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In the Footsteps of Xuanzang in Kyrgyzstan
This journey into the past also reaches the heart of 21st century China’s New Silk Roads strategy
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Chinese cargo truck coming from the Kyrgiz-China border. Photo: Asia Times / Pepe Escobar

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At the start of the Tang dynasty, in the early 7th century, a young wandering monk embarked on a 16-year long voyage from the imperial capital Chang’an (today’s Xian) to India to collect Buddhist manuscripts. At the time Chang’an was six times bigger than Rome at its height, with a population of over one million – the epicenter of Asian civilization.

History ended up converting Xuanzang into a legend and a national hero in China – although in the West he would never reach Marco Polo levels of popularity.

Xuanzang had embarked on a quest that still resonates today. He wanted to know whether all men – or just an enlightened few – could attain Buddhahood. There was only one way to find out: ride all the way to India and bring back Sanskrit texts to China, especially from the Yogacara school of Buddhism, which professed that the outside world did not exist: it was merely a projection of one’s consciousness.

On his epic journey, Xuanzang went through hell and high water: sandy storms in the Taklamakan desert (“You can get in but you never get out”), avalanches in the Tian Shan mountains, pirates in the Ganges. His travels on the ancient Silk Road are mesmerizing, particularly in the years 629 and 630 as he hit northern Silk Road oases such as the kingdom of Hami.

It was at these oases that Xuanzang would reboot his small caravan of camels and horses and interact with local kings, influential merchants and serial warriors. He was already on his way to becoming the most famous pilgrim ever on the oldest trade route in the world.

Sino-Turkic meeting of minds

During my own trip, mixing ancient and new Silk Roads, I crossed Kyrgyzstan from south to north, from the desolate Tajik-Kyrgyz border on the Pamir highway – which looked like a scene from Tarkovsky’s Stalker – all the way to the crossroads of Sary-Tash, with a detour via a made by China road to examine the Kyrgyz-China border at Irkeshtam; then all the way to Osh, the getaway to the Ferghana valley via the mind-bending Taldyk pass; bordering Lake Toktogul, facing myriad other snowed-over passes; and up to the final dash towards the capital Bishkek.

What I really wanted to reach was the pasturage – at this time of the year far from verdant – by Lake Issyk-Kul, where Xuanzang lived an extraordinary historical moment as he met nothing less than the immense tented court of the great khan of the Western Turks.

It was thanks to the king of Turfan – another Silk Road oasis, not far from the current capital of Xinjiang, Urumqi – that Xuanzang was given 24 royal letters to be shown to twenty-four different kingdoms on his way, finally leading to the great khan of the Western Turks. The king of Turfan was in fact a vassal of the great khan, and he was asking for protection for his Chinese friend, invoking a medieval code of honor that applied equally to Europe and Asia.

The empire of the Western Turks at the time extended from the Altai mountains – today in Russia – to territory that’s now part of Afghanistan and Pakistan. To reach the great khan, Xuanzang went through frozen hell. He described mountains of ice that rose up to the sky and ice peaks tumbling down with a mighty roar. It took him one week just to cross the Bedal pass (4,284 meters high) in what was then Chinese Turkestan. The Western Turks used this pass to connect with the Tarim basin. Farther down the road, Xuanzang would still have to face the Hindu Kush and the Pamirsś

Xuanzang and his ragged mini-caravan finally arrived at the southern shore of Lake Issyk-Kul (“Warm Lake”), an inland sea that never freezes, and the second-largest in the world after the Titicaca in Bolivia. That happened to be the winter headquarters of the great khan, while his summer capital remained Tashkent.

Southern shore of Lake Issyk-kul. Photo: Asia Times / Pepe Escobar
Southern shore of Lake Issyk-kul. Photo: Asia Times / Pepe Escobar

I was hosted by a lovely young mother and her baby at a yurt by Lake Issyk-Kul. Xuanzang’s description of the lake, which I got from a 1969 Oriental Books reprint of the original 1884 London version of Si-yu-Ki; Buddhist records of the Western World, by Xuanzang, translated by S. Beal, could have been written today. Except for the dragons and monsters, of course:

A yurt by Lake Issyk-Kul. The design at the top is featured in the Kyrgyz national flag. Photo: Asia Times / Pepe Escobar
A yurt by Lake Issyk-Kul. The design at the top is featured in the Kyrgyz national flag. Photo: Asia Times / Pepe Escobar

“On all sides it is enclosed by mountains, and various streams empty themselves into it and are lost. The color of the water is a bluish-black, its taste is bitter and salt. The waves of this lake roll along tumultuously as they expend themselves. Dragons and fish inhabit it together. At certain occasions scaly monsters rise to the surface, on which travelers passing by put up their prayers of good fortune.”

Meet the balbals

So in the year 630 Xuanzang finally met the great khan of the Western Turks, at the northwest shore of Lake Issyk-Kul, in Tokmak.

Tokmak happens to be very close to the Burana tower, the only major Silk Road site still standing in Kyrgyzstan. We are in the Chuy valley, which was a very busy side branch of the Northern Silk Road, at the crossroads of the Sogdian, Turkic and Chinese civilizations.

Burana Tower, the only Silk Road landmark left standing in Kyrgizstan. Photo: Asia Times / Pepe Escobar
Burana Tower, the only Silk Road landmark left standing in Kyrgizstan. Photo: Asia Times / Pepe Escobar

All that remains of what in the 11th century was a sophisticated city called Balasagun – which the Mongols named Gobolik when they rammed through it in 1218 – is the tower, actually a half minaret. Behind the tower we find the cutest stone creatures in living memory: the balbal, 1,500 year-old stone grave markers.

A balbal, 1,500-year-old stone grave marker near the Burana tower. Photo: Asia Times / Pepe Escobar
A balbal, 1,500-year-old stone grave marker near the Burana tower. Photo: Asia Times / Pepe Escobar

The meeting of Xuanzang and the great khan was a major success. He described “riders mounted on camels and horses, dressed in furs and fine woolen cloth and carrying long lances, banners and straight bows.” Much like the warriors one sees at the extraordinary exhibits at the National Museum of Kazakhstan in Nur-Sultan. The multitude, wrote Xuanzang, “stretched so far that the eye could not tell where it ended.”

This happened to be the last description ever of the great nomad confederation led by the great khan, which collapsed to internal strife still in the early 7th century.

There was also a very important matter to clarify: horses. And that led me to the traditional Sunday animal market at Karakol, not far from the southeast corner of the lake. There I saw multiple descendants of the legendary Przhewalsky horses.

Descendant of the Przhewalsky horse at the market in Karakol. Photo: Asia Times / Pepe Escobar
Descendant of the Przhewalsky horse at the market in Karakol. Photo: Asia Times / Pepe Escobar

Przhewalsky, after whom the diminutive breed of Central Asian wild horses is named, was the top scientific explorer of Mongolia, the Gobi, Tibet and Xinjiang between 1870 and 1885 – and he died in a hospital near Karakol after contracting typhus. He had led a caravan crossing the Taklamakan – an almost impossible feat. A lovely Soviet-era museum near Karakol pays him due tribute.

Bust of Przhewalsky at the Soviet-era memorial near Karakol. Photo: Asia Times / Pepe Escobar
Bust of Przhewalsky at the Soviet-era memorial near Karakol. Photo: Asia Times / Pepe Escobar

Sino-Turkic relations at the time of the great khan were excellent. By the early years of Tang Emperor Taizong, the great khan was at the height of his powers, controlling every latitude between the borders of the Chinese empire and Persia, and from Kashmir in the south to the Altai mountains in the north.

True to the legendary spirit of the ancient Silk Road as a crossroads of cultures and religion, the great khan even knew about Buddhism (a monk from India had tried to convert him). Very close to Tokmak, Soviet archeologists found two Buddhist shrines from the 7th or 8th century.

ORDER IT NOW

The top gossip of Xuanzang meeting the great khan is that the khan tried to dissuade him from going to India: “It is such a hot land where people were like savages without decorum.” But the khan soon understood that Xuanzang was a man on a mission. He gave him letters of introduction to all his countless vassals along the way – princes in Gandhara, which today is split between Afghanistan and Pakistan. Xuanzang also got as gifts 50 pieces of silk and beautiful clothes in crimson satin.

And so our wandering monk set out in safety on his Central Asian Turkdom epic, crossing the Syr-Darya, traversing the Desert of Red Sands and arriving at fabled Samarkand. The greatest ever Silk Road pilgrimage – 16,000 km in 16 years – was only beginning. This tale is at the heart of the 21st century New Silk Roads. China is aiming to revive the spirit of one, two, a thousand Xuanzangs.

(Republished from Asia Times by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Economics, Foreign Policy • Tags: Central Asia, China, New Silk Road 
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  1. Back1 says:

    Mr. Bicycle Tourist speaks to those who build roads:

    Please add bicycle and hiking pathways for future adventurers.

    They can parallel existing routes and even be used locally.

    • Replies: @Edge
    , @Anonymous
  2. How can you talk about Zuan zang without mentioning 西遊記?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Journey_to_the_West

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  3. Anonymous[185] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peripatetic Commenter

    How can you talk about Zuan zang without mentioning 西遊記?

    You must have missed this paragraph:

    Xuanzang’s description of the lake, which I got from a 1969 Oriental Books reprint of the original 1884 London version of Si-yu-Ki; Buddhist records of the Western World, by Xuanzang, translated by S. Beal, could have been written today.

    Or do you subscribe to the PC view that all Chinese speak and write Mandarin?

  4. Magnificent photos, as usual. And the text is certainly very interesting, too, but I am leaving most of it for tomorrow.

  5. Greg Bacon says: • Website

    I pity those people. They must not of yet realized that they need the USG to declare them in need of our style of Democracy, which is carpet-bombing the place(s) until you can no longer see the beauty it once was.
    BTW, the FED says they’ll relieve you of the need to store all that gold.

    • LOL: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @Just passing through
  6. @Greg Bacon

    I agree, what they really need is democracy so that a handful of corporations can control the agenda, what they also need is a few McDonalds and KFCs in these places.

  7. anon[837] • Disclaimer says:

    Mongolians and Central Asians generally don’t like Chinese. I don’t blame them…who wants to be ruled by mainland Chinese insects?

    • Troll: Ghan-buri-Ghan, d dan
  8. (yawn). Pepe, once again, with his 100th (or is this his 1000th?) piece related to the Westward push of the Chinazi state.

    It is always fascinating to me that a journalist, (and Escobar is a journalist as opposed to the semi-literates who seem to be copying-and-pasting their way through the media these days), would spend time pretending that a vicious surveillance state will offer an alternative to the USA.

    It is probable that he must do so in order to attain and/or keep access to people and places, but I must admit that I’m more than a bit tired of Pepe.

    Come to Hong Kong Senhor Escobar. Breath in the tear gas and pepper spray! Hear the cries of the people, old and young, as we are struck by batons for merely standing on the footpath. Watch your fellow journalists attacked by Chinazi cops who scream ‘cockroach’ at those holding press passes. Then write about the fresh air at the oasis, lovely Soviet-era buildings, and those legendary horses.

    Pepe. (yawn)

    • Disagree: Blinky Bill
    • Troll: d dan
    • Replies: @jbwilson24
    , @Blinky Bill
  9. I had never heard of most of the places you visited, Pepe.

    Thanks for the introductions, and for the prod to take out a map and trace you travels; imagine the challenges and delights you encountered; realize how much bigger the world is than the microscope on hysteria offered up by mass communicators in US; and shake the piggy-bank to figure out if it’s even possible to dream about such an exploration.

    PS At American University in DC there’s a circle of stone Face monuments not unlike the Balbal stone markers.
    Now I’m gonna have to sort thru a gazillion photos to find the snapshots —

    PS2 the brickwork on the Burana tower is magnificent — is it laid brick? or carvings? or molded cement?

  10. This is Valentina Anatolievna Shevchenko.
    http://tse2.mm.bing.net/th/id/OIP.6S3tVSMGA_Tma5bHNCIHNgAAAA

    She is the UFC Women’s Flyweight champion. When I read that she was from Kyrzygstan, I immediately knew she was born along the silk road. There were more than just goods that traveled along that road.

  11. Alfred says:

    All the photos that Pepe has taken show desolate landscapes devoid of trees. However, there is ample rainfall in much of Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Iran and Afghanistan. The reason is largely due to the tragedy of the commons. It is in the interests of each goat herder to get his animals to consume whatever is publicly available. To gather all the wood available for heating and cooking. Trees don’t stand a chance unless they are protected by private interests.

    Furthermore, a forest produces aerosols that encourage the formation of clouds which leads to rain. It is a virtuous circle. It can be clearly seen in the tropics but it works elsewhere as well.

  12. @Anonymous

    Or do you subscribe to the PC view that all Chinese speak and write Mandarin?

    I missed it because of the unusual spelling.

    Since I speak some Cantonese as well as some Mandarin I am well aware that Mandarin is not and has never been universal.

  13. What does this have to do with suburban American life, which is all the bozos on here know or care about?

    • Replies: @SaneClownPosse
  14. @Hong Kong Hibernian

    “Pepe, once again, with his 100th (or is this his 1000th?) piece related to the Westward push of the Chinazi state.”

    To summarize, history is off-limits because China is evil.

    Chinazi? I’d love to see you write a post about how modern China and the Third Reich have a lot in common. I know next to nothing about China, but I’m betting that you know even less about German history.

  15. anon[232] • Disclaimer says:

    China is connecting to the Myanmar port by rail . It’s an area that was built by India . Indian dream of looking east is facing at possible wake up with a nightmare .

    Not that long ago , India was supporting the expulsion of Rohingya on ideological ground . But now it’s policy is in a deformed shape .

    • Replies: @KA
  16. Edge says:
    @Back1

    Everyone hates cyclists.
    You do not belong on the road.
    Get a car.

    • Replies: @Back1
  17. @jbwilson24

    They do have a lot in common, actually. They both exist(ed) outside the Jewish sphere of control, and both must be demonized and annihilated based on those grounds alone.

    That’s all that matters in today’s world, and that’s all that has mattered for the past 100 years. Everything else is utterly inconsequential.

    • Replies: @SaneClownPosse
  18. China needs this new silk road to survive. It needs other countries resources to feed and take care of own humungous population and markets to sell what is manufactured in china to provide population with work and income.
    It is done not because of the goodness of Chinese heart but because china needs it.
    Unlike ussr russia , china is not known to forgive debt or help for free.
    Basically another one is trying to take place being left by Anglos.

    • Disagree: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @anon
    , @Blinky Bill
  19. @obwandiyag

    Sure, everybody would be interested in retracing Route 66 as opposed to the Silk Road. /sarc

  20. @Ghan-buri-Ghan

    Sure, the Third Reich was outside “the Jewish sphere of control”. Do you buy bridges as well?

    The Third Reich was financed by the usual bankers, its businesses were run by the usual industrialists/corporations. Over half of the Third Reich officer corps would have qualified for any “final solution”. I guess they received waivers from the ovens, for service on the Eastern Front.

    Nothing in Europe has been outside of that sphere of control for over a thousand years. The royal families were interrelated to each other. Cousins warring with cousins. Much like Republicans and Democrats in US Congress publicly squabbling and nothing changes.

    There’s a real Thousand Year Reich for you.

    Only the public low Juden are used as fodder. Useful to advance the causes.

  21. anon[837] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sergey Krieger

    Do you think Russia is aware of China’s backstabbing potential? If I were Russia, I’d always keep an eye on both China and the Jewish-dominated “West.”

    • Replies: @Hong Kong Hibernian
  22. Anonymous[116] • Disclaimer says:
    @Back1

    They usually fall rapidly into disrepair and become more of a hindrance than a help. Better just stick to the roads and be careful with the traffic.

    If we get a free choice, Turkey/Thailand style wide multi-lane roads with a half lane for 2 wheelers are absolutely perfect for bicycle tourists, albeit much less exciting than small windy Central asian mountain roads

  23. Back1 says:
    @Edge

    Separate path for bikes.
    No overlap, no lane sharing, no side of road.
    No car/bike interaction.

    Ok, maybe big shoulder at side of road, where separate not possible.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  24. Anonymous[419] • Disclaimer says:
    @Back1

    Separate path for bikes.
    No overlap, no lane sharing, no side of road.
    No car/bike interaction

    Doesn’t work in practice.

    Ok, maybe big shoulder at side of road, where separate not possible.

    Perfect

  25. @jbwilson24

    @jbwilson24 ~

    I never implied that historical pieces should not be written and/or read. The parenthetical yawns which I included should have clued you in to the fact that I am bored of Escobar and his pro-Beijing screeds.

    Chinazi is Chinese National Socialism, and has nothing to do with the Germany of 80 odd years ago. Your post indicates a certain agitation, and one can only wonder what it is that bothers you so!

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
  26. @anon

    Yes, the Russians are aware, as everyone should be!

    Here’s a recent article which discusses the Russian response:

    https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics/International-relations/Russia-up-in-arms-over-Chinese-theft-of-military-technology

    • Troll: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @anon
    , @Blinky Bill
  27. @Hong Kong Hibernian

    Behold the greatest revolutionary of our time !!!
    😂😂😂


    Thank you Pepe Escobar for all of your good work.The truth is more important than ever !!!

    • Replies: @Hong Kong Hibernian
  28. @Sergey Krieger

    It is done not because of the goodness of Chinese heart but because china needs it. Unlike ussr russia , china is not known to forgive debt or help for free.

    During the 1970’s China could barely feed her own Children but yet she still sacrificed so much to help other developing nations.

    TAZARA Railway.

    Nyerere and Kaunda pursued different avenues for the construction of a rail route. When Nyerere visited Beijing in February 1965, he was hesitant to raise the issue of the railway out of concern that China was also a poor country. President Liu Shaoqi offered to assist Tanzania and Zambia in building a railway between the two countries. China told Nyerere, “You have difficulties as do we, but our difficulties are different. To help you build the railway, we are willing to forsake building railways for ourselves.”Chinese leaders assured Nyerere that Tanzania and Zambia would have full ownership of the completed railway, along with transferred technology and equipment. Nyerere did not immediately accept the Chinese offer but sought to use it to induce Western backing for the railway, but none was forthcoming. The first passenger train arrived in Dar es Salaam on 24 October 1975, the 11th anniversary of Zambia’s independence from Great Britain.

    China didn’t receive a single Yuan, Ruble or Dollar for it !!

  29. anon[837] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hong Kong Hibernian

    That doesn’t make the West any better. Both China and the West are horrible.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Hong Kong Hibernian
  30. KA says:
    @anon

    http://www.jpolrisk.com/wash-brains-cleanse-hearts/
    Adrian Zenz a carpetbagger from Germany with connections to fanatic evangelical movement and the well known neocons , established connection to past Nazi ,and neo Nazi is busy testifying to Congress : Us gov who also is passing laws to hurt China and 1 or 2 Uighur . Above article is worth looking into detail The article draws a computer generated drawing and says it is duopolies by anonymous source

    it shows a hotel supposed to be a camp ,but outside you see hijab wearing female with men looking into the ground in front of the hotel.

    Sucker muslim has forgotten the doormat for US they proved to be at Afghanistan.

  31. anon[252] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    https://www.icij.org/investigations/china-cables/exposed-chinas-operating-manuals-for-mass-internment-and-arrest-by-algorithm/

    It says that it received what is known as “China Cable” in Chinese documenting existence of the camps for Chinese Uighur . It shows satellite images, witness confirmation, and Chinese procurement documents . It claims that it has checked the language with US ( a contractor for US Gov) based linguist .

    May be there is some truth to the existence of the camps. But by overblowing the nature and distorting the reasons ,and by portraying it as anti Islamic, West is trying to provoke muslim ,get China paranoid and defensive and usher the world into another Afghanistan- Soviet fight .

    Alternatively this whole thing based on partnering with NYT Guardian, Radio Free Asia and with evangelical thugs is just a lie .

    I hope to know more from UNZ

    • Replies: @Hong Kong Hibernian
    , @barr
  32. Smith says:

    I love how the discussion in the comments have jackshit to do with Xuanzang. Nobody cares.

    This is a useless article, show the chink infrastructure or shut up. We can watch discovery planet for the culture.

    • Troll: Blinky Bill, d dan
  33. @Anonymous

    They are two different books. One was written by Xuan Zang himself. The other was written by a much later novelist and was a fiction with monkey king and all that.

    • Replies: @d dan
  34. @anon

    What? Sorry, I don’t understand.

    My original post stated my opinion that Escobar is tiresome.

    His support for the worst surveillance state that the world has ever seen is beyond contemptuous.

  35. @Blinky Bill

    (yawn) Yes, I’ll reread some of Dean Swift’s work. Happy now?

    • Troll: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
  36. @anon

    “May be [sic] there is some truth to the existence of the camps.”

    Yeah, maybe, just maybe, the mainland government is abusing human rights.

    Everything is fake news, oppressive regimes are good if they act as counter to US hegemony, and I found a website that supports my views.

    😉

    • Disagree: Blinky Bill
    • Troll: d dan
    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
  37. d dan says:
    @yakushimaru

    Xuan Zang’s writing is much more valuable. It has much historical values. For example, it reveals much about Indian history of the time, which was extremely limited at that time. In fact, we know more about India from Xuan Zang than from Indian recordings of the time.

    The Monkey King, of course, is purely fictional and for literary value.

    As usual, a beautiful article and photos from this author. Please keep up with the good work. Thank you.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @yakushimaru
  38. @Blinky Bill

    Joshua Wong is much braver than you’ll ever be.

    Come to Hong Kong and see what’s happening. Surely a brave keyboard kommando can do that?

    Is there Western support for the anti-extradition / pro-democracy protests? Of course. Probably even financial support from gov’t agencies.

    BUT I can assure you that when 2,000,000 average Hong Kong people (out of our population of 7.6 million) march peacefully on one afternoon, and when the pro-dem candidates in our recent District Council elections just trounced the pro-Beijing faction, this is a popular movement. No amount of National Endowment for Democracy funds can buy that. Sorry to pop your conspiracy bubble.

    That, though, isn’t as sexy as theories propagated and spread by Escobar and others of his ilk.

    • Troll: d dan
    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
  39. @Hong Kong Hibernian

    If Trump should be impeached and jailed for his connections with the Russians what should be done with this “brave man”?

    • Replies: @barr
  40. @Hong Kong Hibernian

    Russia is no friend to China. In fact, Xi’s friendship with Putin is a betrayal of the Chinese people.

    https://amp.scmp.com/comment/opinion/article/3041246/russia-no-friend-china-fact-xis-friendship-putin-betrayal-chinese

    The junior partner
    How Vladimir Putin’s embrace of China weakens Russia.

    https://www.economist.com/briefing/2019/07/25/how-vladimir-putins-embrace-of-china-weakens-russia

    I’m starting to notice a pattern here with you Anti-China trolls !!! 😂

    Beware the wreckers. SinoRusso friendship forever !!!

  41. @Anonymous

    Si-yu-ki is Mandarin by old style pinyin. It stands for 西域记 which is the book by Xuan Zang. In new style pinyin it is Xi-yu-ji or maybe Xi-yv-ji.

    Journey to the West is the fiction with monkey king etc. The Chinese name is 西游记 or Xi-you-ji in new style pinyin.

    Edgar Snow also had a book titled I think Journey West. The Chinese name is 西行漫记 although I have seen it being called 西游记 a few times. When I was a little child, it confused me for awhile.

  42. @Hong Kong Hibernian

    Iraqi soldiers take babies out of incubators in a Kuwaiti hospital, take the incubators, and leave the babies to die.

    The search for Weapons of Mass Uyghur Destruction continues.

    Once they’re found.

    The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, which granted US President Lyndon B. Johnson the authority to assist any Southeast Asian country whose government was considered to be jeopardized by “communist aggression”. The resolution served as Johnson’s legal justification for deploying U.S. conventional forces and the commencement of open warfare against Vietnam.

  43. @d dan

    Virtually all kids in China know the Money King and that he got a master in Xuan Zang and it is all fiction and fun until later they learned that Xuan Zang was real. Teachers enjoy this moment when the kids are led to think about it.

  44. @Hong Kong Hibernian

    O/T

    Why do you always change your handle when you comment here ? Why not keep the same one so people can keep track of who they are replying to over several different articles. You always comment in same distinctive manner so changing handles really serves little purpose. Do you pick your handles randomly or do you actually have a connection to Éire ?

    • Replies: @Hong Kong Hibernian
  45. barr says:
    @anon

    You don’t have to try again and again to see if a serial pedophile is trustworthy this time. You can if your concern for the child is misguidedly more than your hatred or fear of the pedophile .

  46. barr says:
    @Blinky Bill

    Hong Kongers’ declining freedom of entry”

    What the F** is freedom of entry ?

  47. @Blinky Bill

    I must admit to being a bit confused. Your posts don’t seem to be related to what I had written, but perhaps that’s because I wasn’t clear. I’ll take the blame. Not a problem.

    Regarding my ‘handle’: I can assure you that I only started posting on unz.com a few days ago. My first post was the one where I stated my opinion that Escobar was tiresome and that I had contempt for those apologizing for the worst surveillance state (Chinazi) that the world has ever seen.

    Yes, in Hong Kong currently. Connected to Eire.

    p.s. – I respectfully repeat my invitation for you to visit us here. We’ll have a demonstration on 1st January, (details here: https://news.rthk.hk/rthk/en/component/k2/1500132-20191230.htm ). Come and watch the cops beat innocent bystanders, shoot pepper spray on old ladies walking past, and wear identical ID numbers while shouting out insults to all present.

    peace.

    • LOL: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    , @Blinky Bill
  48. p.s. – I respectfully repeat my invitation for you to visit us here. We’ll have a riot on 1st January,

    (yawn) Yes, I’ll be at the riot. Happy now?

    https://vk.com/id573187444?z=video573187444_456239535%2F36820e3592e703068a%2Fpl_wall_573187444

    https://vk.com/id573187444?z=video573187444_456239543%2F5c29934ff7539af1e0%2Fpl_wall_573187444

    Yes, in Hong Kong currently. Connected to Eire.

    Foreign interference’ includes covert, deceptive and coercive activities intended to affect a political or governmental process that are directed, subsidised or undertaken by (or on behalf of) foreign actors to advance their interests or objectives.

    • Troll: Hong Kong Hibernian
  49. denk says:
    @Blinky Bill

    That clown might not even understand Chinese,
    all those fucking wog

    hehhehe

    • Troll: Hong Kong Hibernian
    • Replies: @Hong Kong Hibernian
  50. @Blinky Bill

    What a nasty group of people on this forum!

    I claim that Escobar is tiresome and is actively working to promote pro-CCP opinions and narratives. This is not the work of an ‘anti-Sino troll’. It is an observation of someone who lives in a city under attack by ‘Xi Zinping Thought’ and the bootlicking tycoons and others who would sell out their mother to make a few yuan (dollars preferred).

    You and the other DOPs (Disciples of Pepe) become outraged and post flame and other nasty comments.

    Your replies are, of course, intellectually VERY weak, and force one to suspect that you are only on this forum to post pro-CCP comments and to also police and attack those of us who love liberty.

    • Troll: GammaRay
    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
  51. @denk

    “denk” is 五毛.

    easy to be tough online 五毛.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
  52. @Hong Kong Hibernian

    Yes, in Hong Kong currently.

    Before you leave get one of your rioter buddies to translate this beautiful Hong Kong song. If your going to visit often you should learn Chinese.

    • Replies: @GammaRay
  53. @Hong Kong Hibernian

    Rioters are the biggest cowards. Tough with everyone weaker than them.

  54. @Hong Kong Hibernian

    Regarding my ‘handle’: I can assure you that I only started posting on unz.com a few days ago.

    You also post under at least one other handle brabantian.

    Your style is distinct and easily recognizable.

    • Replies: @d dan
  55. d dan says:
    @Blinky Bill

    “You also post under at least one other handle brabantian.”

    He is likely another fake Vietnamese “Smith”, pretending innocent after being caught, while dumb enough not to figure out what the evidences reveal.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
  56. GammaRay says:
    @Blinky Bill

    wait, so this hongkong hiberian guy isnt even chinese? lmao

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  57. Anonymous[419] • Disclaimer says:
    @GammaRay

    Welcome to the Internets!

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