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Sinn Fein's Election Victory Is Ireland's 'Brexit Moment'
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“People wanted to kick the government and Sinn Fein provided the shoe to do the kicking,” says Christy Parker, a journalist from the beautiful but de-industrialised town of Youghal in county Cork. He speaks of the “chasm” between the elite benefiting from Ireland’s impressive economic progress and the large part of the population that has been left behind.

Youghal never recovered from the loss of its carpet and textile factories that flourished when I grew up there in the 1950s and 1960s. Today, surveys show that many of its people still yearn for the return of the factories that once provided good jobs. One can see why: the main street is today lined with closed shops, though the cost of renting a flat is high and has doubled over the last eight or nine years.

The town is one of many places in Ireland untouched by the original Celtic Tiger or the economic recovery from the 2008 recession. “Every week people are hearing some new shocking story about the homeless trying to live off food banks somewhere in the country,” says Parker.

I have heard exactly the same phrases being used in the UK to explain why people voted for Brexit. In former coal mining and steel making towns in the Welsh Valleys, I was told that they felt betrayed by everybody in authority from the Welsh Assembly in Cardiff to Westminster and Brussels, “but it was the EU against which people decided to push back.” A man from Walsall said that people there did not care if the GDP of the UK went up or down after Brexit, because they did not consider it “to be their GDP”.

The general election on 8 February was Ireland’s “Brexit moment” when a wide variety of establishment chickens came home to roost, as many voters expressed deep dissatisfaction with the status quo. An exit poll showed that 63 per cent of voters believed that they had not benefited from recent economic improvements.

Politicians and commentators on all sides confirmed the exit poll evidence that the issues which mattered most to voters were health care, housing and homelessness. This is true but tends to obscure the fact that in Ireland, as in the UK and US, voters chose a vociferously nationalist party as the vehicle through which they expressed their rejection of the status quo. In Ireland, Sinn Fein stumbled on a winning political formula whose potency it at first underrated but raised its share of the vote from 9.5 to 24.5 per cent between disastrous local council elections last May and the triumphant general election nine months later. The change in the party’s political prospects may have been astonishing, but nobody believes them to be a flash in the pan protest vote. There is a general assumption that, if there is another general election, and Sinn Fein makes no calamitous mistakes, the party will field enough candidates, as it failed to do this time around, and will win a more complete victory.

The motives of the Irish voters may have been social and economic, but the fact that a quarter of them plumped for Sinn Fein will have a profound influence on Northern Ireland and Ireland’s relations with Britain. For the first time a single party, Sinn Fein, will be politically powerful on both sides of the border, a partner with the DUP in Belfast and potentially either a leading partner in the next Irish government in Dublin or the main opposition to it. This creates a degree of de facto Irish unity never experienced before and will be deeply resented by unionists who see the balance of power swinging against them.

Sinn Fein’s political dominance in the nationalist/Catholic community in the north, that had been showing signs of faltering, will be reinforced. But the unionist/Protestant community, which last year saw Boris Johnson renege on his promises of support, by agreeing to a customs barrier separating Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK, is feeling the ground beginning to give way under its feet.

Brian Feeney, a columnist for the Irish News in Belfast, says history shows that northern nationalists “like republican politics, but they don’t like republican violence”. Destabilisation is most likely to come from the unionist side and a sign of this may be hoax bomb threats against nationalist targets in Belfast in recent days.

A further cause of instability is the British government itself: the highly regarded Northern Ireland Secretary Julian Smith was summarily dismissed in the cabinet reshuffle this week, despite winning plaudits from all sides for brokering the power-sharing deal between Sinn Fein and the DUP that reopened the assembly at Stormont. Smith’s was reportedly sacked due to pledging to investigate alleged crimes committed by British soldiers during the Troubles.

Getting rid of Smith may be an early sign that, under Johnson, English nationalist sensitivities will get priority over keeping Northern Ireland stable. The arrogance and ignorance of Brexiteers when it comes to Ireland has infuriated Irish opinion over the last few years with the Home Secretary Priti Patel famously suggesting that the Irish, who have vivid memories of the Great Famine, could be starved into making concessions.

Voters say that Brexit was not a significant influence on the way they cast their vote in the election, probably because they wrongly supposed that the problem was solved. But Ireland remains the EU’s front line state, which gives it influence in Brussels but ensures constant friction with the UK.

ORDER IT NOW

From Sinn Fein’s point of view, it has been a successful 40 years’ march since it first started winning elections during the hunger strikes of 1980/81 as Daniel Finn describes in his important book One Man’s Terrorist: A Political History of the IRA. The initial slogan was that “Will anyone here object if, with a ballot box in this hand and an Armalite in this hand, we take power in Ireland?” These are not words that Sinn Fein’s many enemies are likely to allow it to forget, but during the election campaign just finished, Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil claims that the shadow of the gunman still tainted Sinn Fein were mostly ignored. The accusation may resonate with older voters, but not with younger ones with no experience of “physical force” republicanism.

Constitutional action has worked too well for Sinn Fein to try anything else. It has also cut the ground from under dissident republicans seeking to return to violence. Northern nationalists know that demographic change is propelling them towards a voting majority. In the south, they are no longer hobbled politically by memories of The Troubles.

Sinn Fein may well congratulate itself that years of struggle have produced its present successes. But it has also been extremely lucky: after trying and failing to make Irish partition an international issue for almost a century, the Brexit vote in 2016 automatically did so by potentially turning the border into an international frontier between the UK and the EU. Sinn Fein chose the right issues on which to campaign in the general election, but it was also the almost accidental beneficiary of disillusionment with traditional parties, and that disillusionment has been leading to these parties’ shock defeat in elections across the world.

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Ireland 
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  1. They don’t have “vivid memories of the Great Famine.” Everybody around then is long dead. They have been deluged with reminders of it. Wonder why.

    • Replies: @BDS Always
  2. Jake says:

    If I recall correctly from many years ago, Sinn Fein in 1918 won 70% of the Irish vote (70% of all Irish votes – there was not a Northern Ireland then). And Sinn Fein run basically on one issue: Irish independence immediately.

    The Brits responded by nullifying the vote, which led to horrible war and then Irish civil war, and then partition and all the Hell that came from it.

    Anybody who doesn’t think that the Brits, meaning the Brit WASP Deep State and its acceptable leaders of both major parties, have been working out plans to play the same game in a slightly new form in order to make Brexit work best or the Brit WASP Elites is hopelessly naive.

    • Replies: @Irish Savant
  3. My friend’s father was born in the first decade of the 20th century in County Tyrone. He said the reason his (Protestant) family left, when he was a child, was that neighbours came to his father and warned him that if they didn’t leave, they would have to kill him. He believed that the neighbours had been Catholics.
    At university, shortly after the “Troubles” started, I met several Irish from both sides. Some Protestants in favour of unification, and some Catholics opposed. One or two were openly hostile to those from the Republic and NI who got along. It wasn’t as black and white as presented. It was the Catholic wife of a classmate from Dublin who explained to me that a rather “odd” meek Protestant student was undoubtedly the way he was, because he came from a small town just outside Dublin where he may have been the only Protestant family in town. In such places, she said Protestants were treated more harshly than Catholics in NI. There is always another story not told. The few I kept in touch with were ecstatic about Blair’s Belfast Agreement, but were wary of the IRA, as they had long maintained the IRA’s view of a united Ireland was Cuba.
    I suspect a great deal of the IRA’s unspoken success, like Brexit, is due to the duopoly’s race replacement immigration programme, personified by people like Alan Shatter. One can only hope that the IRA hasn’t caved to the suicide of the EU. Perhaps an Eirexit is in the cards, and along with a truly independent non-EU Scotland, a different Celtic Tiger can emerge.

  4. Sean says:

    The house price boom in the Republic, which Sinn Fein won’t be able to halt without totally alienting the Irish elite, seems part of a global trend; it’s the kind of thing Michael Hudson and few others seem to understand.

    The arrogance and ignorance of Brexiteers when it comes to Ireland has infuriated Irish opinion over the last few years with the Home Secretary Priti Patel famously suggesting that the Irish, who have vivid memories of the Great Famine, could be starved into making concessions.

    Leo Varadkar broke the Belfast Agreement, because “if erecting an intrusive customs border north-south is a violation of the Good Friday Agreement, in that it compromises the national identity of Irish nationalists in the North, then erecting an equivalent border in the Irish Sea automatically violates the British identity of Northern unionists”. Sinn Fein and Boris both benefited from Varadkar centring everything on the Britain–Ireland relationship. It is difficult to find an instance where Scotland or Ireland benefited from being allies of the Continental powers against England.

    Scotland, Eire, Northern Ireland, Wales and England were in the same customs union as when they were all were in the EU, so it didn’t really matter if Scotland became ‘independent’. in the context of Scotland and the Rest of Britain plus Northern Ireland and the Republic being in the EU. For an ‘ Independent ‘Scotland there would be no real borders, nor trade, or currency exchange rate barriers either. Post-Brexit, all these barriers would assume enormous proportions. Scottish independence is a non–starter. Put it out of your mind. Journalists like to conjure up the spectre, but it is bullcrap.
    The republic has always been given special consideration, for example citizens of the Irish Republic can come to Britain and settle as a right and they can even vote in British elections. I think the Republic under Varadkar has won a tactical victory, but laid the basis for a massive strategic reverse as barriers between Ireland and Britain assume enormous proportions. The EU is using Ireland, which is living off its freeriding deals with Google and others of their kidney. The EU, or rather Germany will put a stop to that in the near future.

    • Replies: @Ulick McGee
  5. Paul Revere says: • Website

    Let’s hope that the Irish are finally waking up to the down side of the Lisbon Treaty, which, if I recall correctly had to be forced on them after twice voting it down.

    The notion that Protestants in the Republic were treated badly as a commenter above suggested based on comments of a college classmate’s wife, are gobshite.

    Having family there and been there many, many times, I have never heard anything negative said about Protestants, ever. The Irish are very tolerant, to a fault, but they are starting to figure out what the globalists have in store for them – they better pray that there are still some heroes left.

    • Replies: @Celt Darnell
  6. @obwandiyag

    “They have been deluged with reminders of it. Wonder why.”

    You tell us?

  7. The squabbles between Europeans, whether Irish and British or Russian and Polish, seem so petty and silly. The enemy is within their gates, and replacing them, but they insist on dancing to the tune of centuries old conflicts? Of all the silly European grudges, the Irish and the Poles take the top. Never mind the Africans and Muslims, let’s rehash the 16-19th centuries!

    • Agree: Irish Savant
  8. A123 says:

    The general election on 8 February was Ireland’s “Brexit moment” when a wide variety of establishment chickens came home to roost, as many voters expressed deep dissatisfaction with the status quo. An exit poll showed that 63 per cent of voters believed that they had not benefited from recent economic improvements.

    What is the answer to breaking the status quo?

    The catastrophic Elite Globalist rule of Barack Hussein, gave a clear way forward for the U.S.. When Trump took office he was able to immediately begin undoing the lengthy list of errors committed by the prior administration.

    The next Irish government does not have such clarity. Many of Ireland’s problems stem from Brussels, which means the new administration cannot immediately begin fixing mistakes. If the EU establishment continues its intransigence towards the UK, Ireland is in an awkward position where it does not fully control its own fate.

    PEACE 😇

  9. @Paul Revere

    Protestants were ethnically cleansed from what is now the Irish Republic during the so-called war of independence and the civil war. You’re just another American demonstrating his ignorance about Irish and British history.

  10. @Sean

    Ireland is not living off free-riding deals.

    Just because Germans etc. are willing to make businessmen pay 3 times more doesn’t mean it is free-riding to charge a low amount. German voters have never been told that such taxes are mostly passed onto them in the form of higher prices anyway.

    Ireland doesn’t have the advantages of resources, location or population that other countries have so it charged factories only 10% profit tax to create jobs when it was perfectly fair and reasonable to do so. The service industry etc. paid double that. The EU outlawed this practice of 2 tax rates so Ireland charged everyone 12.5%. What’s to stop Germany and France from doing the same? The cost of vastly superior education, health care, pensions and welfare for their citizens?

    Also, Google et al pay far less than 12.5% and I believe Google only has 10% Irish working for it. Google is free-riding off Ireland, not the other way around.

  11. @Curmudgeon

    I suspect a great deal of the IRA’s unspoken success, like Brexit, is due to the duopoly’s race replacement immigration programme, personified by people like Alan Shatter. One can only hope that the IRA hasn’t caved to the suicide of the EU. Perhaps an Eirexit is in the cards, and along with a truly independent non-EU Scotland, a different Celtic Tiger can emerge.

    Referring to Sinn Fein as ‘the IRA’ is a bit much, but whatever…that’s not the only part of your post which is comical.

    Sinn Fein is a Globo-Homo party: fully supportive of race replacement, deviant gender politics, and the killing of the unborn.

    The National Party will gain seats in the next election: https://nationalparty.ie/

    • Replies: @Curmudgeon
  12. Sean says:
    @Ulick McGee

    Ireland doesn’t have the advantages of resources, location or population that other countries have so it charged factories only 10% profit tax to create jobs when it was perfectly fair and reasonable to do so. The service industry etc. paid double that. The EU outlawed this practice of 2 tax rates so Ireland charged everyone 12.5%. What’s to stop Germany and France from doing the same? The cost of vastly superior education, health care, pensions and welfare for their citizens?

    That would be fair enough if, as you are suggesting, the profits taxed in Ireland are made in Ireland, but they are not. There are a slew of profit shifting mechanisms that Ireland has recaltrescently refused to cease allowing. But they are being forced to, and they will be forced to again.

    The Irish are the world champions at facilitating the tax tourist corporations’ evasion of tax on profits by the countries where those profits are made. That is free riding in my book. They are in cahoots with the greedy corporation stealing from the populations of those aforementioned countries. There are sick children in places other than Ireland you know. Ireland ought to realise that it, since it is far from being a poor country in the EU now, it will have to start raising tax to pay for people in other EU member states.

    Anyway, those are not Britain’s problems any more. The privileges that the Irish Republic’s citizens have (to come to the UK get benefits as if they are UK subjects and even vote in British elections) are overdue for reform and will be looked at along with Ireland’s status as somewhere UK businesses can financially base themselves in. Ireland and the UK are at a watershed, they will grow farther apart.

  13. Hirflawdd says:

    Scottish independence as part of a British common market is perfectly feasible but I can’t see the Scots voting for independence as a member of the EU – that would mean surrendering sovereignty to Brussels, adopting the Euro and a hard border with England.

    The same geographic realities also apply to the Irish Republic but history coupled with historical mythology seem to rule out any common sense membership of a British economic community. Really the British should treat the Irish as they wish to be treated, as foreigners with none of the privileges now accorded them. The southern Irish must dread the prospect of a million northern Protestants becoming part of a 32 county state.

  14. I think Patrick’s article captures what the vote for Sinn Fein was which was a spirited counter revolution against the status quo. This statement regarding a Brexit voter’s rejection of “economic worries” encapsulates the reasoning behind a vote against the dominant elite support for the EU:

    “A man from Walsall said that people there did not care if the GDP of the UK went up or down after Brexit, because they did not consider it “to be their GDP”

    [MORE]

    All the shops closing in Youghal in Cork would seem to suggest property would be cheaper but as Patrick correctly points out, the private residential sector rents are going up, beyond the reach of people who live there.
    However the *reality* is Sinn Fein are a pro open borders party and unabashedly pro EU and they would advocate moving migrants into these areas. In fact they do! I’m all for talking about the voters but the people they vote for and their organisation needs to be critiqued accurately. What has happened at protests against these policies of immigration is the Sinn Fein candidate comes in and assumes the people all agree with them but is shocked when they don’t. This is where Patrick’s analysis also goes slightly awry in my opinion. Sinn Fein are still a party who use violence but now they use it in the form of demands for censorship and they use intimidation of political opponents which there is strong evidence of. National Party, Ireland Freedom Party posters have been taken down and Aontu candidates have been threatened when they attempted to hand out anti abortion leaflets in Northern Ireland. They also have an army of social media activists who have used some really threatening rhetoric towards loyalist activists. It is steeped in Sectarian hatred which Brendan Hughes, the former IRA member, talks about in the book “Voices from the Grave”. Hughes alleges that Gerry Adams used this divisiveness to promote sectarian hate as a galvanising “motivational” strategy and from what I see from Sinn Fein supporters in the North, Hughes was correct. There is also a tendency to monopolise victimology and that was learned after World War II. Unfortunately it is a very practical way to clear a path for future conflict and the conventional debates usually focus on the horrors of Bloody Sunday in isolation but if there were an attempt to bring up the abominable IRA Napalm attack in LaMon, there would have to be a cross reference back to an atrocity inflicted on the Nationalists/Republicans back then. The desire is that commemoration be kept seperate but that just won’t happen and there are people who don’t want it to. Compare this with the annual post WWII commemoration of Bleiburg where the descendants of slaughtered Croats attend a Catholic Mass because of Tito’s massacres there in 1945. The British returned these people to their deaths when they wanted to surrender as POW’s which was a flagrant breach of the law. Ironically some white Russians who were there too had refugee status! However they were sent to Stalin to be murdered. The reaction to this is that it “wasn’t as bad as what the Ustase did and sure…they were nazis”. So the children were nazis? Really? That is intentional and it’s used to hide Britain’s complicity and guilt in what happened in 1945 in Southern Carinthia when Brigadier Patrick Scott’s famous quote “No visible signs” should never be forgotten. More importantly though, Eden and Macmillan’s lack of moral leadership. So again the politics of victimology which is completely amoral plays out here as it does in Northern Ireland.
    It will be interesting to see how Sinn Fein move this sectarian hate to include the Nationalists in the Republic of Ireland who are also their enemies. I think Sinn Fein will use State censorship which is a form of violence and who knows? Maybe Sinn Fein will join in with supporting the Antifa thugs who turn up in Austria with signs to the effect that Tito should have killed more men, women and children. It was “duh Brits” who made it all possible. My point here is that Sinn Fein are all over the place on many issues and this will intensify.
    They also want to force every form of neoliberalist hedonism on to Ireland and have endorsed a policy of forcing parents to comply with “gender reassigment” (body mutilation) for children who are less than 6 years old. This is just more of the same establishment violence being inflicted on the Irish people. It means that there are now three parties who push the same policies; Sinn Fein, Fianna Fial and Fine Gael are the same party. The policies are pretty much the same and that’s because they don’t work for Ireland. They work for themselves and serve different interests.
    Something Patrick didn’t mention was the suggested commemoration by the ruling party of Fine Gael of the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) which was going to go ahead in spite of furious reactions from the overwhelming majority of the country. For anyone unfamiliar with Ireland the War of Independence in the early 1920’s involved the British Government employing ex Somme World War I veterans and mercenaries to Ireland. This was the “Black and Tans” who are often spoken of who wore combinations of army clothing so they got this nickname. Also they were supported by the RIC who later became the modern RUC (the police in Northern Ireland who were very different and became the PSNI). This, of course, resulted in violence against civilians that has been compared to Cromwell and included opening fire on a crowd at a massively attended sporting event and burning towns to the ground. Now I know that War is Hell and there are, of course, brutal assassinations and violence meted on the other side but that is what I remember from the stories I was told from back then. People in rural Ireland were terrified. That stupid idea to commemorate simply cannot be ignored as a factor in determining the election results. It was so incredibly destructive that I have to wonder if there is an element of staging in it and I have no idea why but it seemed a good way of alienating the electorate to me.
    Also the Irish electoral system itself seems to be totally corrupted and eventually it will be unworkable. They have three seperate election registers and, in some cases, they send polling cards out to the same address with the same name.
    From what I can see, Ireland is an extremely corrupt country (farming, building, you name it. It’s reeking with pay outs, subsidies to large farmers related to Dail ministers, and all kinds of elitist politics). Anyone who’s naive enough to think the Dail is filled with well meaning representatives and that there isn’t a conspiratorial establishment drive to keep Ireland in the EU for their own enrichment, then there’s a bridge over the Liffey I can sell them. I think the results would probably have been the same but it is very strange that this exit poll Patrick speaks of put immigration as an issue which very few cared about. 1% of the population? Well that tallies with the nationalist vote and it might be accurate but it didn’t seem that way from television polls on direct provision centres (places where they house migrants) and also Noel Grealish and a few other independents got in campaigning against mass immigration.
    Ireland is a sewer. Discuss….

    • Replies: @joe862
  15. @Ulick McGee

    Spot on about Google who will be very useful to Sinn Fein in their violent crackdown on freedom of expression if they take power

  16. joe862 says:
    @Smugly_Knowledgeable

    I live in the Chicago area and worked in a heavily irish industry for a couple of decades. I’d be shocked if anything involving a lot of irish catholics were anything but a sewer. Chicago is known worldwide for its corruption and the irish are largely responsible. I think something is just wrong with them. They love BS, always working harder to manipulate perception than to accomplish anything worthwhile. They fancy themselves to be victims even though the bulk of them get ahead by benefitting from ethnic preferences. Most other groups aren’t nearly as ethnocentric as they are. They’re incredibly selfish.

    • Replies: @Smugly_Knowledgeable
  17. @joe862

    I’m an “Irish Catholic” Joe. The Irish establishment hate the Catholic Faith and have sought to undermine the Constitution which is based on natural and moral law. They followed the template that’s been adopted in your country where the Supreme Court is a way of taking away the rights of the people. It is nothing to do with ethnic solidarity when it comes to destroying the country either.

    Know your audience Joe.

    • Replies: @joe862
  18. joe862 says:
    @Smugly_Knowledgeable

    I couldn’t care less if you’re irish catholic. I have extensive firsthand experience with irish catholics and have formed opinions about them. “Irish catholic” is an identity more than anything. I don’t mean sincerely religious types. I don’t think I’ve ever met one. Your saying that “Ireland is an extremely corrupt country” is exactly what I would expect based on my experience with irish catholics here in the US.

    • Replies: @Smugly_Knowledgeable
  19. @Celt Darnell

    Hilarious, those that were collaborating with the British were certainly dealt with, but others who had committed no grievance were largely left alone. Many left of their own accord, realizing that if they wanted to continue living under the Crown it would have to be elsewhere. The question now is whether they can keep their hard fought independence.

  20. @joe862

    “I don’t think I’ve ever met one”.

    How can you make such an absurd generalisation then Joe?

    Ireland has become extremely corrupt due to the machinations and interference of corrupt, degenerate and perverse elites and empires. That should clarify what I meant

  21. Adûnâi says:

    Yesterday, I checked top 9 political parties of the Republic of Ireland on the matter of LGBT acceptance. Only one was against sodomy, one (Aontú)! And who is its leader? Peadar Tóibín (Peadar sounds suspiciously close to Russian pidor – paederast). LoL. And it got 41k votes! 1.9%!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_Irish_general_election
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aontú

    Even this fat ugly woman “politician” has left the faggot circus and joined it. Where are the men? Where are the patres familias?

    https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/sdlp-councillor-quits-party-over-same-sex-marriage-vote-and-joins-aontu-38348652.html

    Why aren’t the DUP campaigning in the Republic of Ireland? Are there so few homopbobes among the Catholic worshippers of Jew Jesus?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democratic_Unionist_Party

    • Replies: @Smugly_Knowledgeable
  22. @Hong Kong Hibernian

    Laugh all you want. The Irish (many scattered some now dead) with whom I have kept touch over the last 45+ years, considered and consider Sein Fein too close to the IRA for their liking, irrespective of their being for or opposed to re-unification or religion. I’m not suggesting the party hasn’t changed, all political parties have, everywhere. For example, when has a real party of the “left” ever been in favour of immigration? If Sein Fein has become globo-homo, then a pox be upon them.

  23. I’m astonished at the normally astute Patrick Cockburn’s elementary misreading of Sinn Fein. That party has long since ceased to be traditionally nationalist, especially in the Republic. In fact they’re the poster children for globohomo, at the forefront of gay rights, same-sex ‘marriage’ and possibly the most ‘progressive’ when it comes to divorce and abortion.

    Their most damning betrayal of Ireland lies however in their policies on open borders which will exacerbate the ongoing ethnic dilution of the native population here. Their bloviating about the cost of accommodation and the difficulty in gaining access to schools and healthcare makes their position all the more hypocritical and renders the party’s name (Sinn Fein means ‘Ourselves Alone’) an inversion of reality.

    • Replies: @Smugly_Knowledgeable
  24. @Jake

    There is no longer a ‘Brit WASP Deep State’ ffs! Just look at the Cabinet with the three most powerful positions held by two Indians and a Jew. The entire British Establishment now wages war on everything and anything representing traditional Christian Britain.

  25. @Curmudgeon

    SF have exactly the same population replacement policies as Alan Shatter.

  26. @Irish Savant

    Utterly astonished how this goes on. Now convinced that UK is done if there is no violent rebellion.

  27. @Irish Savant

    I said that about Sinn Fein in my post but I think he speaks about the spirit behind the vote rather than the actual party. You are completely accurate in what you say. Anyone who sees Sinn Fein as anything other than a neoliberal organisation with authoritarian and potentially sinister oppression of freedoms, comparable to Merkel’s police state, then they’re going to be disappointed. I feel for people who voted for them because they made vague promises about housing and health. I watched them in Northern Ireland and they are a protest party that followed on from a violent political group. Their education minister resigned after she undermined the tripartite selection system and continually went against the popular approach to selection examinations for grammar and secondary schools following the end of the Primary school time. They have also had people who were linked to actual gangsters from Romania who used their position to trap girls and other Romanian people in various types of “work” including prostitution. They were also involved in the “cash for ash” scandal but the British media despise the DUP so they implicated them solely and tbf their involvement was a leadership role. The DUP and Sinn Fein have a handy arrangement which is to collapse Stormont on the basis of a theatrical and public argument and then get paid for doing nothing. This lasted two years till now. I hear stories of local councillors doing good work but at the provincial level which is Stormont, they have been atrocious. Beware Republic of Ireland. These people love diversions into ekwalateee and other nonsense. Anything to avoid doing their jobs.

  28. @Irish Savant

    Once upon a time, there were Anglo-Zionists. Then one fine day, the Zionists turned on the Anglos.

  29. @Curmudgeon

    I wouldn’t get such a thrill up my leg over the election of Sinn Fein in the 26 Counties insofar as an opportunity for an Eire-exit. Sinn Fein today is not the Sinn Fein of the 1920s, 1940s or even 1971-72 (a period of the highest violence in the Six Counties). It is a far left party that is decked out in a nationalist party dress. True nationalism is the least of their concerns. I believe they are quite happy to be in the EU, with its globalist-multi-culty agenda. After the Irish Civil War in the 1920s, many Protestants in the south left. During the Troubles, many on both sides left – but mostly due to economic hardship. Even in the Loyalist parts of Belfast decent jobs were hard to find. This all being an aside, Sinn Fein has caved in to EU delusions. It will not stop the immigration policies of the Jewish Alan Shatter, will promote all kinds of sexual perversions in primary school classrooms (far more than the mere discussion of homosexuality in general), will continue the oppression of free speech. The move toward a united Ireland has to come from a broader spectrum of society than just Sinn Fein (from which it won’t). The breakup of the United Kingdom can cut both ways. For example, Scotland could easily survive if it’s government would give up the idea of a socialist paradise, which would destroy its wealth in 5-10 years. The SNP is not much different from Sinn Fein in political outlook. It just doesn’t have the paramilitary baggage. A nationalist England, a truly nationalist united Ireland, and a non-socialist nationalist independent Scotland can work out economic deals and social policy deals that will comfort and benefit the average person.

    • Replies: @Sean
  30. @Celt Darnell

    I’d say that was true more in places like Donegal, Monaghan and Cavan. Today maybe 3-4% of the 26 Counties are Protestant – mainly Church of Ireland. Many of those folk are well off. They were well off then and they are well off now. It was the less wealthy Protestants who left. Also, the same happened to Catholics in parts of the North during the same time. There were actually pogroms against Catholics. Many fled to a place called Dundalk in Co. Louth.

  31. Anonymous[965] • Disclaimer says:

    Sinn Fein are pro-EU, anti-British marxists. Refering to their victory as a “Brexit moment” is ridiculous, if anything it shows that the Irish are decidedly anti-Brexit and are sending the strongest, most anti-British signal they can.

  32. Anonymous[965] • Disclaimer says:
    @Irish Savant

    The “WASP” obsession seems to be an American thing and very outdated, it has no relevance to modern Britain.

    Also, I’ve always thought referring to the British elite as Anglo-Saxon Protestants sounds ridiculous as most of them are of Norman descent and the Church of England is de facto Catholic, it has very little in common with Protestant churches.

    • Replies: @Irish Savant
  33. It’s a reaction to the flood of Paki’s and similar.
    They’re returning to “Ourselves Alone” from “Anybody but us” that’s worshipped by the EU.

  34. Growing up in the ‘green’ Irish diaspora in the US, I used to admire Sinn Fein many years ago, but no longer. Now that they’ve gone full-on globo-homo and embraced race-replacement, how can they even call themselves nationalists? The truth about Sinn Fein is that they’re not really a nationalist party at all; they’re merely an ‘anybody but England’ party. Pathetic!

    The motives of the Irish voters may have been social and economic, but the fact that a quarter of them plumped for Sinn Fein will have a profound influence on Northern Ireland and Ireland’s relations with Britain …

    The arrogance and ignorance of Brexiteers when it comes to Ireland has infuriated Irish opinion over the last few years with the Home Secretary Priti Patel famously suggesting that the Irish, who have vivid memories of the Great Famine, could be starved into making concessions.

    Does Patrick not see the double-standard he’s erecting here? Does he not understand that poor, unemployed workers in Co. Cork are reacting to their conditions no differently than the poor, unemployed workers in northern England? Does he not see that both are simply prioritizing their own immediate situations over the distant troubles of N. Ireland? And isn’t such a response perfectly natural? Yet he persists in labeling the poor, unemployed workers in Leeds as ‘arrogant’, while showing empathy for the ones in Youghal. Curious …

    Voters say that Brexit was not a significant influence on the way they cast their vote in the election, probably because they wrongly supposed that the problem was solved. But Ireland remains the EU’s front line state, which gives it influence in Brussels but ensures constant friction with the UK.

    I think it is perfectly disgusting and shameless that the EU is using something as unfortunate (not to mention dangerous) as N. Ireland’s troubles as a sleazy ‘wedge issue’ against the Brexiteers. I hope that more Irish wake up and start to see what a truly ugly and cynical organization the EU is. It is completely unworthy of the fine peoples of Europe. I believe in what Charles DeGalle said, that they should have a Europe of nations, rather than a nation of Europe.

    “Will anyone here object if, with a ballot box in this hand and an Armalite in this hand, we take power in Ireland?” These are not words that Sinn Fein’s many enemies are likely to allow it to forget, but during the election campaign just finished, Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil claims that the shadow of the gunman still tainted Sinn Fein were mostly ignored.

    Oh? And where did Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil come from? Why, the latter was formed out of the pro-treaty faction of the IRA back in the twenties, while the former began as blue-shirt militant group in imitation of the Spanish Phalangists. (Some of them even went to Spain in the 30s to fight for Franco.) It turns out that more than one political party in Irish history began with the bullet and only later moved on to the ballot. But this sort of hypocrisy is precisely why ever larger numbers of Irish are becoming disgusted with the mainstream parties–which is what FG and FF are. Too bad they can’t find a better protest party than SF.

    • Replies: @Adûnâi
  35. Sean says:
    @Brooklyn Dave

    The indigenous British do not much care about northern Ireland leaving the UK, which it doubtless will one day, but as with the recent sacking of NI secretary Julian Smith (for agreeing to a inquiry into alleged British atrocities), there is very little patience left with the Nationalists. The EU is trying to punish Britain, but as with the Scots Auld Alliance with France , such attempts by Ireland to use the Continent against England have a poor track record for the hapless Irish (and Scots) who never got anything out of it.

    Sinn Fein is rather like the SNP in being Leftie pro immigration, but business is just as pro immigration (they get cheap labour while the state meats the costs). Immigration is the old business policy of private profit public subsidy. Sinn Fein have a half baked gangster element along the Border around Armagh, where fuel and agricultural smuggling seems to be the main industry, and a lot of bad publicity from their years of ruling by fear is already bubbling up. The area is also a centre of the facilitators of illegal immigration.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-50221753

    Two brothers are wanted on suspicion of manslaughter over 39 people found dead in a lorry in Essex. Police initially believed the 31 men and eight women discovered dead in the refrigerated container in the early hours of Wednesday morning were Chinese. But a number of Vietnamese families have come forward fearing their loved ones are among the dead.

    Ronan Hughes, 40, and Christopher Hughes, 34, from Armagh in Northern Ireland, are also wanted by police on suspicion of human trafficking

    For example, Scotland could easily survive if it’s government would give up the idea of a socialist paradise, which would destroy its wealth in 5-10 years. [ …] A nationalist England, a truly nationalist united Ireland, and a non-socialist nationalist independent Scotland can work out economic deals and social policy deals that will comfort and benefit the average person.

    All three of the leading Irish Republic parties are pro-EU, ditto Scotland. Again, the real issue is whether England would be in the EU. Scotland could not possibly come out the UK and remain in the EU unless England was in it too. All three of the leading Irish parties are pro-EU, so if there is a united Ireland it will be in the EU, which will will try to use Ireland to establish overlordship over Britain. United or not, the Republic will be caught in the middle of increasing hostility between the UK and the EU.

  36. Adûnâi says:
    @Digital Samizdat

    “I believe in what Charles DeGalle said, that they should have a Europe of nations, rather than a nation of Europe.”

    Is that feasible, however? How can you wage wars of extermination against Turkey, Algeria and Egypt with a disunited Europe of varied cultures? Or do you think the fate of the continent to be an eventual bourgeois slumber?

    • Replies: @Digital Samizdat
  37. @Adûnâi

    Waging wars of extermination in the ME? What are you talking about? Are you some kind of sick neocon or something?

  38. @Anonymous

    True, It’s tribal and cultural, nor doctrinal. This is most pronounced in Northern Ireland and Glasgow. Ironically the doctrines of the CofE – and its mirror image the CofI – are much closer to Roman Catholicism than they are to Presbyterianism or Methodism, the bedrocks of Loyalist beliefs.

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