohen's completely admirable efforts to lend sanity and substance to America's Russian foreign policy!

    One can admire Mr. Cohen’s efforts to give us some perspective and–yes–sanity on the debate over Russia, and still view a Sovietist rag like THE NATION with contempt. It would seem that he is related to TN only by marriage. (Tip: Cohen usually appears for interviews on Tuesdays on THE JOHN BATCHELOR SHOW ( WABC 770AM) at 10pm EST. Always informative.)

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    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    36 ulster:

    I too listen to the Batchelor radio show and his informative Cohen interviews. Many times Cohen has thanked Batchelor for offering him one of his few public venues.

    I like Batchelor despite the fact that many other times he presents or is comfortable with a hard Neocon line. I've often wondered if this has anything to do with his Persian background.
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  37. Calling geokat, U.R. Research Specialist A-1!

    Hi geo,

    Maybe you can help me on the following ancillary matter?

    F.y.i., Mighty John Bolton passed on an opportunity to fight LBJ’s atrocious war against communism, in Vietnam.

    As PreZident Trump’s present Iranophobe-warmongering N.S.A. Adviser, I tried (but failed) to determine how much pay & “bennies” Bolton now gets from the bottomless Executive Branch feeding trough.

    Can you help me here, geo?

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    • Replies: @geokat62

    ... how much pay & “bennies” Bolton now gets from the bottomless Executive Branch feeding trough.
     
    Hey, Chuck. Not sure about benefits, but based on this latest press release, I would infer that John Bolthead pulls in at least $180k:

    White House releases salary info for Trump's aides... nearly two dozen aides all earn an annual salary of roughly $180,000.

    https://www.politico.com/story/2017/06/30/trump-white-house-salaries-240149
     
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  38. @Dan Hayes
    Thomm:

    I usually share your disdain for The Nation magazine. But in the vein of stopped clock correctness twice a day even it can sometimes be correct, witness its editor Steve Cohen's completely admirable efforts to lend sanity and substance to America's Russian foreign policy!

    AGEED

    I have never read The Nation nor will I, I’m pretty sure. Even so, when you’re right you’re right. I disagree with Thomm on comment #1. As for the author, Mr. Giraldi, I suppose he could have stuck in “The Nation, that cntrl-left rag, even rightly stated … blah, blah…”, if it makes us feel better (yes, it might ;-}

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  39. ANON[285] • Disclaimer says:
    @SteveM

    Sure, some officers are corrupt
     
    "some"? Har-Dee-Har-Har. What percentage of people who separate from the military claim a "service related disability"? With that designation they not only get the retirement benefit bump but also set-asides for government jobs and contracts as well. Based on the number of service related disability claims by veterans, the United States must have the most physically fragile fighting force on the planet.

    And in this age of stupid perpetual wars, every "disabled veteran" is assumed have been shot up in the Middle East when if fact it's more likely they tripped on the steps on the way back from lunch at Fort Leavenworth. That erroneous assumption of a combat related disability is great for milking benefits from a sympathetic public.

    And there's more. Sleep apnea claims as a service related disability by veterans have exploded. Same with PTSD.

    https://www.veteranslawblog.org/sleep-apnea-va-disability-rating/

    https://www.disabilitysecrets.com/resources/disability/veterans-disability/make-ptsd-claim-va.htm

    The web is saturated with advice on how to game the military disability system.

    A vet I knew laughed as he told me he got a disability award for his knee. Only that injury came from playing too much basketball at his U.S. base. Another "disabled veteran" I know does Cross Fit to stay in shape. His most dangerous deployment was to southern Europe where he met his wife. And yes, he advertises his disability on his business web site and does qualify for government contract set-asides.

    Too bad for the taxpayers though. Since the military has been sanctified by the powerful Pentagon/MSM "Warrior-Hero" propaganda engine, challenging out of control military benefits is a political and social third rail.

    Same scam, different tactics.

    40 years ago we lived in Annapolis, MD in the lowest tier of a then – New housing development concept.

    Our cramped townhouses were on the scrabble outer ring.

    The most lavish houses were in the inner-ring, on a divided boulevard, extensively landscaped and maintained. At least 3/4 of those homes were owned by “Double-Dippers”– military retirees collecting military retirement pay while employed as civil servants in Federal gov, with defense contractor consulting on the side.

    “Thank you for your service,”– in cash, if you please.

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  40. JustJeff says:
    @Thomm
    Wait, so this is a lefty Democrat blog now, where The Nation is cited favorably?

    Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don't make. Sure, some officers are corrupt and the military manages to manufacture demand for its expensive products, but this article goes way too far.

    That’s some top-notch boomerposting 10/10

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    • LOL: Thorfinnsson
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  41. Mr. Anon says:
    @Thomm
    Wait, so this is a lefty Democrat blog now, where The Nation is cited favorably?

    Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don't make. Sure, some officers are corrupt and the military manages to manufacture demand for its expensive products, but this article goes way too far.

    Wait, so this is a lefty Democrat blog now, where The Nation is cited favorably?

    So which wars did Petraeus win?

    Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don’t make.

    Yeah, they have to wear a uniform and get up at 5:00 a.m. So do a lot of plumbers. Most people in the military are not in any more danger from violence than any number of civilians. Being a pizza deliveryman is probably more dangerous than most every military MOS.

    But then why would you know anymore about this topic than about anything else you spout off on?

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    • Replies: @Thomm
    er... because I know about a lot of subjects, and you are just a wigger Buttfuckaroni with a 70 IQ?
    , @ChuckOrloski
    Writing objectively, Mr. Anon noted: "Being a pizza deliveryman is probably more dangerous than most every military MOS."

    Hi Mr. Anon,

    Thanks for your satiric-service including recognition of often brave pizza deliverymen!

    I have a true work experience to share.

    In late-Autumn, 2001, as a dual-Business Manager & Emergency Spill Response Supervisor for Pa. E.M.A. Haz-Mat Certified Teem Environmental, Inc., one afternoon, the excitable company-owner called a mandatory meeting for all personnel.

    Addressing supervisors & (very skilled) Field Technicians, the rather timid owner ordered, "Starting today & through the weekend, TEEM is contracted to perform potential sarin gas terror attack responses within NYC subways & tunnels!
    So everybody better keep their pagers on when you go home & be immediately prepared to respond to sarin gas attacks!"

    A dear friend & late-coworker, Warren Hill, became uncomfortable with the assignment and sensibly spoke up, "Uh, what the fuck? Do we get extra military pay for dealing with the crazy Taliban while we ain't armed with nothin' but V.O.C. & Hnu meters, Personal Protection Equipment?"

    Unused to having to deal with reasonable employee-challenges, the TEEM owner lost it, screamed, What's wrong with you, Warren?!! Can't you read the advertisement painted on our E.R.V., "TEEM Environmental responds to all incidents involving US D.O.T. Hazardous Materials! Get on the ball, would 'ya, Warren!"

    Upon reflection, I stuck neck-out, came to Warren's aid, and opined, "But the Haz-Mat customers who have signed our company 'Emergency Spill Response Agreements' are not known to pose secondary-life threatening hazards after initial accidental discharges happened."

    "Bah..., Just keep your pager on, Chuck!" replied our civilian Commander Stassi.

    P.S.: For anyone interested, attached below is my "wordy" 2015 article that delivers an example of how civilian private-company employees fought in the War Against (White Powder) Anthrax terror threats.
    Cases where the "perp(S)" never caught, an open case, and to this day, I suppose either Federal or State governments cut lots-of-checks, payable to private Emergency Spill Response companie$, for their services.

    https://www.countercurrents.org/orloski250415.htm
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  42. The Scalpel says: • Website
    @LTDanKaffey
    This is the price a mercantile republic pays for an all volunteer fighting force.

    When you have less than 5% of the population serving in the military and commitments all over the globe, then you need to be prepared to pay for those professional services (yes, the military is a profession like any other).

    If you're prepared to go back to a draft force, then we can start talking about changes to the pay and benefit system.

    Personally, I think service of some kind, be it military or community, ought to be a requirement to vote. Service guarantees citizenship.

    I do not mind community service, but I object to military service and I do not want to vote. Voting gives legitimacy to a system that I oppose. I was born in the geographical area now ruled by the government of the United States of America. Perhaps, LT Dan, you would be in favor of a status such as non-citizen resident. I was born in this area by a quirk of fate, not any choice on my part. I do not usually agree with US government policy, nor do I want the US government to represent me or “protect” me. It would be just for me to pay less taxes since I do not desire and would gladly refuse most of the “services” the government provides, especially those noted in the above article.

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    • Agree: jacques sheete
    • Replies: @LTDanKaffey
    Absolutely in favor of a non-resident citizen.

    You would still be required to pay some kind of lease or tax for the land which you occupy, but would otherwise be left alone. You would also be subject to the criminal laws of the jurisdiction you occupied. You would also pay taxes for any consumption that requires use of infrastructure or interstate commerce.

    The United States is large enough that such an arrangement is still possible.
    , @myself
    Non-citizen resident: Persons residing in the territory of the United States, but are non-citizens.

    Different status from Green Card holders.

    For this to work, most public infrastructure would have to be toll-fee based. Use a street, a road, a bridge, or an airport or bus terminal - pay a fee.

    If you call the cops, paramedics or fire department - pay a fee. If you get helped out by public services without you asking for it - pay a fee, but you can explicitly refuse help, and pay nothing.

    Ineligible for most public services like schooling for your kids, hospitals, public defenders. Pay for these yourself.

    NO income taxes, cannot be drafted.

    Pay a small amount to be allowed residency in a safe, secure region, state or part of town - since you are also indirectly benefiting from the general safe, clean environment paid for by the citizen taxpayers.

    Otherwise, all your money is yours alone, and the government stays out of your business.

    Maybe it's possible.
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  43. Thomm says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Wait, so this is a lefty Democrat blog now, where The Nation is cited favorably?
     
    So which wars did Petraeus win?

    Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don’t make.
     
    Yeah, they have to wear a uniform and get up at 5:00 a.m. So do a lot of plumbers. Most people in the military are not in any more danger from violence than any number of civilians. Being a pizza deliveryman is probably more dangerous than most every military MOS.

    But then why would you know anymore about this topic than about anything else you spout off on?

    er… because I know about a lot of subjects, and you are just a wigger Buttfuckaroni with a 70 IQ?

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Is that your ostensibly high IQ on display?

    And, as far as I can recall, the only subjects about which you have displayed any knowledge are trashy TV and WWE smackdown.

    You're a cretin.

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  44. Neither me, my father, my grandfather, nor my great grandmother served in the US Military, but one of the large defense contractors put bread on the table for four generations of my family. My 90-year old grandmother is still collecting my grandfather’s pension from that firm and he’s been dead for 30 years!

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  45. Thomm says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    I don't have a problem with 4% of GDP, but I have a big problem with what we're getting for our money.

    A quarter million for a four-star general is fine, if the general is any good (almost none of them are by design). In theory a general is equivalent to a division manager in a Fortune 500 company, but COs in the US military have amazingly little power. They're not even free to hire and fire their own subordinates in most cases. So our senior officers are really paid generously to pretend they are great military commanders.

    The average SAT score at West Point is only 1340 these days. Prior to the Vietnam War I believe West Point was academically competitive with Ivy League schools, or at least that's what Class of '68 veteran John T. Reed states.

    The Naval Academy is 1322 and the Air Force Academy is 1370.

    These aren't bad scores, but clearly these officers aren't elite academically.

    The enlisted personnel seem adequate in quality thanks to the AFQT, other than women of course. They're overpaid compared to what is available for them in the private sector.

    The pension system, in addition to being overly generous, has perverse incentives. As any service-member approaches that magical 20 year mark, any kind of independent thinking must disappear (which the military already does so much to eliminate). Want your fat pension? Better shut up and emulate your COs in every way possible. It should just be replaced with a Thrift Savings Plan (gov't equivalent of a 401k).

    One sixth of the force consists of women. Every last one of them subtracts from the efficacy of the military.

    One sixth of personnel are officers, which is far too many officers.

    Then you have all the unnecessary EO officers, JAGs, and other political commissars.

    I don't have an issue with the various recreational perks in the armed forces as they contribute to espirit de corps. The private sector could use more of this, honestly.

    The GI Bill is also politically objectionable as we should not be giving money to The Enemy (colleges in this case).

    One sixth of the force consists of women. Every last one of them subtracts from the efficacy of the military.

    Now this is true. Any country that engages in this sort of fiction is one where no men in their right minds should join the military.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    AGREED

    They'll find out how well a social-experiment disguised as a military force works in a real war with a country that American can't bully around.
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  46. @Anonymous
    US is rich and the debt is high. Both can be true at the same time. But taxes are relatively low so if there is a government debt crisis paying down the debt would just involve raising taxes. Just look at GDP per capita US which is very high up there so I don't see how anyone can argue the US is not a very rich country.

    Despite many problems, the US has many advantages like half the world's Ashkenazim who are very good at creating unbeatable new companies. Just look at how the half the 40 riches entrepreneurs under 40 in the US according to Forbes are Jewish. Jews are producing so much innovation in the US that it offsets a lot of the problems like military spending at 4% of GDP and less productive sub-populations.

    US is rich and the debt is high. Both can be true at the same time. But taxes are relatively low so if there is a government debt crisis paying down the debt would just involve raising taxes. Just look at GDP per capita US which is very high up there so I don’t see how anyone can argue the US is not a very rich country.

    Despite many problems, the US has many advantages like half the world’s Ashkenazim who are very good at creating unbeatable new companies….etc., etc., etc….

    Thanks for the laughs. You must be of the Maven-Krugman school of debt. You’re all wrong, and it’s obviously beyond your understanding that though you can fool almost all of the goyim almost all of the time, you can’t fool all of us all the time.

    However, please do keep trying!

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    That wasn't a response. It was just name calling. So if you aren't convinced by my rebuttal it's certainly not because you had more intelligent analysis.
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  47. @Achmed E. Newman
    Do you realize that $4 Trillion means roughly $200,000 is owed by each actual (not just filing forms) taxpaying family? What do you propose to raise taxes to?

    More on the Feral Gov't portion of the Global Financial Stupidity going on in Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 , and Part 5.

    Do you understand why interest rates are too low for Granny to make more than $350 a month on that half-a-million dollars her late husband had sweated his whole life to save up? The interest rates are held down to under 1% on anything but risky investments, so that the federal interest payments are kept 5-6 % of the budget (again look at the pie charts on the 1040 book - if I were at a different computer, I'd paste that in for you). If the rates were let, by the FED, to rise to normal rates - the time value of money - then the interest payments on the $20 Trillion, in the form of Treasury bond interest rates, would rise to something like 1/4 to 1/3 of the whole budget. Keep in mind, 1/3 of the budget expenditures must be covered by NEW BORROWING! Not good, man, not good.

    AEN, thank you for your fine input, but I suspect you’re throwing pearls to swine who don’t even want to understand.

    Even worse, when they claim that debt is good, they conveniently leave out the part about who it’s good for.

    We dumb goyim have repeatedly proven ourselves to be pretty easy marks, but some of us have a clue as to who’s paying for it all, and its good to know that a few know who that would be, so thanks again.

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  48. @Verymuchalive
    Federal Debt $20 trillion, Accumulated Balance of Trade Deficit since 1990 $12 trillion ( unadjusted for inflation ). That's not even including State and Local Debt, never mind Private Debt.
    The only thing preventing complete bankruptcy is that the Dollar is the World's Reserve Currency- for now. Once China and others start dumping US Treasury Bonds, that will be over.

    The only thing preventing complete bankruptcy is that the Dollar is the World’s Reserve Currency- for now.

    Yup.

    And “The Gweatist Generation” fought WW2 to defend worldwide freedom. I guess they forgot about the Bretton-Woods party.

    We been had, I think.

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  49. RVBlake says:
    @Tom Welsh
    "An Air Force four-star general named Arthur Lichte was reduced in rank to a two-star in 2017 after he was found guilty of having raped a lower ranking woman officer".

    You say he was ***reduced in rank*** for raping a female subordinate?

    Why wasn't he given 50 lashes, a dishonourable discharge, and a prison sentence? Even a random civilian would get the prison sentence for rape. And for such a senior officer to commit a crime like that is, of course far, far worse.

    That was a jolting eye-catcher. So this general still receives a six-figure pension check!? I’ve often marveled at the moral fiber exhibited by these gilded peacocks, who, when faced with supporting criminal actions by their government, such as invading countries who’ve done us no harm, click their heels and proceed. Instead of taking an instant retirement, knowing their pensions are secure.

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  50. @Thomm

    One sixth of the force consists of women. Every last one of them subtracts from the efficacy of the military.
     
    Now this is true. Any country that engages in this sort of fiction is one where no men in their right minds should join the military.

    AGREED

    They’ll find out how well a social-experiment disguised as a military force works in a real war with a country that American can’t bully around.

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  51. bjondo says:
    @Dan Hayes
    Thomm:

    I usually share your disdain for The Nation magazine. But in the vein of stopped clock correctness twice a day even it can sometimes be correct, witness its editor Steve Cohen's completely admirable efforts to lend sanity and substance to America's Russian foreign policy!

    I’ve read Cohen is a Russia expert and gives sensible analysis regarding events there. Don’t know his views on holocaust, Occupied Palestine.

    His wife, Katrina vanden Heuvel, is part owner, publisher, editor of THE NATION.

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    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    bjondo:

    I get the impression that Cohen tries to stay clear of anything outside his expertise, Russian history and geopolitics.

    Several times I've heard him fondly reminisce about being raised in Kentucky. So he may not be a complete Upper West Side liberal.
    , @Anon
    Cohen is a true believer in holocaustism.

    Don't know his views on Palestine.

    He can hate on Iran with the best of 'em.

    Cohen's stock in trade is expertise re Russia.

    His greatest recommendation is that he is NOT Susan Glasser.
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  52. @The Scalpel
    I do not mind community service, but I object to military service and I do not want to vote. Voting gives legitimacy to a system that I oppose. I was born in the geographical area now ruled by the government of the United States of America. Perhaps, LT Dan, you would be in favor of a status such as non-citizen resident. I was born in this area by a quirk of fate, not any choice on my part. I do not usually agree with US government policy, nor do I want the US government to represent me or "protect" me. It would be just for me to pay less taxes since I do not desire and would gladly refuse most of the "services" the government provides, especially those noted in the above article.

    Absolutely in favor of a non-resident citizen.

    You would still be required to pay some kind of lease or tax for the land which you occupy, but would otherwise be left alone. You would also be subject to the criminal laws of the jurisdiction you occupied. You would also pay taxes for any consumption that requires use of infrastructure or interstate commerce.

    The United States is large enough that such an arrangement is still possible.

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    • Agree: The Scalpel
    • Replies: @Hibernian
    I think that should be a non-citizen resident.
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  53. bjondo says:
    @Anonymous
    US spends 4% of GDP on the military versus 2% in China, France, UK. That's high but considering how rich the US is, not unbearable. Weak article.

    Over 50% of the discretionary budget. Like $$ going to the toxic Yid landfill, we don’t know actual amounts.

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  54. @Anonymous
    US spends 4% of GDP on the military versus 2% in China, France, UK. That's high but considering how rich the US is, not unbearable. Weak article.

    “…US spends 4% of GDP on the military versus 2% in China, France, UK. That’s high but considering how rich the US is, not unbearable. Weak article…”
    ————————————————————-
    Every productive dollar that’s ever existed has been flushed down the MIC rathole. The whole “budget “is an elaborate ruse to conceal the chains that bind you.
    10’s of trillions disappear with gleeful approval on a regular basis.

    You sound like a typical brainwashed SHYSTER.

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  55. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:

    You guys are two of my favorites.

    But 405’s second paragraph made it seem clear to me that he was trolling.

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  56. ohmy says: • Website

    Mr. Girard, buon giorno. You must be my elder. In ’68 I was paid $96 plus $26 combat pay while in Nam.
    Yea, things are out of control. Unfortunately, the store clerk you ran into the other day is representative of how the majority of “we the people” think. Hence, don’t expect change anytime soon.
    I have been a fan of yours for sometime now. Mostly at NEO, sometimes art Rense. I recently began accessing UNZ and was pleased to see your name in the list of contributors. Sadly I don’t predict improvement in the majorities attitude. But, you do fine work, dom’t quit just yet. As long as we can keep the internet affordable reality may trickle down. I believe the net is the reason the “fake news” moniker had to be. Sort if like “conspiracy theory”. Same party owns both copyrights.
    Keep your head up.
    Joseph

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  57. @Backwoods Bob
    I've seen articles decrying that first-year married privates are eligible for food stamps. Because their housing, medical, and the cost of living differential are not "income". They're living on more than twice the reported income. So yeah, they have arranged the pay precisely so that they are not subject to any income tax, and are in some cases eligible for food stamps.

    They have rec vehicles they can check out, boats and four-wheelers, snowmobiles and etc., special parks and land reservations, scenic cabins they can stay at with trifling fees or are free. Ours has a golf course that must be staggering for upkeep. Gyms, facilities for parties and events - stuff you'd pay a lot for in the private sector. The subsidized shopping is still there, but is not the huge discount it was at one time, at the bases in this state.

    The state gives them all kinds of benefits like instant residency for hunting and fishing. The stores give them discounts. Military appreciation days.

    And frankly it isn't your STEM people, business and tech fields going into the military. Their next best alternatives are a pittance by comparison. For who you are getting, the quality of recruit, this is well paid.

    I don't mind that so much as having three times the size we need to defend our borders, which is what we should be doing and no more. Foreign entanglements, searching for monsters to destroy, acting as the world police - this is the main problem.

    Foreign entanglements, searching for monsters to destroy, acting as the world police – this is the main problem.

    Yooge problems for sure, but playing Sugar Daddy to Izzie-land is the biggest one of all in terms of dollars as well as moral capital, and it probably dwarfs welfare subsidies to “defense” corporations.

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  58. Military spending has one virtue, it is constitutional as it fulfills one duty of the FedGov, one it has often shirked, defend the country.

    Giraldi can whine all he likes, but the DOD is not an entitlement program, nor does the Pentagon get all it wants. It never has gotten all it wants, no matter how much Giraldi whines to the contrary.

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    • Replies: @SteveM

    Military spending has one virtue, it is constitutional as it fulfills one duty of the FedGov, one it has often shirked, defend the country.

    Giraldi can whine all he likes, but the DOD is not an entitlement program, nor does the Pentagon get all it wants. It never has gotten all it wants, no matter how much Giraldi whines to the contrary.
     

    I've never seen such a warped and delusional understanding of the voracious, insatiable, wasteful and corrupt National Security State presented so succinctly...

    P.S. I have a feeling that War Machine accounts have written Quatermaster a lot of checks over the years. I.e., he knows what side his bread is buttered on.

    , @The Scalpel
    "DOD is not an entitlement program, nor does the Pentagon get all it wants. It never has gotten all it wants..."

    Just like the fat kid in Willie Wonka's Chocolate Factory
    , @jacques sheete

    Giraldi can whine all he likes, but the DOD is not an entitlement program, nor does the Pentagon get all it wants.
     
    If it isn't an entitlement program, then what would one look like? Do you know the meaning of "sinecure?"

    You can whine about Giraldi all you want but he's right and yer wrong, and thank G-d that the Pantygon doesn't get all it wants. Can you explain whether it should and why?

    PS: Read the comments regarding disabilities and retirement bennies and then get back to us.

    , @RadicalCenter
    Deliberate dishonest distraction. Whether the DOD got as much as it wanted, it gets much more than our actual defense requires, and the people on the gravy train know it.
    , @RadicalCenter
    The fact that defense is a specifically enumerated duty and power of the fed government, has nothing to do with the proper amount to spend on that function.

    Money spent attacking countries that are not attacking us here in the USA, are not preparing for imminent attack on us here in the USA, and are not aiding those who are attacking or preparing to imminently attack us here in the USA ... is NOT part of that legitimate constitutional function.

    Same with money spent defending Israel or Saudi Arabia, helping the saudis kill Yemenis in Yemen, helping islamists or anyone else overthrow the gov of Syria, etc.

    Same with money spent defending (or controlling) Germany, France, South Korea, Japan, etc.

    Calling that “whining” is not an argument. It suggests that you lack an honest, logical argument on this issue.

    , @Chris Mallory

    Military spending has one virtue, it is constitutional as it fulfills one duty of the FedGov
     
    And we could fulfill that duty by gutting the military budget, bringing all our troops home. Replace most of them with a Swiss style militia forbidden from every being deployed outside our borders.

    The Founders were against a standing army. It is a shame we have ignored their advice.
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  59. @TheBoom
    For me the pay and benefits aren't the core problem. We are paying to destabilize the world, kill US citizens, kill civilians, increase terror all for wars that don't benefit the American citizenry as a whole in any way. At one time they might have been for corporations now they are for Israel.

    “Agree” button on hold for now, and I have nothing to add.

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  60. bjondo says:
    @Anonymous
    US is rich and the debt is high. Both can be true at the same time. But taxes are relatively low so if there is a government debt crisis paying down the debt would just involve raising taxes. Just look at GDP per capita US which is very high up there so I don't see how anyone can argue the US is not a very rich country.

    Despite many problems, the US has many advantages like half the world's Ashkenazim who are very good at creating unbeatable new companies. Just look at how the half the 40 riches entrepreneurs under 40 in the US according to Forbes are Jewish. Jews are producing so much innovation in the US that it offsets a lot of the problems like military spending at 4% of GDP and less productive sub-populations.

    Love the Wall St innovations and Fed innovations and reasons to go to warssss. Broke the economy while stealing trillions. Did similar to Russia.

    God bless the Yids.

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  61. The Scalpel says: • Website
    @Tom Welsh
    "An Air Force four-star general named Arthur Lichte was reduced in rank to a two-star in 2017 after he was found guilty of having raped a lower ranking woman officer".

    You say he was ***reduced in rank*** for raping a female subordinate?

    Why wasn't he given 50 lashes, a dishonourable discharge, and a prison sentence? Even a random civilian would get the prison sentence for rape. And for such a senior officer to commit a crime like that is, of course far, far worse.

    Wait a minute! Were you really under the impression that things are fair?

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  62. Andele says:
    @Tbbh
    Two of my friends own motorcycle dealerships in San Antonio. Gee. I wonder how they can sell so many, compared to dealers in towns without major military bases...

    Tbbh

    Your friends sell so many motorcycles because of the hot San Antonio temperatures , which are very good for riding motorcycles , man …..

    Nothing to do with the US military bases in San Antonio : Lackland , Brooks ,Kelly , Randolph , Sam Houston , Camp Bullis …..

    And , of course , there are so many military bases in San Antonio because of the ” mexican threat ” , don`t you think so ?

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    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    The threat is the Mexicans we have allowed in, not any credible military threat from Mexico’s armed forces.

    Our military should be posted on the entire southern border with orders to kill all invaders who do not heed warnings to turn back. Add a minefield, barbed wire fencing where absent, and armed drones.
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  63. When I joined the U.S. Army in 1965 my starting pay was slightly less than 100 dollars per month. Soldiers then were said to be “in the service”. Today they are “in the military”. Later in life I realized that I had been “in the service” of evil. Still later I learned that the love of money is the root of evil.

    The American Dollar Dies in New York – a Satire from Uganda:

    https://russia-insider.com/en/american-dollar-dies-new-york-satire-uganda/ri23421

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    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson


    Still later I learned that the love of money is the root of evil.
     
    No wonder you're...WorkingClass. :)
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  64. ohmy says: • Website
    @Verymuchalive
    Federal Debt $20 trillion, Accumulated Balance of Trade Deficit since 1990 $12 trillion ( unadjusted for inflation ). That's not even including State and Local Debt, never mind Private Debt.
    The only thing preventing complete bankruptcy is that the Dollar is the World's Reserve Currency- for now. Once China and others start dumping US Treasury Bonds, that will be over.

    JS, Since Rumsfeld admitted, the day before 911 when he helped murder 30 forensic accountants plus a handful of Naval Investigators, you are 1 of the few I ever heard mention the stolen money. Since the Clinton administration up to 2016 the number is now $21 $Trillions, from just 2 departments.
    Check out Catherine Fitts @ solari.com

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    • Replies: @Mike P

    Since the Clinton administration up to 2016 the number is now $21 $Trillions, from just 2 departments.
     
    Can you explain to me how that even works, technically? E.g. the DoD is supposed to have "stolen" a lot more money than its entire regular budget - how could they even lay their hands on such sums? What accounts did that money sit in before it was siphoned off, without anyone noticing?
    , @jacques sheete

    Rumsfeld admitted, the day before 911 when he helped murder 30 forensic accountants plus a handful of Naval Investigators,
     
    Thanks, it's nice to know that there are others who are wide awake. Trouble is, even those who have a clue can't even imagine the .0001% of it, I'm sure.
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  65. JackOH says:
    @Backwoods Bob
    I've seen articles decrying that first-year married privates are eligible for food stamps. Because their housing, medical, and the cost of living differential are not "income". They're living on more than twice the reported income. So yeah, they have arranged the pay precisely so that they are not subject to any income tax, and are in some cases eligible for food stamps.

    They have rec vehicles they can check out, boats and four-wheelers, snowmobiles and etc., special parks and land reservations, scenic cabins they can stay at with trifling fees or are free. Ours has a golf course that must be staggering for upkeep. Gyms, facilities for parties and events - stuff you'd pay a lot for in the private sector. The subsidized shopping is still there, but is not the huge discount it was at one time, at the bases in this state.

    The state gives them all kinds of benefits like instant residency for hunting and fishing. The stores give them discounts. Military appreciation days.

    And frankly it isn't your STEM people, business and tech fields going into the military. Their next best alternatives are a pittance by comparison. For who you are getting, the quality of recruit, this is well paid.

    I don't mind that so much as having three times the size we need to defend our borders, which is what we should be doing and no more. Foreign entanglements, searching for monsters to destroy, acting as the world police - this is the main problem.

    BB, I personally know a couple who are around seventy, very healthy and active, who have parlayed multiple pension-qualifying careers between them in the armed forces, postal service, teaching, and county government, into astounding lifestyles. Harley motorcycle, Winnebago, big house, weekend cottage, cruises, the whole shebang.

    They’re very nice people, part of the local Puerto Rican ascendancy, first generation descendants of the Puerto Ricans recruited by the now defunct local steel mills back in the 1950s.

    I’m sure it can be said they worked for what they got, but, still . . . you gotta wonder what’s going on.

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    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    I’m sure it can be said they worked for what they got, but, still . . . you gotta wonder what’s going on.
     
    It's not called working, it's called "milking," but still they're pikers compared to the arms merchants, bankers and permanent "victim" crowd.
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  66. Anon[355] • Disclaimer says:

    These ‘hero’ armed missionaries also get preferential treatment in state/government hiring.

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  67. SteveM says:
    @Quartermaster
    Military spending has one virtue, it is constitutional as it fulfills one duty of the FedGov, one it has often shirked, defend the country.

    Giraldi can whine all he likes, but the DOD is not an entitlement program, nor does the Pentagon get all it wants. It never has gotten all it wants, no matter how much Giraldi whines to the contrary.

    Military spending has one virtue, it is constitutional as it fulfills one duty of the FedGov, one it has often shirked, defend the country.

    Giraldi can whine all he likes, but the DOD is not an entitlement program, nor does the Pentagon get all it wants. It never has gotten all it wants, no matter how much Giraldi whines to the contrary.

    I’ve never seen such a warped and delusional understanding of the voracious, insatiable, wasteful and corrupt National Security State presented so succinctly…

    P.S. I have a feeling that War Machine accounts have written Quatermaster a lot of checks over the years. I.e., he knows what side his bread is buttered on.

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    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    He’s a double-dipper with gov pensions. Double dipped in bullshit, apparently.
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  68. ohmy says: • Website
    @anon
    Defense spending is allegedly 3.6% of GDP ($700B / $19,000B) but is actually over 5% if you factor in the hidden Defense spending. VA benefits, over $100B, nuclear arsenal covered under Dept of Energy (my favorite) over $30B, Defense portion of debt service over $100B, and other places that I'd have to dig up.

    Defense spending is over 30% of the budget, the low ball 15% is only if you include social security and medicare which you should not because that is covered by dedicated payroll taxes. If payroll taxes were eliminated, those programs would go away but the budget deficit would not be impacted. This is a trick that defense consultants play to make Defense spending look smaller.

    Defense spending is over 50% if you also discount our annual debt service, this is why the $1.3T featured $600B for domestic vs $700B for Defense.

    I thought that singling out military pay was a tad mean spirited. Capping pensions that disproportionately benefit Generals who then go onto consulting jobs for Defense contractors and get paid positions on FOX might be a good idea but I didn't like the tone of this column.

    No serious person who says they care about budget deficits can approach them without looking at Defense Spending.
    - Chris Chuba

    anon, tell it like it is. Everyone should also know the debt servce cost to our budget is the interest Americans pay. What’s 2% of 20 trillions? 40 billions? IDK l, but it’s alot. Well that’s the federal reserve *a private corp.) income estimate for the yeat, which the share holders, all 6 of them, pay no income tax.

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  69. @WorkingClass
    When I joined the U.S. Army in 1965 my starting pay was slightly less than 100 dollars per month. Soldiers then were said to be "in the service". Today they are "in the military". Later in life I realized that I had been "in the service" of evil. Still later I learned that the love of money is the root of evil.

    The American Dollar Dies in New York - a Satire from Uganda:
     
    https://russia-insider.com/en/american-dollar-dies-new-york-satire-uganda/ri23421

    Still later I learned that the love of money is the root of evil.

    No wonder you’re…WorkingClass. :)

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    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    No wonder you’re…WorkingClass.
     
    Oh,looky! Now you have another goy to sneer at!
    , @WorkingClass
    I don't get it Thor. But I take no offense as I can see your smile.
    Did you try my link?
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  70. @Mr. Anon

    Wait, so this is a lefty Democrat blog now, where The Nation is cited favorably?
     
    So which wars did Petraeus win?

    Our men in uniform, particularly the grunts, make sacrifices that the others don’t make.
     
    Yeah, they have to wear a uniform and get up at 5:00 a.m. So do a lot of plumbers. Most people in the military are not in any more danger from violence than any number of civilians. Being a pizza deliveryman is probably more dangerous than most every military MOS.

    But then why would you know anymore about this topic than about anything else you spout off on?

    Writing objectively, Mr. Anon noted: “Being a pizza deliveryman is probably more dangerous than most every military MOS.”

    Hi Mr. Anon,

    Thanks for your satiric-service including recognition of often brave pizza deliverymen!

    I have a true work experience to share.

    In late-Autumn, 2001, as a dual-Business Manager & Emergency Spill Response Supervisor for Pa. E.M.A. Haz-Mat Certified Teem Environmental, Inc., one afternoon, the excitable company-owner called a mandatory meeting for all personnel.

    Addressing supervisors & (very skilled) Field Technicians, the rather timid owner ordered, “Starting today & through the weekend, TEEM is contracted to perform potential sarin gas terror attack responses within NYC subways & tunnels!
    So everybody better keep their pagers on when you go home & be immediately prepared to respond to sarin gas attacks!”

    A dear friend & late-coworker, Warren Hill, became uncomfortable with the assignment and sensibly spoke up, “Uh, what the fuck? Do we get extra military pay for dealing with the crazy Taliban while we ain’t armed with nothin’ but V.O.C. & Hnu meters, Personal Protection Equipment?”

    Unused to having to deal with reasonable employee-challenges, the TEEM owner lost it, screamed, What’s wrong with you, Warren?!! Can’t you read the advertisement painted on our E.R.V., “TEEM Environmental responds to all incidents involving US D.O.T. Hazardous Materials! Get on the ball, would ‘ya, Warren!”

    Upon reflection, I stuck neck-out, came to Warren’s aid, and opined, “But the Haz-Mat customers who have signed our company ‘Emergency Spill Response Agreements’ are not known to pose secondary-life threatening hazards after initial accidental discharges happened.”

    “Bah…, Just keep your pager on, Chuck!” replied our civilian Commander Stassi.

    P.S.: For anyone interested, attached below is my “wordy” 2015 article that delivers an example of how civilian private-company employees fought in the War Against (White Powder) Anthrax terror threats.
    Cases where the “perp(S)” never caught, an open case, and to this day, I suppose either Federal or State governments cut lots-of-checks, payable to private Emergency Spill Response companie$, for their services.

    https://www.countercurrents.org/orloski250415.htm

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    • LOL: Mike P
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  71. Mike P says:
    @ohmy
    JS, Since Rumsfeld admitted, the day before 911 when he helped murder 30 forensic accountants plus a handful of Naval Investigators, you are 1 of the few I ever heard mention the stolen money. Since the Clinton administration up to 2016 the number is now $21 $Trillions, from just 2 departments.
    Check out Catherine Fitts @ solari.com

    Since the Clinton administration up to 2016 the number is now $21 $Trillions, from just 2 departments.

    Can you explain to me how that even works, technically? E.g. the DoD is supposed to have “stolen” a lot more money than its entire regular budget – how could they even lay their hands on such sums? What accounts did that money sit in before it was siphoned off, without anyone noticing?

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    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    What accounts did that money sit in before it was siphoned off, without anyone noticing?
     
    We'll probably never know. The system is not exactly designed for transparency, and besides, guess where the missile, errr, "plane" hit the Penta-graft?

    Wouldn't it be fun to ask Rummy the Smirking Dummy that question?

    I bet this swinish character could provide a bit of insight with a little Nuernberg or Abu Ghraib style info gathering as well, and here's a partial rap sheet...


    Dov S. Zakheim was sworn in as the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) and Chief Financial Officer for the Department of Defense on May 4, 2001. Dr. Zakheim has previously served in a number of key positions in government and private business. Most recently, he was corporate vice president of System Planning Corp., a technology, research and analysis firm based in Arlington, Va. He also served as chief executive officer of SPC International Corp., a subsidiary specializing in political, military and economic consulting. During the 2000 presidential campaign, he served as a senior foreign policy advisor to then-Governor Bush.

    From 1985 until March 1987, Dr. Zakheim was Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Planning and Resources in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Policy). In that capacity, he played an active role in the Department's system acquisition and strategic planning processes. Dr. Zakheim held a variety of other DoD posts from 1981 to 1985. Earlier, he was employed by the National Security and International Affairs Division of the Congressional Budget Office.

    Dr. Zakheim has been a participant on a number of government, corporate, non-profit and charitable boards.

    http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/Zakheim.html
     

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  72. @Tom Welsh
    "An Air Force four-star general named Arthur Lichte was reduced in rank to a two-star in 2017 after he was found guilty of having raped a lower ranking woman officer".

    You say he was ***reduced in rank*** for raping a female subordinate?

    Why wasn't he given 50 lashes, a dishonourable discharge, and a prison sentence? Even a random civilian would get the prison sentence for rape. And for such a senior officer to commit a crime like that is, of course far, far worse.

    The US military are the equivalent of the Roman Empire’s honestiores, or upper classes. As well as the benefits accruing from service, they had special legal treatment, like being exempt from judicial torture. So Arthur Lichte merely gets part of his pension docked for raping a woman. Nothing to see here , mate, move along. Even someone like Chelsea ( ” They call her Natasha, but she looks like Elsie” ) Manning spends a mere 7 years in prison and gets the Defence Department to pay for “gender reassignment”.
    The point about judicial torture is important as America has recently revived the practice. Would Assange be waterboarded if they got hold of him ? Would he have met a fatal “accident” in custody?
    Who knows ? But don’t you even think about doing that to an American serviceman, even one as degenerate as Manning.

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    • Replies: @Rod1963
    You do realize that "waterboarding" is part and parcel of SERE school in the military and has been for a very long time. It's where the Pentagon/CIA got idea of applying to a bunch of sand monkeys.

    Anyone who is special ops gets waterboarded so are fighter pilots and the like. The MSM always neglects this fact.
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  73. Jeff77450 says:

    I wish pay & benefits had been “out of control” when I was in the army in the 1970s.

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  74. Anonymous[862] • Disclaimer says:
    @jacques sheete

    US is rich and the debt is high. Both can be true at the same time. But taxes are relatively low so if there is a government debt crisis paying down the debt would just involve raising taxes. Just look at GDP per capita US which is very high up there so I don’t see how anyone can argue the US is not a very rich country.

    Despite many problems, the US has many advantages like half the world’s Ashkenazim who are very good at creating unbeatable new companies....etc., etc., etc....
     
    Thanks for the laughs. You must be of the Maven-Krugman school of debt. You're all wrong, and it's obviously beyond your understanding that though you can fool almost all of the goyim almost all of the time, you can't fool all of us all the time.

    However, please do keep trying!

    That wasn’t a response. It was just name calling. So if you aren’t convinced by my rebuttal it’s certainly not because you had more intelligent analysis.

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    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    That wasn’t a response. It was just name calling. So if you aren’t convinced by my rebuttal it’s certainly not because you had more intelligent analysis.
     
    What makes you think your comment deserves a respectable or intelligent response? Anyway I wasn't aware that this site existed to host intelligence contests, but knock yerself out.
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  75. The Scalpel says: • Website
    @Quartermaster
    Military spending has one virtue, it is constitutional as it fulfills one duty of the FedGov, one it has often shirked, defend the country.

    Giraldi can whine all he likes, but the DOD is not an entitlement program, nor does the Pentagon get all it wants. It never has gotten all it wants, no matter how much Giraldi whines to the contrary.

    “DOD is not an entitlement program, nor does the Pentagon get all it wants. It never has gotten all it wants…”

    Just like the fat kid in Willie Wonka’s Chocolate Factory

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  76. Anonymous[862] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    Among the lots of good comments on the thread so far, yours is kind of an outlier, to put it nicely. No, you cannot be both rich and in debt (6 - 7 X more than your yearly income) at the same time.. There are perhaps different definitions of broke that people or families may use for themselves.

    1) Out of spending cash - got assets, but awaiting more income before any spending can resume. That's not too bad - it just shows lack of foresight or bad luck.

    2) Broke even - got some assets, but owe the same amount - income is about the same as expenditures expected. There are lots like this - they need to buckle down, but will probably be OK.

    3) Flat broke - can't borrow anymore due to bad payment history, even to friends and family - not enough income to pay expenditures or even on this.

    4) Broke like the US Feral Government - borrowing 1/3 of the money for the $4,000,000,000,000 budget each year, as only 2/3 can be collected via personal income/corporate income/excise/etc. taxes (just look near the back of the IRS 1040 instructions - they're not hiding this stuff). Total debt of $20,000,000,000,000 is 5 X the budget each year and 6-7 X the income collected yearly. It is > 100 % of the total GDP. There is no coming out of this hole without financial pain for almost everyone but those with a Challenger or other large/medium-cabin business jet with precious metals stashed on an island or S. American/Oriental country with a runway on your compound with armed guards.

    Just raise taxes? Fuck you too.

    You use a lot of figures but not the appropriate statistics. What do big aggregate numbers like 200k in debt per family really mean?

    I look at the percentage of tax revenue v. GDP compared to other first world countries. US is actually on the low side by this measure. That means it’s possible to raise taxes and only moderately harm the economic growth engine. And no one has addressed the advantages the US economy has in particular having half of the world’s Ashkenazim.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    You use a lot of figures but not the appropriate statistics. What do big aggregate numbers like 200k in debt per family really mean?
     
    This is not a statistics problem. The numbers tell you we're in big trouble. The $200,000 per taxpaying family mean that taxes would have to be raised by $10,000, as an example, just to pay this money off in 20 years. A steady chipping-away at that debt would give people, like the ones that hold the debt in the form of Treasury bonds, some small idea that "yeah, maybe the dollar is still worth something."

    However, a large majority of those families, in the example, would be made broke themselves if they had to come up with $800 more each month, not to mention made outraged. It can't happen though. What that means is this debt not be paid, and most likely will keep growing the way the Feral Gov't is run.

    The debt won't mean as much if GDP were quickly raised much higher over the coming years, but how can that happen when the US does not create much weatlh anymore (no, I don't count facebook and google as wealth)? The governments and (most of) the people are keeping their standard of living up via borrowing.

    The end result will probably a large amount of inflation, as the FED does by creating money and lending it out for cheap, to keep the stock market propped up so people still feel non-broke. That will ruin the dollar just the same as it will be ruined once interest rates rise and bust the budget that way. Even my man Ron Paul would not have been able to get us out of this, but he would have led people to understand how to dig out after the crash.
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  77. Anonymous[862] • Disclaimer says:
    @Verymuchalive
    Federal Debt $20 trillion, Accumulated Balance of Trade Deficit since 1990 $12 trillion ( unadjusted for inflation ). That's not even including State and Local Debt, never mind Private Debt.
    The only thing preventing complete bankruptcy is that the Dollar is the World's Reserve Currency- for now. Once China and others start dumping US Treasury Bonds, that will be over.

    China has been reducing its holdings in US treasuries. What negative effect has this had so far on the US?

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    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    China has been reducing its holdings in US treasuries. What negative effect has this had so far on the US?
     

    US and China kick off talks to avoid a trade war



    http://money.cnn.com/2018/05/03/news/economy/china-us-trade-talks-beijing-start/index.html
     
    Just a minor coincidence, I'm sure, but stay tuned.
    , @Verymuchalive
    China still has $1.3 trillion in US Treasuries. Reduction as of now has been very slight, so any effect has been very slight.
    When dumping does occur, the effect on the US dollar will be very obvious.
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  78. @ohmy
    JS, Since Rumsfeld admitted, the day before 911 when he helped murder 30 forensic accountants plus a handful of Naval Investigators, you are 1 of the few I ever heard mention the stolen money. Since the Clinton administration up to 2016 the number is now $21 $Trillions, from just 2 departments.
    Check out Catherine Fitts @ solari.com

    Rumsfeld admitted, the day before 911 when he helped murder 30 forensic accountants plus a handful of Naval Investigators,

    Thanks, it’s nice to know that there are others who are wide awake. Trouble is, even those who have a clue can’t even imagine the .0001% of it, I’m sure.

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    • Replies: @ChuckOrloski
    Hi Jacques Sheete,

    Am fairly sure you know about Donald Rumsfeld early political career, including his special assignment as an ambitious congressman, & on behalf of the A.Z.C.

    If not, below I link ZUS Defense Secretary "Shit Happens" treasonous letter to Robert F. Kennedy.

    http://www.israellobby.org/AZCDOJ/congress/default.asp

    Be well, Jacques. Thanks!
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  79. @Mike P

    Since the Clinton administration up to 2016 the number is now $21 $Trillions, from just 2 departments.
     
    Can you explain to me how that even works, technically? E.g. the DoD is supposed to have "stolen" a lot more money than its entire regular budget - how could they even lay their hands on such sums? What accounts did that money sit in before it was siphoned off, without anyone noticing?

    What accounts did that money sit in before it was siphoned off, without anyone noticing?

    We’ll probably never know. The system is not exactly designed for transparency, and besides, guess where the missile, errr, “plane” hit the Penta-graft?

    Wouldn’t it be fun to ask Rummy the Smirking Dummy that question?

    I bet this swinish character could provide a bit of insight with a little Nuernberg or Abu Ghraib style info gathering as well, and here’s a partial rap sheet…

    Dov S. Zakheim was sworn in as the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) and Chief Financial Officer for the Department of Defense on May 4, 2001. Dr. Zakheim has previously served in a number of key positions in government and private business. Most recently, he was corporate vice president of System Planning Corp., a technology, research and analysis firm based in Arlington, Va. He also served as chief executive officer of SPC International Corp., a subsidiary specializing in political, military and economic consulting. During the 2000 presidential campaign, he served as a senior foreign policy advisor to then-Governor Bush.

    From 1985 until March 1987, Dr. Zakheim was Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Planning and Resources in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Policy). In that capacity, he played an active role in the Department’s system acquisition and strategic planning processes. Dr. Zakheim held a variety of other DoD posts from 1981 to 1985. Earlier, he was employed by the National Security and International Affairs Division of the Congressional Budget Office.

    Dr. Zakheim has been a participant on a number of government, corporate, non-profit and charitable boards.

    http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/Zakheim.html

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  80. The United States military is a giant jobs program, Giraldi!

    So what of it! Who cares. Conjure up those dollars out of thin air and let the troops have some loot.

    Did the Founding Fathers warn us about large standing armies in their writings and actions? Yes.

    Did the Founding Fathers know that a large standing army would require a concentrated form of governmental power to collect the loot to pay for that army? Yes.

    Did we just pass the 800 year anniversary of the Magna Carta? Yes. Was the Magna Carta about standing armies and concentrated government power, among other things?

    Were the Founding Fathers somewhat ungrateful to the British Empire for its efforts in the French and Indian War? Yes.

    Would the Founding Fathers be surprised to find a Jew billionaire named Shelly Adelson controlling the use of the US military in the Middle East and West Asia? The cynical and smart ones wouldn’t be surprised at all.

    The GOP has the War budget and the US military and the Democrats have the public schools and many other government workers. The GOP always promises to spend more loot on the War budget and the US military and the Democrats always promise to spend more money on the public schools and other government programs.

    Giraldi has written a CLUNKER of a blog post, folks!

    Giraldi should write about mass immigration, monetary extremism and the impossibility of paying for the retirement of the baby boomers.

    Mass Immigration: DEMOGRAPHY

    Monetary Policy: DEBT

    Baby Boomers: NATION WRECKERS

    The American Empire is soon to go belly up in a manner similar to the upcoming demise of treasonous rat John McCain.

    The WASP /JEW ruling class of the American Empire knows this. A pleasant consolation is that China, Japan and Europe are just as badly bankrupt as the American Empire is.

    Raise the federal funds rate to 10 percent and implode the American Empire. Young people must no longer be saddled with massive unpayable debt and the unpayable retirement of the baby boomers. Pull the plug on the baby boomers now, and let the young people have a future.

    The Chinese, Japanese and Europeans will implode also. Use the nuclear deterrent and offshore balancing to keep global peace.

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    • Replies: @Curmudgeon
    When all else fails, you can still blame the baby boomers for everything. This crap was been going on long before baby boomer parents were born.
    There is an old saying: wars are the Jews harvest. All wars are economic wars, and the bankers, due to usury and money changing being forbidden to Christians, who were the original bankers. They've been running the scam for centuries, but have gone off the charts since the creation of the Federal Reserve banking system.
    What Mr. Giraldi fails to mention is the massive subsidies to business from military spending. Interstate highways were largely financed by military spending. Memphis is a port, due to the Army dredging the Mississippi. The list is long, but goes un-noticed as military spending.
    I won't touch pay and benefits, but if you want wars, a drafted military will never be the answer. De-industrialization and high unemployment (which is grossly understated) only make joining the military more attractive, not more desirable.
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  81. @Thorfinnsson


    Still later I learned that the love of money is the root of evil.
     
    No wonder you're...WorkingClass. :)

    No wonder you’re…WorkingClass.

    Oh,looky! Now you have another goy to sneer at!

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  82. @Thorfinnsson


    Still later I learned that the love of money is the root of evil.
     
    No wonder you're...WorkingClass. :)

    I don’t get it Thor. But I take no offense as I can see your smile.
    Did you try my link?

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  83. @Anonymous
    That wasn't a response. It was just name calling. So if you aren't convinced by my rebuttal it's certainly not because you had more intelligent analysis.

    That wasn’t a response. It was just name calling. So if you aren’t convinced by my rebuttal it’s certainly not because you had more intelligent analysis.

    What makes you think your comment deserves a respectable or intelligent response? Anyway I wasn’t aware that this site existed to host intelligence contests, but knock yerself out.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    If you want to prove your point, then come up with a better rebuttal. If you just want to be a dumbass that's fine too.
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  84. @Quartermaster
    Military spending has one virtue, it is constitutional as it fulfills one duty of the FedGov, one it has often shirked, defend the country.

    Giraldi can whine all he likes, but the DOD is not an entitlement program, nor does the Pentagon get all it wants. It never has gotten all it wants, no matter how much Giraldi whines to the contrary.

    Giraldi can whine all he likes, but the DOD is not an entitlement program, nor does the Pentagon get all it wants.

    If it isn’t an entitlement program, then what would one look like? Do you know the meaning of “sinecure?”

    You can whine about Giraldi all you want but he’s right and yer wrong, and thank G-d that the Pantygon doesn’t get all it wants. Can you explain whether it should and why?

    PS: Read the comments regarding disabilities and retirement bennies and then get back to us.

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  85. @JackOH
    BB, I personally know a couple who are around seventy, very healthy and active, who have parlayed multiple pension-qualifying careers between them in the armed forces, postal service, teaching, and county government, into astounding lifestyles. Harley motorcycle, Winnebago, big house, weekend cottage, cruises, the whole shebang.

    They're very nice people, part of the local Puerto Rican ascendancy, first generation descendants of the Puerto Ricans recruited by the now defunct local steel mills back in the 1950s.

    I'm sure it can be said they worked for what they got, but, still . . . you gotta wonder what's going on.

    I’m sure it can be said they worked for what they got, but, still . . . you gotta wonder what’s going on.

    It’s not called working, it’s called “milking,” but still they’re pikers compared to the arms merchants, bankers and permanent “victim” crowd.

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    • Replies: @JackOH
    He's currently a court bailiff, a patronage job here, earning maybe in the low $30s. Plus, his 20-year Army pension, plus his 20+-year postal service pension. He's a high school grad. His wife is fully retired with a 20-year Army pension, and a teacher's pension with about 20 years in.

    I'll take a wild guess their retirement income is no less than $100,000 a year in my very low-cost area.

    A go-figure sort of deal. Not just double-dipping. More than that, as you and other folks here have said. It's a mentality, a mind-set. For some of the worst of those high-salary government folks, there are only three types of Americans: Bill Gates and other billionaires, government workers, and Americans who are too stupid to find a corporate or government milch cow.
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  86. Rod1963 says:
    @Anon
    Article didn’t mention the dependency allowance. I looked on military websites to find the amount but you have to be registered military to find the amount

    There is a clothing allowance, why? And the military is heavily affirmative action Hispanic black and female I live near a big VA. Twice a day hundreds of VA employees drive right past my house. Almost all are black. I drive through the VA often. Most everyone I see is black except for the Indian immigrant Drs.

    California vets get some kind of no down payment low interest mortgage. When they retire they can get a loan for $50,000 to use for setting up a business or buying rental property.

    You really don’t want affirmative action nurses looking after anymore than those Bombay specials that the VA hires as doctors. It’s not a perk, it’s just free.

    The VA is a train wreck because of these people. No one wants to say squat because you have to point a finger at all the AA hires and that would get you labeled as a racist.

    And oh they are paid, very, very well. The average RN makes over a $100k at the VA. I know private sector nurses who went to work for the VA because of the pay and bennies. Plus you can’t get fired.

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  87. @Anonymous
    China has been reducing its holdings in US treasuries. What negative effect has this had so far on the US?

    China has been reducing its holdings in US treasuries. What negative effect has this had so far on the US?

    US and China kick off talks to avoid a trade war

    http://money.cnn.com/2018/05/03/news/economy/china-us-trade-talks-beijing-start/index.html

    Just a minor coincidence, I’m sure, but stay tuned.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    What evidence is there that the trade discussion is based on China reducing treasury holdings rather than counter-tariffs on US agricultural goods and potentially in a number of other areas like education services (blocking Chinese families from sending kids to lower ranked US colleges)?
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  88. Rod1963 says:
    @Verymuchalive
    The US military are the equivalent of the Roman Empire's honestiores, or upper classes. As well as the benefits accruing from service, they had special legal treatment, like being exempt from judicial torture. So Arthur Lichte merely gets part of his pension docked for raping a woman. Nothing to see here , mate, move along. Even someone like Chelsea ( " They call her Natasha, but she looks like Elsie" ) Manning spends a mere 7 years in prison and gets the Defence Department to pay for "gender reassignment".
    The point about judicial torture is important as America has recently revived the practice. Would Assange be waterboarded if they got hold of him ? Would he have met a fatal "accident" in custody?
    Who knows ? But don't you even think about doing that to an American serviceman, even one as degenerate as Manning.

    You do realize that “waterboarding” is part and parcel of SERE school in the military and has been for a very long time. It’s where the Pentagon/CIA got idea of applying to a bunch of sand monkeys.

    Anyone who is special ops gets waterboarded so are fighter pilots and the like. The MSM always neglects this fact.

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    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    I'm sure the Roman Empire had some version of waterboarding. The American Empire used it on the wogs.

    https://twitter.com/FloydWhaley/status/542531563657768961
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  89. Dov Zakheim is a nasty Neo-Conservative Jew rat, that is widely known. Zakheim was one of the Neo-Conservative rats who helped to drag the US military into the Iraq War debacle. Seems Neo-Conservative rat boy Dov Zakheim also made himself a wealthy rat through his connections to the WASP / JEW ruling class of the American Empire.

    But,

    Let’s not forget nasty Neo-Conservative Jew rat Michael Chertoff and his pal General Michael Hayden.

    Baby boomers Chertoff and Hayden have made out like bandits from their involvement in the Deep State of the American Empire.

    I say the baby boomers are an evil generation of nation wreckers.

    Tweets from 2015:

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  90. Dan Hayes says:
    @36 ulster
    One can admire Mr. Cohen's efforts to give us some perspective and--yes--sanity on the debate over Russia, and still view a Sovietist rag like THE NATION with contempt. It would seem that he is related to TN only by marriage. (Tip: Cohen usually appears for interviews on Tuesdays on THE JOHN BATCHELOR SHOW ( WABC 770AM) at 10pm EST. Always informative.)

    36 ulster:

    I too listen to the Batchelor radio show and his informative Cohen interviews. Many times Cohen has thanked Batchelor for offering him one of his few public venues.

    I like Batchelor despite the fact that many other times he presents or is comfortable with a hard Neocon line. I’ve often wondered if this has anything to do with his Persian background.

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  91. @Anonymous
    China has been reducing its holdings in US treasuries. What negative effect has this had so far on the US?

    China still has $1.3 trillion in US Treasuries. Reduction as of now has been very slight, so any effect has been very slight.
    When dumping does occur, the effect on the US dollar will be very obvious.

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    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Average daily volume in the Treasury market is $500 billion, and the Federal Reserve System is authorized to create unlimited quantities of currency to purchase Treasuries (and other gov't securities) in any case.

    This isn't the financial weapon of mass destruction people think it is.

    The Chinese themselves know this, which is why they stopped adding to their position and have gradually reduced it.

    A more effective strategy would be to focus financial firepower where the Federal Reserve isn't authorized to operate, such as the commercial paper market. Probably Congress itself would then act, but if you can buy enough seats for hard money dweebs you might be able to cause serious trouble.

    http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~sternfin/mkacperc/public_html/commercial.pdf
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  92. @DanFromCt
    I was in the field and in a number of firefights during my year in Vietnam, 69 - 70, and I find the idea of some store or VA clerk thanking me for my service offensive as all get out because I know these well meaning strangers, who owe me nothing at all, are being played for fools to serve the interests of America’s worst enemy, Israel and its American fifth column. I’m also disgusted by this new breed of soldier who’s less any sort of manly patriot than a skin-headed, “muh brothers, muh mission” wind-up martinet who mistakes the vain daintiness of pumping iron as well as technical superiority’s easy targets for manliness. As for the Pentagon, it’s the mother of all bureaucracies whose leaders but for the costumes are no more warriors than the time-serving hacks in any other bloated bureaucracy, who couldn’t care less, as the facts make clear, about sending young Americans to die and be maimed so the sons of their Israeli masters need not.

    Well, that’s well written.

    Bravo!

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  93. Dan Hayes says:
    @bjondo
    I've read Cohen is a Russia expert and gives sensible analysis regarding events there. Don't know his views on holocaust, Occupied Palestine.

    His wife, Katrina vanden Heuvel, is part owner, publisher, editor of THE NATION.

    bjondo:

    I get the impression that Cohen tries to stay clear of anything outside his expertise, Russian history and geopolitics.

    Several times I’ve heard him fondly reminisce about being raised in Kentucky. So he may not be a complete Upper West Side liberal.

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  94. anon[217] • Disclaimer says:

    At least half of our military bills should be sent to Israel. Practically all of our wars these days are on their behalf. The other half should be paid by a war tax. All those who support going to “necessary” wars overseas for “humanitarian” reasons or other will pay into this tax, starting with the neocons and the media (not just mainstream liberal media but many right wing neocon mouthpieces like National Review, Breitbart, DailyCaller).

    Last but not least, any elected official who votes for or calls for war with any nation, from Trump to Pence, Nikki Haley, John McCain, John Bolton, Mike Pompeo et al. should fork out 100% of their salaries to pay for the war until it ends.

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    • Agree: Charles Pewitt
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  95. Anonymous[862] • Disclaimer says:
    @jacques sheete

    That wasn’t a response. It was just name calling. So if you aren’t convinced by my rebuttal it’s certainly not because you had more intelligent analysis.
     
    What makes you think your comment deserves a respectable or intelligent response? Anyway I wasn't aware that this site existed to host intelligence contests, but knock yerself out.

    If you want to prove your point, then come up with a better rebuttal. If you just want to be a dumbass that’s fine too.

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  96. Anonymous[862] • Disclaimer says:
    @jacques sheete

    China has been reducing its holdings in US treasuries. What negative effect has this had so far on the US?
     

    US and China kick off talks to avoid a trade war



    http://money.cnn.com/2018/05/03/news/economy/china-us-trade-talks-beijing-start/index.html
     
    Just a minor coincidence, I'm sure, but stay tuned.

    What evidence is there that the trade discussion is based on China reducing treasury holdings rather than counter-tariffs on US agricultural goods and potentially in a number of other areas like education services (blocking Chinese families from sending kids to lower ranked US colleges)?

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    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    What evidence is there that the trade discussion is based on China reducing treasury holdings rather than counter-tariffs ...
     
    I have none whatsoever and do not intend to obtain any since I already have a lot to do. However, it makes sense to me that both of the above could be factors, as well as others, and that you cannot produce any credible evidence to say that it is due to only one of the reasons you mentioned.

    You seem to be taking a stab at engaging a false dichotomy, which is naughty, naughty!
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  97. Realist says:

    America’s Republican politicians complain that “entitlements,” by which they mean pensions and medical care, are leading the country to bankruptcy even as they fatten the spending on the Pentagon, which now takes 12 percent of the overall budget.

    The US military budget should be $100 billion….do what you can.

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    • Replies: @ChuckOrloski
    As if remotely possible to do so, Realist recommended:
    "The US military budget should be $100 billion….do what you can."

    Hi (Sur)Realist,

    A question.

    Above, who would meaningfully tell that to the ZUS Defense Department, Joint Chiefs of Staff, & the military contractors?

    Sheldon Adelson? Netanyahu?

    Take heart! I trust Peter Aus will appear & bring your do-gooder passion into practical reality. Thanks, nevertheless!
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  98. L.K says:
    @Anonymous
    US is rich and the debt is high. Both can be true at the same time. But taxes are relatively low so if there is a government debt crisis paying down the debt would just involve raising taxes. Just look at GDP per capita US which is very high up there so I don't see how anyone can argue the US is not a very rich country.

    Despite many problems, the US has many advantages like half the world's Ashkenazim who are very good at creating unbeatable new companies. Just look at how the half the 40 riches entrepreneurs under 40 in the US according to Forbes are Jewish. Jews are producing so much innovation in the US that it offsets a lot of the problems like military spending at 4% of GDP and less productive sub-populations.

    “Despite many problems, the US has many advantages like half the world’s Ashkenazim who are very good at creating unbeatable new companies. Just look at how the half the 40 riches entrepreneurs under 40 in the US according to Forbes are Jewish. Jews are producing so much innovation in the US that it offsets a lot of the problems like military spending at 4% of GDP and less productive sub-populations.”

    buhahHAHAHAHAHA….

    another comedian, thanks for the laughs!

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  99. @Rod1963
    You do realize that "waterboarding" is part and parcel of SERE school in the military and has been for a very long time. It's where the Pentagon/CIA got idea of applying to a bunch of sand monkeys.

    Anyone who is special ops gets waterboarded so are fighter pilots and the like. The MSM always neglects this fact.

    I’m sure the Roman Empire had some version of waterboarding. The American Empire used it on the wogs.

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    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    You make my point for me.
    As I said, Judicial Torture was used on humiliores, and , indeed, in European Inquisitorial Systems until the late C18th and early C19th.
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  100. Anon[285] • Disclaimer says:
    @bjondo
    I've read Cohen is a Russia expert and gives sensible analysis regarding events there. Don't know his views on holocaust, Occupied Palestine.

    His wife, Katrina vanden Heuvel, is part owner, publisher, editor of THE NATION.

    Cohen is a true believer in holocaustism.

    Don’t know his views on Palestine.

    He can hate on Iran with the best of ‘em.

    Cohen’s stock in trade is expertise re Russia.

    His greatest recommendation is that he is NOT Susan Glasser.

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  101. @Verymuchalive
    China still has $1.3 trillion in US Treasuries. Reduction as of now has been very slight, so any effect has been very slight.
    When dumping does occur, the effect on the US dollar will be very obvious.

    Average daily volume in the Treasury market is $500 billion, and the Federal Reserve System is authorized to create unlimited quantities of currency to purchase Treasuries (and other gov’t securities) in any case.

    This isn’t the financial weapon of mass destruction people think it is.

    The Chinese themselves know this, which is why they stopped adding to their position and have gradually reduced it.

    A more effective strategy would be to focus financial firepower where the Federal Reserve isn’t authorized to operate, such as the commercial paper market. Probably Congress itself would then act, but if you can buy enough seats for hard money dweebs you might be able to cause serious trouble.

    http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~sternfin/mkacperc/public_html/commercial.pdf

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  102. Sparkon says:

    I’m sure the Roman Empire had some version of waterboarding.

    The Roman Army’s form of punishment was known as decimation, a word now commonly used by semi-literates to torture knowledgeable historians, philologists, and wordsmiths, including not a few Baby Boomers, who apparently know a lot more than you, and who also are smart enough to blame the guilty — and not an entire generation — for the misdeeds or evil gains of a relatively few assholes.

    But I know subtle nuance like that must be difficult to understand for those who can paint — or splatter — only with a very broad brush.

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  103. @Realist

    America’s Republican politicians complain that “entitlements,” by which they mean pensions and medical care, are leading the country to bankruptcy even as they fatten the spending on the Pentagon, which now takes 12 percent of the overall budget.
     
    The US military budget should be $100 billion....do what you can.

    As if remotely possible to do so, Realist recommended:
    “The US military budget should be $100 billion….do what you can.”

    Hi (Sur)Realist,

    A question.

    Above, who would meaningfully tell that to the ZUS Defense Department, Joint Chiefs of Staff, & the military contractors?

    Sheldon Adelson? Netanyahu?

    Take heart! I trust Peter Aus will appear & bring your do-gooder passion into practical reality. Thanks, nevertheless!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Realist

    Above, who would meaningfully tell that to the ZUS Defense Department, Joint Chiefs of Staff, & the military contractors?

    Sheldon Adelson? Netanyahu?
     
    A President with balls.
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  104. @Charles Pewitt
    I'm sure the Roman Empire had some version of waterboarding. The American Empire used it on the wogs.

    https://twitter.com/FloydWhaley/status/542531563657768961

    You make my point for me.
    As I said, Judicial Torture was used on humiliores, and , indeed, in European Inquisitorial Systems until the late C18th and early C19th.

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  105. @Anonymous
    US spends 4% of GDP on the military versus 2% in China, France, UK. That's high but considering how rich the US is, not unbearable. Weak article.

    A person or entity whose liabilities outweigh its assets, is not rich.

    This is more true when the entity, like the US Fed Gov, has vastly more liabilities than physical assets, let alone readily marketable assets.

    The fed gov has promised to pay more each year than it has recently taken in as revenue, and more than it has any realistic hope of generating anytime soon.

    The fed gov is in hock more than 20 trillion in the books right now, and over 100 trillion projected forward.

    Yeah the fed gov is rich.

    Looking at average and median private-household net worth will not make the picture much rosier.

    Stop lying or learn math.

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    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    The oil and gas resources alone owned by the federal government are worth some $200 trillion.

    Then there's the fact that the taxing authority of the federal government makes any fiscal deficit a matter of choice to begin with.
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  106. @Backwoods Bob
    I've seen articles decrying that first-year married privates are eligible for food stamps. Because their housing, medical, and the cost of living differential are not "income". They're living on more than twice the reported income. So yeah, they have arranged the pay precisely so that they are not subject to any income tax, and are in some cases eligible for food stamps.

    They have rec vehicles they can check out, boats and four-wheelers, snowmobiles and etc., special parks and land reservations, scenic cabins they can stay at with trifling fees or are free. Ours has a golf course that must be staggering for upkeep. Gyms, facilities for parties and events - stuff you'd pay a lot for in the private sector. The subsidized shopping is still there, but is not the huge discount it was at one time, at the bases in this state.

    The state gives them all kinds of benefits like instant residency for hunting and fishing. The stores give them discounts. Military appreciation days.

    And frankly it isn't your STEM people, business and tech fields going into the military. Their next best alternatives are a pittance by comparison. For who you are getting, the quality of recruit, this is well paid.

    I don't mind that so much as having three times the size we need to defend our borders, which is what we should be doing and no more. Foreign entanglements, searching for monsters to destroy, acting as the world police - this is the main problem.

    Commissaries, gyms, and hair salons on bases in the USA must end.

    Pay the soldiers well, but have them live and try to get by in the same economy and world as their employers — WE THE TAXPAYERS.

    Also, require soldiers to live off base and pay their own housing (boosting their cash pay accordingly) OR start counting their housing as taxable income as it would be for the rest of us mere TAXPAYERS.

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  107. Evil baby boomers in Europe, England and the United States have been protected by the monetary extremism of the European Central Bank, the Bank of England and the Federal Reserve Bank.

    It is now time to financially liquidate the evil baby boomer generation. If the Federal Reserve Bank raised the federal funds rate to 10 percent, and the ECB and BoE raised interest rates similarly, the baby boomers in the USA, England and most of Europe would be financially busted. The baby boomers have been the generation that benefited the most from the monetary extremism of the last few decades, and especially since 2008.

    The federal funds rate went over 20 percent in 1981, 10 percent now would wipe out the asset bubbles in stocks, bonds and real estate. Do it.

    The baby boomers are an evil generation of nation-wreckers. Bill Clinton and George W Bush are prime examples of evil globalizer baby boomers.

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  108. Realist says:

    Above, who would meaningfully tell that to the ZUS Defense Department, Joint Chiefs of Staff, & the military contractors?

    A President with balls.

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  109. @anon
    Defense spending is allegedly 3.6% of GDP ($700B / $19,000B) but is actually over 5% if you factor in the hidden Defense spending. VA benefits, over $100B, nuclear arsenal covered under Dept of Energy (my favorite) over $30B, Defense portion of debt service over $100B, and other places that I'd have to dig up.

    Defense spending is over 30% of the budget, the low ball 15% is only if you include social security and medicare which you should not because that is covered by dedicated payroll taxes. If payroll taxes were eliminated, those programs would go away but the budget deficit would not be impacted. This is a trick that defense consultants play to make Defense spending look smaller.

    Defense spending is over 50% if you also discount our annual debt service, this is why the $1.3T featured $600B for domestic vs $700B for Defense.

    I thought that singling out military pay was a tad mean spirited. Capping pensions that disproportionately benefit Generals who then go onto consulting jobs for Defense contractors and get paid positions on FOX might be a good idea but I didn't like the tone of this column.

    No serious person who says they care about budget deficits can approach them without looking at Defense Spending.
    - Chris Chuba

    Tough shit that you don’t like his tone. We don’t like being systematically ripped off and told it’s patriotic.

    We should start either taxing the military employees’ housing allowance OR require them to buy their own housing off-base. I’d be fine with increasing cash salary to make up for it. Let’s get an honest number on what their salaries really are and then debate whether they get paid enough.

    And by all means let’s reform and reduce officer pensions. End this last-three-years calculation and require more than 20 years “service” to get half or more of one’s salary as pension. They are desk jobs and they can and should work at least, say, THIRTY years before being able to retire st that level of pension and work elsewhere.

    Military is a wasteful fraudulent untrustworthy bureaucracy like any other in the fed gov — or worse because they get a free pass from a lot of people.

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  110. @RadicalCenter
    A person or entity whose liabilities outweigh its assets, is not rich.

    This is more true when the entity, like the US Fed Gov, has vastly more liabilities than physical assets, let alone readily marketable assets.

    The fed gov has promised to pay more each year than it has recently taken in as revenue, and more than it has any realistic hope of generating anytime soon.

    The fed gov is in hock more than 20 trillion in the books right now, and over 100 trillion projected forward.

    Yeah the fed gov is rich.

    Looking at average and median private-household net worth will not make the picture much rosier.

    Stop lying or learn math.

    The oil and gas resources alone owned by the federal government are worth some $200 trillion.

    Then there’s the fact that the taxing authority of the federal government makes any fiscal deficit a matter of choice to begin with.

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  111. @jacques sheete

    Rumsfeld admitted, the day before 911 when he helped murder 30 forensic accountants plus a handful of Naval Investigators,
     
    Thanks, it's nice to know that there are others who are wide awake. Trouble is, even those who have a clue can't even imagine the .0001% of it, I'm sure.

    Hi Jacques Sheete,

    Am fairly sure you know about Donald Rumsfeld early political career, including his special assignment as an ambitious congressman, & on behalf of the A.Z.C.

    If not, below I link ZUS Defense Secretary “Shit Happens” treasonous letter to Robert F. Kennedy.

    http://www.israellobby.org/AZCDOJ/congress/default.asp

    Be well, Jacques. Thanks!

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  112. @Achmed E. Newman
    That was a very good article with lots of facts that I was unaware regarding the various forms of compensation. I have not been in the miltary. I will tell you that I have seen how things work on the procurement end, and that is the real shitshow, moneywise. The amount of wasted money in personnel involved in trying to micromanage a contractor, the "generation" of paperwork that must weigh 10X vehicle max-gross-weight in order to sign off on it, and other things, ruin the job for the technician or engineer in any company making stuff for the US military.

    It's very easy to spend other people's money. Everyone besides Socialists and Commies probably learned all that during his kindergarten years.

    (BTW, that last sentence of mine brought up the only one (little tiny) thing that I didn't like about the article. You KEEP USING "his and her", "he and she", etc. Enough of that crap, please, Mr. Giraldi. Unz is one of a number of place on-line on which one doesn't have to be PC. He can write as he pleases. The rest of your English is very professional, so why this?).

    Anyway, great article, just the facts and honest opinion without any hyperbole. Regarding your very last paragraph, BTW, it's not just that the army is so costly, but if America ever had to defend itself from one of the countries we buy parts from, cough, China, cough, cough, that'll be a laugh. We are operating on borrowed money, as Jack S (#16) stated, AND foreign supply lines. We're number 1! Yeah!

    And we need Russian equipment to get into space these days, apparently.

    That would be troublesome even if Russia were an ally, as perhaps they should be.

    It’s worse when our gov chooses to slander, threaten, sanction, and encircle the country on whom we are relying.

    Imagine China refusing to sell us what we need AND Russia refusing to let us use or buy its space equipment.

    For that matter, there’s so much demand for oil and natural gas in India and China — likely to keep increasing, too — Russia eventually may be able to say “we will sell to anyone EXCEPT companies and facilities in the USA, and anyone caught reselling to the USA will join them on the blacklist.” If Iran and, say, Venezuela or Nigeria did the same, watch out.

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    • Replies: @ChuckOrloski
    Radical Center proposed: "Russia eventually may be able to say “we will sell to anyone EXCEPT companies and facilities in the USA, and anyone caught reselling to the USA will join them on the blacklist.”

    Hi Radical Center,

    Speaking with utmost respect for your typical sound-thought, have you ever approached the issue from the Globalist's (ideal) "Radical Center" perspective where the planet's economic & military Superpowers decide how crude oil & natural gas sale & distribution is done?

    A very serious "thanks," R.C.!
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  113. @Quartermaster
    Military spending has one virtue, it is constitutional as it fulfills one duty of the FedGov, one it has often shirked, defend the country.

    Giraldi can whine all he likes, but the DOD is not an entitlement program, nor does the Pentagon get all it wants. It never has gotten all it wants, no matter how much Giraldi whines to the contrary.

    Deliberate dishonest distraction. Whether the DOD got as much as it wanted, it gets much more than our actual defense requires, and the people on the gravy train know it.

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  114. @Quartermaster
    Military spending has one virtue, it is constitutional as it fulfills one duty of the FedGov, one it has often shirked, defend the country.

    Giraldi can whine all he likes, but the DOD is not an entitlement program, nor does the Pentagon get all it wants. It never has gotten all it wants, no matter how much Giraldi whines to the contrary.

    The fact that defense is a specifically enumerated duty and power of the fed government, has nothing to do with the proper amount to spend on that function.

    Money spent attacking countries that are not attacking us here in the USA, are not preparing for imminent attack on us here in the USA, and are not aiding those who are attacking or preparing to imminently attack us here in the USA … is NOT part of that legitimate constitutional function.

    Same with money spent defending Israel or Saudi Arabia, helping the saudis kill Yemenis in Yemen, helping islamists or anyone else overthrow the gov of Syria, etc.

    Same with money spent defending (or controlling) Germany, France, South Korea, Japan, etc.

    Calling that “whining” is not an argument. It suggests that you lack an honest, logical argument on this issue.

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    • Replies: @anarchyst
    You are correct. The rest of the world that falls under the USA "defense umbrella" can afford extravagant social programs as they do not pay for their defense. In fact, WE are required to pay rent on foreign bases in which to place our troops.
    If I had my way, all foreign troop deployments would stop. Those countries requesting our "protection" would have to pay for it.
    Seems to me, that was one of President Trump's campaign promises--making foreign countries pay for their defense.
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  115. @Andele
    Tbbh

    Your friends sell so many motorcycles because of the hot San Antonio temperatures , which are very good for riding motorcycles , man .....

    Nothing to do with the US military bases in San Antonio : Lackland , Brooks ,Kelly , Randolph , Sam Houston , Camp Bullis .....

    And , of course , there are so many military bases in San Antonio because of the " mexican threat " , don`t you think so ?

    The threat is the Mexicans we have allowed in, not any credible military threat from Mexico’s armed forces.

    Our military should be posted on the entire southern border with orders to kill all invaders who do not heed warnings to turn back. Add a minefield, barbed wire fencing where absent, and armed drones.

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    • Replies: @ChuckOrloski
    Radical Center opined: "Our military should be posted on the entire southern border with orders to kill all invaders who do not heed warnings to turn back."

    Hi Radical Center,

    The biggest problem I have with the solution (above) is your having used, in error, the words, "Our military."

    Were that the actual case, Jewish Lobbies, billionaire ZUS Jews, Congress, & PreZident Trump would be very pissed at Mr. Giraldi's for provocatively having the gall to use the description, "American military" in his article title.

    Thanks again, Radical Center. By increment, you are getting there! So please simply consider dropping the word "Our"?

    Like one of the Maven Shama's "old grey mares, "That ain't what it used to be."
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  116. @SteveM

    Military spending has one virtue, it is constitutional as it fulfills one duty of the FedGov, one it has often shirked, defend the country.

    Giraldi can whine all he likes, but the DOD is not an entitlement program, nor does the Pentagon get all it wants. It never has gotten all it wants, no matter how much Giraldi whines to the contrary.
     

    I've never seen such a warped and delusional understanding of the voracious, insatiable, wasteful and corrupt National Security State presented so succinctly...

    P.S. I have a feeling that War Machine accounts have written Quatermaster a lot of checks over the years. I.e., he knows what side his bread is buttered on.

    He’s a double-dipper with gov pensions. Double dipped in bullshit, apparently.

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  117. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Anon
    Article didn’t mention the dependency allowance. I looked on military websites to find the amount but you have to be registered military to find the amount

    There is a clothing allowance, why? And the military is heavily affirmative action Hispanic black and female I live near a big VA. Twice a day hundreds of VA employees drive right past my house. Almost all are black. I drive through the VA often. Most everyone I see is black except for the Indian immigrant Drs.

    California vets get some kind of no down payment low interest mortgage. When they retire they can get a loan for $50,000 to use for setting up a business or buying rental property.

    The clothing allowance is for purchase, upkeep, and repair of uniforms. There is a bureaucratic mindset of having things clearly laid out which guarantees a lot of this spending, especially when the time preferences of new enlistees bears out the wisdom of having a specially set aside and clearly labeled clothing allowance. Many good critics with detailed grievamces skip over the governmental addiction to trying to solve reality with longer and longer rulebooks.

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  118. @RadicalCenter
    And we need Russian equipment to get into space these days, apparently.

    That would be troublesome even if Russia were an ally, as perhaps they should be.

    It’s worse when our gov chooses to slander, threaten, sanction, and encircle the country on whom we are relying.

    Imagine China refusing to sell us what we need AND Russia refusing to let us use or buy its space equipment.

    For that matter, there’s so much demand for oil and natural gas in India and China — likely to keep increasing, too — Russia eventually may be able to say “we will sell to anyone EXCEPT companies and facilities in the USA, and anyone caught reselling to the USA will join them on the blacklist.” If Iran and, say, Venezuela or Nigeria did the same, watch out.

    Radical Center proposed: “Russia eventually may be able to say “we will sell to anyone EXCEPT companies and facilities in the USA, and anyone caught reselling to the USA will join them on the blacklist.”

    Hi Radical Center,

    Speaking with utmost respect for your typical sound-thought, have you ever approached the issue from the Globalist’s (ideal) “Radical Center” perspective where the planet’s economic & military Superpowers decide how crude oil & natural gas sale & distribution is done?

    A very serious “thanks,” R.C.!

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  119. @TheBoom
    For me the pay and benefits aren't the core problem. We are paying to destabilize the world, kill US citizens, kill civilians, increase terror all for wars that don't benefit the American citizenry as a whole in any way. At one time they might have been for corporations now they are for Israel.

    sad but true.

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  120. @RadicalCenter
    The threat is the Mexicans we have allowed in, not any credible military threat from Mexico’s armed forces.

    Our military should be posted on the entire southern border with orders to kill all invaders who do not heed warnings to turn back. Add a minefield, barbed wire fencing where absent, and armed drones.

    Radical Center opined: “Our military should be posted on the entire southern border with orders to kill all invaders who do not heed warnings to turn back.”

    Hi Radical Center,

    The biggest problem I have with the solution (above) is your having used, in error, the words, “Our military.”

    Were that the actual case, Jewish Lobbies, billionaire ZUS Jews, Congress, & PreZident Trump would be very pissed at Mr. Giraldi’s for provocatively having the gall to use the description, “American military” in his article title.

    Thanks again, Radical Center. By increment, you are getting there! So please simply consider dropping the word “Our”?

    Like one of the Maven Shama’s “old grey mares, “That ain’t what it used to be.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    You're right, of course. These days I try to always write and say "the US government" rather than "OUR government." I should have done the same with "US military."
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  121. anarchyst says:
    @Tom Welsh
    "An Air Force four-star general named Arthur Lichte was reduced in rank to a two-star in 2017 after he was found guilty of having raped a lower ranking woman officer".

    You say he was ***reduced in rank*** for raping a female subordinate?

    Why wasn't he given 50 lashes, a dishonourable discharge, and a prison sentence? Even a random civilian would get the prison sentence for rape. And for such a senior officer to commit a crime like that is, of course far, far worse.

    There are two standards…one for enlisted personnel and the other for officers. During the Grenada situation some enlisted personnel and officers were caught attempting to ship captured AK-47 rifles back to the states. The enlisted personnel got “hard time” in Leavenworth while the officers got “letters of reprimand”. Double standard, indeed.
    I might have made the military a career, but the disparities in both facilities and treatment of officers vs. enlisted was a real turn-off. I completed my enlistment honorably and returned to civilian life.
    It is my humble opinion (and personal observation) that the commissioned officer rank structure where there is concern for the enlisted troops ends with the rank of colonel. The general staff is more akin to political office than it is to serving in the military and taking care of their military subordinates.
    As to “pay and allowances”, when I was active duty (1969-1971) it was not much. In fact, at the time, those of us in uniform were looked down upon and blamed for the prosecution of the Vietnam conflict. Not only that, legislated job programs that were supposed to go to us Vietnam veterans never materialized.
    Yes, the all-volunteer forced made it necessary to increase “pay and allowances” to relatively attractive levels.
    If I had my way, I would bring back the draft with NO college deferments. In fact, the sons and daughters of politicians would get called up first. Service in the IDF doesn’t count.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Yes, but expand that.

    Mandate that we first enlist, train, and promptly deploy any children and grandchildren of all members of Congress, members of the President's Cabinet, federal judges, Federal Reserve Board of Governors, and the CEOs/CFOs/CIOs etc. of military companies (including Northrup Grumman, Boeing, and their ilk).

    I'd support enacting such a requirement today.

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  122. anarchyst says:
    @RadicalCenter
    The fact that defense is a specifically enumerated duty and power of the fed government, has nothing to do with the proper amount to spend on that function.

    Money spent attacking countries that are not attacking us here in the USA, are not preparing for imminent attack on us here in the USA, and are not aiding those who are attacking or preparing to imminently attack us here in the USA ... is NOT part of that legitimate constitutional function.

    Same with money spent defending Israel or Saudi Arabia, helping the saudis kill Yemenis in Yemen, helping islamists or anyone else overthrow the gov of Syria, etc.

    Same with money spent defending (or controlling) Germany, France, South Korea, Japan, etc.

    Calling that “whining” is not an argument. It suggests that you lack an honest, logical argument on this issue.

    You are correct. The rest of the world that falls under the USA “defense umbrella” can afford extravagant social programs as they do not pay for their defense. In fact, WE are required to pay rent on foreign bases in which to place our troops.
    If I had my way, all foreign troop deployments would stop. Those countries requesting our “protection” would have to pay for it.
    Seems to me, that was one of President Trump’s campaign promises–making foreign countries pay for their defense.

    Read More
    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    If I had my way, all foreign troop deployments would stop. Those countries requesting our “protection” would have to pay for it.

    Seems to me, that was one of President Trump’s campaign promises–making foreign countries pay for their defense.
     
    I don't like the idea of the american military being a mercenary force anymore than the idea of them being an imperial garrison force.
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  123. Rurik says:
    @TheBoom
    For me the pay and benefits aren't the core problem. We are paying to destabilize the world, kill US citizens, kill civilians, increase terror all for wars that don't benefit the American citizenry as a whole in any way. At one time they might have been for corporations now they are for Israel.

    sad but true

    Read More
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  124. Johnr says:

    You sir are an American hating leftist. The military, until the left decided it was the government’s job to provide cradel to grave care for everyone accounted for more than 75 percent of the federal budget. To complain that the military consumes 12 of the budget while Medicaid consumes 50 percent is a straw man. Having been an infantry man I can tell you that anyone who can do 20 or 30 years deserves a life long pension. Being a man is hard on the body.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    But they don't have to do "20 to 30 years", just 20, before that pension kicks in.

    Secondly, many people getting those military pensions -- and going to other fed gov jobs in order to double-dip pensions -- never see combat and aren't even deployed to a zone where combat is reasonably likely.

    Third, Medicaid costs too much, but it doesn't consume anywhere near 50% of the federal budget.

    I do see your point that if the fed gov stuck to its few, limited constitutional responsibilities, defense (and border security) would constitute a pretty large share of fed gov spending just because the fed gov isn't supposed to be doing a thousand other things.

    Lastly, my brother-in-law is a retired Air Force FIGHTER PILOT who survived direct combat in Vietnam, and he heartily agreed when I sent him this column. Is he an America-hating leftist too?

    Similarly, both active and retired military "servicemembers" gave their donations and votes most to RON PAUL, who was very well known for constantly making similar points about military over-spending and adventurism and proposing large cuts to military and war spending. I guess those many, many soldiers are America-hating leftists too.

    It's embarrassing that you need to insult patriotic Americans who simply think that "military" spending is unfair to taxpayers and well beyond what is needed for a strong DEFENSE (as opposed to being policeman or bully of the world).

    , @Chris Mallory
    Why should anyone be allowed to live off the tax payers for 20-30 years then draw a cushy pension? A standing army is un-American.
    , @Thorfinnsson


    You sir are an American hating leftist.
     
    The Empire is not your friend. Ever notice how every time it breaks another country, "refugees" from there and elsewhere get dumped on small towns in America? Ever notice how the officer corps blindly marches along with leftist social engineering rather resigning en masse?


    The military, until the left decided it was the government’s job to provide cradel to grave care for everyone accounted for more than 75 percent of the federal budget. To complain that the military consumes 12 of the budget while Medicaid consumes 50 percent is a straw man.
     
    The armed forces were three quarters of the federal budget in the 1950s with the Cold War on.

    In the 1920s, when the federal budget was only 4% of GDP, it was around one quarter.

    Medicaid is a separate issue from the defense budget, where we're clearly not getting what we're paying for.

    Though agree that highlighting what fraction of the federal budget is accounted for by the Pentagon is a bit of a red herring. Rather the question is do we have the national defense (or, as the case may be, offense...) we need, and are we spending our money efficiently?


    Having been an infantry man I can tell you that anyone who can do 20 or 30 years deserves a life long pension. Being a man is hard on the body.
     
    Do roofers deserve a life long defined benefit pension after twenty years?
    , @jacques sheete

    Being a man is hard on the body.
     
    And being a pampered government agent is being a punk which is hard on the soul.

    “… I spent most of my [33 years in the Marine Corps] being a high class muscle- man for Big Business, for Wall Street and for the Bankers.

    In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for [crony] capitalism.”

    Major General Butler USMC, War is a Racket, 1935

    http://www.ratical.org/ratville/CAH/warisaracket.html

     

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  125. JackOH says:
    @jacques sheete

    I’m sure it can be said they worked for what they got, but, still . . . you gotta wonder what’s going on.
     
    It's not called working, it's called "milking," but still they're pikers compared to the arms merchants, bankers and permanent "victim" crowd.

    He’s currently a court bailiff, a patronage job here, earning maybe in the low $30s. Plus, his 20-year Army pension, plus his 20+-year postal service pension. He’s a high school grad. His wife is fully retired with a 20-year Army pension, and a teacher’s pension with about 20 years in.

    I’ll take a wild guess their retirement income is no less than $100,000 a year in my very low-cost area.

    A go-figure sort of deal. Not just double-dipping. More than that, as you and other folks here have said. It’s a mentality, a mind-set. For some of the worst of those high-salary government folks, there are only three types of Americans: Bill Gates and other billionaires, government workers, and Americans who are too stupid to find a corporate or government milch cow.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jacques sheete
    I hear ya.

    Sick system.
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  126. @ChuckOrloski
    Radical Center opined: "Our military should be posted on the entire southern border with orders to kill all invaders who do not heed warnings to turn back."

    Hi Radical Center,

    The biggest problem I have with the solution (above) is your having used, in error, the words, "Our military."

    Were that the actual case, Jewish Lobbies, billionaire ZUS Jews, Congress, & PreZident Trump would be very pissed at Mr. Giraldi's for provocatively having the gall to use the description, "American military" in his article title.

    Thanks again, Radical Center. By increment, you are getting there! So please simply consider dropping the word "Our"?

    Like one of the Maven Shama's "old grey mares, "That ain't what it used to be."

    You’re right, of course. These days I try to always write and say “the US government” rather than “OUR government.” I should have done the same with “US military.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @ChuckOrloski
    Radical Center reflected to a barricaded extent & wrote: "I should have done the same with “US military.”

    Hi Radical Center,

    Doubtless, as Orwell taught, the proper choice of official government-affiliated "names" is very important for either forthrightly conveying or distorting political realities, truth.

    Above, it ain't "US military." That name is retro but still useful for the purpose of dumb goyim-population DECEPTION.

    It is the Zionized US military.

    F.y.i., many Moons ago, Philip Giraldi wrote an outstanding U.R. article about this dreaded mutation.

    Now I see where this article's comment-thread descends, and I will respectfully move onto Marcos Cicero's (new) Zizzling U.R. article.

    Have an aggressive day, Radical Center! Thanks.
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  127. @anarchyst
    There are two standards...one for enlisted personnel and the other for officers. During the Grenada situation some enlisted personnel and officers were caught attempting to ship captured AK-47 rifles back to the states. The enlisted personnel got "hard time" in Leavenworth while the officers got "letters of reprimand". Double standard, indeed.
    I might have made the military a career, but the disparities in both facilities and treatment of officers vs. enlisted was a real turn-off. I completed my enlistment honorably and returned to civilian life.
    It is my humble opinion (and personal observation) that the commissioned officer rank structure where there is concern for the enlisted troops ends with the rank of colonel. The general staff is more akin to political office than it is to serving in the military and taking care of their military subordinates.
    As to "pay and allowances", when I was active duty (1969-1971) it was not much. In fact, at the time, those of us in uniform were looked down upon and blamed for the prosecution of the Vietnam conflict. Not only that, legislated job programs that were supposed to go to us Vietnam veterans never materialized.
    Yes, the all-volunteer forced made it necessary to increase "pay and allowances" to relatively attractive levels.
    If I had my way, I would bring back the draft with NO college deferments. In fact, the sons and daughters of politicians would get called up first. Service in the IDF doesn't count.

    Yes, but expand that.

    Mandate that we first enlist, train, and promptly deploy any children and grandchildren of all members of Congress, members of the President’s Cabinet, federal judges, Federal Reserve Board of Governors, and the CEOs/CFOs/CIOs etc. of military companies (including Northrup Grumman, Boeing, and their ilk).

    I’d support enacting such a requirement today.

    Read More
    • Agree: anarchyst
    • Replies: @Chris Mallory

    Mandate that we first enlist, train, and promptly deploy any children and grandchildren of all members of Congress, members of the President’s Cabinet, federal judges, Federal Reserve Board of Governors, and the CEOs/CFOs/CIOs etc. of military companies (including Northrup Grumman, Boeing, and their ilk).
     
    Exactly, though I would add in nephews. No reason why George P should have been allowed to be a JAG officer instead of a Marine PFC in a rifle platoon.

    I thought the Bush twins would have been well served to work as nurse's aides in a military burn ward.

    The Obama spawn were probably too young.
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  128. @Johnr
    You sir are an American hating leftist. The military, until the left decided it was the government's job to provide cradel to grave care for everyone accounted for more than 75 percent of the federal budget. To complain that the military consumes 12 of the budget while Medicaid consumes 50 percent is a straw man. Having been an infantry man I can tell you that anyone who can do 20 or 30 years deserves a life long pension. Being a man is hard on the body.

    But they don’t have to do “20 to 30 years”, just 20, before that pension kicks in.

    Secondly, many people getting those military pensions — and going to other fed gov jobs in order to double-dip pensions — never see combat and aren’t even deployed to a zone where combat is reasonably likely.

    Third, Medicaid costs too much, but it doesn’t consume anywhere near 50% of the federal budget.

    I do see your point that if the fed gov stuck to its few, limited constitutional responsibilities, defense (and border security) would constitute a pretty large share of fed gov spending just because the fed gov isn’t supposed to be doing a thousand other things.

    Lastly, my brother-in-law is a retired Air Force FIGHTER PILOT who survived direct combat in Vietnam, and he heartily agreed when I sent him this column. Is he an America-hating leftist too?

    Similarly, both active and retired military “servicemembers” gave their donations and votes most to RON PAUL, who was very well known for constantly making similar points about military over-spending and adventurism and proposing large cuts to military and war spending. I guess those many, many soldiers are America-hating leftists too.

    It’s embarrassing that you need to insult patriotic Americans who simply think that “military” spending is unfair to taxpayers and well beyond what is needed for a strong DEFENSE (as opposed to being policeman or bully of the world).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    AGREED

    Great stuff in all your comments, Mr. Center.
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  129. @Quartermaster
    Military spending has one virtue, it is constitutional as it fulfills one duty of the FedGov, one it has often shirked, defend the country.

    Giraldi can whine all he likes, but the DOD is not an entitlement program, nor does the Pentagon get all it wants. It never has gotten all it wants, no matter how much Giraldi whines to the contrary.

    Military spending has one virtue, it is constitutional as it fulfills one duty of the FedGov

    And we could fulfill that duty by gutting the military budget, bringing all our troops home. Replace most of them with a Swiss style militia forbidden from every being deployed outside our borders.

    The Founders were against a standing army. It is a shame we have ignored their advice.

    Read More
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  130. @RadicalCenter
    Yes, but expand that.

    Mandate that we first enlist, train, and promptly deploy any children and grandchildren of all members of Congress, members of the President's Cabinet, federal judges, Federal Reserve Board of Governors, and the CEOs/CFOs/CIOs etc. of military companies (including Northrup Grumman, Boeing, and their ilk).

    I'd support enacting such a requirement today.

    Mandate that we first enlist, train, and promptly deploy any children and grandchildren of all members of Congress, members of the President’s Cabinet, federal judges, Federal Reserve Board of Governors, and the CEOs/CFOs/CIOs etc. of military companies (including Northrup Grumman, Boeing, and their ilk).

    Exactly, though I would add in nephews. No reason why George P should have been allowed to be a JAG officer instead of a Marine PFC in a rifle platoon.

    I thought the Bush twins would have been well served to work as nurse’s aides in a military burn ward.

    The Obama spawn were probably too young.

    Read More
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  131. @Johnr
    You sir are an American hating leftist. The military, until the left decided it was the government's job to provide cradel to grave care for everyone accounted for more than 75 percent of the federal budget. To complain that the military consumes 12 of the budget while Medicaid consumes 50 percent is a straw man. Having been an infantry man I can tell you that anyone who can do 20 or 30 years deserves a life long pension. Being a man is hard on the body.

    Why should anyone be allowed to live off the tax payers for 20-30 years then draw a cushy pension? A standing army is un-American.

    Read More
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  132. geokat62 says:
    @ChuckOrloski
    Calling geokat, U.R. Research Specialist A-1!

    Hi geo,

    Maybe you can help me on the following ancillary matter?

    F.y.i., Mighty John Bolton passed on an opportunity to fight LBJ's atrocious war against communism, in Vietnam.

    As PreZident Trump's present Iranophobe-warmongering N.S.A. Adviser, I tried (but failed) to determine how much pay & "bennies" Bolton now gets from the bottomless Executive Branch feeding trough.

    Can you help me here, geo?

    … how much pay & “bennies” Bolton now gets from the bottomless Executive Branch feeding trough.

    Hey, Chuck. Not sure about benefits, but based on this latest press release, I would infer that John Bolthead pulls in at least $180k:

    White House releases salary info for Trump’s aides… nearly two dozen aides all earn an annual salary of roughly $180,000.

    https://www.politico.com/story/2017/06/30/trump-white-house-salaries-240149

    Read More
    • Replies: @ChuckOrloski
    geokat researched & figures:
    "Not sure about benefits, but based on this latest press release, I would infer that John Bolthead pulls in at least $180k."

    Helluva job, geo! Thanks.

    When Bolthead's next Israeli-driven salary review happens, he will get what PreZident Trump would describe as a "Big Time" raise!

    F.y.i., am Jumping ship now for Marcos Cicero's new U.R. article. Frankly, I am concerned that Mr. Giraldi has set aside his accurate "Zionized" characterization of what he now describes as the "ruinously expensive American military."

    Doubtless, Philip 'walks & talks" in much larger size Dissent-Shoes than me, & he likely gets proportionately larger Lobby jackboot-kicks than I.

    So being extra pissy since ZUS's deliberately provocative opening of it's Jerusalem Embassy, the only hesitation there (for me) is Cicero's use of the word "American" in the article title.

    Thanks again, Brother geo. Just one more thing? Brother Nathanael Kapner has engaged sacred combat on Cicero's article.
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  133. @RadicalCenter
    You're right, of course. These days I try to always write and say "the US government" rather than "OUR government." I should have done the same with "US military."

    Radical Center reflected to a barricaded extent & wrote: “I should have done the same with “US military.”

    Hi Radical Center,

    Doubtless, as Orwell taught, the proper choice of official government-affiliated “names” is very important for either forthrightly conveying or distorting political realities, truth.

    Above, it ain’t “US military.” That name is retro but still useful for the purpose of dumb goyim-population DECEPTION.

    It is the Zionized US military.

    F.y.i., many Moons ago, Philip Giraldi wrote an outstanding U.R. article about this dreaded mutation.

    Now I see where this article’s comment-thread descends, and I will respectfully move onto Marcos Cicero’s (new) Zizzling U.R. article.

    Have an aggressive day, Radical Center! Thanks.

    Read More
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  134. @Johnr
    You sir are an American hating leftist. The military, until the left decided it was the government's job to provide cradel to grave care for everyone accounted for more than 75 percent of the federal budget. To complain that the military consumes 12 of the budget while Medicaid consumes 50 percent is a straw man. Having been an infantry man I can tell you that anyone who can do 20 or 30 years deserves a life long pension. Being a man is hard on the body.

    You sir are an American hating leftist.

    The Empire is not your friend. Ever notice how every time it breaks another country, “refugees” from there and elsewhere get dumped on small towns in America? Ever notice how the officer corps blindly marches along with leftist social engineering rather resigning en masse?

    The military, until the left decided it was the government’s job to provide cradel to grave care for everyone accounted for more than 75 percent of the federal budget. To complain that the military consumes 12 of the budget while Medicaid consumes 50 percent is a straw man.

    The armed forces were three quarters of the federal budget in the 1950s with the Cold War on.

    In the 1920s, when the federal budget was only 4% of GDP, it was around one quarter.

    Medicaid is a separate issue from the defense budget, where we’re clearly not getting what we’re paying for.

    Though agree that highlighting what fraction of the federal budget is accounted for by the Pentagon is a bit of a red herring. Rather the question is do we have the national defense (or, as the case may be, offense…) we need, and are we spending our money efficiently?

    Having been an infantry man I can tell you that anyone who can do 20 or 30 years deserves a life long pension. Being a man is hard on the body.

    Do roofers deserve a life long defined benefit pension after twenty years?

    Read More
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  135. @Charles Pewitt
    The United States military is a giant jobs program, Giraldi!

    So what of it! Who cares. Conjure up those dollars out of thin air and let the troops have some loot.

    Did the Founding Fathers warn us about large standing armies in their writings and actions? Yes.

    Did the Founding Fathers know that a large standing army would require a concentrated form of governmental power to collect the loot to pay for that army? Yes.

    Did we just pass the 800 year anniversary of the Magna Carta? Yes. Was the Magna Carta about standing armies and concentrated government power, among other things?

    Were the Founding Fathers somewhat ungrateful to the British Empire for its efforts in the French and Indian War? Yes.

    Would the Founding Fathers be surprised to find a Jew billionaire named Shelly Adelson controlling the use of the US military in the Middle East and West Asia? The cynical and smart ones wouldn't be surprised at all.

    The GOP has the War budget and the US military and the Democrats have the public schools and many other government workers. The GOP always promises to spend more loot on the War budget and the US military and the Democrats always promise to spend more money on the public schools and other government programs.

    Giraldi has written a CLUNKER of a blog post, folks!

    Giraldi should write about mass immigration, monetary extremism and the impossibility of paying for the retirement of the baby boomers.

    Mass Immigration: DEMOGRAPHY

    Monetary Policy: DEBT

    Baby Boomers: NATION WRECKERS

    The American Empire is soon to go belly up in a manner similar to the upcoming demise of treasonous rat John McCain.

    The WASP /JEW ruling class of the American Empire knows this. A pleasant consolation is that China, Japan and Europe are just as badly bankrupt as the American Empire is.

    Raise the federal funds rate to 10 percent and implode the American Empire. Young people must no longer be saddled with massive unpayable debt and the unpayable retirement of the baby boomers. Pull the plug on the baby boomers now, and let the young people have a future.

    The Chinese, Japanese and Europeans will implode also. Use the nuclear deterrent and offshore balancing to keep global peace.

    When all else fails, you can still blame the baby boomers for everything. This crap was been going on long before baby boomer parents were born.
    There is an old saying: wars are the Jews harvest. All wars are economic wars, and the bankers, due to usury and money changing being forbidden to Christians, who were the original bankers. They’ve been running the scam for centuries, but have gone off the charts since the creation of the Federal Reserve banking system.
    What Mr. Giraldi fails to mention is the massive subsidies to business from military spending. Interstate highways were largely financed by military spending. Memphis is a port, due to the Army dredging the Mississippi. The list is long, but goes un-noticed as military spending.
    I won’t touch pay and benefits, but if you want wars, a drafted military will never be the answer. De-industrialization and high unemployment (which is grossly understated) only make joining the military more attractive, not more desirable.

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  136. @geokat62

    ... how much pay & “bennies” Bolton now gets from the bottomless Executive Branch feeding trough.
     
    Hey, Chuck. Not sure about benefits, but based on this latest press release, I would infer that John Bolthead pulls in at least $180k:

    White House releases salary info for Trump's aides... nearly two dozen aides all earn an annual salary of roughly $180,000.

    https://www.politico.com/story/2017/06/30/trump-white-house-salaries-240149
     

    geokat researched & figures:
    “Not sure about benefits, but based on this latest press release, I would infer that John Bolthead pulls in at least $180k.”

    Helluva job, geo! Thanks.

    When Bolthead’s next Israeli-driven salary review happens, he will get what PreZident Trump would describe as a “Big Time” raise!

    F.y.i., am Jumping ship now for Marcos Cicero’s new U.R. article. Frankly, I am concerned that Mr. Giraldi has set aside his accurate “Zionized” characterization of what he now describes as the “ruinously expensive American military.”

    Doubtless, Philip ‘walks & talks” in much larger size Dissent-Shoes than me, & he likely gets proportionately larger Lobby jackboot-kicks than I.

    So being extra pissy since ZUS’s deliberately provocative opening of it’s Jerusalem Embassy, the only hesitation there (for me) is Cicero’s use of the word “American” in the article title.

    Thanks again, Brother geo. Just one more thing? Brother Nathanael Kapner has engaged sacred combat on Cicero’s article.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Realist

    Frankly, I am concerned that Mr. Giraldi has set aside his accurate “Zionized” characterization of what he now describes as the “ruinously expensive American military.
     
    So if Giraldi deviates from his usual articles about Zionists influence you are 'concerned'.
    Your obsessive 24/7/365 hatred of all things Jewish is bazaar.
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  137. As a Vietnam vet, and a supporter of the military, I urge others to understand this article. And how many senior officers retire with “full or partial disability?” It is a scandal.

    Why should the military, and ANY government employee and office holder, including those elected, receive ANY retirement pay and benefits? Pay them good wages up front, and let them participate in the Social security system like the rest of us. If they want more, they can join many programs to invest in like IRAs, etc. Or just save.

    Get EVERYBODY involved, private and government employees together in the same system, and maybe Social Security will be ensured of solvency. Sure, Generals, Admirals and Congress critters will make much less in retirement, but that is on them if they don’t plan ahead. And if that seems unreasonable to them, then we know that they serve not out of patriotism.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Low Voltage
    It doesn't make much sense. The people in charge of protecting capitalism refuse to participate in it. Some people might call that a "clue."
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  138. H. S. says:

    ”Support free speech and full open inquiry!
    We the people will not be silenced!”

    Deep Truth: Visionaries Speak Out

    Friday, June 8, 8:00-10:30pm EST
    Mockingbird 2.0: Propaganda, Fake News, Fake History, and Outright Censorship
    Moderator – Tom Kiely

    Mark Crispin Miller – The Silence of the Left

    Ray McGovern – Russiagate: How It Started, Morphed, and Now Threatens Us All

    Gerry Docherty – How History Gets Memory-Holed: An Eye-Opening Case Study

    Alison Weir – How Pro-Israel Thought Police Are Silencing Americans

    Saturday, June 9, 11:00-1:30 EST
    Confronting Oligarchy: Resisting Full Spectrum Dominance
    Moderator: Tom Kiely

    Dean Henderson – All Roads Lead to the City of London

    Cynthia McKinney – The People vs. Empire: Calling For a TransPartisan Movement

    Jeremy Rothe-Kushel – We the People Power Politics: Principles, Practices, and Proposals

    Saturday, June 9, 2:30-5:00 EST
    False Flags: Mass Psy-Op Events as Pretext for Wars and a Surveillance State
    Moderator: Tom Kiely

    Barbara Honegger – 9/11: Gladio Brought Home to the U.S.

    Michael Springmann – Weaponized Migration: Fueling Europe for False Flags

    Sunday, June 10 , 2:30-5:00 EST
    Understanding Zionism: Deconstructing the Power Paradigm
    Moderator: Kevin Barrett

    Kevin Barrett – Anti-Semitism, Anti-Zionism, Judeophobia: Let’s Define Our Terms

    Philip Giraldi – ​How Jewish Power Sustains the Israel Narrative

    Gilad Atzmon – Truth, Truthfulness, and Palestine

    Alan Sabrosky – The Impact of Zionist Influence in the U.S.

    INFO: http://deeptruth.info

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  139. @Anonymous
    You use a lot of figures but not the appropriate statistics. What do big aggregate numbers like 200k in debt per family really mean?

    I look at the percentage of tax revenue v. GDP compared to other first world countries. US is actually on the low side by this measure. That means it's possible to raise taxes and only moderately harm the economic growth engine. And no one has addressed the advantages the US economy has in particular having half of the world's Ashkenazim.

    You use a lot of figures but not the appropriate statistics. What do big aggregate numbers like 200k in debt per family really mean?

    This is not a statistics problem. The numbers tell you we’re in big trouble. The $200,000 per taxpaying family mean that taxes would have to be raised by $10,000, as an example, just to pay this money off in 20 years. A steady chipping-away at that debt would give people, like the ones that hold the debt in the form of Treasury bonds, some small idea that “yeah, maybe the dollar is still worth something.”

    However, a large majority of those families, in the example, would be made broke themselves if they had to come up with $800 more each month, not to mention made outraged. It can’t happen though. What that means is this debt not be paid, and most likely will keep growing the way the Feral Gov’t is run.

    The debt won’t mean as much if GDP were quickly raised much higher over the coming years, but how can that happen when the US does not create much weatlh anymore (no, I don’t count facebook and google as wealth)? The governments and (most of) the people are keeping their standard of living up via borrowing.

    The end result will probably a large amount of inflation, as the FED does by creating money and lending it out for cheap, to keep the stock market propped up so people still feel non-broke. That will ruin the dollar just the same as it will be ruined once interest rates rise and bust the budget that way. Even my man Ron Paul would not have been able to get us out of this, but he would have led people to understand how to dig out after the crash.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson


    This is not a statistics problem. The numbers tell you we’re in big trouble. The $200,000 per taxpaying family mean that taxes would have to be raised by $10,000, as an example, just to pay this money off in 20 years.
     
    The money does not have to be paid off. Daily volume of the Treasury market averages $500 billion. This is a non-problem that people have been panicking about for my entire life.


    A steady chipping-away at that debt would give people, like the ones that hold the debt in the form of Treasury bonds, some small idea that “yeah, maybe the dollar is still worth something.”
     
    I can tell the Dollar is still worth something every time I buy something and it's accepted without complaint. As can everyone else.


    However, a large majority of those families, in the example, would be made broke themselves if they had to come up with $800 more each month, not to mention made outraged. It can’t happen though. What that means is this debt not be paid, and most likely will keep growing the way the Feral Gov’t is run.
     
    1 - Most income taxes paid by the wealthy

    2 - If you can't afford an extra $800 a month you're a loser

    3 - The debt does not need to be paid, and that it keeps growing is not a problem


    The debt won’t mean as much if GDP were quickly raised much higher over the coming years, but how can that happen when the US does not create much weatlh anymore (no, I don’t count facebook and google as wealth)?
     
    Facebook and Google might not be valued by you as wealth, but the market disagrees (not that I am supporter of either entity). The two entities are worth well over one trillion combined.


    The governments and (most of) the people are keeping their standard of living up via borrowing.
     
    Not a problem provided the debt can be serviced, which it is. The average credit score in America now exceeds 700. And total consumer debt is no higher than it was before the previous crisis, despite a larger population with higher incomes and improved credit.


    The end result will probably a large amount of inflation, as the FED does by creating money and lending it out for cheap, to keep the stock market propped up so people still feel non-broke. That will ruin the dollar just the same as it will be ruined once interest rates rise and bust the budget that way. Even my man Ron Paul would not have been able to get us out of this, but he would have led people to understand how to dig out after the crash.
     
    Real Soon Now

    You are a religious fanatic whose views do not align with reality
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  140. @RadicalCenter
    But they don't have to do "20 to 30 years", just 20, before that pension kicks in.

    Secondly, many people getting those military pensions -- and going to other fed gov jobs in order to double-dip pensions -- never see combat and aren't even deployed to a zone where combat is reasonably likely.

    Third, Medicaid costs too much, but it doesn't consume anywhere near 50% of the federal budget.

    I do see your point that if the fed gov stuck to its few, limited constitutional responsibilities, defense (and border security) would constitute a pretty large share of fed gov spending just because the fed gov isn't supposed to be doing a thousand other things.

    Lastly, my brother-in-law is a retired Air Force FIGHTER PILOT who survived direct combat in Vietnam, and he heartily agreed when I sent him this column. Is he an America-hating leftist too?

    Similarly, both active and retired military "servicemembers" gave their donations and votes most to RON PAUL, who was very well known for constantly making similar points about military over-spending and adventurism and proposing large cuts to military and war spending. I guess those many, many soldiers are America-hating leftists too.

    It's embarrassing that you need to insult patriotic Americans who simply think that "military" spending is unfair to taxpayers and well beyond what is needed for a strong DEFENSE (as opposed to being policeman or bully of the world).

    AGREED

    Great stuff in all your comments, Mr. Center.

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  141. G.-M. P. says:
    @Verymuchalive
    You're spot on. By the Late Roman Empire, society was divided into 2 groups - the humiliores ( lower classes ) and the honestiores ( upper classes ). Soldiers belonged to the latter group, and most historians consider that the common soldier never had a higher status in any society.
    History doesn't repeat itself exactly, but modern day America has largely followed the Roman route. Certainly, the sheer cost of the Roman Military was a factor in the decline and fall of the Roman Empire.
    The Roman soldier had a much more dangerous period of military service than the risk averse modern American military. Roman veterans certainly earned their benefits.

    “Throughout their existence, the Templars remained an independent body, answerable only to the Pope. But it was their affairs away from the Holy land that brought them to preeminence, as international bankers, ironic it was that the pure knights would create the financial banking system so integral to the economic infrastructure throughout Christendom and which ultimately brough them to their downfall.

    History always repeats itself:

    “Taking Down” British Officials”

    “A quite incredible story out of England has not received much media coverage in the United States. It concerns how the Israeli Embassy in London connived with government officials to “take down” parliamentarians and government ministers who were considered to be critical of the Jewish State.”

    “Indeed, wherever one goes – Western Europe, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the United States – there is a well-organized and funded mechanism in place ready, willing and able to go to war to protect Israel.”

    http://www.unz.com/pgiraldi/taking-down-british-officials/

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  142. myself says:
    @The Scalpel
    I do not mind community service, but I object to military service and I do not want to vote. Voting gives legitimacy to a system that I oppose. I was born in the geographical area now ruled by the government of the United States of America. Perhaps, LT Dan, you would be in favor of a status such as non-citizen resident. I was born in this area by a quirk of fate, not any choice on my part. I do not usually agree with US government policy, nor do I want the US government to represent me or "protect" me. It would be just for me to pay less taxes since I do not desire and would gladly refuse most of the "services" the government provides, especially those noted in the above article.

    Non-citizen resident: Persons residing in the territory of the United States, but are non-citizens.

    Different status from Green Card holders.

    For this to work, most public infrastructure would have to be toll-fee based. Use a street, a road, a bridge, or an airport or bus terminal – pay a fee.

    If you call the cops, paramedics or fire department – pay a fee. If you get helped out by public services without you asking for it – pay a fee, but you can explicitly refuse help, and pay nothing.

    Ineligible for most public services like schooling for your kids, hospitals, public defenders. Pay for these yourself.

    NO income taxes, cannot be drafted.

    Pay a small amount to be allowed residency in a safe, secure region, state or part of town – since you are also indirectly benefiting from the general safe, clean environment paid for by the citizen taxpayers.

    Otherwise, all your money is yours alone, and the government stays out of your business.

    Maybe it’s possible.

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  143. @JackOH
    He's currently a court bailiff, a patronage job here, earning maybe in the low $30s. Plus, his 20-year Army pension, plus his 20+-year postal service pension. He's a high school grad. His wife is fully retired with a 20-year Army pension, and a teacher's pension with about 20 years in.

    I'll take a wild guess their retirement income is no less than $100,000 a year in my very low-cost area.

    A go-figure sort of deal. Not just double-dipping. More than that, as you and other folks here have said. It's a mentality, a mind-set. For some of the worst of those high-salary government folks, there are only three types of Americans: Bill Gates and other billionaires, government workers, and Americans who are too stupid to find a corporate or government milch cow.

    I hear ya.

    Sick system.

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  144. @Johnr
    You sir are an American hating leftist. The military, until the left decided it was the government's job to provide cradel to grave care for everyone accounted for more than 75 percent of the federal budget. To complain that the military consumes 12 of the budget while Medicaid consumes 50 percent is a straw man. Having been an infantry man I can tell you that anyone who can do 20 or 30 years deserves a life long pension. Being a man is hard on the body.

    Being a man is hard on the body.

    And being a pampered government agent is being a punk which is hard on the soul.

    “… I spent most of my [33 years in the Marine Corps] being a high class muscle- man for Big Business, for Wall Street and for the Bankers.

    In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for [crony] capitalism.”

    Major General Butler USMC, War is a Racket, 1935

    http://www.ratical.org/ratville/CAH/warisaracket.html

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  145. Realist says:
    @ChuckOrloski
    As if remotely possible to do so, Realist recommended:
    "The US military budget should be $100 billion….do what you can."

    Hi (Sur)Realist,

    A question.

    Above, who would meaningfully tell that to the ZUS Defense Department, Joint Chiefs of Staff, & the military contractors?

    Sheldon Adelson? Netanyahu?

    Take heart! I trust Peter Aus will appear & bring your do-gooder passion into practical reality. Thanks, nevertheless!

    Above, who would meaningfully tell that to the ZUS Defense Department, Joint Chiefs of Staff, & the military contractors?

    Sheldon Adelson? Netanyahu?

    A President with balls.

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  146. Realist says:
    @ChuckOrloski
    geokat researched & figures:
    "Not sure about benefits, but based on this latest press release, I would infer that John Bolthead pulls in at least $180k."

    Helluva job, geo! Thanks.

    When Bolthead's next Israeli-driven salary review happens, he will get what PreZident Trump would describe as a "Big Time" raise!

    F.y.i., am Jumping ship now for Marcos Cicero's new U.R. article. Frankly, I am concerned that Mr. Giraldi has set aside his accurate "Zionized" characterization of what he now describes as the "ruinously expensive American military."

    Doubtless, Philip 'walks & talks" in much larger size Dissent-Shoes than me, & he likely gets proportionately larger Lobby jackboot-kicks than I.

    So being extra pissy since ZUS's deliberately provocative opening of it's Jerusalem Embassy, the only hesitation there (for me) is Cicero's use of the word "American" in the article title.

    Thanks again, Brother geo. Just one more thing? Brother Nathanael Kapner has engaged sacred combat on Cicero's article.

    Frankly, I am concerned that Mr. Giraldi has set aside his accurate “Zionized” characterization of what he now describes as the “ruinously expensive American military.

    So if Giraldi deviates from his usual articles about Zionists influence you are ‘concerned’.
    Your obsessive 24/7/365 hatred of all things Jewish is bazaar.

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    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    Your obsessive 24/7/365 hatred of all things Jewish is bazaar(sic).
     
    I believe that is an example of a strawman argument, but even if it weren't why would it be bizarre?

    PS: You better hope the Zio-trolls don't notice your misspelling because they tend to mock people who make errors like that. Of course they tend to mock even those of us who are often correct. (They just hate it when any dumb goy speaks the truth.)
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  147. Anonymous[196] • Disclaimer says:
    @Tbbh
    We spend more than the next ten nations, COMBINED. ...To "defend ourselves" from goat herders that can't afford passports or air tickets. 800 bases scattered across the planet. But, thinking about it, folks like somalians have been invading the US...OH. WAIT! Federal refugee programs have been importing somalis. NEVER MIND.

    We fight them there so we can bring them here and put them on welfare/food stamps? Makes perfect sense.

    We spend more than the next ten nations, COMBINED. …To “defend ourselves” from goat herders that can’t afford passports or air tickets. 800 bases scattered across the planet. But, thinking about it, folks like somalians have been invading the US…OH. WAIT! Federal refugee programs have been importing somalis. NEVER MIND.

    We fight them there so we can bring them here and put them on welfare/food stamps? Makes perfect sense.

    Yep, we import the third world so they can then engage in welfare fraud and siphon off even more hundreds of millions of dollars to their shithole.

    http://www.fox9.com/news/investigators/millions-of-dollars-in-suitcases-fly-out-of-msp-but-why

    Millions of dollars in suitcases fly out of MSP, but why?

    MINNEAPOLIS (KMSP) – For five months, Fox 9 has been investigating what appears to be rampant fraud in a massive state program.

    This fraud is suspected of costing Minnesota taxpayers as much as $100 million a year.

    The Fox 9 Investigators reporting is based on public records and nearly a dozen government sources who have direct knowledge of what is happening.

    SUITCASES FILLED WITH MONEY

    This story begins at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, where mysterious suitcases filled with cash have become a common carry-on.

    On the morning of March 15, Fox 9 chased a tip about a man who was leaving the country. Sources said he took a carry-on bag through security that was packed with $1 million in cash. Travelers can do that, as long as they fill out the proper government forms…

    …FOX 9 REPORTED ON THE FRAUD FIVE YEARS AGO

    To better understand the connection between daycare fraud and the surge in carry-on cash, you have to look at the history of this crime.

    Five years ago the Fox 9 Investigators were first to report that daycare fraud was on the rise in Minnesota, exposing how some businesses were gaming the system to steal millions in government subsidies meant to help low-income families with their childcare expenses…

    …Fox 9 obtained video of Fozia Ali being sworn in as a member of the city of Hopkins Park Board.

    “I will support the constitution of the United States,” she said.

    As she was taking her oath of office, she was also under investigation for wire fraud and theft of public money.

    “So help me God,” she said during the ceremony.

    State and federal agents had already raided Ali’s daycare center in south Minneapolis. The business was suspected of billing the government for more than a million dollars’ worth of bogus childcare services.

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  148. Catiline says:

    Isn’t the military at all levels disproportionately Southern?

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    • Replies: @Low Voltage
    According to Chas Freeman (You should Google him if you aren't familiar with his name), the South eventually won the Civil War by taking over the Pentagon. The United States now has far more in common with the agrarian Confederacy than the industrial Union:

    Low wages
    Military worship
    Free trade
    Natural resource based economy
    Third world immigration (slave trade)
    Etcetera

    Eisenhauer warned about the Military Industrial Complex. He should have called it a resurgent Confederacy.
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  149. JSRagman says:

    This liberal needs to spend a year or ten in the Marine Corps. Then he would get a much needed dose of reality. To save much needed money we should cut foreign aid.
    Another even better way to save tax dollars would be to mandate sterilization for all welfare recipients and their offspring. Think of the billions that would save.

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  150. @Catiline
    Isn't the military at all levels disproportionately Southern?

    According to Chas Freeman (You should Google him if you aren’t familiar with his name), the South eventually won the Civil War by taking over the Pentagon. The United States now has far more in common with the agrarian Confederacy than the industrial Union:

    Low wages
    Military worship
    Free trade
    Natural resource based economy
    Third world immigration (slave trade)
    Etcetera

    Eisenhauer warned about the Military Industrial Complex. He should have called it a resurgent Confederacy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Catiline
    National/historical reversion to the mean I suppose.
    , @Jesse James
    "According to Chas Freeman (You should Google him if you aren’t familiar with his name), the South eventually won the Civil War by taking over the Pentagon. The United States now has far more in common with the agrarian Confederacy than the industrial Union:

    Low wages
    Military worship
    Free trade
    Natural resource based economy
    Third world immigration (slave trade)
    Etcetera

    Eisenhauer warned about the Military Industrial Complex. He should have called it a resurgent Confederacy."


    That's absurd. The Pentagon is intravenously connected to NYC's Wall Street and is overseen by the Boston to Northern Virginia East Coast Neo-liberal Oligarchy who hate the South and the white people who live in it.

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  151. TKK says:

    It is wonderful the author attacked the sacred cow of the American military. The problem runs deeper. The hard jobs in the American military are contracted out to companies like KBR.

    In return, KBR employs large numbers of minorities and what they call foreign nationals
    These are usually Bosnians or Somalians- Neither of which is known for their energizing work ethic.

    A typical day on an Iraqi base such as al-Assad right now, would show you military men and women working out, eating like hogs, running their mouth, Skyping with friends and family, having affairs and generally complaining about any type of work they have to do in the hot sun.

    These American heroes work for 15 minutes and then have a 45 minute rest break if the temperature is over 90°. Many run to the medic asking for IVs when the temperature goes over 100°. I can say the only exception to this seems to be the special forces, who are much tougher than the general enlisted slackers.

    The American taxpayer is twice gut punched because these contractors are paid staggering amounts of money. A person who folds towels in the gym, usually a surly Bosnian ,is generally paid about $60,000 a year. This is justified by combat pay and the fact that they do work seven days a week.

    Having worked with the military, I can say unequivocally that most of them are lazy and entitled. My grandfather fighting in World War II -who actually saw combat- did not mope home , whine he was traumatized and get hooked on moriphine.

    He came home and began working in a mill.

    Living in a community near Fort Bragg, everyone knows that the worst members of the community will be the military family. They have as many unruly children as they can to raise their stipends. When they are supposed to be at work you see their cars parked at home from 10 to 3. They then scurry back to work- I assume to clock out or save face.

    The American military is the most strident form of socialism in the world today. Total morons receive cradle to grave security for a mere 20 years of service that could involve something as silly as sitting at a desk checking out books. If they did this for seven months in Afghanistan they will come home and say they have posttraumatic stress s and need lifelong service dogs and narcotics.

    Another hidden repugnant fact about many military servicemembers is there horrific treatment of their service dogs. They are not qualified to own dogs and they are too lazy to walk and take care of them.

    The shelters around Fort Bragg are full of dogs that these so-called “wounded warriors” abandoned when they actually had to get up off the couch and take them for a walk.

    Here’s an idea: if the actual Reality of combat turn you into a quivering little girl that wants to hide in their apartment all day and watch Netflix, don’t sign up for the service.

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    • Replies: @Mike P
    I consider all of this excellent news. An expensive yet useless American military is the best hope for maintaining world peace.
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  152. Mr. Anon says:
    @Thomm
    er... because I know about a lot of subjects, and you are just a wigger Buttfuckaroni with a 70 IQ?

    Is that your ostensibly high IQ on display?

    And, as far as I can recall, the only subjects about which you have displayed any knowledge are trashy TV and WWE smackdown.

    You’re a cretin.

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  153. Mr. Anon says:
    @anarchyst
    You are correct. The rest of the world that falls under the USA "defense umbrella" can afford extravagant social programs as they do not pay for their defense. In fact, WE are required to pay rent on foreign bases in which to place our troops.
    If I had my way, all foreign troop deployments would stop. Those countries requesting our "protection" would have to pay for it.
    Seems to me, that was one of President Trump's campaign promises--making foreign countries pay for their defense.

    If I had my way, all foreign troop deployments would stop. Those countries requesting our “protection” would have to pay for it.

    Seems to me, that was one of President Trump’s campaign promises–making foreign countries pay for their defense.

    I don’t like the idea of the american military being a mercenary force anymore than the idea of them being an imperial garrison force.

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  154. @Achmed E. Newman

    You use a lot of figures but not the appropriate statistics. What do big aggregate numbers like 200k in debt per family really mean?
     
    This is not a statistics problem. The numbers tell you we're in big trouble. The $200,000 per taxpaying family mean that taxes would have to be raised by $10,000, as an example, just to pay this money off in 20 years. A steady chipping-away at that debt would give people, like the ones that hold the debt in the form of Treasury bonds, some small idea that "yeah, maybe the dollar is still worth something."

    However, a large majority of those families, in the example, would be made broke themselves if they had to come up with $800 more each month, not to mention made outraged. It can't happen though. What that means is this debt not be paid, and most likely will keep growing the way the Feral Gov't is run.

    The debt won't mean as much if GDP were quickly raised much higher over the coming years, but how can that happen when the US does not create much weatlh anymore (no, I don't count facebook and google as wealth)? The governments and (most of) the people are keeping their standard of living up via borrowing.

    The end result will probably a large amount of inflation, as the FED does by creating money and lending it out for cheap, to keep the stock market propped up so people still feel non-broke. That will ruin the dollar just the same as it will be ruined once interest rates rise and bust the budget that way. Even my man Ron Paul would not have been able to get us out of this, but he would have led people to understand how to dig out after the crash.

    This is not a statistics problem. The numbers tell you we’re in big trouble. The $200,000 per taxpaying family mean that taxes would have to be raised by $10,000, as an example, just to pay this money off in 20 years.

    The money does not have to be paid off. Daily volume of the Treasury market averages $500 billion. This is a non-problem that people have been panicking about for my entire life.

    A steady chipping-away at that debt would give people, like the ones that hold the debt in the form of Treasury bonds, some small idea that “yeah, maybe the dollar is still worth something.”

    I can tell the Dollar is still worth something every time I buy something and it’s accepted without complaint. As can everyone else.

    However, a large majority of those families, in the example, would be made broke themselves if they had to come up with $800 more each month, not to mention made outraged. It can’t happen though. What that means is this debt not be paid, and most likely will keep growing the way the Feral Gov’t is run.

    1 – Most income taxes paid by the wealthy

    2 – If you can’t afford an extra $800 a month you’re a loser

    3 – The debt does not need to be paid, and that it keeps growing is not a problem

    The debt won’t mean as much if GDP were quickly raised much higher over the coming years, but how can that happen when the US does not create much weatlh anymore (no, I don’t count facebook and google as wealth)?

    Facebook and Google might not be valued by you as wealth, but the market disagrees (not that I am supporter of either entity). The two entities are worth well over one trillion combined.

    The governments and (most of) the people are keeping their standard of living up via borrowing.

    Not a problem provided the debt can be serviced, which it is. The average credit score in America now exceeds 700. And total consumer debt is no higher than it was before the previous crisis, despite a larger population with higher incomes and improved credit.

    The end result will probably a large amount of inflation, as the FED does by creating money and lending it out for cheap, to keep the stock market propped up so people still feel non-broke. That will ruin the dollar just the same as it will be ruined once interest rates rise and bust the budget that way. Even my man Ron Paul would not have been able to get us out of this, but he would have led people to understand how to dig out after the crash.

    Real Soon Now

    You are a religious fanatic whose views do not align with reality

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    • Replies: @Rurik

    2 – If you can’t afford an extra $800 a month you’re a loser
     
    the value of the dollar is falling drastically, as everything from a trip to the grocery store to filling your tank creeps and creeps up, while wages are stagnant. This trend will continue, as people are forced to scramble to protect the value of their savings, by going to the rigged casino that is Wall Street, where their pensions and savings will eventually be looted, just as it was in 2008.

    yes, they can 'print' money till kingdom come, but that's not the point of owing the national debt. The point isn't to simply have the debt, the point is power.

    the point is having the power to pick winners and losers, or what's the point of even having power?

    they'll use that debt to demand your pensions, and raise your property taxes, and a thousand other ways of destroying the dying middle class. 'Of course we're taking your pension to pay off the debt, but then you should have thought of that before you borrowed trillions of dollars to wage endless wars for Israel, and to fund all those entitlement programs that would make your nations a magnet for Third World immigration.' Don't complain about your debt now, you were the ones who borrowed all that mullah, now it's time to pay the piper.'

    Debt is a weapon, and they'll wield it sure as a gun pressed to your temple.

    They're at war, and always have been. It's an undeclared war, but their zealotry is netherworldly, while their victims don't even know they're slated for the trash heap of history.

    https://www.mediamatters.org/video/2018/05/15/tucker-carlson-hosts-apartheid-apologist-complain-about-south-africa-not-what-nelson-mandela-wanted/220214

    just listen to how he describes the news coverage of certain crimes, it eerily mirrors our own media, and that of all of Western Europe.

    "Hands up, don't shoot", (vis-à-vis Michael Brown) is a fake news lie, and yet it's plastered from the mountain tops with a psychotic hysteria, but no one has ever heard of Channon Christian (racist who got what was coming to her, just like the racists in S. Africa).

    And what gives them this power to control the narrative, to the point where the Western world will sit on its hands as its members are savaged in their own countries? And any expression of compassion for S. African farmers is considered racism most foul. Even suggesting that the white farmers and their families being slaughtered by hatred-crazed blacks, be allowed asylum, is considered beyond the Pale, by the very government orchestrating the slaughters. IOW, they don't want them out of the country, they want them dead. And hopefully tortured to death.

    It's debt that gives ((them)) this power.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_JWeOIuySc

    And it's the Fed that allows them unlimited means of enslaving the planet to their debt, and using that power to pick winners and losers.

    https://cdn.inquisitr.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Ivanka-Trump-in-Jerusalem.jpg

    This is the real issue of national debt. It's all about power, and picking winners and losers.

    , @Anonymous
    Very good response.

    Sadly this extended conversation about economics reveals a problem with a lot of the commentators on Unz. They understand what normies don't understand (e.g. Zionist Jews have out of control influence over US foreign policy), but not because of high intelligence.

    They do want to appear intelligent but lack anything close to Karlin level necessary analytical ability and knowledge, which they mask by predicting the next apocalypse which gives their hollow thinking and weaknesses in knowledge a kind of gravity.
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    The money does not have to be paid off. Daily volume of the Treasury market averages $500 billion.
     
    It doesn't matter how much is TRADED AROUND. If that money dissipated overnight, it'd be a big damn problem for the holders of it. $800 Billion back in 2008 was needed to prop up the too-big-to-fail banks in '08, and believe you me, it was sure a crisis to those guys.

    This is a non-problem that people have been panicking about for my entire life.
     
    I am very familiar with the talk that "debt doesn't matter". That started way back in the 1980's. However, what can't go on, won't go on. At some point, too many people will look at the notes that they're holding and wonder whether they're backed by anything.

    You ARE right that the wealthy pay a big proportion of the income taxes, but no matter who can afford it, 10K per family extra per year to pay down debt does not go into the productive economy.

    Maybe you live in NYC or "The City" in London, but Americans are absolutely NOT in good financial shape in general around the country. Man, you know car loans go out to 6 and 7 years now? Student debt default rates are in the 15-20 % range of the $1.5 Trillion owed. There aren't enough decent jobs for most graduates to pay that money back. You don't get out much if you think that things are going swimmingly economics-wise.

    I'm just curious what you think will happen when the FED lets interest rates rise, or how long they can continue this charade of holding them down to almost nothing to prop up the stock market so people can reckon they are doing OK.
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  155. While this article is accurate, it should be noted that while the US$ is still the preeminent settlement currency, the Empire pays for the upkeep of our pampered centurions. Since the 1970s, Germany and Japan have carried the US economy on their capable backs (Trilateral Commission), while London and Wall St. have looted and plundered the developing countries through sundry financial swindles. None of this would be possible without the strong arm tactics of the US military.

    In short, the only thing that has changed since Smedley Butler’s seminal work is the increasing share of the spoils enjoyed by the military caste. Contemporary events suggest that the status quo is no longer tenable since all of the low hanging fruit has been picked. Thoughtful observers will take advantage of the present situation and have some fun before the music stops.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jacques sheete
    Another powerful comment; low voltage, but very high amp!
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  156. JackOH says:

    Are there a disproportionate number of current veterans claiming PTSD as a service-connected and compensable disability, or, even without compensation, getting treatment through the VA, or maybe even privately?

    No snark intended. I don’t actually know. We had a recent incident at a local VA clinic where a guy blew his brains out while in the waiting room for a scheduled appointment. He was an enlisted air force guy with Afghan or Gulf II service. I did think: how much trauma-inducing combat could this guy have experienced? Again, I don’t know any better.

    Anyone know better about PTSD claims?

    Read More
    • Replies: @anarchyst
    Yes, I can elaborate. Those of us who served in Vietnam were subject to a 12 or 13 month "tour of duty" depending on branch of service, and would not be sent back to Vietnam for at least three years, unless one volunteered to return to Vietnam sooner.
    Since the Gulf war, American troops have been deployed on back-to-back "tours of duty" lasting for years, with a 30-day hiatus between deployments. This is destructive to the troops' mental health, much greater than those who deployed to Vietnam. PTSD was known as "shell shock in WW1 and WW2, and was actively discouraged and dismissed as "malingering" during Korea and Vietnam.
    Back-to-back deployments are NEVER a good idea, but are necessary because of manning constraints.
    , @Hibernian
    Many Air Force personnel have become more ground oriented in the GWOT, not as infantry but as MPs, transport, etc. MPs go on patrols, transport drivers are ambushed , etc. This does not mean they are the same as infantrymen who continually seek contact with the enemy.
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  157. The military establishment has its issues. And while there could definitely be come changes to improve compensation accountability, the real expense is not in manpower.

    The pay/benefits issues that are clear to me are

    a.. no civilian contracting work in consulting until five years after retirement.

    b. no one elected or appointed to serve in public office should be permitted to own, trade, sell stock/bonds, sit on advisory boards or be board members of any financial institution.

    Both “a” and “b” are conflicts of interest.

    Read More
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  158. Rurik says:
    @Thorfinnsson


    This is not a statistics problem. The numbers tell you we’re in big trouble. The $200,000 per taxpaying family mean that taxes would have to be raised by $10,000, as an example, just to pay this money off in 20 years.
     
    The money does not have to be paid off. Daily volume of the Treasury market averages $500 billion. This is a non-problem that people have been panicking about for my entire life.


    A steady chipping-away at that debt would give people, like the ones that hold the debt in the form of Treasury bonds, some small idea that “yeah, maybe the dollar is still worth something.”
     
    I can tell the Dollar is still worth something every time I buy something and it's accepted without complaint. As can everyone else.


    However, a large majority of those families, in the example, would be made broke themselves if they had to come up with $800 more each month, not to mention made outraged. It can’t happen though. What that means is this debt not be paid, and most likely will keep growing the way the Feral Gov’t is run.
     
    1 - Most income taxes paid by the wealthy

    2 - If you can't afford an extra $800 a month you're a loser

    3 - The debt does not need to be paid, and that it keeps growing is not a problem


    The debt won’t mean as much if GDP were quickly raised much higher over the coming years, but how can that happen when the US does not create much weatlh anymore (no, I don’t count facebook and google as wealth)?
     
    Facebook and Google might not be valued by you as wealth, but the market disagrees (not that I am supporter of either entity). The two entities are worth well over one trillion combined.


    The governments and (most of) the people are keeping their standard of living up via borrowing.
     
    Not a problem provided the debt can be serviced, which it is. The average credit score in America now exceeds 700. And total consumer debt is no higher than it was before the previous crisis, despite a larger population with higher incomes and improved credit.


    The end result will probably a large amount of inflation, as the FED does by creating money and lending it out for cheap, to keep the stock market propped up so people still feel non-broke. That will ruin the dollar just the same as it will be ruined once interest rates rise and bust the budget that way. Even my man Ron Paul would not have been able to get us out of this, but he would have led people to understand how to dig out after the crash.
     
    Real Soon Now

    You are a religious fanatic whose views do not align with reality

    2 – If you can’t afford an extra $800 a month you’re a loser

    the value of the dollar is falling drastically, as everything from a trip to the grocery store to filling your tank creeps and creeps up, while wages are stagnant. This trend will continue, as people are forced to scramble to protect the value of their savings, by going to the rigged casino that is Wall Street, where their pensions and savings will eventually be looted, just as it was in 2008.

    yes, they can ‘print’ money till kingdom come, but that’s not the point of owing the national debt. The point isn’t to simply have the debt, the point is power.

    the point is having the power to pick winners and losers, or what’s the point of even having power?

    they’ll use that debt to demand your pensions, and raise your property taxes, and a thousand other ways of destroying the dying middle class. ‘Of course we’re taking your pension to pay off the debt, but then you should have thought of that before you borrowed trillions of dollars to wage endless wars for Israel, and to fund all those entitlement programs that would make your nations a magnet for Third World immigration.’ Don’t complain about your debt now, you were the ones who borrowed all that mullah, now it’s time to pay the piper.’

    Debt is a weapon, and they’ll wield it sure as a gun pressed to your temple.

    They’re at war, and always have been. It’s an undeclared war, but their zealotry is netherworldly, while their victims don’t even know they’re slated for the trash heap of history.

    https://www.mediamatters.org/video/2018/05/15/tucker-carlson-hosts-apartheid-apologist-complain-about-south-africa-not-what-nelson-mandela-wanted/220214

    just listen to how he describes the news coverage of certain crimes, it eerily mirrors our own media, and that of all of Western Europe.

    “Hands up, don’t shoot”, (vis-à-vis Michael Brown) is a fake news lie, and yet it’s plastered from the mountain tops with a psychotic hysteria, but no one has ever heard of Channon Christian (racist who got what was coming to her, just like the racists in S. Africa).

    And what gives them this power to control the narrative, to the point where the Western world will sit on its hands as its members are savaged in their own countries? And any expression of compassion for S. African farmers is considered racism most foul. Even suggesting that the white farmers and their families being slaughtered by hatred-crazed blacks, be allowed asylum, is considered beyond the Pale, by the very government orchestrating the slaughters. IOW, they don’t want them out of the country, they want them dead. And hopefully tortured to death.

    It’s debt that gives ((them)) this power.

    And it’s the Fed that allows them unlimited means of enslaving the planet to their debt, and using that power to pick winners and losers.

    This is the real issue of national debt. It’s all about power, and picking winners and losers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ChuckOrloski
    Hi Rurik,

    Although no one's counting, I'd vote your comment as runaway # 1 on this article.

    The corresponding picture of Mnuchin & Ivanka spoke beyond 1,000,000 negative words I could summon.

    Especially for the Zio-washed younger commenters appearing on this thread, I link Bruce Springsteen's song, with lyrics, "Atlantic City."

    As you know, as Resorts International owner, Donald Trump operated The Taj Mahal, now shuttered, on the A.C. boardwalk.

    In the song below, you & perhaps others will be interested to hear Springsteen mourn, "There's winners & losers and don't get caught on the wrong side of the track.

    https://youtu.be/RaIXwgK__Xo

    Rurik, do you happen to know the name of Jordan's north-south railroad on display in the classic "Lawrence of Arabia?" January, 1981, I saw it & never learned the line's name.

    Likely there are many stalwart & principled Palestinian (losers?) assembled on both sides of that RR-border & who ride the daily Tel Aviv/D.C. Express to ISIShantytown?

    Thanks very much for your Servus!
    , @jacques sheete

    And it’s the Fed that allows them unlimited means of enslaving the planet to their debt, and using that power to pick winners and losers.
     
    Rurik, haven't you been reading Krugman? Don't you know that "debt is good?" Good, good, goooood!

    'Smatta you jealous er sump'n?


    Note to the clueless: The above is my admittedly weak attempt at sarcasm. R's comment is spot on through and through.
    , @Thorfinnsson


    the value of the dollar is falling drastically, as everything from a trip to the grocery store to filling your tank creeps and creeps up
     
    Uhh dude how can there be inflation when I can get four double cheeseburgers from McDonald's for under eight dollars? Have you even heard of the McDonald's 1-2-3 menu?

    I just bought a 65" OLED 4K display for $2,300. A dozen eggs at the gas station cost 99 cents.

    A base first generation Ford Taurus sedan with a 90 horsepower engine and no air conditioning cost $10,050 in 1985. A base Ford Fusion with 175 horsepower (and better fuel economy), fancy infotainment, oodles of safety systems, alloy wheels, etc. today costs $22,215.

    So for mid-size sedans from Ford the 33-year rate of inflation without hedonic adjustments (a favorite bugbear among hard money cranks) is 2.43%.

    The sky is falling!


    This trend will continue, as people are forced to scramble to protect the value of their savings, by going to the rigged casino that is Wall Street, where their pensions and savings will eventually be looted, just as it was in 2008.
     
    Looted? Who profited from that, exactly, other than the very small number of people who went short? Perhaps if your portfolio consisted solely of Lehman Brothers shares, Greek state bonds, subprime mortgage backed securities (ideally, one would only own MBSes solely composed of the famed NINJA--no income no job or assets--mortages), and Cypriot bank deposits. And needless to say this brilliant portfolio was not hedged, because hedging is for cowards! :)

    Meanwhile since 2009 the S&P 500 has returned over 400% with dividends reinvested.

    Wall Street has also greatly improved the products available to retail investors since then. Money is flowing out of "active" mutual funds and into low-cost index funds, and soon Vanguard will offer index funds for free (no expense ratio!). Target Date Funds and Robo-Advisors automatically rebalance your portfolio based on your age, ideal for people who aren't interested in finance and just want to grow a nest egg.

    And in case you're not paying attention, there are now time deposits and Treasuries which pay interest which exceeds the rate of inflation.

    Those with an irrational fear of stocks have always been able to protect their wealth from inflation by purchasing Series-I Savings Bonds directly from the United States Treasury, and bigger purchasers (can't buy more than $10,000 of I-Bonds in a year or hold more than $300,000) can buy Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS).

    As for the rest of your crankery, man it's a good thing I'm not a middle class dweeb with a pension worried about my property taxes. Though my property taxes are irritating as my town is being looted by teachers and firefighters. [email protected]#$ing gold-bricking parasites.

    Defined-benefit pensions were a bad idea, which is why they'e being replaced by defined-contribution pensions. I own my 401k and HSA outright. They're not entitlements which depend upon the promises and wishful thinking of others.

    And yes, people who rely on defined-benefit pensions other than federal government workers are largely going to get screwed. This is wrong, but proves my point about them being a bad idea. But they're not going to get screwed because of your fear of debt and Wall Street. They're going to get screwed because their pensions were never properly funded to begin with.

    As for (((they))), three of the five largest banks in America have Irish CEOs. You've been cucked by the Shamrock and the Leprechaun, Rurik!
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  159. Mike P says:
    @TKK
    It is wonderful the author attacked the sacred cow of the American military. The problem runs deeper. The hard jobs in the American military are contracted out to companies like KBR.

    In return, KBR employs large numbers of minorities and what they call foreign nationals
    These are usually Bosnians or Somalians- Neither of which is known for their energizing work ethic.

    A typical day on an Iraqi base such as al-Assad right now, would show you military men and women working out, eating like hogs, running their mouth, Skyping with friends and family, having affairs and generally complaining about any type of work they have to do in the hot sun.

    These American heroes work for 15 minutes and then have a 45 minute rest break if the temperature is over 90°. Many run to the medic asking for IVs when the temperature goes over 100°. I can say the only exception to this seems to be the special forces, who are much tougher than the general enlisted slackers.

    The American taxpayer is twice gut punched because these contractors are paid staggering amounts of money. A person who folds towels in the gym, usually a surly Bosnian ,is generally paid about $60,000 a year. This is justified by combat pay and the fact that they do work seven days a week.

    Having worked with the military, I can say unequivocally that most of them are lazy and entitled. My grandfather fighting in World War II -who actually saw combat- did not mope home , whine he was traumatized and get hooked on moriphine.

    He came home and began working in a mill.

    Living in a community near Fort Bragg, everyone knows that the worst members of the community will be the military family. They have as many unruly children as they can to raise their stipends. When they are supposed to be at work you see their cars parked at home from 10 to 3. They then scurry back to work- I assume to clock out or save face.



    The American military is the most strident form of socialism in the world today. Total morons receive cradle to grave security for a mere 20 years of service that could involve something as silly as sitting at a desk checking out books. If they did this for seven months in Afghanistan they will come home and say they have posttraumatic stress s and need lifelong service dogs and narcotics.



    Another hidden repugnant fact about many military servicemembers is there horrific treatment of their service dogs. They are not qualified to own dogs and they are too lazy to walk and take care of them.

    The shelters around Fort Bragg are full of dogs that these so-called “wounded warriors” abandoned when they actually had to get up off the couch and take them for a walk.


    Here’s an idea: if the actual Reality of combat turn you into a quivering little girl that wants to hide in their apartment all day and watch Netflix, don’t sign up for the service.

    I consider all of this excellent news. An expensive yet useless American military is the best hope for maintaining world peace.

    Read More
    • LOL: HogHappenin
    • Replies: @HogHappenin
    Ah is that true? I pray that was said in jest

    "World peace" like the one's we've been witnessing from the last 10 or so years?
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  160. Unmoved by service men decrying the sentiment.

    I deeply appreciate those who have served the country in uniform. And that is especially the case for men.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    I deeply appreciate those who have served the country in uniform. And that is especially the case for men.
     
    Oh you do, do you ? Well isn't that swell?

    When yer ready to lose the romantic fantasy, check this out...

    In an effort to PREVENT the war that Churchill called “unnecessary,” (WW2,) this 2 time Medal of Honor recipient wrote...


    “… I spent most of my [33 years in the Marine Corps] being a high class muscle- man for Big Business, for Wall Street and for the Bankers.

    In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for [crony] capitalism.”

    Major General Butler USMC, War is a Racket, 1935

    http://www.ratical.org/ratville/CAH/warisaracket.html
     

    Some get it; some don’t.

    “They can send every last soldier anywhere on earth, but there will only be a war if soldiers are willing to fight, and the ruling class: the billionaires who profit from human suffering care only about expanding their wealth, controlling the world economy, understand that their power lies only in their ability to convince us that war, oppression, and exploitation is in our interests.”

    We were told we were fighting terrorists, but the real terrorist was me and the real terrorism is this occupation.

    - Mike Prysner, Iraq War vet

     

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90OYp2hdTMU
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  161. @Rurik

    2 – If you can’t afford an extra $800 a month you’re a loser
     
    the value of the dollar is falling drastically, as everything from a trip to the grocery store to filling your tank creeps and creeps up, while wages are stagnant. This trend will continue, as people are forced to scramble to protect the value of their savings, by going to the rigged casino that is Wall Street, where their pensions and savings will eventually be looted, just as it was in 2008.

    yes, they can 'print' money till kingdom come, but that's not the point of owing the national debt. The point isn't to simply have the debt, the point is power.

    the point is having the power to pick winners and losers, or what's the point of even having power?

    they'll use that debt to demand your pensions, and raise your property taxes, and a thousand other ways of destroying the dying middle class. 'Of course we're taking your pension to pay off the debt, but then you should have thought of that before you borrowed trillions of dollars to wage endless wars for Israel, and to fund all those entitlement programs that would make your nations a magnet for Third World immigration.' Don't complain about your debt now, you were the ones who borrowed all that mullah, now it's time to pay the piper.'

    Debt is a weapon, and they'll wield it sure as a gun pressed to your temple.

    They're at war, and always have been. It's an undeclared war, but their zealotry is netherworldly, while their victims don't even know they're slated for the trash heap of history.

    https://www.mediamatters.org/video/2018/05/15/tucker-carlson-hosts-apartheid-apologist-complain-about-south-africa-not-what-nelson-mandela-wanted/220214

    just listen to how he describes the news coverage of certain crimes, it eerily mirrors our own media, and that of all of Western Europe.

    "Hands up, don't shoot", (vis-à-vis Michael Brown) is a fake news lie, and yet it's plastered from the mountain tops with a psychotic hysteria, but no one has ever heard of Channon Christian (racist who got what was coming to her, just like the racists in S. Africa).

    And what gives them this power to control the narrative, to the point where the Western world will sit on its hands as its members are savaged in their own countries? And any expression of compassion for S. African farmers is considered racism most foul. Even suggesting that the white farmers and their families being slaughtered by hatred-crazed blacks, be allowed asylum, is considered beyond the Pale, by the very government orchestrating the slaughters. IOW, they don't want them out of the country, they want them dead. And hopefully tortured to death.

    It's debt that gives ((them)) this power.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_JWeOIuySc

    And it's the Fed that allows them unlimited means of enslaving the planet to their debt, and using that power to pick winners and losers.

    https://cdn.inquisitr.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Ivanka-Trump-in-Jerusalem.jpg

    This is the real issue of national debt. It's all about power, and picking winners and losers.

    Hi Rurik,

    Although no one’s counting, I’d vote your comment as runaway # 1 on this article.

    The corresponding picture of Mnuchin & Ivanka spoke beyond 1,000,000 negative words I could summon.

    Especially for the Zio-washed younger commenters appearing on this thread, I link Bruce Springsteen’s song, with lyrics, “Atlantic City.”

    As you know, as Resorts International owner, Donald Trump operated The Taj Mahal, now shuttered, on the A.C. boardwalk.

    In the song below, you & perhaps others will be interested to hear Springsteen mourn, “There’s winners & losers and don’t get caught on the wrong side of the track.

    Rurik, do you happen to know the name of Jordan’s north-south railroad on display in the classic “Lawrence of Arabia?” January, 1981, I saw it & never learned the line’s name.

    Likely there are many stalwart & principled Palestinian (losers?) assembled on both sides of that RR-border & who ride the daily Tel Aviv/D.C. Express to ISIShantytown?

    Thanks very much for your Servus!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rurik
    Thank you Brother Chuck,

    The corresponding picture of Mnuchin & Ivanka spoke beyond 1,000,000 negative words I could summon.
     
    sounds about right, because there really aren't words capable of expressing the sinister clouds gathering that are represented by that photograph, is there?

    this must be the railroad you're referring to.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/rail-journeys/T-E-Lawrence-and-the-Hejaz-railway/

    Peace.
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  162. anarchyst says:
    @JackOH
    Are there a disproportionate number of current veterans claiming PTSD as a service-connected and compensable disability, or, even without compensation, getting treatment through the VA, or maybe even privately?

    No snark intended. I don't actually know. We had a recent incident at a local VA clinic where a guy blew his brains out while in the waiting room for a scheduled appointment. He was an enlisted air force guy with Afghan or Gulf II service. I did think: how much trauma-inducing combat could this guy have experienced? Again, I don't know any better.

    Anyone know better about PTSD claims?

    Yes, I can elaborate. Those of us who served in Vietnam were subject to a 12 or 13 month “tour of duty” depending on branch of service, and would not be sent back to Vietnam for at least three years, unless one volunteered to return to Vietnam sooner.
    Since the Gulf war, American troops have been deployed on back-to-back “tours of duty” lasting for years, with a 30-day hiatus between deployments. This is destructive to the troops’ mental health, much greater than those who deployed to Vietnam. PTSD was known as “shell shock in WW1 and WW2, and was actively discouraged and dismissed as “malingering” during Korea and Vietnam.
    Back-to-back deployments are NEVER a good idea, but are necessary because of manning constraints.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JackOH
    anarchist, thanks. That does make sense.
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  163. Anonymous[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson


    This is not a statistics problem. The numbers tell you we’re in big trouble. The $200,000 per taxpaying family mean that taxes would have to be raised by $10,000, as an example, just to pay this money off in 20 years.
     
    The money does not have to be paid off. Daily volume of the Treasury market averages $500 billion. This is a non-problem that people have been panicking about for my entire life.


    A steady chipping-away at that debt would give people, like the ones that hold the debt in the form of Treasury bonds, some small idea that “yeah, maybe the dollar is still worth something.”
     
    I can tell the Dollar is still worth something every time I buy something and it's accepted without complaint. As can everyone else.


    However, a large majority of those families, in the example, would be made broke themselves if they had to come up with $800 more each month, not to mention made outraged. It can’t happen though. What that means is this debt not be paid, and most likely will keep growing the way the Feral Gov’t is run.
     
    1 - Most income taxes paid by the wealthy

    2 - If you can't afford an extra $800 a month you're a loser

    3 - The debt does not need to be paid, and that it keeps growing is not a problem


    The debt won’t mean as much if GDP were quickly raised much higher over the coming years, but how can that happen when the US does not create much weatlh anymore (no, I don’t count facebook and google as wealth)?
     
    Facebook and Google might not be valued by you as wealth, but the market disagrees (not that I am supporter of either entity). The two entities are worth well over one trillion combined.


    The governments and (most of) the people are keeping their standard of living up via borrowing.
     
    Not a problem provided the debt can be serviced, which it is. The average credit score in America now exceeds 700. And total consumer debt is no higher than it was before the previous crisis, despite a larger population with higher incomes and improved credit.


    The end result will probably a large amount of inflation, as the FED does by creating money and lending it out for cheap, to keep the stock market propped up so people still feel non-broke. That will ruin the dollar just the same as it will be ruined once interest rates rise and bust the budget that way. Even my man Ron Paul would not have been able to get us out of this, but he would have led people to understand how to dig out after the crash.
     
    Real Soon Now

    You are a religious fanatic whose views do not align with reality

    Very good response.

    Sadly this extended conversation about economics reveals a problem with a lot of the commentators on Unz. They understand what normies don’t understand (e.g. Zionist Jews have out of control influence over US foreign policy), but not because of high intelligence.

    They do want to appear intelligent but lack anything close to Karlin level necessary analytical ability and knowledge, which they mask by predicting the next apocalypse which gives their hollow thinking and weaknesses in knowledge a kind of gravity.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Thank you.

    Something a crypto-loon stated recently I think explains why.

    This crypto-loon also eats an all-meat diet, which is scientifically grounded.

    He stated that once one sees that the conventional wisdom in one domain is wrong, it is easy to see that it is wrong in other domains.

    So once you become a dissident in one area, it's natural to be a dissident in another. I am a former hard money crank myself incidentally.
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  164. @Realist

    Frankly, I am concerned that Mr. Giraldi has set aside his accurate “Zionized” characterization of what he now describes as the “ruinously expensive American military.
     
    So if Giraldi deviates from his usual articles about Zionists influence you are 'concerned'.
    Your obsessive 24/7/365 hatred of all things Jewish is bazaar.

    Your obsessive 24/7/365 hatred of all things Jewish is bazaar(sic).

    I believe that is an example of a strawman argument, but even if it weren’t why would it be bizarre?

    PS: You better hope the Zio-trolls don’t notice your misspelling because they tend to mock people who make errors like that. Of course they tend to mock even those of us who are often correct. (They just hate it when any dumb goy speaks the truth.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Realist

    PS: You better hope the Zio-trolls don’t notice your misspelling because they tend to mock people who make errors like that.
     
    It wasn't misspelled...just wrong bizarre.
    I don't pay much attention to the bozos on this blog.
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  165. @Anonymous
    What evidence is there that the trade discussion is based on China reducing treasury holdings rather than counter-tariffs on US agricultural goods and potentially in a number of other areas like education services (blocking Chinese families from sending kids to lower ranked US colleges)?

    What evidence is there that the trade discussion is based on China reducing treasury holdings rather than counter-tariffs …

    I have none whatsoever and do not intend to obtain any since I already have a lot to do. However, it makes sense to me that both of the above could be factors, as well as others, and that you cannot produce any credible evidence to say that it is due to only one of the reasons you mentioned.

    You seem to be taking a stab at engaging a false dichotomy, which is naughty, naughty!

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  166. Rurik says:
    @ChuckOrloski
    Hi Rurik,

    Although no one's counting, I'd vote your comment as runaway # 1 on this article.

    The corresponding picture of Mnuchin & Ivanka spoke beyond 1,000,000 negative words I could summon.

    Especially for the Zio-washed younger commenters appearing on this thread, I link Bruce Springsteen's song, with lyrics, "Atlantic City."

    As you know, as Resorts International owner, Donald Trump operated The Taj Mahal, now shuttered, on the A.C. boardwalk.

    In the song below, you & perhaps others will be interested to hear Springsteen mourn, "There's winners & losers and don't get caught on the wrong side of the track.

    https://youtu.be/RaIXwgK__Xo

    Rurik, do you happen to know the name of Jordan's north-south railroad on display in the classic "Lawrence of Arabia?" January, 1981, I saw it & never learned the line's name.

    Likely there are many stalwart & principled Palestinian (losers?) assembled on both sides of that RR-border & who ride the daily Tel Aviv/D.C. Express to ISIShantytown?

    Thanks very much for your Servus!

    Thank you Brother Chuck,

    The corresponding picture of Mnuchin & Ivanka spoke beyond 1,000,000 negative words I could summon.

    sounds about right, because there really aren’t words capable of expressing the sinister clouds gathering that are represented by that photograph, is there?

    this must be the railroad you’re referring to.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/rail-journeys/T-E-Lawrence-and-the-Hejaz-railway/

    Peace.

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    • Replies: @ChuckOrloski
    Anon (419) did me favor, saying: "this must be the railroad you’re referring to."

    Hi 419!

    Very nice of you to go out-of-the way to help me.

    January 1981, aboard a Mercedes Benz (
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  167. @Low Voltage
    While this article is accurate, it should be noted that while the US$ is still the preeminent settlement currency, the Empire pays for the upkeep of our pampered centurions. Since the 1970s, Germany and Japan have carried the US economy on their capable backs (Trilateral Commission), while London and Wall St. have looted and plundered the developing countries through sundry financial swindles. None of this would be possible without the strong arm tactics of the US military.

    In short, the only thing that has changed since Smedley Butler's seminal work is the increasing share of the spoils enjoyed by the military caste. Contemporary events suggest that the status quo is no longer tenable since all of the low hanging fruit has been picked. Thoughtful observers will take advantage of the present situation and have some fun before the music stops.

    Another powerful comment; low voltage, but very high amp!

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    • Replies: @Rurik
    Agree!
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  168. @Rurik

    2 – If you can’t afford an extra $800 a month you’re a loser
     
    the value of the dollar is falling drastically, as everything from a trip to the grocery store to filling your tank creeps and creeps up, while wages are stagnant. This trend will continue, as people are forced to scramble to protect the value of their savings, by going to the rigged casino that is Wall Street, where their pensions and savings will eventually be looted, just as it was in 2008.

    yes, they can 'print' money till kingdom come, but that's not the point of owing the national debt. The point isn't to simply have the debt, the point is power.

    the point is having the power to pick winners and losers, or what's the point of even having power?

    they'll use that debt to demand your pensions, and raise your property taxes, and a thousand other ways of destroying the dying middle class. 'Of course we're taking your pension to pay off the debt, but then you should have thought of that before you borrowed trillions of dollars to wage endless wars for Israel, and to fund all those entitlement programs that would make your nations a magnet for Third World immigration.' Don't complain about your debt now, you were the ones who borrowed all that mullah, now it's time to pay the piper.'

    Debt is a weapon, and they'll wield it sure as a gun pressed to your temple.

    They're at war, and always have been. It's an undeclared war, but their zealotry is netherworldly, while their victims don't even know they're slated for the trash heap of history.

    https://www.mediamatters.org/video/2018/05/15/tucker-carlson-hosts-apartheid-apologist-complain-about-south-africa-not-what-nelson-mandela-wanted/220214

    just listen to how he describes the news coverage of certain crimes, it eerily mirrors our own media, and that of all of Western Europe.

    "Hands up, don't shoot", (vis-à-vis Michael Brown) is a fake news lie, and yet it's plastered from the mountain tops with a psychotic hysteria, but no one has ever heard of Channon Christian (racist who got what was coming to her, just like the racists in S. Africa).

    And what gives them this power to control the narrative, to the point where the Western world will sit on its hands as its members are savaged in their own countries? And any expression of compassion for S. African farmers is considered racism most foul. Even suggesting that the white farmers and their families being slaughtered by hatred-crazed blacks, be allowed asylum, is considered beyond the Pale, by the very government orchestrating the slaughters. IOW, they don't want them out of the country, they want them dead. And hopefully tortured to death.

    It's debt that gives ((them)) this power.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_JWeOIuySc

    And it's the Fed that allows them unlimited means of enslaving the planet to their debt, and using that power to pick winners and losers.

    https://cdn.inquisitr.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Ivanka-Trump-in-Jerusalem.jpg

    This is the real issue of national debt. It's all about power, and picking winners and losers.

    And it’s the Fed that allows them unlimited means of enslaving the planet to their debt, and using that power to pick winners and losers.

    Rurik, haven’t you been reading Krugman? Don’t you know that “debt is good?” Good, good, goooood!

    ‘Smatta you jealous er sump’n?

    Note to the clueless: The above is my admittedly weak attempt at sarcasm. R’s comment is spot on through and through.

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    • Agree: Mike P
    • Replies: @Rurik

    Krugman? Don’t you know that “debt is good?” Good, good, goooood!
     
    ah yes, Kruggy!

    he's the economic version of Krauthammer, wrong on everything, that's why they're so smart!

    or is it smaart

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgHXHtHSsNo
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  169. @EliteCommInc.
    Unmoved by service men decrying the sentiment.

    I deeply appreciate those who have served the country in uniform. And that is especially the case for men.

    I deeply appreciate those who have served the country in uniform. And that is especially the case for men.

    Oh you do, do you ? Well isn’t that swell?

    When yer ready to lose the romantic fantasy, check this out…

    In an effort to PREVENT the war that Churchill called “unnecessary,” (WW2,) this 2 time Medal of Honor recipient wrote…

    “… I spent most of my [33 years in the Marine Corps] being a high class muscle- man for Big Business, for Wall Street and for the Bankers.

    In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for [crony] capitalism.”

    Major General Butler USMC, War is a Racket, 1935

    http://www.ratical.org/ratville/CAH/warisaracket.html

    Some get it; some don’t.

    “They can send every last soldier anywhere on earth, but there will only be a war if soldiers are willing to fight, and the ruling class: the billionaires who profit from human suffering care only about expanding their wealth, controlling the world economy, understand that their power lies only in their ability to convince us that war, oppression, and exploitation is in our interests.”

    We were told we were fighting terrorists, but the real terrorist was me and the real terrorism is this occupation.

    - Mike Prysner, Iraq War vet

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    • Replies: @EliteComminc.
    I think I stand where i came in --- I appreciate their service.


    I appreciate their service and am certainly disappointed when said service is ill used by the civilian leadership. i appreciate their service, knowing that some will violate common decency and ethics not only against our enemies, but regretfully to their own --

    I appreciate then when they make mistakes -- and should be held accountable.


    I appreciate our armed forces and the men who serve, even if some think they are overcompensated and some surely are.

    I have no fantasies about life in service or the tragedy of conflict - it's a nasty business all way 'round.


    I appreciate their service.

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  170. @Rurik

    2 – If you can’t afford an extra $800 a month you’re a loser
     
    the value of the dollar is falling drastically, as everything from a trip to the grocery store to filling your tank creeps and creeps up, while wages are stagnant. This trend will continue, as people are forced to scramble to protect the value of their savings, by going to the rigged casino that is Wall Street, where their pensions and savings will eventually be looted, just as it was in 2008.

    yes, they can 'print' money till kingdom come, but that's not the point of owing the national debt. The point isn't to simply have the debt, the point is power.

    the point is having the power to pick winners and losers, or what's the point of even having power?

    they'll use that debt to demand your pensions, and raise your property taxes, and a thousand other ways of destroying the dying middle class. 'Of course we're taking your pension to pay off the debt, but then you should have thought of that before you borrowed trillions of dollars to wage endless wars for Israel, and to fund all those entitlement programs that would make your nations a magnet for Third World immigration.' Don't complain about your debt now, you were the ones who borrowed all that mullah, now it's time to pay the piper.'

    Debt is a weapon, and they'll wield it sure as a gun pressed to your temple.

    They're at war, and always have been. It's an undeclared war, but their zealotry is netherworldly, while their victims don't even know they're slated for the trash heap of history.

    https://www.mediamatters.org/video/2018/05/15/tucker-carlson-hosts-apartheid-apologist-complain-about-south-africa-not-what-nelson-mandela-wanted/220214

    just listen to how he describes the news coverage of certain crimes, it eerily mirrors our own media, and that of all of Western Europe.

    "Hands up, don't shoot", (vis-à-vis Michael Brown) is a fake news lie, and yet it's plastered from the mountain tops with a psychotic hysteria, but no one has ever heard of Channon Christian (racist who got what was coming to her, just like the racists in S. Africa).

    And what gives them this power to control the narrative, to the point where the Western world will sit on its hands as its members are savaged in their own countries? And any expression of compassion for S. African farmers is considered racism most foul. Even suggesting that the white farmers and their families being slaughtered by hatred-crazed blacks, be allowed asylum, is considered beyond the Pale, by the very government orchestrating the slaughters. IOW, they don't want them out of the country, they want them dead. And hopefully tortured to death.

    It's debt that gives ((them)) this power.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_JWeOIuySc

    And it's the Fed that allows them unlimited means of enslaving the planet to their debt, and using that power to pick winners and losers.

    https://cdn.inquisitr.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Ivanka-Trump-in-Jerusalem.jpg

    This is the real issue of national debt. It's all about power, and picking winners and losers.

    the value of the dollar is falling drastically, as everything from a trip to the grocery store to filling your tank creeps and creeps up

    Uhh dude how can there be inflation when I can get four double cheeseburgers from McDonald’s for under eight dollars? Have you even heard of the McDonald’s 1-2-3 menu?

    I just bought a 65″ OLED 4K display for $2,300. A dozen eggs at the gas station cost 99 cents.

    A base first generation Ford Taurus sedan with a 90 horsepower engine and no air conditioning cost $10,050 in 1985. A base Ford Fusion with 175 horsepower (and better fuel economy), fancy infotainment, oodles of safety systems, alloy wheels, etc. today costs $22,215.

    So for mid-size sedans from Ford the 33-year rate of inflation without hedonic adjustments (a favorite bugbear among hard money cranks) is 2.43%.

    The sky is falling!

    This trend will continue, as people are forced to scramble to protect the value of their savings, by going to the rigged casino that is Wall Street, where their pensions and savings will eventually be looted, just as it was in 2008.

    Looted? Who profited from that, exactly, other than the very small number of people who went short? Perhaps if your portfolio consisted solely of Lehman Brothers shares, Greek state bonds, subprime mortgage backed securities (ideally, one would only own MBSes solely composed of the famed NINJA–no income no job or assets–mortages), and Cypriot bank deposits. And needless to say this brilliant portfolio was not hedged, because hedging is for cowards! :)

    Meanwhile since 2009 the S&P 500 has returned over 400% with dividends reinvested.

    Wall Street has also greatly improved the products available to retail investors since then. Money is flowing out of “active” mutual funds and into low-cost index funds, and soon Vanguard will offer index funds for free (no expense ratio!). Target Date Funds and Robo-Advisors automatically rebalance your portfolio based on your age, ideal for people who aren’t interested in finance and just want to grow a nest egg.

    And in case you’re not paying attention, there are now time deposits and Treasuries which pay interest which exceeds the rate of inflation.

    Those with an irrational fear of stocks have always been able to protect their wealth from inflation by purchasing Series-I Savings Bonds directly from the United States Treasury, and bigger purchasers (can’t buy more than $10,000 of I-Bonds in a year or hold more than $300,000) can buy Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS).

    As for the rest of your crankery, man it’s a good thing I’m not a middle class dweeb with a pension worried about my property taxes. Though my property taxes are irritating as my town is being looted by teachers and firefighters. [email protected]#$ing gold-bricking parasites.

    Defined-benefit pensions were a bad idea, which is why they’e being replaced by defined-contribution pensions. I own my 401k and HSA outright. They’re not entitlements which depend upon the promises and wishful thinking of others.

    And yes, people who rely on defined-benefit pensions other than federal government workers are largely going to get screwed. This is wrong, but proves my point about them being a bad idea. But they’re not going to get screwed because of your fear of debt and Wall Street. They’re going to get screwed because their pensions were never properly funded to begin with.

    As for (((they))), three of the five largest banks in America have Irish CEOs. You’ve been cucked by the Shamrock and the Leprechaun, Rurik!

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    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    Uhh dude how can there be inflation when I can get four double cheeseburgers from McDonald’s for under eight dollars? Have you even heard of the McDonald’s 1-2-3 menu?
     
    And I thought you were being sarcastic!

    BTW, WTF, Dear Pollyanna, is a McDonald’s 1-2-3 menu?
    , @jacques sheete

    They’re not entitlements which depend upon the promises and wishful thinking of others.
     
    That comment shows that you have the potential to understand some of what you speak.

    ...man it’s a good thing I’m not a middle class dweeb with a pension worried about my property taxes.
     
    That's one of several that demonstrate you have a bit to learn; if there's no inflation, then why do property taxes keep rising?

    I'll agree that when it comes to wages, deflation seems to be the rule despite the fact that when I was a kid, $1.50 an hour was OK, while I don't think people can do as well with the commonly offered $12.50 an hour nowadays. Hmmm...deflated inflation?

    No inflation? Let's talk gasoline prices, or are the higher prices due to some magic fairy dust they lace it with nowadays? Ever do a brake job on a car? Take it from me that even with "ceramics" brakes don't last any longer or function any better than they did when they cost about 90% less.

    Since you mentioned car prices, you can't just look at the sticker price and justify the increase tag price on the quality improvement, because, for one thing, auto manufacturers likely make more money on the financing than on the profit, if any. In other words, all the glitz and glitter and "hedonic adjustments" are essentially "come ons." Yer not buying a car so much as acquiring debt to look cute 'n feel good. It's long been common knowledge that GMAC was the money maker for GM, which, if I recall was yet another that needed a bailout form the taxpayers. I bet you didn't include that cute little fact in your calculus. Parenthetically, any decent person would vomit if they knew what controls GM...

    Anyway, there's a lot more that could be said, but who cares? Besides, rurik is right and you apparently have a lot to learn, so snap to it and quit trying to baffle us dumb goyim with BS.

    Thank you.
    , @Rurik
    [There's a serious possibility that commenters unwilling to save their email or name information will no longer have their comments published.]

    I just bought a 65″ OLED 4K display for $2,300.
     
    you're admitting to that?!

    To watch what with exactly. Maybe programming is better in your area.

    A dozen eggs at the gas station cost 99 cents.
     
    http://blogs.ubc.ca/herder/files/2012/04/battery-cages1.jpg

    we buy only 'pasture raised' eggs. My gal thinks eating eggs from healthy chickens, who're 'happy' will result in better quality eggs, but for me, I spend the extra money (about $6+ per dozen) for moral reasons. Which is same reason I don't eat ham or bacon or dogs or cats.

    Not that I judge other people who do, (except when they torture the animals before they kill them, because the meat taste better that way. In which case I'd like to feed such humans to the pigs that I don't eat).

    Some cars and some things are cheaper, but generally, the middle and working classes are languishing, and it's getting worse, not better, as the wealth gap explodes.

    Looted? Who profited from that, exactly, other than the very small number of people who went short?
     
    the whole rotten and corrupt den on snakes on Wall Street profited massively during the orgy of fraud and theft. Countywide, Shittybank, Goldman Sachs, and all the rest of the thieving scoundrels. They killed Glass so they could loot the Treasury, and loot the Treasury they did.

    It was a feeding frenzy, with synthetic 'credit default swaps', and 'collateralized debt obligations' and collateralized derivatives with sub-prime liar loans, and Freddy and Fanny to cover the tracks.

    With the SEC carefully looking the other way, hoping to get a gig with Goldilocks making thirty times what they made as regulators.

    Greed, and avarice like never seen before. That's who made the money. All of those rats and swindlers at the big investment banks.

    books should be written

    and when it all imploded, as it must surely do so again, the big boyz got out first. And then the taxpayer was slated to cover the loses. Just as Robert Rubin, the Dr. Frankenstein of Wall Street/Treasury/Fed corruption and collusion (with his Igor; Lawrence Summers)- planned.

    Meanwhile since 2009 the S&P 500 has returned over 400% with dividends reinvested.
     
    QE baby! Up the ying and out the yang.

    An orgy of 'printing', until the music stops, and only the same people who knew it was coming in 08, will know when it comes this time around. And trillions of dollars of "wealth" will be disappeared over night. There goes your pension.

    Remember the ratings agencies?

    you know what the ratings agencies remind me of, recently it was revealed that Experian sold, er, I mean lost millions of people's data. Now they're on the television running ads for protecting people's data. I shit you not. You can call them and pay them to "protect" your data from the "dark web'. Wow.

    And the ratings agencies? Yep, they're still in business. Holy moly.

    Wall Street has also greatly improved the products available to retail investors since then.
     
    I bet!

    buy a commodity ETF today, and watch as the price is manipulated with the aplomb of a pick pocket. Just hit a few keys on the Fed's computer, and voila! Silver trades at curious lows, while demand is higher than ever.

    it's a shell game, and its rigged. Works well as long as you're playing it safe, but then weren't AAA rated funds eviscerated, (along with people's pensions) following the 08 crash?

    Have they instituted hardy reforms to prevent something like that from happening again?

    your crankery, man it’s a good thing I’m not a middle class dweeb
     
    personally, I'm just fine. I have no debt, and I've done well enough to spend an inordinate amount of time bloviating about things I'll never be able to actually change, but speaking out seems cathartic, and I hope I'm tossing pebbles, that will create ripples, so to speak, as I suspect most of us are doing here.

    I don't rail here against the serials crimes and atrocities of our elites for my personal benefit, but rather for the (especially young) people who I see will be victims of these snakes. And I'm here just trying to warn them, that the emerging Orwellian total surveillance police state they're building is not going to be an utopian unicorn land they're thinking it is. Not hardly.

    But they’re not going to get screwed because of your fear of debt and Wall Street.
     
    they're going to get screwed because the system is set up to screw them.

    The reason the wealth gap is burgeoning, is because the .01% that run things want it to, and the people who're being set up to get screwed again, are being lied to by the people who they're trusting and paying and exalting to positions of power to look out for their interests- the politicians- are the very people betraying them to their enemies.

    As for (((they))), three of the five largest banks in America have Irish CEOs.
     
    the problem isn't the commercial banks. The problem is the investment banks, and what used to be a wall (Glass-Steagall) that separated the investment banks from the Treasury, which is now the henhouse being guarded by the jackal.

    ~ Rurik
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  171. @Anonymous
    Very good response.

    Sadly this extended conversation about economics reveals a problem with a lot of the commentators on Unz. They understand what normies don't understand (e.g. Zionist Jews have out of control influence over US foreign policy), but not because of high intelligence.

    They do want to appear intelligent but lack anything close to Karlin level necessary analytical ability and knowledge, which they mask by predicting the next apocalypse which gives their hollow thinking and weaknesses in knowledge a kind of gravity.

    Thank you.

    Something a crypto-loon stated recently I think explains why.

    This crypto-loon also eats an all-meat diet, which is scientifically grounded.

    He stated that once one sees that the conventional wisdom in one domain is wrong, it is easy to see that it is wrong in other domains.

    So once you become a dissident in one area, it’s natural to be a dissident in another. I am a former hard money crank myself incidentally.

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  172. Realist says:
    @jacques sheete

    Your obsessive 24/7/365 hatred of all things Jewish is bazaar(sic).
     
    I believe that is an example of a strawman argument, but even if it weren't why would it be bizarre?

    PS: You better hope the Zio-trolls don't notice your misspelling because they tend to mock people who make errors like that. Of course they tend to mock even those of us who are often correct. (They just hate it when any dumb goy speaks the truth.)

    PS: You better hope the Zio-trolls don’t notice your misspelling because they tend to mock people who make errors like that.

    It wasn’t misspelled…just wrong bizarre.
    I don’t pay much attention to the bozos on this blog.

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    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    It wasn’t misspelled…just wrong bizarre.
     
    I was generously offering you the benefit of the doubt, kind sir, and that's not something you could rationally expect from the Zio-trolls that infest, well, everywhere.

    They routinely and invariably offer a veritable bazaar of the bizarre.
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  173. @Thorfinnsson


    the value of the dollar is falling drastically, as everything from a trip to the grocery store to filling your tank creeps and creeps up
     
    Uhh dude how can there be inflation when I can get four double cheeseburgers from McDonald's for under eight dollars? Have you even heard of the McDonald's 1-2-3 menu?

    I just bought a 65" OLED 4K display for $2,300. A dozen eggs at the gas station cost 99 cents.

    A base first generation Ford Taurus sedan with a 90 horsepower engine and no air conditioning cost $10,050 in 1985. A base Ford Fusion with 175 horsepower (and better fuel economy), fancy infotainment, oodles of safety systems, alloy wheels, etc. today costs $22,215.

    So for mid-size sedans from Ford the 33-year rate of inflation without hedonic adjustments (a favorite bugbear among hard money cranks) is 2.43%.

    The sky is falling!


    This trend will continue, as people are forced to scramble to protect the value of their savings, by going to the rigged casino that is Wall Street, where their pensions and savings will eventually be looted, just as it was in 2008.
     
    Looted? Who profited from that, exactly, other than the very small number of people who went short? Perhaps if your portfolio consisted solely of Lehman Brothers shares, Greek state bonds, subprime mortgage backed securities (ideally, one would only own MBSes solely composed of the famed NINJA--no income no job or assets--mortages), and Cypriot bank deposits. And needless to say this brilliant portfolio was not hedged, because hedging is for cowards! :)

    Meanwhile since 2009 the S&P 500 has returned over 400% with dividends reinvested.

    Wall Street has also greatly improved the products available to retail investors since then. Money is flowing out of "active" mutual funds and into low-cost index funds, and soon Vanguard will offer index funds for free (no expense ratio!). Target Date Funds and Robo-Advisors automatically rebalance your portfolio based on your age, ideal for people who aren't interested in finance and just want to grow a nest egg.

    And in case you're not paying attention, there are now time deposits and Treasuries which pay interest which exceeds the rate of inflation.

    Those with an irrational fear of stocks have always been able to protect their wealth from inflation by purchasing Series-I Savings Bonds directly from the United States Treasury, and bigger purchasers (can't buy more than $10,000 of I-Bonds in a year or hold more than $300,000) can buy Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS).

    As for the rest of your crankery, man it's a good thing I'm not a middle class dweeb with a pension worried about my property taxes. Though my property taxes are irritating as my town is being looted by teachers and firefighters. [email protected]#$ing gold-bricking parasites.

    Defined-benefit pensions were a bad idea, which is why they'e being replaced by defined-contribution pensions. I own my 401k and HSA outright. They're not entitlements which depend upon the promises and wishful thinking of others.

    And yes, people who rely on defined-benefit pensions other than federal government workers are largely going to get screwed. This is wrong, but proves my point about them being a bad idea. But they're not going to get screwed because of your fear of debt and Wall Street. They're going to get screwed because their pensions were never properly funded to begin with.

    As for (((they))), three of the five largest banks in America have Irish CEOs. You've been cucked by the Shamrock and the Leprechaun, Rurik!

    Uhh dude how can there be inflation when I can get four double cheeseburgers from McDonald’s for under eight dollars? Have you even heard of the McDonald’s 1-2-3 menu?

    And I thought you were being sarcastic!

    BTW, WTF, Dear Pollyanna, is a McDonald’s 1-2-3 menu?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    https://www.mcdonalds.com/us/en-us/full-menu/123dollarmenu.html

    It's the replacement for the old Dollar menu. It offers various items for one, two, or three Dollars.

    Wendy's likewise has a Value Menu: https://menu.wendys.com/en_US/category/value-menu/

    You will not find "premium" items such as the Big Mac or Baconator on these menus.

    I was being sarcastic with the McDonald's line, as the replacement of the Dollar Menu with the 1-2-3 menu is due to inflation.

    Food prices have tended to rise in line with the overall rate of inflation in my lifetime. The big inflation in America is in education and healthcare. Fortunately I consume neither.

    Childcare prices also increase faster than inflation, which I don't understand at all. Childcare after all is unskilled labor, and as Rurik notes real wages have been flat for decades. Proliferating regulations?
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  174. @myself
    One thing worth wondering about is:

    What is the real "defense burden" (the percentage of our GDP spent on the military) sans bullshit accounting tricks and "reclassification" of expenses.

    For example, if we used accounting methods as used in some of the more efficient, less bloated military establishments of our allies, what would be the actual cost to our economy of our defense spending?

    For all we know, military expenditures may actually be back to Reagan Cold War percentage levels, or slightly more.

    To the DoD’s budget (including “extraordinary” war funding) one would add the Department of Veterans’ Affairs ($180 bn) and the nuclear weapons programs ($12bn) of the Department of Energy.

    Some people suggest including elements of the DHS as well, but I think this is bogus.

    States also pay some expenses of the National Guard (this issue is so confusing I don’t understand it), and some states operate welfare programs for veterans. I’m not sure if the latter should count.

    So you can add another percentage point of GDP to the official budget.

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  175. @Realist

    PS: You better hope the Zio-trolls don’t notice your misspelling because they tend to mock people who make errors like that.
     
    It wasn't misspelled...just wrong bizarre.
    I don't pay much attention to the bozos on this blog.

    It wasn’t misspelled…just wrong bizarre.

    I was generously offering you the benefit of the doubt, kind sir, and that’s not something you could rationally expect from the Zio-trolls that infest, well, everywhere.

    They routinely and invariably offer a veritable bazaar of the bizarre.

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  176. @Rurik
    Thank you Brother Chuck,

    The corresponding picture of Mnuchin & Ivanka spoke beyond 1,000,000 negative words I could summon.
     
    sounds about right, because there really aren't words capable of expressing the sinister clouds gathering that are represented by that photograph, is there?

    this must be the railroad you're referring to.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/rail-journeys/T-E-Lawrence-and-the-Hejaz-railway/

    Peace.

    Anon (419) did me favor, saying: “this must be the railroad you’re referring to.”

    Hi 419!

    Very nice of you to go out-of-the way to help me.

    January 1981, aboard a Mercedes Benz (

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rurik
    Hey Brother Chuck,

    that was me, Rurik

    I just forgot the email address I used to log on last time, and the software is telling me I have to remember from now on, and stop making up email addresses as I go.

    I responded to your post before I will to some others, (if I have the time), so that they'll also know that I am Anon for now, until I figure how to get my identity back ;)

    Peace.
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  177. @jacques sheete

    Uhh dude how can there be inflation when I can get four double cheeseburgers from McDonald’s for under eight dollars? Have you even heard of the McDonald’s 1-2-3 menu?
     
    And I thought you were being sarcastic!

    BTW, WTF, Dear Pollyanna, is a McDonald’s 1-2-3 menu?

    https://www.mcdonalds.com/us/en-us/full-menu/123dollarmenu.html

    It’s the replacement for the old Dollar menu. It offers various items for one, two, or three Dollars.

    Wendy’s likewise has a Value Menu: https://menu.wendys.com/en_US/category/value-menu/

    You will not find “premium” items such as the Big Mac or Baconator on these menus.

    I was being sarcastic with the McDonald’s line, as the replacement of the Dollar Menu with the 1-2-3 menu is due to inflation.

    Food prices have tended to rise in line with the overall rate of inflation in my lifetime. The big inflation in America is in education and healthcare. Fortunately I consume neither.

    Childcare prices also increase faster than inflation, which I don’t understand at all. Childcare after all is unskilled labor, and as Rurik notes real wages have been flat for decades. Proliferating regulations?

    Read More
    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    It’s the replacement for the old Dollar menu. It offers various items for one, two, or three Dollars.
     
    No wonder yer not a middle class dweeb. Sounds like some crap for the poor lower class ones who never had, and never will have a sense of value, and will forever be wage, tax and debt slaves.

    But hey, uh got my buurgerr, 'n sody! What a deal!

    , @jacques sheete

    You will not find “premium” items such as the Big Mac or Baconator on these menus.
     
    Thank you for putting "premium" in quotes.

    You're also correct that I will not find those things there. The reason is that you'll never catch me looking for anything in one of those ridiculous joints (other than a bathroom on occasion).

    On the other hand, you won't catch me sipping wine and snacking on caviar with some of the effete trolls around here, either.

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  178. @Thorfinnsson


    the value of the dollar is falling drastically, as everything from a trip to the grocery store to filling your tank creeps and creeps up
     
    Uhh dude how can there be inflation when I can get four double cheeseburgers from McDonald's for under eight dollars? Have you even heard of the McDonald's 1-2-3 menu?

    I just bought a 65" OLED 4K display for $2,300. A dozen eggs at the gas station cost 99 cents.

    A base first generation Ford Taurus sedan with a 90 horsepower engine and no air conditioning cost $10,050 in 1985. A base Ford Fusion with 175 horsepower (and better fuel economy), fancy infotainment, oodles of safety systems, alloy wheels, etc. today costs $22,215.

    So for mid-size sedans from Ford the 33-year rate of inflation without hedonic adjustments (a favorite bugbear among hard money cranks) is 2.43%.

    The sky is falling!


    This trend will continue, as people are forced to scramble to protect the value of their savings, by going to the rigged casino that is Wall Street, where their pensions and savings will eventually be looted, just as it was in 2008.
     
    Looted? Who profited from that, exactly, other than the very small number of people who went short? Perhaps if your portfolio consisted solely of Lehman Brothers shares, Greek state bonds, subprime mortgage backed securities (ideally, one would only own MBSes solely composed of the famed NINJA--no income no job or assets--mortages), and Cypriot bank deposits. And needless to say this brilliant portfolio was not hedged, because hedging is for cowards! :)

    Meanwhile since 2009 the S&P 500 has returned over 400% with dividends reinvested.

    Wall Street has also greatly improved the products available to retail investors since then. Money is flowing out of "active" mutual funds and into low-cost index funds, and soon Vanguard will offer index funds for free (no expense ratio!). Target Date Funds and Robo-Advisors automatically rebalance your portfolio based on your age, ideal for people who aren't interested in finance and just want to grow a nest egg.

    And in case you're not paying attention, there are now time deposits and Treasuries which pay interest which exceeds the rate of inflation.

    Those with an irrational fear of stocks have always been able to protect their wealth from inflation by purchasing Series-I Savings Bonds directly from the United States Treasury, and bigger purchasers (can't buy more than $10,000 of I-Bonds in a year or hold more than $300,000) can buy Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS).

    As for the rest of your crankery, man it's a good thing I'm not a middle class dweeb with a pension worried about my property taxes. Though my property taxes are irritating as my town is being looted by teachers and firefighters. [email protected]#$ing gold-bricking parasites.

    Defined-benefit pensions were a bad idea, which is why they'e being replaced by defined-contribution pensions. I own my 401k and HSA outright. They're not entitlements which depend upon the promises and wishful thinking of others.

    And yes, people who rely on defined-benefit pensions other than federal government workers are largely going to get screwed. This is wrong, but proves my point about them being a bad idea. But they're not going to get screwed because of your fear of debt and Wall Street. They're going to get screwed because their pensions were never properly funded to begin with.

    As for (((they))), three of the five largest banks in America have Irish CEOs. You've been cucked by the Shamrock and the Leprechaun, Rurik!

    They’re not entitlements which depend upon the promises and wishful thinking of others.

    That comment shows that you have the potential to understand some of what you speak.

    …man it’s a good thing I’m not a middle class dweeb with a pension worried about my property taxes.

    That’s one of several that demonstrate you have a bit to learn; if there’s no inflation, then why do property taxes keep rising?

    I’ll agree that when it comes to wages, deflation seems to be the rule despite the fact that when I was a kid, $1.50 an hour was OK, while I don’t think people can do as well with the commonly offered $12.50 an hour nowadays. Hmmm…deflated inflation?

    No inflation? Let’s talk gasoline prices, or are the higher prices due to some magic fairy dust they lace it with nowadays? Ever do a brake job on a car? Take it from me that even with “ceramics” brakes don’t last any longer or function any better than they did when they cost about 90% less.

    Since you mentioned car prices, you can’t just look at the sticker price and justify the increase tag price on the quality improvement, because, for one thing, auto manufacturers likely make more money on the financing than on the profit, if any. In other words, all the glitz and glitter and “hedonic adjustments” are essentially “come ons.” Yer not buying a car so much as acquiring debt to look cute ‘n feel good. It’s long been common knowledge that GMAC was the money maker for GM, which, if I recall was yet another that needed a bailout form the taxpayers. I bet you didn’t include that cute little fact in your calculus. Parenthetically, any decent person would vomit if they knew what controls GM…

    Anyway, there’s a lot more that could be said, but who cares? Besides, rurik is right and you apparently have a lot to learn, so snap to it and quit trying to baffle us dumb goyim with BS.

    Thank you.

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    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I don't dispute the existence of inflation. I dispute the idea, common to hard money cranks, that inflation is much higher than reported. An amusing fact about this is that a Shadow Stats subscription has the same nominal price it did a decade ago.


    That’s one of several that demonstrate you have a bit to learn; if there’s no inflation, then why do property taxes keep rising?
     
    Local government spending is the same share of GDP it was four decades ago. Property taxes rise...as do assessed property values and incomes. There are obviously issues in particular areas where they rise unreasonably as a result of some kind of political mafia taking control of the city, but broadly they rise with the overall economy.

    I agree that they're too high to begin with of course. E.g. my rural community of 8,000 has a professional fire department for some baffling reason, along with dedicated EMTs.


    I’ll agree that when it comes to wages, deflation seems to be the rule despite the fact that when I was a kid, $1.50 an hour was OK, while I don’t think people can do as well with the commonly offered $12.50 an hour nowadays. Hmmm…deflated inflation?
     
    No, this is wage inflation. The trouble for workers is that 40-50 years ago wages stopped inflating faster than prices, which they did during the postwar era.


    No inflation? Let’s talk gasoline prices, or are the higher prices due to some magic fairy dust they lace it with nowadays? Ever do a brake job on a car? Take it from me that even with “ceramics” brakes don’t last any longer or function any better than they did when they cost about 90% less.
     
    Commodities are cyclical. WTI is currently at $70/bbl, wasn't that long ago it was at $26. In real terms gas prices have been much higher many times in the past, even the fairly distant past like 1979.

    I am a track rat and thus have done a lot of brake jobs--generally go through a couple sets of pads in a weekend. Not old so I don't know what brake pads cost in the 80s, but I do know from older track rats that they've improved a lot (the discs not really).

    And it depends on the product you're talking about. Everyone and his dog knows that electronics have gotten cheaper for instance. A lot of other manufactured products haven't necessarily gotten cheaper, but haven't rise much in price.

    Hence why the BLS has its "basket" of goods and services, which is just an idealized average. Everyone has his own personal basket of goods. Since I don't consume healthcare or education I've seen less inflation than other consumers. Maybe even deflation.


    Since you mentioned car prices, you can’t just look at the sticker price and justify the increase tag price on the quality improvement
     
    Perhaps you could, but as noted earlier I'm not disputing overall inflation. It's none the less noteworthy that Ford mid-size sedans have an inflation rate of 2.43% (very close to overall inflation for the period), yet the cars have improved radically (mostly).

    And some inflation is just down to government regulation of course, especially in the case of the auto industry.


    auto manufacturers likely make more money on the financing than on the profit, if any. In other words, all the glitz and glitter and “hedonic adjustments” are essentially “come ons.” Yer not buying a car so much as acquiring debt to look cute ‘n feel good.
     
    I don't see how this is relevant at all. Most consumers can't afford to purchase a new car in cash, and for those of us who can it's a poor use of capital. Lending money to borrowers is a credit risk, and there is the opportunity cost of alternative investments.

    And it's not even true. After 9-11 Detroit decided to implement 0% financing for instance. Obviously not profitable--their cost of finance (whatever commercial paper cost in the 00s) was higher than their interest profit (zero).

    Personally I've never had a car loan in my life incidentally, but I've realized this is unusual.


    It’s long been common knowledge that GMAC was the money maker for GM, which, if I recall was yet another that needed a bailout form the taxpayers.
     
    GMAC no longer exists. It's now Ally Financial, an excellent online-only bank.

    GM makes most of its profits from trucks.

    Rather than "common knowledge" you can have a look at GM's audited financial statements, filed every year with the Securities and Exchange Commission and publicly accessible for free.

    It was once true, now a very long time ago, that most profit came from GMAC. That was an exception in the company's history and basically an artifact of the late 20th century. GM was for instance the first corporation to earn one billion dollars in a single quarter, done in 1966 on the back of a sizzling car lineup with V-8 engines galore and a booming economy with fast rising incomes.


    Anyway, there’s a lot more that could be said, but who cares? Besides, rurik is right and you apparently have a lot to learn, so snap to it and quit trying to baffle us dumb goyim with BS.
     
    You guys both clearly know a lot less than I do on these matters. But you're religious fanatics so it won't sink in.
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  179. @Thorfinnsson
    https://www.mcdonalds.com/us/en-us/full-menu/123dollarmenu.html

    It's the replacement for the old Dollar menu. It offers various items for one, two, or three Dollars.

    Wendy's likewise has a Value Menu: https://menu.wendys.com/en_US/category/value-menu/

    You will not find "premium" items such as the Big Mac or Baconator on these menus.

    I was being sarcastic with the McDonald's line, as the replacement of the Dollar Menu with the 1-2-3 menu is due to inflation.

    Food prices have tended to rise in line with the overall rate of inflation in my lifetime. The big inflation in America is in education and healthcare. Fortunately I consume neither.

    Childcare prices also increase faster than inflation, which I don't understand at all. Childcare after all is unskilled labor, and as Rurik notes real wages have been flat for decades. Proliferating regulations?

    It’s the replacement for the old Dollar menu. It offers various items for one, two, or three Dollars.

    No wonder yer not a middle class dweeb. Sounds like some crap for the poor lower class ones who never had, and never will have a sense of value, and will forever be wage, tax and debt slaves.

    But hey, uh got my buurgerr, ‘n sody! What a deal!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Byrresheim
    He even wrote out the word sarcasm …
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  180. Catiline says:
    @Low Voltage
    According to Chas Freeman (You should Google him if you aren't familiar with his name), the South eventually won the Civil War by taking over the Pentagon. The United States now has far more in common with the agrarian Confederacy than the industrial Union:

    Low wages
    Military worship
    Free trade
    Natural resource based economy
    Third world immigration (slave trade)
    Etcetera

    Eisenhauer warned about the Military Industrial Complex. He should have called it a resurgent Confederacy.

    National/historical reversion to the mean I suppose.

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  181. @Thorfinnsson
    https://www.mcdonalds.com/us/en-us/full-menu/123dollarmenu.html

    It's the replacement for the old Dollar menu. It offers various items for one, two, or three Dollars.

    Wendy's likewise has a Value Menu: https://menu.wendys.com/en_US/category/value-menu/

    You will not find "premium" items such as the Big Mac or Baconator on these menus.

    I was being sarcastic with the McDonald's line, as the replacement of the Dollar Menu with the 1-2-3 menu is due to inflation.

    Food prices have tended to rise in line with the overall rate of inflation in my lifetime. The big inflation in America is in education and healthcare. Fortunately I consume neither.

    Childcare prices also increase faster than inflation, which I don't understand at all. Childcare after all is unskilled labor, and as Rurik notes real wages have been flat for decades. Proliferating regulations?

    You will not find “premium” items such as the Big Mac or Baconator on these menus.

    Thank you for putting “premium” in quotes.

    You’re also correct that I will not find those things there. The reason is that you’ll never catch me looking for anything in one of those ridiculous joints (other than a bathroom on occasion).

    On the other hand, you won’t catch me sipping wine and snacking on caviar with some of the effete trolls around here, either.

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    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    McDonald's is nice for road trips owing to the standardization of the product. I live in a rural area so I am forced to drive a lot.

    I get four double cheeseburgers (made with 100% real beef, now fresh) without buns and a cappuccino. The cappuccinos are quite good, though you need be very clear that you don't want "flavor" (sugar) and you do want whole milk.
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  182. Rurik says:
    @ChuckOrloski
    Anon (419) did me favor, saying: "this must be the railroad you’re referring to."

    Hi 419!

    Very nice of you to go out-of-the way to help me.

    January 1981, aboard a Mercedes Benz (

    Hey Brother Chuck,

    that was me, Rurik

    I just forgot the email address I used to log on last time, and the software is telling me I have to remember from now on, and stop making up email addresses as I go.

    I responded to your post before I will to some others, (if I have the time), so that they’ll also know that I am Anon for now, until I figure how to get my identity back ;)

    Peace.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ChuckOrloski
    Got it, Brother Rurik.

    Mohammedans say "Allah Akbar," and based upon your great picture-post of the smiling Mnuchin & Mrs. Kushner @ al Quds, I am compelled to add..., so is "Rurik of U.R.abia" great.
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  183. Rurik says:
    @jacques sheete
    Another powerful comment; low voltage, but very high amp!

    Agree!

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  184. Rurik says:
    @jacques sheete

    And it’s the Fed that allows them unlimited means of enslaving the planet to their debt, and using that power to pick winners and losers.
     
    Rurik, haven't you been reading Krugman? Don't you know that "debt is good?" Good, good, goooood!

    'Smatta you jealous er sump'n?


    Note to the clueless: The above is my admittedly weak attempt at sarcasm. R's comment is spot on through and through.

    Krugman? Don’t you know that “debt is good?” Good, good, goooood!

    ah yes, Kruggy!

    he’s the economic version of Krauthammer, wrong on everything, that’s why they’re so smart!

    or is it smaart

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  185. @Low Voltage
    According to Chas Freeman (You should Google him if you aren't familiar with his name), the South eventually won the Civil War by taking over the Pentagon. The United States now has far more in common with the agrarian Confederacy than the industrial Union:

    Low wages
    Military worship
    Free trade
    Natural resource based economy
    Third world immigration (slave trade)
    Etcetera

    Eisenhauer warned about the Military Industrial Complex. He should have called it a resurgent Confederacy.

    “According to Chas Freeman (You should Google him if you aren’t familiar with his name), the South eventually won the Civil War by taking over the Pentagon. The United States now has far more in common with the agrarian Confederacy than the industrial Union:

    Low wages
    Military worship
    Free trade
    Natural resource based economy
    Third world immigration (slave trade)
    Etcetera

    Eisenhauer warned about the Military Industrial Complex. He should have called it a resurgent Confederacy.”

    That’s absurd. The Pentagon is intravenously connected to NYC’s Wall Street and is overseen by the Boston to Northern Virginia East Coast Neo-liberal Oligarchy who hate the South and the white people who live in it.

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    • Agree: Bill Jones
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    And you have the audacity to call yourself a Southerner? More like a Southron. Big difference there, Chief.

    There are several southern states, ranging from Texas to Alabama to Kentucky, which are heavily dependent upon military spending for their lifeblood of their communities. So when you make the claim that the Pentagon and Wall Street "hate the South", you are decidedly in error.

    http://www.ncsl.org/research/military-and-veterans-affairs/military-s-impact-on-state-economies.aspx

    "The economic benefits created by military installations are susceptible to change at both the federal and state levels. Recent events such as the drawdown of troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, federal budget cuts, and potential future rounds of Base Realignment and Closure have left government officials uncertain of the future role and sustainability of military installations. These trends have been a driving force behind many states’ decisions to commission studies that define the military activity and infrastructure that exists in the state and measure the economic impact of military presence. Economic impact studies allow states to better advocate on behalf of their installations and plan for future growth or restructuring."

    "The United States now has far more in common with the agrarian Confederacy than the industrial Union..."

    No, those are features of America, which includes the South. Try again.
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  186. polaco says:
    @Cloak And Dagger
    This is how Rome fell.

    And it was the Roman military attacking and looting it’s own cities when the empire was really crumbling and they weren’t getting paid.

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  187. @Thorfinnsson


    This is not a statistics problem. The numbers tell you we’re in big trouble. The $200,000 per taxpaying family mean that taxes would have to be raised by $10,000, as an example, just to pay this money off in 20 years.
     
    The money does not have to be paid off. Daily volume of the Treasury market averages $500 billion. This is a non-problem that people have been panicking about for my entire life.


    A steady chipping-away at that debt would give people, like the ones that hold the debt in the form of Treasury bonds, some small idea that “yeah, maybe the dollar is still worth something.”
     
    I can tell the Dollar is still worth something every time I buy something and it's accepted without complaint. As can everyone else.


    However, a large majority of those families, in the example, would be made broke themselves if they had to come up with $800 more each month, not to mention made outraged. It can’t happen though. What that means is this debt not be paid, and most likely will keep growing the way the Feral Gov’t is run.
     
    1 - Most income taxes paid by the wealthy

    2 - If you can't afford an extra $800 a month you're a loser

    3 - The debt does not need to be paid, and that it keeps growing is not a problem


    The debt won’t mean as much if GDP were quickly raised much higher over the coming years, but how can that happen when the US does not create much weatlh anymore (no, I don’t count facebook and google as wealth)?
     
    Facebook and Google might not be valued by you as wealth, but the market disagrees (not that I am supporter of either entity). The two entities are worth well over one trillion combined.


    The governments and (most of) the people are keeping their standard of living up via borrowing.
     
    Not a problem provided the debt can be serviced, which it is. The average credit score in America now exceeds 700. And total consumer debt is no higher than it was before the previous crisis, despite a larger population with higher incomes and improved credit.


    The end result will probably a large amount of inflation, as the FED does by creating money and lending it out for cheap, to keep the stock market propped up so people still feel non-broke. That will ruin the dollar just the same as it will be ruined once interest rates rise and bust the budget that way. Even my man Ron Paul would not have been able to get us out of this, but he would have led people to understand how to dig out after the crash.
     
    Real Soon Now

    You are a religious fanatic whose views do not align with reality

    The money does not have to be paid off. Daily volume of the Treasury market averages $500 billion.

    It doesn’t matter how much is TRADED AROUND. If that money dissipated overnight, it’d be a big damn problem for the holders of it. $800 Billion back in 2008 was needed to prop up the too-big-to-fail banks in ’08, and believe you me, it was sure a crisis to those guys.

    This is a non-problem that people have been panicking about for my entire life.

    I am very familiar with the talk that “debt doesn’t matter”. That started way back in the 1980′s. However, what can’t go on, won’t go on. At some point, too many people will look at the notes that they’re holding and wonder whether they’re backed by anything.

    You ARE right that the wealthy pay a big proportion of the income taxes, but no matter who can afford it, 10K per family extra per year to pay down debt does not go into the productive economy.

    Maybe you live in NYC or “The City” in London, but Americans are absolutely NOT in good financial shape in general around the country. Man, you know car loans go out to 6 and 7 years now? Student debt default rates are in the 15-20 % range of the $1.5 Trillion owed. There aren’t enough decent jobs for most graduates to pay that money back. You don’t get out much if you think that things are going swimmingly economics-wise.

    I’m just curious what you think will happen when the FED lets interest rates rise, or how long they can continue this charade of holding them down to almost nothing to prop up the stock market so people can reckon they are doing OK.

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    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson


    It doesn’t matter how much is TRADED AROUND. If that money dissipated overnight, it’d be a big damn problem for the holders of it. $800 Billion back in 2008 was needed to prop up the too-big-to-fail banks in ’08, and believe you me, it was sure a crisis to those guys.
     
    Money doesn't dissipate unless it's defaulted on. The federal government can't default unless it wants to.

    $500 billion a day (and, of course, the Federal Reserve's unlimited buying power) means China can't wreck the country by dumping its $1.3 trillion in Treasuries.

    There was no crisis in Treasuries in 2008 at all. The most significant crisis was in the commercial paper market, which the Federal Reserve isn't allowed to conduct open market operations in. Hence my suggestion that China focus on that if it wants to harm us with financial weapons.


    I am very familiar with the talk that “debt doesn’t matter”. That started way back in the 1980′s. However, what can’t go on, won’t go on. At some point, too many people will look at the notes that they’re holding and wonder whether they’re backed by anything.
     
    I don't think it doesn't matter, but the sky isn't falling. Right now we have federal debt of 100% of GDP along with trillion dollar annual deficits, but we also have low inflation and low unemployment.

    There is some level at which deficits would have to cause unhealthy inflation, and it's not prudent to have a high national debt as you want surge capacity for economic crises and wars.

    And obviously there's a debt level where serving the debt would become difficult.


    Maybe you live in NYC or “The City” in London, but Americans are absolutely NOT in good financial shape in general around the country.
     
    I live in a rural area (though part of the tiny upper class here) and I agree with you. Things are a bit better for ordinary people than they were not too long ago however, and the data shows this. Unemployment has dropped, the workforce participation ratio is growing again after dropping for decades, and the country's average credit score is now over 700. This of course after decades of people getting hammered.


    Man, you know car loans go out to 6 and 7 years now?
     
    People being able to spend less money per month on transportation does not strike me as a bad thing. Yes, the total amount paid ends up being higher, but this isn't bad at all. The monthly savings can be invested at a higher rate of return than the interest on the car loan for any creditworthy borrowers. I realize most people don't do this, but most people are losers.


    Student debt default rates are in the 15-20 % range of the $1.5 Trillion owed. There aren’t enough decent jobs for most graduates to pay that money back. You don’t get out much if you think that things are going swimmingly economics-wise.
     
    The education racket is a clear disaster of course. Inflation in America is heavily concentrated in education and healthcare.

    I’m just curious what you think will happen when the FED lets interest rates rise, or how long they can continue this charade of holding them down to almost nothing to prop up the stock market so people can reckon they are doing OK.
     
    The FED has much less power than you think it has--or than it itself thinks it has. Its continually mystified by why it can't increase inflation to its target. All it can do it set the overnight rate and conduct open market operations. Most banks don't even borrow from the FED for their ordinary operations, they get money from depositors (lowest cost of finance) or borrow from the interbank lending market (hence all the fuss about the LIBOR).

    Interest rates have risen less because of the FED's policy and more because credit origination has increased.

    Note that QE ended in 2014 and interest rates have been rising for awhile now, yet the stock market kept on booming until this year. We're now in a stealth bear market as earnings keep rising but stock prices are not, so earnings multiples are falling. I expect a fairly lengthy period of mediocre returns in the stock market simply because the past nine years have been so good.

    Most stocks are owned by wealthy people--ordinary people pay attention to their paychecks and bills.
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  188. Rurik says:
    @Thorfinnsson


    the value of the dollar is falling drastically, as everything from a trip to the grocery store to filling your tank creeps and creeps up
     
    Uhh dude how can there be inflation when I can get four double cheeseburgers from McDonald's for under eight dollars? Have you even heard of the McDonald's 1-2-3 menu?

    I just bought a 65" OLED 4K display for $2,300. A dozen eggs at the gas station cost 99 cents.

    A base first generation Ford Taurus sedan with a 90 horsepower engine and no air conditioning cost $10,050 in 1985. A base Ford Fusion with 175 horsepower (and better fuel economy), fancy infotainment, oodles of safety systems, alloy wheels, etc. today costs $22,215.

    So for mid-size sedans from Ford the 33-year rate of inflation without hedonic adjustments (a favorite bugbear among hard money cranks) is 2.43%.

    The sky is falling!


    This trend will continue, as people are forced to scramble to protect the value of their savings, by going to the rigged casino that is Wall Street, where their pensions and savings will eventually be looted, just as it was in 2008.
     
    Looted? Who profited from that, exactly, other than the very small number of people who went short? Perhaps if your portfolio consisted solely of Lehman Brothers shares, Greek state bonds, subprime mortgage backed securities (ideally, one would only own MBSes solely composed of the famed NINJA--no income no job or assets--mortages), and Cypriot bank deposits. And needless to say this brilliant portfolio was not hedged, because hedging is for cowards! :)

    Meanwhile since 2009 the S&P 500 has returned over 400% with dividends reinvested.

    Wall Street has also greatly improved the products available to retail investors since then. Money is flowing out of "active" mutual funds and into low-cost index funds, and soon Vanguard will offer index funds for free (no expense ratio!). Target Date Funds and Robo-Advisors automatically rebalance your portfolio based on your age, ideal for people who aren't interested in finance and just want to grow a nest egg.

    And in case you're not paying attention, there are now time deposits and Treasuries which pay interest which exceeds the rate of inflation.

    Those with an irrational fear of stocks have always been able to protect their wealth from inflation by purchasing Series-I Savings Bonds directly from the United States Treasury, and bigger purchasers (can't buy more than $10,000 of I-Bonds in a year or hold more than $300,000) can buy Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS).

    As for the rest of your crankery, man it's a good thing I'm not a middle class dweeb with a pension worried about my property taxes. Though my property taxes are irritating as my town is being looted by teachers and firefighters. [email protected]#$ing gold-bricking parasites.

    Defined-benefit pensions were a bad idea, which is why they'e being replaced by defined-contribution pensions. I own my 401k and HSA outright. They're not entitlements which depend upon the promises and wishful thinking of others.

    And yes, people who rely on defined-benefit pensions other than federal government workers are largely going to get screwed. This is wrong, but proves my point about them being a bad idea. But they're not going to get screwed because of your fear of debt and Wall Street. They're going to get screwed because their pensions were never properly funded to begin with.

    As for (((they))), three of the five largest banks in America have Irish CEOs. You've been cucked by the Shamrock and the Leprechaun, Rurik!

    [There's a serious possibility that commenters unwilling to save their email or name information will no longer have their comments published.]

    I just bought a 65″ OLED 4K display for $2,300.

    you’re admitting to that?!

    To watch what with exactly. Maybe programming is better in your area.

    A dozen eggs at the gas station cost 99 cents.

    we buy only ‘pasture raised’ eggs. My gal thinks eating eggs from healthy chickens, who’re ‘happy’ will result in better quality eggs, but for me, I spend the extra money (about $6+ per dozen) for moral reasons. Which is same reason I don’t eat ham or bacon or dogs or cats.

    Not that I judge other people who do, (except when they torture the animals before they kill them, because the meat taste better that way. In which case I’d like to feed such humans to the pigs that I don’t eat).

    Some cars and some things are cheaper, but generally, the middle and working classes are languishing, and it’s getting worse, not better, as the wealth gap explodes.

    Looted? Who profited from that, exactly, other than the very small number of people who went short?

    the whole rotten and corrupt den on snakes on Wall Street profited massively during the orgy of fraud and theft. Countywide, Shittybank, Goldman Sachs, and all the rest of the thieving scoundrels. They killed Glass so they could loot the Treasury, and loot the Treasury they did.

    It was a feeding frenzy, with synthetic ‘credit default swaps’, and ‘collateralized debt obligations’ and collateralized derivatives with sub-prime liar loans, and Freddy and Fanny to cover the tracks.

    With the SEC carefully looking the other way, hoping to get a gig with Goldilocks making thirty times what they made as regulators.

    Greed, and avarice like never seen before. That’s who made the money. All of those rats and swindlers at the big investment banks.

    books should be written

    and when it all imploded, as it must surely do so again, the big boyz got out first. And then the taxpayer was slated to cover the loses. Just as Robert Rubin, the Dr. Frankenstein of Wall Street/Treasury/Fed corruption and collusion (with his Igor; Lawrence Summers)- planned.

    Meanwhile since 2009 the S&P 500 has returned over 400% with dividends reinvested.

    QE baby! Up the ying and out the yang.

    An orgy of ‘printing’, until the music stops, and only the same people who knew it was coming in 08, will know when it comes this time around. And trillions of dollars of “wealth” will be disappeared over night. There goes your pension.

    Remember the ratings agencies?

    you know what the ratings agencies remind me of, recently it was revealed that Experian sold, er, I mean lost millions of people’s data. Now they’re on the television running ads for protecting people’s data. I shit you not. You can call them and pay them to “protect” your data from the “dark web’. Wow.

    And the ratings agencies? Yep, they’re still in business. Holy moly.

    Wall Street has also greatly improved the products available to retail investors since then.

    I bet!

    buy a commodity ETF today, and watch as the price is manipulated with the aplomb of a pick pocket. Just hit a few keys on the Fed’s computer, and voila! Silver trades at curious lows, while demand is higher than ever.

    it’s a shell game, and its rigged. Works well as long as you’re playing it safe, but then weren’t AAA rated funds eviscerated, (along with people’s pensions) following the 08 crash?

    Have they instituted hardy reforms to prevent something like that from happening again?

    your crankery, man it’s a good thing I’m not a middle class dweeb

    personally, I’m just fine. I have no debt, and I’ve done well enough to spend an inordinate amount of time bloviating about things I’ll never be able to actually change, but speaking out seems cathartic, and I hope I’m tossing pebbles, that will create ripples, so to speak, as I suspect most of us are doing here.

    I don’t rail here against the serials crimes and atrocities of our elites for my personal benefit, but rather for the (especially young) people who I see will be victims of these snakes. And I’m here just trying to warn them, that the emerging Orwellian total surveillance police state they’re building is not going to be an utopian unicorn land they’re thinking it is. Not hardly.

    But they’re not going to get screwed because of your fear of debt and Wall Street.

    they’re going to get screwed because the system is set up to screw them.

    The reason the wealth gap is burgeoning, is because the .01% that run things want it to, and the people who’re being set up to get screwed again, are being lied to by the people who they’re trusting and paying and exalting to positions of power to look out for their interests- the politicians- are the very people betraying them to their enemies.

    As for (((they))), three of the five largest banks in America have Irish CEOs.

    the problem isn’t the commercial banks. The problem is the investment banks, and what used to be a wall (Glass-Steagall) that separated the investment banks from the Treasury, which is now the henhouse being guarded by the jackal.

    ~ Rurik

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson


    you’re admitting to that?!

    To watch what with exactly. Maybe programming is better in your area.
     
    It's the best display in its size class you can buy according to Consumer Reports, why deny buying a great product?

    I purchased it for use in our engineering lab, mainly for engineering's kanban board.


    we buy only ‘pasture raised’ eggs. My gal thinks eating eggs from healthy chickens, who’re ‘happy’ will result in better quality eggs, but for me, I spend the extra money (about $6+ per dozen) for moral reasons. Which is same reason I don’t eat ham or bacon or dogs or cats.

    Not that I judge other people who do, (except when they torture the animals before they kill them, because the meat taste better that way. In which case I’d like to feed such humans to the pigs that I don’t eat).
     
    And what is the rate of inflation on pastured eggs? I have no idea. One of my employees gives me pastured eggs on occasion.

    Your gal is right with respect to nutrition (but it's a lot more minor than the gap with chicken meat), though Serious Eats was unable to detect a taste difference in a double blind study. Pastured eggs do look a lot better in the pan.

    Animals exist to serve us, though they should be treated humanely which is a serious problem. Pigs, dogs, and cats aren't people and thus are fair game. And honestly I'd probably eat a human if presented with the option, just out of curiosity. Not going to claim cannibalism is moral of course.


    the whole rotten and corrupt den on snakes on Wall Street profited massively during the orgy of fraud and theft. Countywide, Shittybank, Goldman Sachs, and all the rest of the thieving scoundrels.
     
    Countrywide profited so much it went bankrupt.

    CitiBank and Goldman Sachs profited so much they had to beg the government (and Buffet in Goldman's case) for help.


    They killed Glass so they could loot the Treasury, and loot the Treasury they did.
     
    Germany and Canada have never had a separation between commercial and investment banking. In fact very few countries other than America did.

    The Treasury didn't get looted and in fact made a profit on TARP (though it was still inappropriate--the stockholders should've gotten wiped out).


    It was a feeding frenzy, with synthetic ‘credit default swaps’, and ‘collateralized debt obligations’ and collateralized derivatives with sub-prime liar loans, and Freddy and Fanny to cover the tracks.
     
    People who bought credit default swaps got rich.

    People who bought CDOs got hosed.

    And sure, issuers of both earned commissions.

    What's your point?


    With the SEC carefully looking the other way, hoping to get a gig with Goldilocks making thirty times what they made as regulators.
     
    The same stability and good times which induce financiers to take risks also leads to deregulating politicians and regulators, even if there is of course a conflict of interest and even corruption at work. The SEC was convinced that modern risk models were so sophisticated that there was no longer any need to limit leverage.

    Greed, and avarice like never seen before. That’s who made the money. All of those rats and swindlers at the big investment banks.
     
    More like greed and avarice like have been seen...many times before. Remember the dot com bubble?

    And no, the people who made the money were the contrarian bears. Who were widely denounced as crazy lunatics deep into 2007 and even 2008 by everyone else on Wall Street.

    Remember, the big banks had to be bailed out. They lost their shirts.

    and when it all imploded, as it must surely do so again, the big boyz got out first. And then the taxpayer was slated to cover the loses. Just as Robert Rubin, the Dr. Frankenstein of Wall Street/Treasury/Fed corruption and collusion (with his Igor; Lawrence Summers)- planned.
     
    The Treasury made a profit on TARP. So the taxpayer in fact lost nothing from the bailout, which was wrong for other reasons.

    QE baby! Up the ying and out the yang.

    An orgy of ‘printing’, until the music stops, and only the same people who knew it was coming in 08, will know when it comes this time around. And trillions of dollars of “wealth” will be disappeared over night. There goes your pension.
    QE ended in 2014. Stock market kept surging until this year. Stock prices have grown broadly in line with increased earnings per share and dividends, with some valuation expansion. The stock market grows 80% of the time and has a real CAGR of 8.6% going back to 1871. Quite a lot of financial crises during that time, including many far worse than what happened in 07-08.


    Remember the ratings agencies?

    you know what the ratings agencies remind me of, recently it was revealed that Experian sold, er, I mean lost millions of people’s data. Now they’re on the television running ads for protecting people’s data. I shit you not. You can call them and pay them to “protect” your data from the “dark web’. Wow.

    And the ratings agencies? Yep, they’re still in business. Holy moly.
    Who cares? Bonds are for losers. People who buy them are complete dopes.

    And yes, conflict of interest is at the heart of the business model of the ratings agencies.

    I bet!

    buy a commodity ETF today, and watch as the price is manipulated with the aplomb of a pick pocket. Just hit a few keys on the Fed’s computer, and voila! Silver trades at curious lows, while demand is higher than ever.
     
    Maybe stop speculating in commodities and just sign up with WealthFront or Betterment.


    it’s a shell game, and its rigged. Works well as long as you’re playing it safe, but then weren’t AAA rated funds eviscerated, (along with people’s pensions) following the 08 crash?
     
    Yes, and people who bought those were morons anyway. I was in my early 20s at the time, and it was extremely obvious to me that the housing bubble was crazy.

    And as I noted earlier, bonds are for losers.

    If you played it safe by instead buying shares in, say, Berkshire Hathaway, there was no problem. Unless you HAD to retire in exactly 2009 or something.

    Have they instituted hardy reforms to prevent something like that from happening again?
     
    Some, but I'm not convinced this sort of thing can actually be prevented to begin with. Seems endemic to capitalism.


    they’re going to get screwed because the system is set up to screw them.
     
    That might be. But specifically they will get screwed because defined benefit pensions are chronically underfunded. Which is why they're a bad idea to begin with.


    The reason the wealth gap is burgeoning, is because the .01% that run things want it to, and the people who’re being set up to get screwed again, are being lied to by the people who they’re trusting and paying and exalting to positions of power to look out for their interests- the politicians- are the very people betraying them to their enemies.
     
    We're just returning to normal. The 20th century was an unusual and historically unprecedented departure from traditional levels of inequality.


    the problem isn’t the commercial banks. The problem is the investment banks, and what used to be a wall (Glass-Steagall) that separated the investment banks from the Treasury, which is now the henhouse being guarded by the jackal.
     
    Glass-Steagall separated investment banks from bank deposits, not the Treasury.

    This is completely overblown. Most countries never had this separation, and there were many instances of commercial banks under Glass-Steagall blowing themselves up. A great example was the 1982 Latin American debt crisis.

    A potentially more serious problem with banking is that the end of Glass-Steagall along with the great concentration of the big banks perhaps reduces credit origination to rural areas, small business, etc. I'd want to see empirical research on this before leaping to conclusion of course.

    By the way, note that your post here did not have much to do with inflation at all. :)
     

     
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  189. Rurik says:

    [There's a serious possibility that commenters unwilling to save their email or name information will no longer have their comments published.]

    thank you moderators

    point taken, I’ll maintain consistent info from now on.

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  190. @Rurik
    Hey Brother Chuck,

    that was me, Rurik

    I just forgot the email address I used to log on last time, and the software is telling me I have to remember from now on, and stop making up email addresses as I go.

    I responded to your post before I will to some others, (if I have the time), so that they'll also know that I am Anon for now, until I figure how to get my identity back ;)

    Peace.

    Got it, Brother Rurik.

    Mohammedans say “Allah Akbar,” and based upon your great picture-post of the smiling Mnuchin & Mrs. Kushner @ al Quds, I am compelled to add…, so is “Rurik of U.R.abia” great.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    you're too kind Brother Chuck,

    Peace.
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  191. Hibernian says:
    @LondonBob
    Clearly is if you look at your debt to GDP and deficit.

    Interesting because the US has its history as part of the English tradition of no standing armies, militias, all possible due to the favourable geography of having a strip of water, or moat as Shakespeare put it, to deter potential invaders. The US military really is a WWII and Cold War creation. That the US seems to be the only nation not have benefited from the end of the cold war dividend in reduced military spending is an impressive feat by lobbyists and neocon ideologues.

    I think we benefitted at least a little bit between the end of the Cold War and 911. That was how Bill Clinton ran a slight surplus at least one year.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    I think we benefitted at least a little bit between the end of the Cold War and 911.

    Emphasize the words "a least a little" because it wasn't very much as the government spent a lot of money to close those bases and pay for retraining programs for laid off defense workers.

    There was no real surplus under Clinton that could be attributed to the peace dividend. The national debt never went down as in enough came in to retire some debt by not rolling it over when old debt matured. What happened was the dot com boom resulted in tons of stock options being exercised and huge pay days for web designers. You also had Y2K hysteria. This not only resulted in more income tax paid but a huge jump in Social Security taxes collected which don't help the debt (but do the deficit since Congress steals the money) because they are on the books as Treasuries that will later be redeemed to pay for future SS outgoes that are higher then incoming taxes.

    Remember the time leading up to Y2K was goldmine for old COBOL programmers supposedly fixing old legacy financial services software. There were also stories of 20 somethings making well over 50 dollars an hour for HTML programming for web pages. Coders were dropping out of university programs to get in on the gravy train.

    It allowed people to crow that the deficit was gone but it was sleight of hand and those gains became later capital loses when those stock prices collapsed and those jobs disappeared leaving people on unemployment insurance.

    A lot of stock options are cashed out immediately after execution in what is called a cashless transaction. The IRS treats this as ordinary income subject to both income tax and SS taxes.
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  192. Hibernian says:
    @LTDanKaffey
    Absolutely in favor of a non-resident citizen.

    You would still be required to pay some kind of lease or tax for the land which you occupy, but would otherwise be left alone. You would also be subject to the criminal laws of the jurisdiction you occupied. You would also pay taxes for any consumption that requires use of infrastructure or interstate commerce.

    The United States is large enough that such an arrangement is still possible.

    I think that should be a non-citizen resident.

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  193. Hibernian says:
    @JackOH
    Are there a disproportionate number of current veterans claiming PTSD as a service-connected and compensable disability, or, even without compensation, getting treatment through the VA, or maybe even privately?

    No snark intended. I don't actually know. We had a recent incident at a local VA clinic where a guy blew his brains out while in the waiting room for a scheduled appointment. He was an enlisted air force guy with Afghan or Gulf II service. I did think: how much trauma-inducing combat could this guy have experienced? Again, I don't know any better.

    Anyone know better about PTSD claims?

    Many Air Force personnel have become more ground oriented in the GWOT, not as infantry but as MPs, transport, etc. MPs go on patrols, transport drivers are ambushed , etc. This does not mean they are the same as infantrymen who continually seek contact with the enemy.

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  194. @jacques sheete

    I deeply appreciate those who have served the country in uniform. And that is especially the case for men.
     
    Oh you do, do you ? Well isn't that swell?

    When yer ready to lose the romantic fantasy, check this out...

    In an effort to PREVENT the war that Churchill called “unnecessary,” (WW2,) this 2 time Medal of Honor recipient wrote...


    “… I spent most of my [33 years in the Marine Corps] being a high class muscle- man for Big Business, for Wall Street and for the Bankers.

    In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for [crony] capitalism.”

    Major General Butler USMC, War is a Racket, 1935

    http://www.ratical.org/ratville/CAH/warisaracket.html
     

    Some get it; some don’t.

    “They can send every last soldier anywhere on earth, but there will only be a war if soldiers are willing to fight, and the ruling class: the billionaires who profit from human suffering care only about expanding their wealth, controlling the world economy, understand that their power lies only in their ability to convince us that war, oppression, and exploitation is in our interests.”

    We were told we were fighting terrorists, but the real terrorist was me and the real terrorism is this occupation.

    - Mike Prysner, Iraq War vet

     

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90OYp2hdTMU

    I think I stand where i came in — I appreciate their service.

    I appreciate their service and am certainly disappointed when said service is ill used by the civilian leadership. i appreciate their service, knowing that some will violate common decency and ethics not only against our enemies, but regretfully to their own –

    I appreciate then when they make mistakes — and should be held accountable.

    I appreciate our armed forces and the men who serve, even if some think they are overcompensated and some surely are.

    I have no fantasies about life in service or the tragedy of conflict – it’s a nasty business all way ’round.

    I appreciate their service.

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  195. MarkinLA says:
    @Hibernian
    I think we benefitted at least a little bit between the end of the Cold War and 911. That was how Bill Clinton ran a slight surplus at least one year.

    I think we benefitted at least a little bit between the end of the Cold War and 911.

    Emphasize the words “a least a little” because it wasn’t very much as the government spent a lot of money to close those bases and pay for retraining programs for laid off defense workers.

    There was no real surplus under Clinton that could be attributed to the peace dividend. The national debt never went down as in enough came in to retire some debt by not rolling it over when old debt matured. What happened was the dot com boom resulted in tons of stock options being exercised and huge pay days for web designers. You also had Y2K hysteria. This not only resulted in more income tax paid but a huge jump in Social Security taxes collected which don’t help the debt (but do the deficit since Congress steals the money) because they are on the books as Treasuries that will later be redeemed to pay for future SS outgoes that are higher then incoming taxes.

    Remember the time leading up to Y2K was goldmine for old COBOL programmers supposedly fixing old legacy financial services software. There were also stories of 20 somethings making well over 50 dollars an hour for HTML programming for web pages. Coders were dropping out of university programs to get in on the gravy train.

    It allowed people to crow that the deficit was gone but it was sleight of hand and those gains became later capital loses when those stock prices collapsed and those jobs disappeared leaving people on unemployment insurance.

    A lot of stock options are cashed out immediately after execution in what is called a cashless transaction. The IRS treats this as ordinary income subject to both income tax and SS taxes.

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  196. @jacques sheete

    They’re not entitlements which depend upon the promises and wishful thinking of others.
     
    That comment shows that you have the potential to understand some of what you speak.

    ...man it’s a good thing I’m not a middle class dweeb with a pension worried about my property taxes.
     
    That's one of several that demonstrate you have a bit to learn; if there's no inflation, then why do property taxes keep rising?

    I'll agree that when it comes to wages, deflation seems to be the rule despite the fact that when I was a kid, $1.50 an hour was OK, while I don't think people can do as well with the commonly offered $12.50 an hour nowadays. Hmmm...deflated inflation?

    No inflation? Let's talk gasoline prices, or are the higher prices due to some magic fairy dust they lace it with nowadays? Ever do a brake job on a car? Take it from me that even with "ceramics" brakes don't last any longer or function any better than they did when they cost about 90% less.

    Since you mentioned car prices, you can't just look at the sticker price and justify the increase tag price on the quality improvement, because, for one thing, auto manufacturers likely make more money on the financing than on the profit, if any. In other words, all the glitz and glitter and "hedonic adjustments" are essentially "come ons." Yer not buying a car so much as acquiring debt to look cute 'n feel good. It's long been common knowledge that GMAC was the money maker for GM, which, if I recall was yet another that needed a bailout form the taxpayers. I bet you didn't include that cute little fact in your calculus. Parenthetically, any decent person would vomit if they knew what controls GM...

    Anyway, there's a lot more that could be said, but who cares? Besides, rurik is right and you apparently have a lot to learn, so snap to it and quit trying to baffle us dumb goyim with BS.

    Thank you.

    I don’t dispute the existence of inflation. I dispute the idea, common to hard money cranks, that inflation is much higher than reported. An amusing fact about this is that a Shadow Stats subscription has the same nominal price it did a decade ago.

    That’s one of several that demonstrate you have a bit to learn; if there’s no inflation, then why do property taxes keep rising?

    Local government spending is the same share of GDP it was four decades ago. Property taxes rise…as do assessed property values and incomes. There are obviously issues in particular areas where they rise unreasonably as a result of some kind of political mafia taking control of the city, but broadly they rise with the overall economy.

    I agree that they’re too high to begin with of course. E.g. my rural community of 8,000 has a professional fire department for some baffling reason, along with dedicated EMTs.

    I’ll agree that when it comes to wages, deflation seems to be the rule despite the fact that when I was a kid, $1.50 an hour was OK, while I don’t think people can do as well with the commonly offered $12.50 an hour nowadays. Hmmm…deflated inflation?

    No, this is wage inflation. The trouble for workers is that 40-50 years ago wages stopped inflating faster than prices, which they did during the postwar era.

    No inflation? Let’s talk gasoline prices, or are the higher prices due to some magic fairy dust they lace it with nowadays? Ever do a brake job on a car? Take it from me that even with “ceramics” brakes don’t last any longer or function any better than they did when they cost about 90% less.

    Commodities are cyclical. WTI is currently at $70/bbl, wasn’t that long ago it was at $26. In real terms gas prices have been much higher many times in the past, even the fairly distant past like 1979.

    I am a track rat and thus have done a lot of brake jobs–generally go through a couple sets of pads in a weekend. Not old so I don’t know what brake pads cost in the 80s, but I do know from older track rats that they’ve improved a lot (the discs not really).

    And it depends on the product you’re talking about. Everyone and his dog knows that electronics have gotten cheaper for instance. A lot of other manufactured products haven’t necessarily gotten cheaper, but haven’t rise much in price.

    Hence why the BLS has its “basket” of goods and services, which is just an idealized average. Everyone has his own personal basket of goods. Since I don’t consume healthcare or education I’ve seen less inflation than other consumers. Maybe even deflation.

    Since you mentioned car prices, you can’t just look at the sticker price and justify the increase tag price on the quality improvement

    Perhaps you could, but as noted earlier I’m not disputing overall inflation. It’s none the less noteworthy that Ford mid-size sedans have an inflation rate of 2.43% (very close to overall inflation for the period), yet the cars have improved radically (mostly).

    And some inflation is just down to government regulation of course, especially in the case of the auto industry.

    auto manufacturers likely make more money on the financing than on the profit, if any. In other words, all the glitz and glitter and “hedonic adjustments” are essentially “come ons.” Yer not buying a car so much as acquiring debt to look cute ‘n feel good.

    I don’t see how this is relevant at all. Most consumers can’t afford to purchase a new car in cash, and for those of us who can it’s a poor use of capital. Lending money to borrowers is a credit risk, and there is the opportunity cost of alternative investments.

    And it’s not even true. After 9-11 Detroit decided to implement 0% financing for instance. Obviously not profitable–their cost of finance (whatever commercial paper cost in the 00s) was higher than their interest profit (zero).

    Personally I’ve never had a car loan in my life incidentally, but I’ve realized this is unusual.

    It’s long been common knowledge that GMAC was the money maker for GM, which, if I recall was yet another that needed a bailout form the taxpayers.

    GMAC no longer exists. It’s now Ally Financial, an excellent online-only bank.

    GM makes most of its profits from trucks.

    Rather than “common knowledge” you can have a look at GM’s audited financial statements, filed every year with the Securities and Exchange Commission and publicly accessible for free.

    It was once true, now a very long time ago, that most profit came from GMAC. That was an exception in the company’s history and basically an artifact of the late 20th century. GM was for instance the first corporation to earn one billion dollars in a single quarter, done in 1966 on the back of a sizzling car lineup with V-8 engines galore and a booming economy with fast rising incomes.

    Anyway, there’s a lot more that could be said, but who cares? Besides, rurik is right and you apparently have a lot to learn, so snap to it and quit trying to baffle us dumb goyim with BS.

    You guys both clearly know a lot less than I do on these matters. But you’re religious fanatics so it won’t sink in.

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    • Replies: @anarchyst
    GMAC became a "bank" (Ally) right after the "crash" so that it could partake in TARP bailout funds. As an auto finance arm and not a true "bank" it would have been unable to feed at the federal reserve bailout spigot. This was a smart move that allowed GM to profit off the misery of others.
    , @Anon

    I don’t dispute the existence of inflation. I dispute the idea, common to hard money cranks,
     
    a great way to think about inflation, is to consider the value of the US dollar for the first hundred or so years of its use. When it was being coined by congress and tied to gold. It basically kept its value for over a hundred years, and you would pay about the same for a quart of milk or pound of coffee, from 1792, to 1913.

    here's a nice chart that shows an indication of inflation following the treason of the Fed, and then subsequent treason of FDR and then Nixon taking us off the gold standard.

    https://economics-charts.com/images/cpi-1800-2005.png

    https://economics-charts.com/cpi/cpi-1800-2005.html

    since the Satanic perfidy of the Fed, (the very evil the founding fathers fought the revolution to prevent, and which Andrew Jackson heroically resisted, to the point of an assassination attempt) Americans purchasing power, which remained virtually unchanged for a hundred or so years before the Fed, has been reduced to app. 2% of the purchasing power the dollar had in 1913. This inflation is due to the international banksters, who own and control the Fed (class A stock holders), 'printing' trillions upon trillions of Federal Reserve Notes and loaning them out, (at interest) to their fellow bankster around the world and to the US Treasury. Where now we have to borrow our own money (at interest) from the greediest and most demonic scum on the planet. Rothschild and his cabal.

    And it is because of this biblical level of treachery, that has doomed the planet to serial wars for Israel, ever since.

    Please keep in mind, that America's entry into WWI was a contrived scheme by Zionists, both in England, with the Balfour Declaration, and in Wilson's administration, with ((Louis Brandeis and Colonel House)) in the Wilson regime, to betray, destroy and enslave Germany.

    Wilson also funded and facilitated Trotsky to enslave Russia to genocidal Bolshevism.

    He's often lauded as one of America's greatest presidents, by the ((PTB)) today, but I'd say he was spectacularly the very worst president bar none. And by his treachery and treason, has doomed the planet to enslavement by the banksters. with their Eternal Wars, and Total surveillance, and burgeoning Orwellian police state, for which there seems to be no redress.

    more here:

    https://libertyinternational.wordpress.com/2013/12/23/federal-reserve-100-years-of-us-dollar/
    , @jacques sheete

    You guys both clearly know a lot less than I do on these matters. But you’re religious fanatics so it won’t sink in.
     
    Now, that's one helluvan argument.

    You win. Now, go spend your winnings at McDonalds!
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  197. @jacques sheete

    You will not find “premium” items such as the Big Mac or Baconator on these menus.
     
    Thank you for putting "premium" in quotes.

    You're also correct that I will not find those things there. The reason is that you'll never catch me looking for anything in one of those ridiculous joints (other than a bathroom on occasion).

    On the other hand, you won't catch me sipping wine and snacking on caviar with some of the effete trolls around here, either.

    McDonald’s is nice for road trips owing to the standardization of the product. I live in a rural area so I am forced to drive a lot.

    I get four double cheeseburgers (made with 100% real beef, now fresh) without buns and a cappuccino. The cappuccinos are quite good, though you need be very clear that you don’t want “flavor” (sugar) and you do want whole milk.

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  198. @Achmed E. Newman

    The money does not have to be paid off. Daily volume of the Treasury market averages $500 billion.
     
    It doesn't matter how much is TRADED AROUND. If that money dissipated overnight, it'd be a big damn problem for the holders of it. $800 Billion back in 2008 was needed to prop up the too-big-to-fail banks in '08, and believe you me, it was sure a crisis to those guys.

    This is a non-problem that people have been panicking about for my entire life.
     
    I am very familiar with the talk that "debt doesn't matter". That started way back in the 1980's. However, what can't go on, won't go on. At some point, too many people will look at the notes that they're holding and wonder whether they're backed by anything.

    You ARE right that the wealthy pay a big proportion of the income taxes, but no matter who can afford it, 10K per family extra per year to pay down debt does not go into the productive economy.

    Maybe you live in NYC or "The City" in London, but Americans are absolutely NOT in good financial shape in general around the country. Man, you know car loans go out to 6 and 7 years now? Student debt default rates are in the 15-20 % range of the $1.5 Trillion owed. There aren't enough decent jobs for most graduates to pay that money back. You don't get out much if you think that things are going swimmingly economics-wise.

    I'm just curious what you think will happen when the FED lets interest rates rise, or how long they can continue this charade of holding them down to almost nothing to prop up the stock market so people can reckon they are doing OK.

    It doesn’t matter how much is TRADED AROUND. If that money dissipated overnight, it’d be a big damn problem for the holders of it. $800 Billion back in 2008 was needed to prop up the too-big-to-fail banks in ’08, and believe you me, it was sure a crisis to those guys.

    Money doesn’t dissipate unless it’s defaulted on. The federal government can’t default unless it wants to.

    $500 billion a day (and, of course, the Federal Reserve’s unlimited buying power) means China can’t wreck the country by dumping its $1.3 trillion in Treasuries.

    There was no crisis in Treasuries in 2008 at all. The most significant crisis was in the commercial paper market, which the Federal Reserve isn’t allowed to conduct open market operations in. Hence my suggestion that China focus on that if it wants to harm us with financial weapons.

    I am very familiar with the talk that “debt doesn’t matter”. That started way back in the 1980′s. However, what can’t go on, won’t go on. At some point, too many people will look at the notes that they’re holding and wonder whether they’re backed by anything.

    I don’t think it doesn’t matter, but the sky isn’t falling. Right now we have federal debt of 100% of GDP along with trillion dollar annual deficits, but we also have low inflation and low unemployment.

    There is some level at which deficits would have to cause unhealthy inflation, and it’s not prudent to have a high national debt as you want surge capacity for economic crises and wars.

    And obviously there’s a debt level where serving the debt would become difficult.

    Maybe you live in NYC or “The City” in London, but Americans are absolutely NOT in good financial shape in general around the country.

    I live in a rural area (though part of the tiny upper class here) and I agree with you. Things are a bit better for ordinary people than they were not too long ago however, and the data shows this. Unemployment has dropped, the workforce participation ratio is growing again after dropping for decades, and the country’s average credit score is now over 700. This of course after decades of people getting hammered.

    Man, you know car loans go out to 6 and 7 years now?

    People being able to spend less money per month on transportation does not strike me as a bad thing. Yes, the total amount paid ends up being higher, but this isn’t bad at all. The monthly savings can be invested at a higher rate of return than the interest on the car loan for any creditworthy borrowers. I realize most people don’t do this, but most people are losers.

    Student debt default rates are in the 15-20 % range of the $1.5 Trillion owed. There aren’t enough decent jobs for most graduates to pay that money back. You don’t get out much if you think that things are going swimmingly economics-wise.

    The education racket is a clear disaster of course. Inflation in America is heavily concentrated in education and healthcare.

    I’m just curious what you think will happen when the FED lets interest rates rise, or how long they can continue this charade of holding them down to almost nothing to prop up the stock market so people can reckon they are doing OK.

    The FED has much less power than you think it has–or than it itself thinks it has. Its continually mystified by why it can’t increase inflation to its target. All it can do it set the overnight rate and conduct open market operations. Most banks don’t even borrow from the FED for their ordinary operations, they get money from depositors (lowest cost of finance) or borrow from the interbank lending market (hence all the fuss about the LIBOR).

    Interest rates have risen less because of the FED’s policy and more because credit origination has increased.

    Note that QE ended in 2014 and interest rates have been rising for awhile now, yet the stock market kept on booming until this year. We’re now in a stealth bear market as earnings keep rising but stock prices are not, so earnings multiples are falling. I expect a fairly lengthy period of mediocre returns in the stock market simply because the past nine years have been so good.

    Most stocks are owned by wealthy people–ordinary people pay attention to their paychecks and bills.

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    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    but we also have low inflation and low unemployment.
     
    You know, I was just going to ignore you, but when I noticed that, I had to respond.

    You reveal how much you know by making a statement like that and it's a bonehead if not braindead one.

    Have you noticed the price of beefsteak lately? Some good examples of inflation there. how about housing prices?

    On the other hand, as you pointed out, electronics can be a bargain. Probably no inflation there for the most part.

    The point is, it is just plain meaningless to make such a blanket statement about inflation or about "unemployment" in the way you did. One reason is that the figure is highly manipulated and another is that it doesn't seem to account for under employment, and I'm betting that that's significant and important, but it's obvious there's no way to explain that concept so you'd understand.

    Are you sure you're not really the Maven ("debt is good") in disguise?
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  199. @Rick Johnson
    As a Vietnam vet, and a supporter of the military, I urge others to understand this article. And how many senior officers retire with "full or partial disability?" It is a scandal.

    Why should the military, and ANY government employee and office holder, including those elected, receive ANY retirement pay and benefits? Pay them good wages up front, and let them participate in the Social security system like the rest of us. If they want more, they can join many programs to invest in like IRAs, etc. Or just save.

    Get EVERYBODY involved, private and government employees together in the same system, and maybe Social Security will be ensured of solvency. Sure, Generals, Admirals and Congress critters will make much less in retirement, but that is on them if they don't plan ahead. And if that seems unreasonable to them, then we know that they serve not out of patriotism.

    It doesn’t make much sense. The people in charge of protecting capitalism refuse to participate in it. Some people might call that a “clue.”

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  200. Giuseppe says:

    I was in a Virginia supermarket the other day checking out when the woman behind the cash register in a perky voice asked me “Will you give $5 to support our troops?” I responded “No. Our troops already get way too much of our money.” She replied, “Hee, hee that’s a funny joke” and I said “It’s not a joke.” Her face dropped and she signaled to her boss over in customer service and asked her to take over, saying that I had been rude.

    I might be preaching to the choir on this, as they say, but what is being described is known as an embedded donation, or embedded giving. An embedded donation is a donation solicited on behalf of a charity or worthy cause by a retail business. Embedded, because when the donation is supposedly finally made, it consists of many donations from many customers solicited by the business but made in the name of the business. Significantly, embedded donations are subject to none of the regulatory red tape that direct contributions to charities are, and are used by companies such as supermarkets to improve their bottom line. For instance, the Virginia supermarket is not required by law to disclose the dollar amount of charitable embedded contributions it takes in on the behalf of some other charitable cause. Sure, they do appear to end up giving something to the charity, but how much? That’s entirely up to the company. The management of a nationwide supermarket chain some years ago refused to reveal what percentage of what they took in was kept back for administrative costs. Their reason? “That is proprietary information.” Proprietary information for how much is withheld from donations, proprietary information like the criteria with which a company may evaluate whether or not to expand into a new location? OK. Just so you know, that information that used to be on the internet, investigative reporting in Portland, OR, was since scrubbed clean. So these interests are powerful enough to remove dissenting voices.

    Embedded donations are without question absolutely evil. They give the appearance of a public service, but never, ever succumb to their shame tactics, like, the checker typically asking for a donation in front of all of the customers standing behind you. They are actually required to do that by their management. You can go online and find anonymous complaints by the employees, who incidentally hate being asked to solicit money for these charities. But even lower level management is kept in the dark about these schemes, so it does no good to complain to a manager. So if you are so inclined to support the troops, donate directly to a worthy cause such as Wounded Warrior. They same applies for breast cancer research, and even, at the pet food store, requests for a donation to help adopt pets. Better to just give directly to the Humane Society. It’s OK to say no.

    Just so you understand, companies engaged in embedded donations will sometimes get the CEO’s of charities to endorse their good work collecting funds from their customers. This is just a fig leaf. Yes, these businesses actually do give money to charities. But from the same funds donated to charity, they keep a lot of money back to improve their bottom line and maybe even give their top level management a nice fat bonus for rallying the troops for charity.

    Always give directly to charities, never donate through supermarkets or pet store chains, etc, etc, unless you want to be in some uncertainty as to what small percentage of your dollar donation will actually make it to the charity in question.

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    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I didn't know that, thanks for sharing.

    That's actually quite clever of the retailers (not saying that it's good or okay). I assume companies like Wal-Mart donate all (or close enough) of the money to charities as their reputation is worth more, but as you said we have no way of knowing.

    I've always objected to the practice simply because ordinary people have trouble resisting this sort of social pressure. I mean you're not against needy children or whatever, are you?

    I don't support the objectives of most charities to begin with and have always been comfortable being contrarian, so I've never fallen for this. And even if I were interested in donating, why would I make a donation that I can't itemize on my tax return?
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  201. @Rurik
    [There's a serious possibility that commenters unwilling to save their email or name information will no longer have their comments published.]

    I just bought a 65″ OLED 4K display for $2,300.
     
    you're admitting to that?!

    To watch what with exactly. Maybe programming is better in your area.

    A dozen eggs at the gas station cost 99 cents.
     
    http://blogs.ubc.ca/herder/files/2012/04/battery-cages1.jpg

    we buy only 'pasture raised' eggs. My gal thinks eating eggs from healthy chickens, who're 'happy' will result in better quality eggs, but for me, I spend the extra money (about $6+ per dozen) for moral reasons. Which is same reason I don't eat ham or bacon or dogs or cats.

    Not that I judge other people who do, (except when they torture the animals before they kill them, because the meat taste better that way. In which case I'd like to feed such humans to the pigs that I don't eat).

    Some cars and some things are cheaper, but generally, the middle and working classes are languishing, and it's getting worse, not better, as the wealth gap explodes.

    Looted? Who profited from that, exactly, other than the very small number of people who went short?
     
    the whole rotten and corrupt den on snakes on Wall Street profited massively during the orgy of fraud and theft. Countywide, Shittybank, Goldman Sachs, and all the rest of the thieving scoundrels. They killed Glass so they could loot the Treasury, and loot the Treasury they did.

    It was a feeding frenzy, with synthetic 'credit default swaps', and 'collateralized debt obligations' and collateralized derivatives with sub-prime liar loans, and Freddy and Fanny to cover the tracks.

    With the SEC carefully looking the other way, hoping to get a gig with Goldilocks making thirty times what they made as regulators.

    Greed, and avarice like never seen before. That's who made the money. All of those rats and swindlers at the big investment banks.

    books should be written

    and when it all imploded, as it must surely do so again, the big boyz got out first. And then the taxpayer was slated to cover the loses. Just as Robert Rubin, the Dr. Frankenstein of Wall Street/Treasury/Fed corruption and collusion (with his Igor; Lawrence Summers)- planned.

    Meanwhile since 2009 the S&P 500 has returned over 400% with dividends reinvested.
     
    QE baby! Up the ying and out the yang.

    An orgy of 'printing', until the music stops, and only the same people who knew it was coming in 08, will know when it comes this time around. And trillions of dollars of "wealth" will be disappeared over night. There goes your pension.

    Remember the ratings agencies?

    you know what the ratings agencies remind me of, recently it was revealed that Experian sold, er, I mean lost millions of people's data. Now they're on the television running ads for protecting people's data. I shit you not. You can call them and pay them to "protect" your data from the "dark web'. Wow.

    And the ratings agencies? Yep, they're still in business. Holy moly.

    Wall Street has also greatly improved the products available to retail investors since then.
     
    I bet!

    buy a commodity ETF today, and watch as the price is manipulated with the aplomb of a pick pocket. Just hit a few keys on the Fed's computer, and voila! Silver trades at curious lows, while demand is higher than ever.

    it's a shell game, and its rigged. Works well as long as you're playing it safe, but then weren't AAA rated funds eviscerated, (along with people's pensions) following the 08 crash?

    Have they instituted hardy reforms to prevent something like that from happening again?

    your crankery, man it’s a good thing I’m not a middle class dweeb
     
    personally, I'm just fine. I have no debt, and I've done well enough to spend an inordinate amount of time bloviating about things I'll never be able to actually change, but speaking out seems cathartic, and I hope I'm tossing pebbles, that will create ripples, so to speak, as I suspect most of us are doing here.

    I don't rail here against the serials crimes and atrocities of our elites for my personal benefit, but rather for the (especially young) people who I see will be victims of these snakes. And I'm here just trying to warn them, that the emerging Orwellian total surveillance police state they're building is not going to be an utopian unicorn land they're thinking it is. Not hardly.

    But they’re not going to get screwed because of your fear of debt and Wall Street.
     
    they're going to get screwed because the system is set up to screw them.

    The reason the wealth gap is burgeoning, is because the .01% that run things want it to, and the people who're being set up to get screwed again, are being lied to by the people who they're trusting and paying and exalting to positions of power to look out for their interests- the politicians- are the very people betraying them to their enemies.

    As for (((they))), three of the five largest banks in America have Irish CEOs.
     
    the problem isn't the commercial banks. The problem is the investment banks, and what used to be a wall (Glass-Steagall) that separated the investment banks from the Treasury, which is now the henhouse being guarded by the jackal.

    ~ Rurik

    you’re admitting to that?!

    To watch what with exactly. Maybe programming is better in your area.

    It’s the best display in its size class you can buy according to Consumer Reports, why deny buying a great product?

    I purchased it for use in our engineering lab, mainly for engineering’s kanban board.

    we buy only ‘pasture raised’ eggs. My gal thinks eating eggs from healthy chickens, who’re ‘happy’ will result in better quality eggs, but for me, I spend the extra money (about $6+ per dozen) for moral reasons. Which is same reason I don’t eat ham or bacon or dogs or cats.

    Not that I judge other people who do, (except when they torture the animals before they kill them, because the meat taste better that way. In which case I’d like to feed such humans to the pigs that I don’t eat).

    And what is the rate of inflation on pastured eggs? I have no idea. One of my employees gives me pastured eggs on occasion.

    Your gal is right with respect to nutrition (but it’s a lot more minor than the gap with chicken meat), though Serious Eats was unable to detect a taste difference in a double blind study. Pastured eggs do look a lot better in the pan.

    Animals exist to serve us, though they should be treated humanely which is a serious problem. Pigs, dogs, and cats aren’t people and thus are fair game. And honestly I’d probably eat a human if presented with the option, just out of curiosity. Not going to claim cannibalism is moral of course.

    the whole rotten and corrupt den on snakes on Wall Street profited massively during the orgy of fraud and theft. Countywide, Shittybank, Goldman Sachs, and all the rest of the thieving scoundrels.

    Countrywide profited so much it went bankrupt.

    CitiBank and Goldman Sachs profited so much they had to beg the government (and Buffet in Goldman’s case) for help.

    They killed Glass so they could loot the Treasury, and loot the Treasury they did.

    Germany and Canada have never had a separation between commercial and investment banking. In fact very few countries other than America did.

    The Treasury didn’t get looted and in fact made a profit on TARP (though it was still inappropriate–the stockholders should’ve gotten wiped out).

    It was a feeding frenzy, with synthetic ‘credit default swaps’, and ‘collateralized debt obligations’ and collateralized derivatives with sub-prime liar loans, and Freddy and Fanny to cover the tracks.

    People who bought credit default swaps got rich.

    People who bought CDOs got hosed.

    And sure, issuers of both earned commissions.

    What’s your point?

    With the SEC carefully looking the other way, hoping to get a gig with Goldilocks making thirty times what they made as regulators.

    The same stability and good times which induce financiers to take risks also leads to deregulating politicians and regulators, even if there is of course a conflict of interest and even corruption at work. The SEC was convinced that modern risk models were so sophisticated that there was no longer any need to limit leverage.

    Greed, and avarice like never seen before. That’s who made the money. All of those rats and swindlers at the big investment banks.

    More like greed and avarice like have been seen…many times before. Remember the dot com bubble?

    And no, the people who made the money were the contrarian bears. Who were widely denounced as crazy lunatics deep into 2007 and even 2008 by everyone else on Wall Street.

    Remember, the big banks had to be bailed out. They lost their shirts.

    and when it all imploded, as it must surely do so again, the big boyz got out first. And then the taxpayer was slated to cover the loses. Just as Robert Rubin, the Dr. Frankenstein of Wall Street/Treasury/Fed corruption and collusion (with his Igor; Lawrence Summers)- planned.

    The Treasury made a profit on TARP. So the taxpayer in fact lost nothing from the bailout, which was wrong for other reasons.

    QE baby! Up the ying and out the yang.

    An orgy of ‘printing’, until the music stops, and only the same people who knew it was coming in 08, will know when it comes this time around. And trillions of dollars of “wealth” will be disappeared over night. There goes your pension.
    QE ended in 2014. Stock market kept surging until this year. Stock prices have grown broadly in line with increased earnings per share and dividends, with some valuation expansion. The stock market grows 80% of the time and has a real CAGR of 8.6% going back to 1871. Quite a lot of financial crises during that time, including many far worse than what happened in 07-08.

    Remember the ratings agencies?

    you know what the ratings agencies remind me of, recently it was revealed that Experian sold, er, I mean lost millions of people’s data. Now they’re on the television running ads for protecting people’s data. I shit you not. You can call them and pay them to “protect” your data from the “dark web’. Wow.

    And the ratings agencies? Yep, they’re still in business. Holy moly.
    Who cares? Bonds are for losers. People who buy them are complete dopes.

    And yes, conflict of interest is at the heart of the business model of the ratings agencies.

    I bet!

    buy a commodity ETF today, and watch as the price is manipulated with the aplomb of a pick pocket. Just hit a few keys on the Fed’s computer, and voila! Silver trades at curious lows, while demand is higher than ever.

    Maybe stop speculating in commodities and just sign up with WealthFront or Betterment.

    it’s a shell game, and its rigged. Works well as long as you’re playing it safe, but then weren’t AAA rated funds eviscerated, (along with people’s pensions) following the 08 crash?

    Yes, and people who bought those were morons anyway. I was in my early 20s at the time, and it was extremely obvious to me that the housing bubble was crazy.

    And as I noted earlier, bonds are for losers.

    If you played it safe by instead buying shares in, say, Berkshire Hathaway, there was no problem. Unless you HAD to retire in exactly 2009 or something.

    Have they instituted hardy reforms to prevent something like that from happening again?

    Some, but I’m not convinced this sort of thing can actually be prevented to begin with. Seems endemic to capitalism.

    they’re going to get screwed because the system is set up to screw them.

    That might be. But specifically they will get screwed because defined benefit pensions are chronically underfunded. Which is why they’re a bad idea to begin with.

    The reason the wealth gap is burgeoning, is because the .01% that run things want it to, and the people who’re being set up to get screwed again, are being lied to by the people who they’re trusting and paying and exalting to positions of power to look out for their interests- the politicians- are the very people betraying them to their enemies.

    We’re just returning to normal. The 20th century was an unusual and historically unprecedented departure from traditional levels of inequality.

    the problem isn’t the commercial banks. The problem is the investment banks, and what used to be a wall (Glass-Steagall) that separated the investment banks from the Treasury, which is now the henhouse being guarded by the jackal.

    Glass-Steagall separated investment banks from bank deposits, not the Treasury.

    This is completely overblown. Most countries never had this separation, and there were many instances of commercial banks under Glass-Steagall blowing themselves up. A great example was the 1982 Latin American debt crisis.

    A potentially more serious problem with banking is that the end of Glass-Steagall along with the great concentration of the big banks perhaps reduces credit origination to rural areas, small business, etc. I’d want to see empirical research on this before leaping to conclusion of course.

    By the way, note that your post here did not have much to do with inflation at all. :)

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    • Replies: @Anon

    Animals exist to serve us,
     
    now you sound like a Zionist, because that is exactly what they believe about all non-Jews.

    Did you know that? True story, btw.

    as to Animals existing to serve us, I feel that's the same mentality as a 19th century plantation overseer, vis-à-vis his chattel. Or a Sea World or circus type of mentality where animals should be made to humiliate themselves for our amusement. As if they were put here for that purpose.

    I remember being told as a child (growing up in a Christian household) that animals were put here by God for us to use as beasts of burden or food, or both. That was their purpose, and they didn't have souls or anything, so whatever you decided to do to them was always OK. They're just animals after all. Nothing like a feeling, conscious being that actually feels pain or terror or sadness or anything (certainty not love, ha!), so if you're Michael Vick, and you torture the dog to death who just disappointed you in a fight, then what's the big deal?

    Or if you're taste is for dog, and you prefer the bones be broken before it's killed and cooked, because the trauma the dog goes though enhances the flavor of the meat, they why not?! Right?

    It's just a damn animal!

    but Vick didn't invent this charming 'retribution'

    If they hunt poorly, they are tortured as retribution for the shame they reflected upon their owners.

    The reasoning of the galgueros is that by torturing and killing the dogs they wash away the dishonor the dogs displayed that brought shame to their masters. In reality, the practice is simply an exercise in sadism that involves burning the dogs with acid, dragging them behind cars, sacrificing them to fighting dogs, skinning them alive or burying them alive. The most famous torture is called the "piano dance;" this involves hanging the dog by the neck with the feet just touching the ground as it struggles to breathe and slowly is strangled to death by its movements
     
    https://www.thedodo.com/the-pain-in-spain-the-saving-of-the-galgos-1102421730.html

    but this is the shit that pisses me off the most

    http://www.dogingtonpost.com/10000-dogs-tortured-annual-yulin-dog-eating-festival/

    the deliberate, sadistic cruelty of burning and boiling dogs and cats alive, and generally being as cruel to them as these animals on two legs are capable of.

    though they should be treated humanely which is a serious problem. Pigs, dogs, and cats aren’t people and thus are fair game.
     
    personally, I have no problem whatsoever with people eating dogs or cats or even each other if that's what it comes down to, like the tragic Donner party, for instance.

    But cruelty for cruelty's sake always gets my blood up. No matter if it's towards other bipedal animals, or the four legged version.

    The difference between humans and the rest of the animal kingdom is one of degree, not one of kind.

    A chimp feels pain and despair just like you do. It loves its offspring with the same tender devotion that human mothers display. When they're beaten and cry out, it's because they feel the pain, just like you would. And if they're happy or contented, you can see it on their faces, just like with a human.

    the things we 'humane' and 'divine' beings who have 'souls and compassion' and are 'civilized' - do to our fellow creatures

    https://img.rt.com/files/2015.10/article/56129043c361884d468b4584.jpg

    because they're just animals, convinces me that we are a whole hell of a way far off from having evolved from the slime.

    In fact, someone once asked me, 'if we're related to the apes, then were's the missing link?

    well, look in a mirror. Because we're the missing link. And if we ever do evolve into something resembling a creature that a God would be proud of, (if we don't blow the whole place up first) then we'll be a people that recognizes that animals too, also are entitled to dignity and empathy.

    all for now.

    I'll get to the economic later. It's just that animals are an issue that I'm keen on.
    , @Anon

    The SEC was convinced that modern risk models were so sophisticated that there was no longer any need to limit leverage.
     
    wow, everything you're saying is a crock of shit

    you're an apologist for the scum on Wall Street who looted Main Street

    we'll have to get to the bottom of this swamp

    Remember, the big banks had to be bailed out. They lost their shirts.
     
    they "had" to be bailed out because the orgy of fraud blew up in their greedy faces.

    because they were betting on massive margins that were insane, and only worked as long as the Ponzi scheme of graft was in full swing, just like today.

    Just consider the case of Jon Corzine, and how he looted depositor's funds. He wasn't even charged for this fundamental financial crime. The kind of crime that destroys confidence in the system, but because he's connected, they didn't even slap his wrist.

    the whole system is corrupt and rotten from top to bottom, and you'd try to run cover for that lot?!



    Have they instituted hardy reforms to prevent something like that from happening again?
     
    Some, but I’m not convinced this sort of thing can actually be prevented to begin with. Seems endemic to capitalism.
     
    utter bullshit

    just reinstating Glass would be huge. A iron wall between the investment banks and the Treasury.

    (Yes, deposits insured by the Treasury)

    if the scumbags on Wall Street know in no uncertain terms that they are going to be left holding the bag for their casino loses, the culture on Wall Street would change in a New York second.

    And I suspect that you know that. But you're a cheap shill for the corrupt system, huh?

    We’re just returning to normal. The 20th century was an unusual and historically unprecedented departure from traditional levels of inequality.
     
    more bullshit

    A potentially more serious problem with banking is that the end of Glass-Steagall along with the great concentration of the big banks perhaps reduces credit origination to rural areas

     

    yea, I bet

    here ya go...

    https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/jefferson-county-alabama-screwed-by-wall-street-still-paying-20110407
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  202. @Giuseppe

    I was in a Virginia supermarket the other day checking out when the woman behind the cash register in a perky voice asked me “Will you give $5 to support our troops?” I responded “No. Our troops already get way too much of our money.” She replied, “Hee, hee that’s a funny joke” and I said “It’s not a joke.” Her face dropped and she signaled to her boss over in customer service and asked her to take over, saying that I had been rude.
     
    I might be preaching to the choir on this, as they say, but what is being described is known as an embedded donation, or embedded giving. An embedded donation is a donation solicited on behalf of a charity or worthy cause by a retail business. Embedded, because when the donation is supposedly finally made, it consists of many donations from many customers solicited by the business but made in the name of the business. Significantly, embedded donations are subject to none of the regulatory red tape that direct contributions to charities are, and are used by companies such as supermarkets to improve their bottom line. For instance, the Virginia supermarket is not required by law to disclose the dollar amount of charitable embedded contributions it takes in on the behalf of some other charitable cause. Sure, they do appear to end up giving something to the charity, but how much? That's entirely up to the company. The management of a nationwide supermarket chain some years ago refused to reveal what percentage of what they took in was kept back for administrative costs. Their reason? "That is proprietary information." Proprietary information for how much is withheld from donations, proprietary information like the criteria with which a company may evaluate whether or not to expand into a new location? OK. Just so you know, that information that used to be on the internet, investigative reporting in Portland, OR, was since scrubbed clean. So these interests are powerful enough to remove dissenting voices.

    Embedded donations are without question absolutely evil. They give the appearance of a public service, but never, ever succumb to their shame tactics, like, the checker typically asking for a donation in front of all of the customers standing behind you. They are actually required to do that by their management. You can go online and find anonymous complaints by the employees, who incidentally hate being asked to solicit money for these charities. But even lower level management is kept in the dark about these schemes, so it does no good to complain to a manager. So if you are so inclined to support the troops, donate directly to a worthy cause such as Wounded Warrior. They same applies for breast cancer research, and even, at the pet food store, requests for a donation to help adopt pets. Better to just give directly to the Humane Society. It's OK to say no.

    Just so you understand, companies engaged in embedded donations will sometimes get the CEO's of charities to endorse their good work collecting funds from their customers. This is just a fig leaf. Yes, these businesses actually do give money to charities. But from the same funds donated to charity, they keep a lot of money back to improve their bottom line and maybe even give their top level management a nice fat bonus for rallying the troops for charity.

    Always give directly to charities, never donate through supermarkets or pet store chains, etc, etc, unless you want to be in some uncertainty as to what small percentage of your dollar donation will actually make it to the charity in question.

    I didn’t know that, thanks for sharing.

    That’s actually quite clever of the retailers (not saying that it’s good or okay). I assume companies like Wal-Mart donate all (or close enough) of the money to charities as their reputation is worth more, but as you said we have no way of knowing.

    I’ve always objected to the practice simply because ordinary people have trouble resisting this sort of social pressure. I mean you’re not against needy children or whatever, are you?

    I don’t support the objectives of most charities to begin with and have always been comfortable being contrarian, so I’ve never fallen for this. And even if I were interested in donating, why would I make a donation that I can’t itemize on my tax return?

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    • Replies: @Liberty Mike
    Better yet, never, ever, donate to big charity.

    Here, in Massachusetts, one is subjected to an incessant campaign to donate to the Jimmy Fund, a charity which purportedly is devoted to the care / cure of all manner of pediatric cancer and which began in 1953 and is sponsored by the Boston Red Sox.

    To wit, many Dunkin Donuts' franchises will hit you up going through the drive-thru for a donation. No different if you walk in and order. The cashiers are required to ask for the donation at the point of sale. Recently, I met a client and his mother for coffee at a Dunkin Donuts. After the cashier took our order (I picked up the tab), she asked if I would like to donate to the Jimmy Fund, and I responded, "HELL, NO!"

    Same thing at the supermarkets. When there is no person behind me, I will take the time to express my outrage that a business would pimp for the Jimmy Fund. It is an imposition. It demonstrates that the business does not care about its customers.

    I have also encountered this at the movies. Can you imagine?

    Big Charity, particularly the medico-pharmaceutical operations, is a scam.
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  203. Paul C. says:
    @Anonymous
    US is rich and the debt is high. Both can be true at the same time. But taxes are relatively low so if there is a government debt crisis paying down the debt would just involve raising taxes. Just look at GDP per capita US which is very high up there so I don't see how anyone can argue the US is not a very rich country.

    Despite many problems, the US has many advantages like half the world's Ashkenazim who are very good at creating unbeatable new companies. Just look at how the half the 40 riches entrepreneurs under 40 in the US according to Forbes are Jewish. Jews are producing so much innovation in the US that it offsets a lot of the problems like military spending at 4% of GDP and less productive sub-populations.

    The US could be prosperous if not for the parasitic international central bankers who control its currency. This criminal cartel (zionist/jewish) is siphoning the wealth not only of the US but every nation on earth, which is why they’re all in debt. It would defy economics if this were not the case. You would have rich and poor countries, they couldn’t all be insolvent, which is what they are.

    Effectively, we’re all slaves to this illegal cartel. With an unlimited money supply, or should I say currency supply, since it’s not real money, all aspects of society are owned and controlled by them (gov’t, courts, education, etc). Our labor keeps the machine going and we’re forced to pay over 50% in taxes when you add it all up (federal, state, fica, sales) and another sizable % goes to paying interest (mortgage loans etc).

    All 50 states recognize Commercial law (UCC) which is Admiralty law, leaving us without rights. There’s a delicate dance going on to recognize Common law so it’s not obvious to all that we’re slaves to the bankers. The truth is the US is a corporation and all the federal agencies are corporations too.

    We’ve been duped. We need to end the Fed immediately and start a new government of the people.

    The bankers are satanic, they create all wars and are trying to put the final pieces in place (disarm the US through false flags, staged by our gov’t) for the overthrow of the US and likely depopulation, similar to the Bolshevik Revolution. Once the US goes, they’ll have world domination which is what they seek, as outlined in the Protocols of Zion, Morals and Dogma and the Communist Manifesto.

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    • LOL: Thorfinnsson
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson


    The US could be prosperous if not for the parasitic international central bankers who control its currency.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_(PPP)_per_capita#Lists_of_countries_and_dependencies

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_wealth_per_adult

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_financial_assets_per_capita

    By any measure the USA is one of the most prosperous countries in the world.

    This criminal cartel (zionist/jewish) is siphoning the wealth not only of the US but every nation on earth, which is why they’re all in debt.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_international_investment_position#List_of_countries_and_regions_by_net_international_investment_position_in_million_USD_according_to_the_IMF

    Actually we're in debt to foreigners, not the other way around.

    And your language suggests you think debt is something bad.

    You would have rich and poor countries, they couldn’t all be insolvent, which is what they are.
     
    Insolvency does not mean what you think it means.

    Insolvency means being unable to pay money owed. That describes Venezuela, but not America (or most other countries).

    Effectively, we’re all slaves to this illegal cartel. With an unlimited money supply, or should I say currency supply, since it’s not real money
     
    ????????????

    The money supply isn't "unlimited".

    https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/M2

    Currently M2 is about $14 trillion.

    And let me guess--only gold and silver are real money, because God himself commanded us to only use specie coins for payments invented in the 7th century BC by the Kingdom of Lydia. Or something.

    The fact that the US Dollar is legal tender valid for all debts public and private, and that just about everyone in the world happily accepts it, is irrelevant. It's just not real money. Because RON PAUL says so.

    Our labor keeps the machine going and we’re forced to pay over 50% in taxes when you add it all up (federal, state, fica, sales)
     
    https://www.taxpolicycenter.org/briefing-book/how-do-us-taxes-compare-internationally

    Appears to be 26% of GDP. Of course ymmv depending on your income and which state you live in.

    another sizable % goes to paying interest (mortgage loans etc).
     
    Do you think people should lend out money for free? A thirty-year non-recourse mortgage with a 4% interest rate is a pretty damn good deal.

    All 50 states recognize Commercial law (UCC) which is Admiralty law, leaving us without rights. There’s a delicate dance going on to recognize Common law so it’s not obvious to all that we’re slaves to the bankers.
     
    The UCC is an amazing thing. It means I can sue a deadbeat in Louisiana here in Wisconsin, and the judgment will be exported and the Sheriff down in the bayou will head out and seize the deadbeat's property for me.

    We’ve been duped. We need to end the Fed immediately and start a new government of the people.
     
    The last thing we need is a government of "the people", which includes religious fanatics like you.

    The persistent hatred of central banking, fiat money, banks, financial markets, etc. by a dedicated faction of the American population is one of the strangest things about this country.

    You're not even a moron either based on your writing ability. But you're completely wrong and passionately committed to it.
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  204. JackOH says:
    @anarchyst
    Yes, I can elaborate. Those of us who served in Vietnam were subject to a 12 or 13 month "tour of duty" depending on branch of service, and would not be sent back to Vietnam for at least three years, unless one volunteered to return to Vietnam sooner.
    Since the Gulf war, American troops have been deployed on back-to-back "tours of duty" lasting for years, with a 30-day hiatus between deployments. This is destructive to the troops' mental health, much greater than those who deployed to Vietnam. PTSD was known as "shell shock in WW1 and WW2, and was actively discouraged and dismissed as "malingering" during Korea and Vietnam.
    Back-to-back deployments are NEVER a good idea, but are necessary because of manning constraints.

    anarchist, thanks. That does make sense.

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  205. @Mike P
    I consider all of this excellent news. An expensive yet useless American military is the best hope for maintaining world peace.

    Ah is that true? I pray that was said in jest

    “World peace” like the one’s we’ve been witnessing from the last 10 or so years?

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  206. anarchyst says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    I don't dispute the existence of inflation. I dispute the idea, common to hard money cranks, that inflation is much higher than reported. An amusing fact about this is that a Shadow Stats subscription has the same nominal price it did a decade ago.


    That’s one of several that demonstrate you have a bit to learn; if there’s no inflation, then why do property taxes keep rising?
     
    Local government spending is the same share of GDP it was four decades ago. Property taxes rise...as do assessed property values and incomes. There are obviously issues in particular areas where they rise unreasonably as a result of some kind of political mafia taking control of the city, but broadly they rise with the overall economy.

    I agree that they're too high to begin with of course. E.g. my rural community of 8,000 has a professional fire department for some baffling reason, along with dedicated EMTs.


    I’ll agree that when it comes to wages, deflation seems to be the rule despite the fact that when I was a kid, $1.50 an hour was OK, while I don’t think people can do as well with the commonly offered $12.50 an hour nowadays. Hmmm…deflated inflation?
     
    No, this is wage inflation. The trouble for workers is that 40-50 years ago wages stopped inflating faster than prices, which they did during the postwar era.


    No inflation? Let’s talk gasoline prices, or are the higher prices due to some magic fairy dust they lace it with nowadays? Ever do a brake job on a car? Take it from me that even with “ceramics” brakes don’t last any longer or function any better than they did when they cost about 90% less.
     
    Commodities are cyclical. WTI is currently at $70/bbl, wasn't that long ago it was at $26. In real terms gas prices have been much higher many times in the past, even the fairly distant past like 1979.

    I am a track rat and thus have done a lot of brake jobs--generally go through a couple sets of pads in a weekend. Not old so I don't know what brake pads cost in the 80s, but I do know from older track rats that they've improved a lot (the discs not really).

    And it depends on the product you're talking about. Everyone and his dog knows that electronics have gotten cheaper for instance. A lot of other manufactured products haven't necessarily gotten cheaper, but haven't rise much in price.

    Hence why the BLS has its "basket" of goods and services, which is just an idealized average. Everyone has his own personal basket of goods. Since I don't consume healthcare or education I've seen less inflation than other consumers. Maybe even deflation.


    Since you mentioned car prices, you can’t just look at the sticker price and justify the increase tag price on the quality improvement
     
    Perhaps you could, but as noted earlier I'm not disputing overall inflation. It's none the less noteworthy that Ford mid-size sedans have an inflation rate of 2.43% (very close to overall inflation for the period), yet the cars have improved radically (mostly).

    And some inflation is just down to government regulation of course, especially in the case of the auto industry.


    auto manufacturers likely make more money on the financing than on the profit, if any. In other words, all the glitz and glitter and “hedonic adjustments” are essentially “come ons.” Yer not buying a car so much as acquiring debt to look cute ‘n feel good.
     
    I don't see how this is relevant at all. Most consumers can't afford to purchase a new car in cash, and for those of us who can it's a poor use of capital. Lending money to borrowers is a credit risk, and there is the opportunity cost of alternative investments.

    And it's not even true. After 9-11 Detroit decided to implement 0% financing for instance. Obviously not profitable--their cost of finance (whatever commercial paper cost in the 00s) was higher than their interest profit (zero).

    Personally I've never had a car loan in my life incidentally, but I've realized this is unusual.


    It’s long been common knowledge that GMAC was the money maker for GM, which, if I recall was yet another that needed a bailout form the taxpayers.
     
    GMAC no longer exists. It's now Ally Financial, an excellent online-only bank.

    GM makes most of its profits from trucks.

    Rather than "common knowledge" you can have a look at GM's audited financial statements, filed every year with the Securities and Exchange Commission and publicly accessible for free.

    It was once true, now a very long time ago, that most profit came from GMAC. That was an exception in the company's history and basically an artifact of the late 20th century. GM was for instance the first corporation to earn one billion dollars in a single quarter, done in 1966 on the back of a sizzling car lineup with V-8 engines galore and a booming economy with fast rising incomes.


    Anyway, there’s a lot more that could be said, but who cares? Besides, rurik is right and you apparently have a lot to learn, so snap to it and quit trying to baffle us dumb goyim with BS.
     
    You guys both clearly know a lot less than I do on these matters. But you're religious fanatics so it won't sink in.

    GMAC became a “bank” (Ally) right after the “crash” so that it could partake in TARP bailout funds. As an auto finance arm and not a true “bank” it would have been unable to feed at the federal reserve bailout spigot. This was a smart move that allowed GM to profit off the misery of others.

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    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Sure. Point being GMAC no longer exists, which makes Jacques Sheete's claim about auto-financing being GM's main profit center objectively wrong.

    And this is the sort of thing he could've discovered in about one minute.

    But people genuinely prefer being wrong because it validates their deeply held irrational beliefs.

    And I supported the auto bailout then and still do today. The auto industry is the bedrock of America's industrial base. If anything there should be more auto bailouts--the fact that foreign automakers are permitted vast marketshare in America or that Italians are allowed to run Chrysler is obscene.

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  207. @Thorfinnsson
    I didn't know that, thanks for sharing.

    That's actually quite clever of the retailers (not saying that it's good or okay). I assume companies like Wal-Mart donate all (or close enough) of the money to charities as their reputation is worth more, but as you said we have no way of knowing.

    I've always objected to the practice simply because ordinary people have trouble resisting this sort of social pressure. I mean you're not against needy children or whatever, are you?

    I don't support the objectives of most charities to begin with and have always been comfortable being contrarian, so I've never fallen for this. And even if I were interested in donating, why would I make a donation that I can't itemize on my tax return?

    Better yet, never, ever, donate to big charity.

    Here, in Massachusetts, one is subjected to an incessant campaign to donate to the Jimmy Fund, a charity which purportedly is devoted to the care / cure of all manner of pediatric cancer and which began in 1953 and is sponsored by the Boston Red Sox.

    To wit, many Dunkin Donuts’ franchises will hit you up going through the drive-thru for a donation. No different if you walk in and order. The cashiers are required to ask for the donation at the point of sale. Recently, I met a client and his mother for coffee at a Dunkin Donuts. After the cashier took our order (I picked up the tab), she asked if I would like to donate to the Jimmy Fund, and I responded, “HELL, NO!”

    Same thing at the supermarkets. When there is no person behind me, I will take the time to express my outrage that a business would pimp for the Jimmy Fund. It is an imposition. It demonstrates that the business does not care about its customers.

    I have also encountered this at the movies. Can you imagine?

    Big Charity, particularly the medico-pharmaceutical operations, is a scam.

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  208. Anon[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @ChuckOrloski
    Got it, Brother Rurik.

    Mohammedans say "Allah Akbar," and based upon your great picture-post of the smiling Mnuchin & Mrs. Kushner @ al Quds, I am compelled to add..., so is "Rurik of U.R.abia" great.

    you’re too kind Brother Chuck,

    Peace.

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  209. @Paul C.
    The US could be prosperous if not for the parasitic international central bankers who control its currency. This criminal cartel (zionist/jewish) is siphoning the wealth not only of the US but every nation on earth, which is why they're all in debt. It would defy economics if this were not the case. You would have rich and poor countries, they couldn't all be insolvent, which is what they are.

    Effectively, we're all slaves to this illegal cartel. With an unlimited money supply, or should I say currency supply, since it's not real money, all aspects of society are owned and controlled by them (gov't, courts, education, etc). Our labor keeps the machine going and we're forced to pay over 50% in taxes when you add it all up (federal, state, fica, sales) and another sizable % goes to paying interest (mortgage loans etc).

    All 50 states recognize Commercial law (UCC) which is Admiralty law, leaving us without rights. There's a delicate dance going on to recognize Common law so it's not obvious to all that we're slaves to the bankers. The truth is the US is a corporation and all the federal agencies are corporations too.

    We've been duped. We need to end the Fed immediately and start a new government of the people.

    The bankers are satanic, they create all wars and are trying to put the final pieces in place (disarm the US through false flags, staged by our gov't) for the overthrow of the US and likely depopulation, similar to the Bolshevik Revolution. Once the US goes, they'll have world domination which is what they seek, as outlined in the Protocols of Zion, Morals and Dogma and the Communist Manifesto.

    The US could be prosperous if not for the parasitic international central bankers who control its currency.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_(PPP)_per_capita#Lists_of_countries_and_dependencies

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_wealth_per_adult

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_financial_assets_per_capita

    By any measure the USA is one of the most prosperous countries in the world.

    This criminal cartel (zionist/jewish) is siphoning the wealth not only of the US but every nation on earth, which is why they’re all in debt.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_international_investment_position#List_of_countries_and_regions_by_net_international_investment_position_in_million_USD_according_to_the_IMF

    Actually we’re in debt to foreigners, not the other way around.

    And your language suggests you think debt is something bad.

    You would have rich and poor countries, they couldn’t all be insolvent, which is what they are.

    Insolvency does not mean what you think it means.

    Insolvency means being unable to pay money owed. That describes Venezuela, but not America (or most other countries).

    Effectively, we’re all slaves to this illegal cartel. With an unlimited money supply, or should I say currency supply, since it’s not real money

    ????????????

    The money supply isn’t “unlimited”.

    https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/M2

    Currently M2 is about $14 trillion.

    And let me guess–only gold and silver are real money, because God himself commanded us to only use specie coins for payments invented in the 7th century BC by the Kingdom of Lydia. Or something.

    The fact that the US Dollar is legal tender valid for all debts public and private, and that just about everyone in the world happily accepts it, is irrelevant. It’s just not real money. Because RON PAUL says so.

    Our labor keeps the machine going and we’re forced to pay over 50% in taxes when you add it all up (federal, state, fica, sales)

    https://www.taxpolicycenter.org/briefing-book/how-do-us-taxes-compare-internationally

    Appears to be 26% of GDP. Of course ymmv depending on your income and which state you live in.

    another sizable % goes to paying interest (mortgage loans etc).

    Do you think people should lend out money for free? A thirty-year non-recourse mortgage with a 4% interest rate is a pretty damn good deal.

    All 50 states recognize Commercial law (UCC) which is Admiralty law, leaving us without rights. There’s a delicate dance going on to recognize Common law so it’s not obvious to all that we’re slaves to the bankers.

    The UCC is an amazing thing. It means I can sue a deadbeat in Louisiana here in Wisconsin, and the judgment will be exported and the Sheriff down in the bayou will head out and seize the deadbeat’s property for me.

    We’ve been duped. We need to end the Fed immediately and start a new government of the people.

    The last thing we need is a government of “the people”, which includes religious fanatics like you.

    The persistent hatred of central banking, fiat money, banks, financial markets, etc. by a dedicated faction of the American population is one of the strangest things about this country.

    You’re not even a moron either based on your writing ability. But you’re completely wrong and passionately committed to it.

    Read More
    • Troll: Stonehands
    • Replies: @Paul C.

    By any measure the USA is one of the most prosperous countries in the world.
     
    $21T in debt is prosperous? Can you name one nation that is not in debt? Why are they all in debt if they're creditor nations? A topic for another time is that this debt is bogus.

    Do you understand that the Federal Reserve is a private bank? What families control the Federal Reserve and what are their countries of origin?

    Do you realize there's a private central bank in every nation? If you disagree, cite one nation that does not have a private central bank.

    The criminal banking cartel has every nation in a vise.

    The money supply isn’t “unlimited”. Currently M2 is about $14 trillion.
     
    The money supply is whatever the Federal Reserve bankers deem it to be. Since the Fed has not been audited, we have no insight into this criminal enterprise.

    Do you think people should lend out money for free? A thirty-year non-recourse mortgage with a 4% interest rate is a pretty damn good deal.
     
    Why do we need a private bank? Imagine if the interest income went to the US Treasury, we wouldn't need an income tax. It's no coincidence the IRS was introduced at the same time the Federal Reserve was established in 1913.

    The last thing we need is a government of “the people”, which includes religious fanatics like you.
     
    The parasitic, satanic, zionist, criminal banking cartel's religion is that of the Talmud. Other evidence of their "character" is documented in the Protocols of Zion, Morals and Dogma and the Communist Manifesto, most of the 10 planks have already been established in the US.

    You're okay with these religious fanatics controlling over us, censoring speech and criticism of Israel and in general the hate speech their doctrines exude, but a government that serves the wishes of "the people" is something you take issue with?
    , @Rurik

    The persistent hatred of central banking, fiat money, banks, financial markets, etc. by a dedicated faction of the American population is one of the strangest things about this country.
     
    what's strange is that they're not hanging from lampposts

    here a nice tidbit that's all over the news right now

    Almost Half Of US Families Can’t Afford Basics Like Rent And Food

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/local/almost-half-of-us-families-can-e2-80-99t-afford-basics-like-rent-and-food/ar-AAxqntR?OCID=ansmsnnews11

    All told, the 0.1 percent now owns about as much wealth as the bottom 90 percent of America combined. And that’s just the official numbers. Plenty of their wealth is parked overseas and in places where it’s hard to get an accurate count of what they’ve accumulated.

    https://www.salon.com/2016/04/14/the_1_percent_are_the_real_villains_what_americans_dont_understand_about_income_inequality_partner/


    As you move on up the 0.1 percent ladder, you get folks like Steve Cohen, the hedge fund billionaire who bought a 14-foot shark in formaldehyde for his office, as if to signal his shady business practices (his previous firm, SAC Capital, was shut down by the feds for insider trading). Cohen doesn’t have just one mansion, he has lots of them. His $23 million principal home is in Greenwich, Connecticut, featuring an indoor basketball court, a glass-enclosed pool, a 6,700-square-foot ice skating rink with a Zamboni machine that smoothes the ice, a golf course and a private art museum. He also has five other homes just in the New York area alone.

    People like Cohen are a big part of the undue concentration of wealth at the expense of workers and communities—they create little of value for society and siphon off funds for our schools and infrastructure with tax loopholes allowed by bought politicians, like the notorious “carried interest” loophole. You also get bankers CEOs like Jamie Dimon of JPMorgan Chase and corporate chieftains paid stratospheric salaries even while driving their companies into the ground, like erstwhile GOP presidential hopeful Carly Fiorina, formerly of Hewlett Packard.
     


    It used to be that these gazillionaires would make their donations and then simply pick up the phone and tell Congress what they wanted done—as Jamie Dimon did when he and other bankers wanted a key part of Dodd-Frank to be rolled back in 2014. They tend to get what they want (Dimon did), and above all, what they want is not to pay taxes or have their activities regulated.
     
    all we need to remember is that one man's debt is another man's asset'

    so it may seem like a zero sum game, where the .01% collude to buy Senators and presidents, who do their bidding in all things, like war and granting them subsidies.


    Hey, remember that company that essentially caused the whole recession a few years ago and then managed to get billions in bailout money from the federal government because the U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve were both stacked with the company's former CEOs and high-level employees? Well, just so you know, they also do pretty well in the subsidies department. Goldman Sachs has raked in over $660 million, mostly from their home state of New York, but with some help from New Jersey, Utah and Michigan as well. Hooray!
     
    https://mic.com/articles/85101/10-corporations-receiving-massive-public-subsidies-from-taxpayers#.yDp5Lb5iP

    but just because Main Street is starving is no reason to pooh-pooh subsidies to Goldman Sachs after all, one man's debt is another man's asset!

    , @Stonehands
    The precedent has been set for bail- ins in the future, as well as a cashless society so the herd can be more effectively fleeced via negative interest rates.
    This is the credo you defend and advocate, because your conscience has been seared and God has given you over to a reprobate mind.

    So you can make another buck.

    At the expense of the working class, while you Wall ST yehudis “socialize” losses from YOUR idiot tranches of fraudulent mortagages.
    , @jacques sheete
    Hint to Pollyanna...quoting WIkipedia on topics like this will tells us all we need to know about your credibility, knowledge and intelligence.

    It's on the same level as promoting Krugman or any other paid mouthpiece as an authority on anything.
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  210. @anarchyst
    GMAC became a "bank" (Ally) right after the "crash" so that it could partake in TARP bailout funds. As an auto finance arm and not a true "bank" it would have been unable to feed at the federal reserve bailout spigot. This was a smart move that allowed GM to profit off the misery of others.

    Sure. Point being GMAC no longer exists, which makes Jacques Sheete’s claim about auto-financing being GM’s main profit center objectively wrong.

    And this is the sort of thing he could’ve discovered in about one minute.

    But people genuinely prefer being wrong because it validates their deeply held irrational beliefs.

    And I supported the auto bailout then and still do today. The auto industry is the bedrock of America’s industrial base. If anything there should be more auto bailouts–the fact that foreign automakers are permitted vast marketshare in America or that Italians are allowed to run Chrysler is obscene.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hibernian
    I think they created a new auto finance subsidiary when they spun off Ally.
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  211. Anon[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    I don't dispute the existence of inflation. I dispute the idea, common to hard money cranks, that inflation is much higher than reported. An amusing fact about this is that a Shadow Stats subscription has the same nominal price it did a decade ago.


    That’s one of several that demonstrate you have a bit to learn; if there’s no inflation, then why do property taxes keep rising?
     
    Local government spending is the same share of GDP it was four decades ago. Property taxes rise...as do assessed property values and incomes. There are obviously issues in particular areas where they rise unreasonably as a result of some kind of political mafia taking control of the city, but broadly they rise with the overall economy.

    I agree that they're too high to begin with of course. E.g. my rural community of 8,000 has a professional fire department for some baffling reason, along with dedicated EMTs.


    I’ll agree that when it comes to wages, deflation seems to be the rule despite the fact that when I was a kid, $1.50 an hour was OK, while I don’t think people can do as well with the commonly offered $12.50 an hour nowadays. Hmmm…deflated inflation?
     
    No, this is wage inflation. The trouble for workers is that 40-50 years ago wages stopped inflating faster than prices, which they did during the postwar era.


    No inflation? Let’s talk gasoline prices, or are the higher prices due to some magic fairy dust they lace it with nowadays? Ever do a brake job on a car? Take it from me that even with “ceramics” brakes don’t last any longer or function any better than they did when they cost about 90% less.
     
    Commodities are cyclical. WTI is currently at $70/bbl, wasn't that long ago it was at $26. In real terms gas prices have been much higher many times in the past, even the fairly distant past like 1979.

    I am a track rat and thus have done a lot of brake jobs--generally go through a couple sets of pads in a weekend. Not old so I don't know what brake pads cost in the 80s, but I do know from older track rats that they've improved a lot (the discs not really).

    And it depends on the product you're talking about. Everyone and his dog knows that electronics have gotten cheaper for instance. A lot of other manufactured products haven't necessarily gotten cheaper, but haven't rise much in price.

    Hence why the BLS has its "basket" of goods and services, which is just an idealized average. Everyone has his own personal basket of goods. Since I don't consume healthcare or education I've seen less inflation than other consumers. Maybe even deflation.


    Since you mentioned car prices, you can’t just look at the sticker price and justify the increase tag price on the quality improvement
     
    Perhaps you could, but as noted earlier I'm not disputing overall inflation. It's none the less noteworthy that Ford mid-size sedans have an inflation rate of 2.43% (very close to overall inflation for the period), yet the cars have improved radically (mostly).

    And some inflation is just down to government regulation of course, especially in the case of the auto industry.


    auto manufacturers likely make more money on the financing than on the profit, if any. In other words, all the glitz and glitter and “hedonic adjustments” are essentially “come ons.” Yer not buying a car so much as acquiring debt to look cute ‘n feel good.
     
    I don't see how this is relevant at all. Most consumers can't afford to purchase a new car in cash, and for those of us who can it's a poor use of capital. Lending money to borrowers is a credit risk, and there is the opportunity cost of alternative investments.

    And it's not even true. After 9-11 Detroit decided to implement 0% financing for instance. Obviously not profitable--their cost of finance (whatever commercial paper cost in the 00s) was higher than their interest profit (zero).

    Personally I've never had a car loan in my life incidentally, but I've realized this is unusual.


    It’s long been common knowledge that GMAC was the money maker for GM, which, if I recall was yet another that needed a bailout form the taxpayers.
     
    GMAC no longer exists. It's now Ally Financial, an excellent online-only bank.

    GM makes most of its profits from trucks.

    Rather than "common knowledge" you can have a look at GM's audited financial statements, filed every year with the Securities and Exchange Commission and publicly accessible for free.

    It was once true, now a very long time ago, that most profit came from GMAC. That was an exception in the company's history and basically an artifact of the late 20th century. GM was for instance the first corporation to earn one billion dollars in a single quarter, done in 1966 on the back of a sizzling car lineup with V-8 engines galore and a booming economy with fast rising incomes.


    Anyway, there’s a lot more that could be said, but who cares? Besides, rurik is right and you apparently have a lot to learn, so snap to it and quit trying to baffle us dumb goyim with BS.
     
    You guys both clearly know a lot less than I do on these matters. But you're religious fanatics so it won't sink in.

    I don’t dispute the existence of inflation. I dispute the idea, common to hard money cranks,

    a great way to think about inflation, is to consider the value of the US dollar for the first hundred or so years of its use. When it was being coined by congress and tied to gold. It basically kept its value for over a hundred years, and you would pay about the same for a quart of milk or pound of coffee, from 1792, to 1913.

    here’s a nice chart that shows an indication of inflation following the treason of the Fed, and then subsequent treason of FDR and then Nixon taking us off the gold standard.

    https://economics-charts.com/cpi/cpi-1800-2005.html

    since the Satanic perfidy of the Fed, (the very evil the founding fathers fought the revolution to prevent, and which Andrew Jackson heroically resisted, to the point of an assassination attempt) Americans purchasing power, which remained virtually unchanged for a hundred or so years before the Fed, has been reduced to app. 2% of the purchasing power the dollar had in 1913. This inflation is due to the international banksters, who own and control the Fed (class A stock holders), ‘printing’ trillions upon trillions of Federal Reserve Notes and loaning them out, (at interest) to their fellow bankster around the world and to the US Treasury. Where now we have to borrow our own money (at interest) from the greediest and most demonic scum on the planet. Rothschild and his cabal.

    And it is because of this biblical level of treachery, that has doomed the planet to serial wars for Israel, ever since.

    Please keep in mind, that America’s entry into WWI was a contrived scheme by Zionists, both in England, with the Balfour Declaration, and in Wilson’s administration, with ((Louis Brandeis and Colonel House)) in the Wilson regime, to betray, destroy and enslave Germany.

    Wilson also funded and facilitated Trotsky to enslave Russia to genocidal Bolshevism.

    He’s often lauded as one of America’s greatest presidents, by the ((PTB)) today, but I’d say he was spectacularly the very worst president bar none. And by his treachery and treason, has doomed the planet to enslavement by the banksters. with their Eternal Wars, and Total surveillance, and burgeoning Orwellian police state, for which there seems to be no redress.

    more here:

    https://libertyinternational.wordpress.com/2013/12/23/federal-reserve-100-years-of-us-dollar/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    According to you hard money cranks the most important thing in the world is that a gallon of milk has the same nominal price a century from now.

    That way, when your skeleton is reaniminated and crawls out the ground, you'll be able to head down to the store and buy a gallon of milk with a two Dollar bill.

    This is just crazy. Moderate inflation is not a problem at all for just about anyone, unless your investing strategy is to stuff your mattress full of hundred Dollar bills.

    The end of the gold standard has led to just about zero negative consequences, whereas the gold standard itself had many negative features.

    And you're not just crazy about money. You guys have some weird hatred of interest, and somehow our financial system has something to do with Zionism. Ooooookay...

    Not that I'm a fan of Wilson either. Logically we should've either stayed neutral, or joined the Central Powers. Joining the Central Powers would've allowed us to annex Canada, Bermuda, the British and French West Indies, and perhaps other territories as well.
    , @ChuckOrloski
    Anon # 290 profoundly wrote:
    "since the Satanic perfidy of the Fed, (the very evil the founding fathers fought the revolution to prevent, and which Andrew Jackson heroically resisted, to the point of an assassination attempt) Americans purchasing power, which remained virtually unchanged for a hundred or so years before the Fed, has been reduced to app. 2% of the purchasing power the dollar had in 1913."

    Amen, Brother # 290!

    Thanks very much for the education.
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  212. @Anon

    I don’t dispute the existence of inflation. I dispute the idea, common to hard money cranks,
     
    a great way to think about inflation, is to consider the value of the US dollar for the first hundred or so years of its use. When it was being coined by congress and tied to gold. It basically kept its value for over a hundred years, and you would pay about the same for a quart of milk or pound of coffee, from 1792, to 1913.

    here's a nice chart that shows an indication of inflation following the treason of the Fed, and then subsequent treason of FDR and then Nixon taking us off the gold standard.

    https://economics-charts.com/images/cpi-1800-2005.png

    https://economics-charts.com/cpi/cpi-1800-2005.html

    since the Satanic perfidy of the Fed, (the very evil the founding fathers fought the revolution to prevent, and which Andrew Jackson heroically resisted, to the point of an assassination attempt) Americans purchasing power, which remained virtually unchanged for a hundred or so years before the Fed, has been reduced to app. 2% of the purchasing power the dollar had in 1913. This inflation is due to the international banksters, who own and control the Fed (class A stock holders), 'printing' trillions upon trillions of Federal Reserve Notes and loaning them out, (at interest) to their fellow bankster around the world and to the US Treasury. Where now we have to borrow our own money (at interest) from the greediest and most demonic scum on the planet. Rothschild and his cabal.

    And it is because of this biblical level of treachery, that has doomed the planet to serial wars for Israel, ever since.

    Please keep in mind, that America's entry into WWI was a contrived scheme by Zionists, both in England, with the Balfour Declaration, and in Wilson's administration, with ((Louis Brandeis and Colonel House)) in the Wilson regime, to betray, destroy and enslave Germany.

    Wilson also funded and facilitated Trotsky to enslave Russia to genocidal Bolshevism.

    He's often lauded as one of America's greatest presidents, by the ((PTB)) today, but I'd say he was spectacularly the very worst president bar none. And by his treachery and treason, has doomed the planet to enslavement by the banksters. with their Eternal Wars, and Total surveillance, and burgeoning Orwellian police state, for which there seems to be no redress.

    more here:

    https://libertyinternational.wordpress.com/2013/12/23/federal-reserve-100-years-of-us-dollar/

    According to you hard money cranks the most important thing in the world is that a gallon of milk has the same nominal price a century from now.

    That way, when your skeleton is reaniminated and crawls out the ground, you’ll be able to head down to the store and buy a gallon of milk with a two Dollar bill.

    This is just crazy. Moderate inflation is not a problem at all for just about anyone, unless your investing strategy is to stuff your mattress full of hundred Dollar bills.

    The end of the gold standard has led to just about zero negative consequences, whereas the gold standard itself had many negative features.

    And you’re not just crazy about money. You guys have some weird hatred of interest, and somehow our financial system has something to do with Zionism. Ooooookay…

    Not that I’m a fan of Wilson either. Logically we should’ve either stayed neutral, or joined the Central Powers. Joining the Central Powers would’ve allowed us to annex Canada, Bermuda, the British and French West Indies, and perhaps other territories as well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon

    According to you hard money cranks the most important thing in the world is that a gallon of milk has the same nominal price a century from now.
     
    no, (shithead)

    the most important thing is not to be forced to use fiat money, created out of thin air, by scumbag bankers- who loot the value of your savings by inflating the money supply and driving down the value of your savings. But most of all, who use the power to create infinite supplies of money to corrupt our governments and institutions. Duh.

    Moderate inflation is not a problem at all for just about anyone, unless your investing strategy is to stuff your mattress full of hundred Dollar bills.
     
    not when they should be gambling in your rigged casino, huh?

    The end of the gold standard has led to just about zero negative consequences, whereas the gold standard itself had many negative features.
     
    this is of course true if you're a Rothschild or Lloyd Blankfien. Not so much if your son just got killed fighting in a contrived war for the fun and profit of Zionists.

    and somehow our financial system has something to do with Zionism. Ooooookay…
     
    you just outed yourself as a pathetic zio-troll

    well done ;)
    , @Sam Shama
    Oh Dear G'd how did I miss this exchange until now?!!!!

    Thorfinsson, I offer my most delighted congratulations to you. I have in the past attempted to discuss the very same items with Rurik, Jacques Sheete, CanSpeccy, amongst others, and failed to penetrate the Luddite barrier.

    You'll notice how the rambling posts [particularly from Rurik] will move away from the objective points when cornered. For instance on the subjects of Inflation and Debt. Jacques Sheete, of course, resorts to tinny laughter and repetition, as if, like phlogiston alchemy, tinny laughs will convert his nonsense to something resembling value!

    My most favourite extract from your posts has to be this one:


    According to you hard money cranks the most important thing in the world is that a gallon of milk has the same nominal price a century from now.

    That way, when your skeleton is reanimated and crawls out the ground, you’ll be able to head down to the store and buy a gallon of milk with a two Dollar bill.
     

    Hahahahahahaha. May I use it?

    It does get the point across to these estimable gents far more effectively than a chart of the real per capita gross domestic product as a means to show that while the price of milk has gone from whatever it was in the past to what it is now, real income has more than bested those price rises. Not to mention how the prices of more salient items today, e.g DRAM prices have steadily declined.

    P.S.
    Rurik, Sheete, I must congratulate the two of you though. There is a certain canine determination about your attitudes. Never let go of the useless bone. :-)


    [https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/A939RX0Q048SBEA]

    , @Rurik

    somehow our financial system has something to do with Zionism. Ooooookay…
     
    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-vwytT8eRxEo/WvZU02nTytI/AAAAAAAC84s/hhEQ376XIQEXmdDf09HOHnJYi9E6OzjZwCLcBGAs/s640/JEWS%2B%252816%2529.jpg
    , @jacques sheete

    This is just crazy. Moderate inflation is not a problem at all for just about anyone, unless your investing strategy is to stuff your mattress full of hundred Dollar bills.
     
    Ahhh, there may indeed be a G-d!

    I was about to introduce the topic about inflation and it's effect on savers. So maybe you fiat money Pollyannas would care to elaborate?
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  213. Anon[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson


    you’re admitting to that?!

    To watch what with exactly. Maybe programming is better in your area.
     
    It's the best display in its size class you can buy according to Consumer Reports, why deny buying a great product?

    I purchased it for use in our engineering lab, mainly for engineering's kanban board.


    we buy only ‘pasture raised’ eggs. My gal thinks eating eggs from healthy chickens, who’re ‘happy’ will result in better quality eggs, but for me, I spend the extra money (about $6+ per dozen) for moral reasons. Which is same reason I don’t eat ham or bacon or dogs or cats.

    Not that I judge other people who do, (except when they torture the animals before they kill them, because the meat taste better that way. In which case I’d like to feed such humans to the pigs that I don’t eat).
     
    And what is the rate of inflation on pastured eggs? I have no idea. One of my employees gives me pastured eggs on occasion.

    Your gal is right with respect to nutrition (but it's a lot more minor than the gap with chicken meat), though Serious Eats was unable to detect a taste difference in a double blind study. Pastured eggs do look a lot better in the pan.

    Animals exist to serve us, though they should be treated humanely which is a serious problem. Pigs, dogs, and cats aren't people and thus are fair game. And honestly I'd probably eat a human if presented with the option, just out of curiosity. Not going to claim cannibalism is moral of course.


    the whole rotten and corrupt den on snakes on Wall Street profited massively during the orgy of fraud and theft. Countywide, Shittybank, Goldman Sachs, and all the rest of the thieving scoundrels.
     
    Countrywide profited so much it went bankrupt.

    CitiBank and Goldman Sachs profited so much they had to beg the government (and Buffet in Goldman's case) for help.


    They killed Glass so they could loot the Treasury, and loot the Treasury they did.
     
    Germany and Canada have never had a separation between commercial and investment banking. In fact very few countries other than America did.

    The Treasury didn't get looted and in fact made a profit on TARP (though it was still inappropriate--the stockholders should've gotten wiped out).


    It was a feeding frenzy, with synthetic ‘credit default swaps’, and ‘collateralized debt obligations’ and collateralized derivatives with sub-prime liar loans, and Freddy and Fanny to cover the tracks.
     
    People who bought credit default swaps got rich.

    People who bought CDOs got hosed.

    And sure, issuers of both earned commissions.

    What's your point?


    With the SEC carefully looking the other way, hoping to get a gig with Goldilocks making thirty times what they made as regulators.
     
    The same stability and good times which induce financiers to take risks also leads to deregulating politicians and regulators, even if there is of course a conflict of interest and even corruption at work. The SEC was convinced that modern risk models were so sophisticated that there was no longer any need to limit leverage.

    Greed, and avarice like never seen before. That’s who made the money. All of those rats and swindlers at the big investment banks.
     
    More like greed and avarice like have been seen...many times before. Remember the dot com bubble?

    And no, the people who made the money were the contrarian bears. Who were widely denounced as crazy lunatics deep into 2007 and even 2008 by everyone else on Wall Street.

    Remember, the big banks had to be bailed out. They lost their shirts.

    and when it all imploded, as it must surely do so again, the big boyz got out first. And then the taxpayer was slated to cover the loses. Just as Robert Rubin, the Dr. Frankenstein of Wall Street/Treasury/Fed corruption and collusion (with his Igor; Lawrence Summers)- planned.
     
    The Treasury made a profit on TARP. So the taxpayer in fact lost nothing from the bailout, which was wrong for other reasons.

    QE baby! Up the ying and out the yang.

    An orgy of ‘printing’, until the music stops, and only the same people who knew it was coming in 08, will know when it comes this time around. And trillions of dollars of “wealth” will be disappeared over night. There goes your pension.
    QE ended in 2014. Stock market kept surging until this year. Stock prices have grown broadly in line with increased earnings per share and dividends, with some valuation expansion. The stock market grows 80% of the time and has a real CAGR of 8.6% going back to 1871. Quite a lot of financial crises during that time, including many far worse than what happened in 07-08.


    Remember the ratings agencies?

    you know what the ratings agencies remind me of, recently it was revealed that Experian sold, er, I mean lost millions of people’s data. Now they’re on the television running ads for protecting people’s data. I shit you not. You can call them and pay them to “protect” your data from the “dark web’. Wow.

    And the ratings agencies? Yep, they’re still in business. Holy moly.
    Who cares? Bonds are for losers. People who buy them are complete dopes.

    And yes, conflict of interest is at the heart of the business model of the ratings agencies.

    I bet!

    buy a commodity ETF today, and watch as the price is manipulated with the aplomb of a pick pocket. Just hit a few keys on the Fed’s computer, and voila! Silver trades at curious lows, while demand is higher than ever.
     
    Maybe stop speculating in commodities and just sign up with WealthFront or Betterment.


    it’s a shell game, and its rigged. Works well as long as you’re playing it safe, but then weren’t AAA rated funds eviscerated, (along with people’s pensions) following the 08 crash?
     
    Yes, and people who bought those were morons anyway. I was in my early 20s at the time, and it was extremely obvious to me that the housing bubble was crazy.

    And as I noted earlier, bonds are for losers.

    If you played it safe by instead buying shares in, say, Berkshire Hathaway, there was no problem. Unless you HAD to retire in exactly 2009 or something.

    Have they instituted hardy reforms to prevent something like that from happening again?
     
    Some, but I'm not convinced this sort of thing can actually be prevented to begin with. Seems endemic to capitalism.


    they’re going to get screwed because the system is set up to screw them.
     
    That might be. But specifically they will get screwed because defined benefit pensions are chronically underfunded. Which is why they're a bad idea to begin with.


    The reason the wealth gap is burgeoning, is because the .01% that run things want it to, and the people who’re being set up to get screwed again, are being lied to by the people who they’re trusting and paying and exalting to positions of power to look out for their interests- the politicians- are the very people betraying them to their enemies.
     
    We're just returning to normal. The 20th century was an unusual and historically unprecedented departure from traditional levels of inequality.


    the problem isn’t the commercial banks. The problem is the investment banks, and what used to be a wall (Glass-Steagall) that separated the investment banks from the Treasury, which is now the henhouse being guarded by the jackal.
     
    Glass-Steagall separated investment banks from bank deposits, not the Treasury.

    This is completely overblown. Most countries never had this separation, and there were many instances of commercial banks under Glass-Steagall blowing themselves up. A great example was the 1982 Latin American debt crisis.

    A potentially more serious problem with banking is that the end of Glass-Steagall along with the great concentration of the big banks perhaps reduces credit origination to rural areas, small business, etc. I'd want to see empirical research on this before leaping to conclusion of course.

    By the way, note that your post here did not have much to do with inflation at all. :)
     

     

    Animals exist to serve us,

    now you sound like a Zionist, because that is exactly what they believe about all non-Jews.

    Did you know that? True story, btw.

    as to Animals existing to serve us, I feel that’s the same mentality as a 19th century plantation overseer, vis-à-vis his chattel. Or a Sea World or circus type of mentality where animals should be made to humiliate themselves for our amusement. As if they were put here for that purpose.

    I remember being told as a child (growing up in a Christian household) that animals were put here by God for us to use as beasts of burden or food, or both. That was their purpose, and they didn’t have souls or anything, so whatever you decided to do to them was always OK. They’re just animals after all. Nothing like a feeling, conscious being that actually feels pain or terror or sadness or anything (certainty not love, ha!), so if you’re Michael Vick, and you torture the dog to death who just disappointed you in a fight, then what’s the big deal?

    Or if you’re taste is for dog, and you prefer the bones be broken before it’s killed and cooked, because the trauma the dog goes though enhances the flavor of the meat, they why not?! Right?

    It’s just a damn animal!

    but Vick didn’t invent this charming ‘retribution’

    If they hunt poorly, they are tortured as retribution for the shame they reflected upon their owners.

    The reasoning of the galgueros is that by torturing and killing the dogs they wash away the dishonor the dogs displayed that brought shame to their masters. In reality, the practice is simply an exercise in sadism that involves burning the dogs with acid, dragging them behind cars, sacrificing them to fighting dogs, skinning them alive or burying them alive. The most famous torture is called the “piano dance;” this involves hanging the dog by the neck with the feet just touching the ground as it struggles to breathe and slowly is strangled to death by its movements

    https://www.thedodo.com/the-pain-in-spain-the-saving-of-the-galgos-1102421730.html

    but this is the shit that pisses me off the most

    http://www.dogingtonpost.com/10000-dogs-tortured-annual-yulin-dog-eating-festival/

    the deliberate, sadistic cruelty of burning and boiling dogs and cats alive, and generally being as cruel to them as these animals on two legs are capable of.

    though they should be treated humanely which is a serious problem. Pigs, dogs, and cats aren’t people and thus are fair game.

    personally, I have no problem whatsoever with people eating dogs or cats or even each other if that’s what it comes down to, like the tragic Donner party, for instance.

    But cruelty for cruelty’s sake always gets my blood up. No matter if it’s towards other bipedal animals, or the four legged version.

    The difference between humans and the rest of the animal kingdom is one of degree, not one of kind.

    A chimp feels pain and despair just like you do. It loves its offspring with the same tender devotion that human mothers display. When they’re beaten and cry out, it’s because they feel the pain, just like you would. And if they’re happy or contented, you can see it on their faces, just like with a human.

    the things we ‘humane’ and ‘divine’ beings who have ‘souls and compassion’ and are ‘civilized’ – do to our fellow creatures

    because they’re just animals, convinces me that we are a whole hell of a way far off from having evolved from the slime.

    In fact, someone once asked me, ‘if we’re related to the apes, then were’s the missing link?

    well, look in a mirror. Because we’re the missing link. And if we ever do evolve into something resembling a creature that a God would be proud of, (if we don’t blow the whole place up first) then we’ll be a people that recognizes that animals too, also are entitled to dignity and empathy.

    all for now.

    I’ll get to the economic later. It’s just that animals are an issue that I’m keen on.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson


    now you sound like a Zionist, because that is exactly what they believe about all non-Jews.

    Did you know that? True story, btw.
     
    I'd say this has worked out well for the Jews in general. They've been around for thousands of years and have achieved high levels of success, wealth, and power.


    as to Animals existing to serve us, I feel that’s the same mentality as a 19th century plantation overseer, vis-à-vis his chattel.
     
    Most people freely enslave themselves. I don't see what the big deal is.

    And we're talking about blacks here, who are completely useless for any purpose unless enslaved.


    Or a Sea World or circus type of mentality where animals should be made to humiliate themselves for our amusement. As if they were put here for that purpose.

    I remember being told as a child (growing up in a Christian household) that animals were put here by God for us to use as beasts of burden or food, or both. That was their purpose, and they didn’t have souls or anything, so whatever you decided to do to them was always OK. They’re just animals after all.
     
    This is a useful belief that facilitates the efficient exploitation of animals. Animals provide us with important nutrition, products, and labor.


    Nothing like a feeling, conscious being that actually feels pain or terror or sadness or anything (certainty not love, ha!), so if you’re Michael Vick, and you torture the dog to death who just disappointed you in a fight, then what’s the big deal?

    Or if you’re taste is for dog, and you prefer the bones be broken before it’s killed and cooked, because the trauma the dog goes though enhances the flavor of the meat, they why not?! Right?

    It’s just a damn animal!
     
    Look, I happen to be a dog lover and do not approve of cruelty to animals. But I promote self-interest over feelings. We empathize with mammals because they are very similar to us.

    I read some sad stuff about how dachshunds suffered during the world wars as a result of anti-German sentiment. As if dachshunds were to blame for the German army.

    http://dachshundlove.blogspot.com/2008/03/dachshunds-in-history-mimi-most.html
    http://www.easypetmd.com/doginfo/anti-dachshund-propaganda

    None the less as the world's apex carnivore predator and #1 engineering species the entire ecosystem is our domain.

    As for the rest of your stuff, cruelty for cruelty's sake is disgusting. And tolerating animal cruelty likely has negative consequences beyond simply the emotional distress we feel when we see animals abused.

    But I won't be shaken from my view that animals exist to serve us and that vegans and vegetarians are our enemies and must be destroyed.
    , @anarchyst
    I agree with you that torturing animals to enhance "flavor" and other "practices" that extend the suffering of animals is just plain wrong. If one is intent on killing an animal for food, it should be done as swiftly and humanely as possible.
    However, the environmentalist movement was quite successful in infantilizing the general public by making outlandish claims, giving animals “rights", among other things…
    I call it the “disneyfication” of animals, raising animals up to the status of humans, imbuing human qualities on them…Walt Disney and his animal cartoons, “Bambi” among others, is responsible for turning adult humans into animal-worshiping crazies…the roots of rabid environmentalism also has its start with disney cartoons…
    The “disneyfication” of animals has done more to damage the concept of man having dominion over other living things and has contributed greatly to our present crop of anti-hunters and pro-animal activists.
    If civilization collapses, you can bet that this “disneyfication” of animals along with “gun control” (actually people control) will go away… people will be too busy looking for their next meal.
    PETA=people eating tasty animals…
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  214. Anon[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson


    you’re admitting to that?!

    To watch what with exactly. Maybe programming is better in your area.
     
    It's the best display in its size class you can buy according to Consumer Reports, why deny buying a great product?

    I purchased it for use in our engineering lab, mainly for engineering's kanban board.


    we buy only ‘pasture raised’ eggs. My gal thinks eating eggs from healthy chickens, who’re ‘happy’ will result in better quality eggs, but for me, I spend the extra money (about $6+ per dozen) for moral reasons. Which is same reason I don’t eat ham or bacon or dogs or cats.

    Not that I judge other people who do, (except when they torture the animals before they kill them, because the meat taste better that way. In which case I’d like to feed such humans to the pigs that I don’t eat).
     
    And what is the rate of inflation on pastured eggs? I have no idea. One of my employees gives me pastured eggs on occasion.

    Your gal is right with respect to nutrition (but it's a lot more minor than the gap with chicken meat), though Serious Eats was unable to detect a taste difference in a double blind study. Pastured eggs do look a lot better in the pan.

    Animals exist to serve us, though they should be treated humanely which is a serious problem. Pigs, dogs, and cats aren't people and thus are fair game. And honestly I'd probably eat a human if presented with the option, just out of curiosity. Not going to claim cannibalism is moral of course.


    the whole rotten and corrupt den on snakes on Wall Street profited massively during the orgy of fraud and theft. Countywide, Shittybank, Goldman Sachs, and all the rest of the thieving scoundrels.
     
    Countrywide profited so much it went bankrupt.

    CitiBank and Goldman Sachs profited so much they had to beg the government (and Buffet in Goldman's case) for help.


    They killed Glass so they could loot the Treasury, and loot the Treasury they did.
     
    Germany and Canada have never had a separation between commercial and investment banking. In fact very few countries other than America did.

    The Treasury didn't get looted and in fact made a profit on TARP (though it was still inappropriate--the stockholders should've gotten wiped out).


    It was a feeding frenzy, with synthetic ‘credit default swaps’, and ‘collateralized debt obligations’ and collateralized derivatives with sub-prime liar loans, and Freddy and Fanny to cover the tracks.
     
    People who bought credit default swaps got rich.

    People who bought CDOs got hosed.

    And sure, issuers of both earned commissions.

    What's your point?


    With the SEC carefully looking the other way, hoping to get a gig with Goldilocks making thirty times what they made as regulators.
     
    The same stability and good times which induce financiers to take risks also leads to deregulating politicians and regulators, even if there is of course a conflict of interest and even corruption at work. The SEC was convinced that modern risk models were so sophisticated that there was no longer any need to limit leverage.

    Greed, and avarice like never seen before. That’s who made the money. All of those rats and swindlers at the big investment banks.
     
    More like greed and avarice like have been seen...many times before. Remember the dot com bubble?

    And no, the people who made the money were the contrarian bears. Who were widely denounced as crazy lunatics deep into 2007 and even 2008 by everyone else on Wall Street.

    Remember, the big banks had to be bailed out. They lost their shirts.

    and when it all imploded, as it must surely do so again, the big boyz got out first. And then the taxpayer was slated to cover the loses. Just as Robert Rubin, the Dr. Frankenstein of Wall Street/Treasury/Fed corruption and collusion (with his Igor; Lawrence Summers)- planned.
     
    The Treasury made a profit on TARP. So the taxpayer in fact lost nothing from the bailout, which was wrong for other reasons.

    QE baby! Up the ying and out the yang.

    An orgy of ‘printing’, until the music stops, and only the same people who knew it was coming in 08, will know when it comes this time around. And trillions of dollars of “wealth” will be disappeared over night. There goes your pension.
    QE ended in 2014. Stock market kept surging until this year. Stock prices have grown broadly in line with increased earnings per share and dividends, with some valuation expansion. The stock market grows 80% of the time and has a real CAGR of 8.6% going back to 1871. Quite a lot of financial crises during that time, including many far worse than what happened in 07-08.


    Remember the ratings agencies?

    you know what the ratings agencies remind me of, recently it was revealed that Experian sold, er, I mean lost millions of people’s data. Now they’re on the television running ads for protecting people’s data. I shit you not. You can call them and pay them to “protect” your data from the “dark web’. Wow.

    And the ratings agencies? Yep, they’re still in business. Holy moly.
    Who cares? Bonds are for losers. People who buy them are complete dopes.

    And yes, conflict of interest is at the heart of the business model of the ratings agencies.

    I bet!

    buy a commodity ETF today, and watch as the price is manipulated with the aplomb of a pick pocket. Just hit a few keys on the Fed’s computer, and voila! Silver trades at curious lows, while demand is higher than ever.
     
    Maybe stop speculating in commodities and just sign up with WealthFront or Betterment.


    it’s a shell game, and its rigged. Works well as long as you’re playing it safe, but then weren’t AAA rated funds eviscerated, (along with people’s pensions) following the 08 crash?
     
    Yes, and people who bought those were morons anyway. I was in my early 20s at the time, and it was extremely obvious to me that the housing bubble was crazy.

    And as I noted earlier, bonds are for losers.

    If you played it safe by instead buying shares in, say, Berkshire Hathaway, there was no problem. Unless you HAD to retire in exactly 2009 or something.

    Have they instituted hardy reforms to prevent something like that from happening again?
     
    Some, but I'm not convinced this sort of thing can actually be prevented to begin with. Seems endemic to capitalism.


    they’re going to get screwed because the system is set up to screw them.
     
    That might be. But specifically they will get screwed because defined benefit pensions are chronically underfunded. Which is why they're a bad idea to begin with.


    The reason the wealth gap is burgeoning, is because the .01% that run things want it to, and the people who’re being set up to get screwed again, are being lied to by the people who they’re trusting and paying and exalting to positions of power to look out for their interests- the politicians- are the very people betraying them to their enemies.
     
    We're just returning to normal. The 20th century was an unusual and historically unprecedented departure from traditional levels of inequality.


    the problem isn’t the commercial banks. The problem is the investment banks, and what used to be a wall (Glass-Steagall) that separated the investment banks from the Treasury, which is now the henhouse being guarded by the jackal.
     
    Glass-Steagall separated investment banks from bank deposits, not the Treasury.

    This is completely overblown. Most countries never had this separation, and there were many instances of commercial banks under Glass-Steagall blowing themselves up. A great example was the 1982 Latin American debt crisis.

    A potentially more serious problem with banking is that the end of Glass-Steagall along with the great concentration of the big banks perhaps reduces credit origination to rural areas, small business, etc. I'd want to see empirical research on this before leaping to conclusion of course.

    By the way, note that your post here did not have much to do with inflation at all. :)
     

     

    The SEC was convinced that modern risk models were so sophisticated that there was no longer any need to limit leverage.

    wow, everything you’re saying is a crock of shit

    you’re an apologist for the scum on Wall Street who looted Main Street

    we’ll have to get to the bottom of this swamp

    Remember, the big banks had to be bailed out. They lost their shirts.

    they “had” to be bailed out because the orgy of fraud blew up in their greedy faces.

    because they were betting on massive margins that were insane, and only worked as long as the Ponzi scheme of graft was in full swing, just like today.

    Just consider the case of Jon Corzine, and how he looted depositor’s funds. He wasn’t even charged for this fundamental financial crime. The kind of crime that destroys confidence in the system, but because he’s connected, they didn’t even slap his wrist.

    the whole system is corrupt and rotten from top to bottom, and you’d try to run cover for that lot?!

    Have they instituted hardy reforms to prevent something like that from happening again?

    Some, but I’m not convinced this sort of thing can actually be prevented to begin with. Seems endemic to capitalism.

    utter bullshit

    just reinstating Glass would be huge. A iron wall between the investment banks and the Treasury.

    (Yes, deposits insured by the Treasury)

    if the scumbags on Wall Street know in no uncertain terms that they are going to be left holding the bag for their casino loses, the culture on Wall Street would change in a New York second.

    And I suspect that you know that. But you’re a cheap shill for the corrupt system, huh?

    We’re just returning to normal. The 20th century was an unusual and historically unprecedented departure from traditional levels of inequality.

    more bullshit

    A potentially more serious problem with banking is that the end of Glass-Steagall along with the great concentration of the big banks perhaps reduces credit origination to rural areas

    yea, I bet

    here ya go…

    https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/jefferson-county-alabama-screwed-by-wall-street-still-paying-20110407

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson


    you’re an apologist for the scum on Wall Street who looted Main Street
     
    Main Street got a lot of houses that they didn't pay for, leading Wall Street to go bust. Of course a lot of people made money along the way, and not all on Wall Street. No doubt realtors did quite well during that time.

    What was looted from Main Street exactly?


    they “had” to be bailed out because the orgy of fraud blew up in their greedy faces.
     
    The had to be bailed out owing to their role in originating credit. Banks blow up from time to time.

    The bailouts should've wiped out the stockholders of course, as the Swedes did with the financial crisis in the early 90s.


    because they were betting on massive margins that were insane, and only worked as long as the Ponzi scheme of graft was in full swing, just like today.
     
    Correction, it only worked as long as rates stayed low enough that the poor quality borrowers could still service the mortgages they never should've been issued.

    And it was strictly speaking not a Ponzi scheme in that it involved nothing pyramidal.

    Where's the graft today exactly?

    Just consider the case of Jon Corzine, and how he looted depositor’s funds. He wasn’t even charged for this fundamental financial crime. The kind of crime that destroys confidence in the system, but because he’s connected, they didn’t even slap his wrist.
     
    Corzine didn't have depositors because MF Global wasn't a bank. That said, yes, the guy should be in prison.

    the whole system is corrupt and rotten from top to bottom, and you’d try to run cover for that lot?!
     
    Yeah, because I'm not a hard money crank.

    What exactly is corrupt and rotten about Vanguard? How about Charles Schwab?

    utter bullshit

    just reinstating Glass would be huge. A iron wall between the investment banks and the Treasury.

    (Yes, deposits insured by the Treasury)
     
    As noted before, the commercial banks blew themselves up lots of times during the Glass-Steagall era, most notably the 1982 Latin American debt crisis. The was also the collapse of Continental Illinois Bank in 1984 and the Savings & Loan collapse in 1989. No ties whatsoever to securities.

    You also never addressed the fact that most other countries never separated commercial and investment banking. There has never been such a separation in Germany for instance, and insider trading was in fact legal there until 1995.


    if the scumbags on Wall Street know in no uncertain terms that they are going to be left holding the bag for their casino loses, the culture on Wall Street would change in a New York second.

    And I suspect that you know that. But you’re a cheap shill for the corrupt system, huh?
     
    Prior to the Savings & Loan crisis I don't believe Wall Street was ever bailed out by Congress (which refused to act on the 1982 Latin American debt crisis), though there were actions by the FDIC (which charges insurance premiums incidentally) and the FED.

    But there was a time when those didn't exist either.

    And yet panics, collapses, bank failures, depressions, etc. were more or less routine. Jay Cook certainly didn't get bailed out in the Panic of 1873.

    It's endemic to capitalism and goes back to the 17th century Netherlands, if not earlier.


    more bullshit
     
    What Thorfinnsson is saying hurts my feelings so it must be bullshit.

    Did you miss out the whole brouhaha when Picketty published his book on inequality? Prior to the 20th century inequality was massive and had been so for about seven hundred years. Records further back weren't available, but it's safe to say there was plenty of inequality going all the way back to the invention of agriculture and the formation of states.

    Gregory Clark in his surname studies of England, Florence, Sweden, and China that social mobility today is really no different than it was in the Middle Ages.


    yea, I bet

    here ya go…

    https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/jefferson-county-alabama-screwed-by-wall-street-still-paying-20110407
     
    This doesn't relate to what I said. Here Wall Street did in fact originate credit to a flyover country borrower, just to the disadvantage of the unsophisticated locals who don't know the difference between the LIBOR and a wild boar.

    Probably would be a good idea for state legislatures to pass laws prohibiting local governments from entering into swap agreements without the approval of the state comptroller or something.

    Bottom line is you have no idea what you're talking about and are motivating by an irrational, passionate hatred of banks and money. This is such a strange religion. And you're angry that I'm not part of your cult.
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  215. Anon[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    According to you hard money cranks the most important thing in the world is that a gallon of milk has the same nominal price a century from now.

    That way, when your skeleton is reaniminated and crawls out the ground, you'll be able to head down to the store and buy a gallon of milk with a two Dollar bill.

    This is just crazy. Moderate inflation is not a problem at all for just about anyone, unless your investing strategy is to stuff your mattress full of hundred Dollar bills.

    The end of the gold standard has led to just about zero negative consequences, whereas the gold standard itself had many negative features.

    And you're not just crazy about money. You guys have some weird hatred of interest, and somehow our financial system has something to do with Zionism. Ooooookay...

    Not that I'm a fan of Wilson either. Logically we should've either stayed neutral, or joined the Central Powers. Joining the Central Powers would've allowed us to annex Canada, Bermuda, the British and French West Indies, and perhaps other territories as well.

    According to you hard money cranks the most important thing in the world is that a gallon of milk has the same nominal price a century from now.

    no, (shithead)

    the most important thing is not to be forced to use fiat money, created out of thin air, by scumbag bankers- who loot the value of your savings by inflating the money supply and driving down the value of your savings. But most of all, who use the power to create infinite supplies of money to corrupt our governments and institutions. Duh.

    Moderate inflation is not a problem at all for just about anyone, unless your investing strategy is to stuff your mattress full of hundred Dollar bills.

    not when they should be gambling in your rigged casino, huh?

    The end of the gold standard has led to just about zero negative consequences, whereas the gold standard itself had many negative features.

    this is of course true if you’re a Rothschild or Lloyd Blankfien. Not so much if your son just got killed fighting in a contrived war for the fun and profit of Zionists.

    and somehow our financial system has something to do with Zionism. Ooooookay…

    you just outed yourself as a pathetic zio-troll

    well done ;)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson

    no, (shithead)
     

    Off to a great start. :)

    the most important thing is not to be forced to use fiat money, created out of thin air, by scumbag bankers- who loot the value of your savings by inflating the money supply and driving down the value of your savings.
     
    Why is this important at all?

    Do you keep your savings in the form of cash stuffed under your mattress?

    Have you ever heard of Vanguard dude?

    But most of all, who use the power to create infinite supplies of money to corrupt our governments and institutions. Duh.
     

    Yeah, so obvious...

    They don't create infinite money. The money supply grows at a fairly steady rate.

    The #1 think banks originate money for is home mortgage lending. So they're corrupting Americans into...buying houses.

    The horror...

    not when they should be gambling in your rigged casino, huh?
     

    The compound annual growth rate of the S&P 500 going back to 1871 is 8.6%. Yeah it's rigged all right...rigged in favor of buy-and-hold equity investors.

    this is of course true if you’re a Rothschild or Lloyd Blankfien. Not so much if your son just got killed fighting in a contrived war for the fun and profit of Zionists.
     
    The Rothschilds were more wealthy and powerful under the gold standard than they are today. Goldman Sachs did well in the gold standard era as well.

    I'm not an Israel Firster or a supporter of our idiotic foreign policy, but tying these things to the abolition of the gold standard is the dumbest thing I've ever heard.

    American populists in the 19th century were in favor of inflation. They referred to the imposition of the full gold standard in 1873 as the Crime of '73 and launched the Free Silver movement in response. William Jennings Bryan delivered his famous Cross of Gold speech in Chicago in 1896, accusing the bankers of wishing to crucify the farmers on a cross of gold.

    Do you think that William Jennings Bryan and 19th century American farmers were pawns of the ZIONISTS?

    Or how about Thomas Edison, who supported fiat money and what is now known as Modern Monetary Theory?

    "A country than can issue a Dollar bond can surely issue a Dollar bill." -Thomas Alva Edison

    Henry Ford, that notorious Zionist, was another proponent of fiat money and MMT. :)

    The bottom line is that bankers, unsurprisingly, understand money. Unfortunately greed and FOMO causes them to blow up the economy from time to time. Suckers, like you, don't. In the 19th century you would've been part of the Free Silver movement and thunderously denouncing the Gold Ring.

    you just outed yourself as a pathetic zio-troll

    well done ;)
     

    Yeah dude.

    Totally nailed it.

    , @MarkinLA
    the most important thing is not to be forced to use fiat money, created out of thin air, by scumbag bankers- who loot the value of your savings by inflating the money supply and driving down the value of your savings. But most of all, who use the power to create infinite supplies of money to corrupt our governments and institutions. Duh.

    Actually the average person isn't "looted" by the inflation in the money supply but by the inflations and deflations in the various markets markets when he decides he wants to get in on the action and all of this occurred when we also had a gold standard. People speculating on rising process for stocks, commodities, and real estate, even when they know the game is likely rigged, have created far more damaging effects to the working classes than losses due to inflation. Those loses tend to occur because of our immigration mess keeping wages low for long period of time.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  216. @Anon

    Animals exist to serve us,
     
    now you sound like a Zionist, because that is exactly what they believe about all non-Jews.

    Did you know that? True story, btw.

    as to Animals existing to serve us, I feel that's the same mentality as a 19th century plantation overseer, vis-à-vis his chattel. Or a Sea World or circus type of mentality where animals should be made to humiliate themselves for our amusement. As if they were put here for that purpose.

    I remember being told as a child (growing up in a Christian household) that animals were put here by God for us to use as beasts of burden or food, or both. That was their purpose, and they didn't have souls or anything, so whatever you decided to do to them was always OK. They're just animals after all. Nothing like a feeling, conscious being that actually feels pain or terror or sadness or anything (certainty not love, ha!), so if you're Michael Vick, and you torture the dog to death who just disappointed you in a fight, then what's the big deal?

    Or if you're taste is for dog, and you prefer the bones be broken before it's killed and cooked, because the trauma the dog goes though enhances the flavor of the meat, they why not?! Right?

    It's just a damn animal!

    but Vick didn't invent this charming 'retribution'

    If they hunt poorly, they are tortured as retribution for the shame they reflected upon their owners.

    The reasoning of the galgueros is that by torturing and killing the dogs they wash away the dishonor the dogs displayed that brought shame to their masters. In reality, the practice is simply an exercise in sadism that involves burning the dogs with acid, dragging them behind cars, sacrificing them to fighting dogs, skinning them alive or burying them alive. The most famous torture is called the "piano dance;" this involves hanging the dog by the neck with the feet just touching the ground as it struggles to breathe and slowly is strangled to death by its movements
     
    https://www.thedodo.com/the-pain-in-spain-the-saving-of-the-galgos-1102421730.html

    but this is the shit that pisses me off the most

    http://www.dogingtonpost.com/10000-dogs-tortured-annual-yulin-dog-eating-festival/

    the deliberate, sadistic cruelty of burning and boiling dogs and cats alive, and generally being as cruel to them as these animals on two legs are capable of.

    though they should be treated humanely which is a serious problem. Pigs, dogs, and cats aren’t people and thus are fair game.
     
    personally, I have no problem whatsoever with people eating dogs or cats or even each other if that's what it comes down to, like the tragic Donner party, for instance.

    But cruelty for cruelty's sake always gets my blood up. No matter if it's towards other bipedal animals, or the four legged version.

    The difference between humans and the rest of the animal kingdom is one of degree, not one of kind.

    A chimp feels pain and despair just like you do. It loves its offspring with the same tender devotion that human mothers display. When they're beaten and cry out, it's because they feel the pain, just like you would. And if they're happy or contented, you can see it on their faces, just like with a human.

    the things we 'humane' and 'divine' beings who have 'souls and compassion' and are 'civilized' - do to our fellow creatures

    https://img.rt.com/files/2015.10/article/56129043c361884d468b4584.jpg

    because they're just animals, convinces me that we are a whole hell of a way far off from having evolved from the slime.

    In fact, someone once asked me, 'if we're related to the apes, then were's the missing link?

    well, look in a mirror. Because we're the missing link. And if we ever do evolve into something resembling a creature that a God would be proud of, (if we don't blow the whole place up first) then we'll be a people that recognizes that animals too, also are entitled to dignity and empathy.

    all for now.

    I'll get to the economic later. It's just that animals are an issue that I'm keen on.

    now you sound like a Zionist, because that is exactly what they believe about all non-Jews.

    Did you know that? True story, btw.

    I’d say this has worked out well for the Jews in general. They’ve been around for thousands of years and have achieved high levels of success, wealth, and power.

    as to Animals existing to serve us, I feel that’s the same mentality as a 19th century plantation overseer, vis-à-vis his chattel.

    Most people freely enslave themselves. I don’t see what the big deal is.

    And we’re talking about blacks here, who are completely useless for any purpose unless enslaved.

    Or a Sea World or circus type of mentality where animals should be made to humiliate themselves for our amusement. As if they were put here for that purpose.

    I remember being told as a child (growing up in a Christian household) that animals were put here by God for us to use as beasts of burden or food, or both. That was their purpose, and they didn’t have souls or anything, so whatever you decided to do to them was always OK. They’re just animals after all.

    This is a useful belief that facilitates the efficient exploitation of animals. Animals provide us with important nutrition, products, and labor.

    Nothing like a feeling, conscious being that actually feels pain or terror or sadness or anything (certainty not love, ha!), so if you’re Michael Vick, and you torture the dog to death who just disappointed you in a fight, then what’s the big deal?

    Or if you’re taste is for dog, and you prefer the bones be broken before it’s killed and cooked, because the trauma the dog goes though enhances the flavor of the meat, they why not?! Right?

    It’s just a damn animal!

    Look, I happen to be a dog lover and do not approve of cruelty to animals. But I promote self-interest over feelings. We empathize with mammals because they are very similar to us.

    I read some sad stuff about how dachshunds suffered during the world wars as a result of anti-German sentiment. As if dachshunds were to blame for the German army.

    http://dachshundlove.blogspot.com/2008/03/dachshunds-in-history-mimi-most.html

    http://www.easypetmd.com/doginfo/anti-dachshund-propaganda

    None the less as the world’s apex carnivore predator and #1 engineering species the entire ecosystem is our domain.

    As for the rest of your stuff, cruelty for cruelty’s sake is disgusting. And tolerating animal cruelty likely has negative consequences beyond simply the emotional distress we feel when we see animals abused.

    But I won’t be shaken from my view that animals exist to serve us and that vegans and vegetarians are our enemies and must be destroyed.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon

    We empathize with mammals because they are very similar to us.
     
    in exactly the same way we empathize with our loved ones.

    Juliet's love for Romeo was an expression of the same human repertoire of emotional empathy that a boy's love for his dog is also part of.

    one is not more valid than the other, simply because it crosses a vague line between species.

    I'm not saying dogs should be given the same legal status as a human, but that they should be protected from fiends who would be cruel to them, yes.


    the entire ecosystem is our domain.
     
    to over-populate with bipedal consumer farm animals/tax units/cannon fodder until it's raped clean of all other life forms.

    I wish I was just speaking theoretically about that, but what I said is going on now, with a snowballing and probably irreversible trajectory.

    , @ChuckOrloski
    In the case of leftist beating upon QB Michael Vick, Thorfinnsson issued an encyclical: "Look, I happen to be a dog lover and do not approve of cruelty to animals."

    Were I endowed with elite ZUS Jew power, I'd immediately give former-Eagle QB, Michael Vick, a dual honorary-degree for psychology and administrative law.

    Afterward, Michael Vick would be appointed Special Prosecutor and taskEd with investigating what degree of torture Ms. Gina Haspel helped inflict upon humans during her Thailand-based CIA management stint.

    For sake of auld lang syne, Thorfinnsson, below is old news about the (Z)American Psychological Association's "collaboration" and pet-like "justification."

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/05/01/us/report-says-american-psychological-association-collaborated-on-torture-justification.html

    P.S. Am pleased you profess to be a "pet lover.". You have more moral high ground than some cranky U.S. Mailmen who persist to complain about getting occasionally attacked by terrorist Pit Bull.
    , @jacques sheete

    I’d say this has worked out well for the Jews in general. They’ve been around for thousands of years and have achieved high levels of success, wealth, and power.
     
    There you go, making wild generalizations again.

    If it's true that "[they] have achieved high levels of success, wealth, and power," then why are they always howling about being victims? You really need to bone up on the history of the poor suffering tribe and how bad they claim to have had it.

    I just finished "Challenging Years" by Stephen Wise, and it's histrionic bipolarity is hilarious. One sentence he's strutting around braying claims like the one above, and in the next he's howling about posekyooshun and terrible difficulties the tribe was suffering.
    , @jacques sheete

    But I won’t be shaken from my view that animals exist to serve us and that vegans and vegetarians are our enemies and must be destroyed.
     
    Ha! Whatcha gonna do, eat them?

    Too funny. Yer just hear to stir things up. I know this cuz I've been guilty of such myself at times. Heheheh!

    ROFL.

    Gawd, I love to hear your reasoning on why they're our enemies they must be destroyed. Too funny.

    PS: Btw, I only agree that they must be destroyed only if they're cat persons...
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  217. @Anon

    I don’t dispute the existence of inflation. I dispute the idea, common to hard money cranks,
     
    a great way to think about inflation, is to consider the value of the US dollar for the first hundred or so years of its use. When it was being coined by congress and tied to gold. It basically kept its value for over a hundred years, and you would pay about the same for a quart of milk or pound of coffee, from 1792, to 1913.

    here's a nice chart that shows an indication of inflation following the treason of the Fed, and then subsequent treason of FDR and then Nixon taking us off the gold standard.

    https://economics-charts.com/images/cpi-1800-2005.png

    https://economics-charts.com/cpi/cpi-1800-2005.html

    since the Satanic perfidy of the Fed, (the very evil the founding fathers fought the revolution to prevent, and which Andrew Jackson heroically resisted, to the point of an assassination attempt) Americans purchasing power, which remained virtually unchanged for a hundred or so years before the Fed, has been reduced to app. 2% of the purchasing power the dollar had in 1913. This inflation is due to the international banksters, who own and control the Fed (class A stock holders), 'printing' trillions upon trillions of Federal Reserve Notes and loaning them out, (at interest) to their fellow bankster around the world and to the US Treasury. Where now we have to borrow our own money (at interest) from the greediest and most demonic scum on the planet. Rothschild and his cabal.

    And it is because of this biblical level of treachery, that has doomed the planet to serial wars for Israel, ever since.

    Please keep in mind, that America's entry into WWI was a contrived scheme by Zionists, both in England, with the Balfour Declaration, and in Wilson's administration, with ((Louis Brandeis and Colonel House)) in the Wilson regime, to betray, destroy and enslave Germany.

    Wilson also funded and facilitated Trotsky to enslave Russia to genocidal Bolshevism.

    He's often lauded as one of America's greatest presidents, by the ((PTB)) today, but I'd say he was spectacularly the very worst president bar none. And by his treachery and treason, has doomed the planet to enslavement by the banksters. with their Eternal Wars, and Total surveillance, and burgeoning Orwellian police state, for which there seems to be no redress.

    more here:

    https://libertyinternational.wordpress.com/2013/12/23/federal-reserve-100-years-of-us-dollar/

    Anon # 290 profoundly wrote:
    “since the Satanic perfidy of the Fed, (the very evil the founding fathers fought the revolution to prevent, and which Andrew Jackson heroically resisted, to the point of an assassination attempt) Americans purchasing power, which remained virtually unchanged for a hundred or so years before the Fed, has been reduced to app. 2% of the purchasing power the dollar had in 1913.”

    Amen, Brother # 290!

    Thanks very much for the education.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rurik
    [The problem should now have been fixed and you should go back to using your "Rurik" handle and your current email.]

    Amen, Brother # 290!
     
    thanks Brother Chuck!

    I don't know what I'm doing wrong. I picked a specific email address, the same one I was using yesterday, and yet today the software is telling me that I'm not Rurik, but I am!

    I don't want to be a hassle to the moderators, so as long as I've messed things up somehow, I guess I'm 290 for now.

    Peace.
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  218. Anon[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson


    now you sound like a Zionist, because that is exactly what they believe about all non-Jews.

    Did you know that? True story, btw.
     
    I'd say this has worked out well for the Jews in general. They've been around for thousands of years and have achieved high levels of success, wealth, and power.


    as to Animals existing to serve us, I feel that’s the same mentality as a 19th century plantation overseer, vis-à-vis his chattel.
     
    Most people freely enslave themselves. I don't see what the big deal is.

    And we're talking about blacks here, who are completely useless for any purpose unless enslaved.


    Or a Sea World or circus type of mentality where animals should be made to humiliate themselves for our amusement. As if they were put here for that purpose.

    I remember being told as a child (growing up in a Christian household) that animals were put here by God for us to use as beasts of burden or food, or both. That was their purpose, and they didn’t have souls or anything, so whatever you decided to do to them was always OK. They’re just animals after all.
     
    This is a useful belief that facilitates the efficient exploitation of animals. Animals provide us with important nutrition, products, and labor.


    Nothing like a feeling, conscious being that actually feels pain or terror or sadness or anything (certainty not love, ha!), so if you’re Michael Vick, and you torture the dog to death who just disappointed you in a fight, then what’s the big deal?

    Or if you’re taste is for dog, and you prefer the bones be broken before it’s killed and cooked, because the trauma the dog goes though enhances the flavor of the meat, they why not?! Right?

    It’s just a damn animal!
     
    Look, I happen to be a dog lover and do not approve of cruelty to animals. But I promote self-interest over feelings. We empathize with mammals because they are very similar to us.

    I read some sad stuff about how dachshunds suffered during the world wars as a result of anti-German sentiment. As if dachshunds were to blame for the German army.

    http://dachshundlove.blogspot.com/2008/03/dachshunds-in-history-mimi-most.html
    http://www.easypetmd.