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Before the first Trump-Biden debate, moderator Chris Wallace listed the six subjects that would be covered:

The Trump and Biden records, the Supreme Court, COVID-19, the economy, race and violence in our cities, and the integrity of the election.

According to a recent Gallup survey, Wallace’s topics tracked the public’s concerns — the top seven of which were the coronavirus, government leadership, race relations, the economy, crime and violence, the judicial system, morality and family decline.

As an issue, national security did not even break Gallup’s Top 10. It ranked below education and homelessness, just above climate change.

Which raises a question?

Can a nation as divided as we are and as distracted as we are by the most lethal pandemic in 100 years, the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, and the worst racial crisis since the 1960s, conduct a global policy to contain the ambitions of two rival great powers on the other side of the world and to create a U.S.-led democratic world order?

Can we build, lead and sustain alliances of dozens of nations to contain Vladimir Putin’s Russia and Xi Jinping’s China as we did the Soviet Union during more than 40 years of the Cold War?

Are we still up to it? And must we Americans do it?

Or should we let the internal problems and pressures on these two nations do the primary work of containing their external ambitions?

Case in point: Vladimir Putin’s Russia. While our Beltway elites are obsessed with Russia and Putin, seeing in them a mortal threat to our democracy, close observers are seeing something else.

“Putin, Long the Sower of Instability, Is Now Surrounded by It,” runs a headline in Thursday’s New York Times. The theme also appears in The Financial Times in a story headlined, “Putin Watches as Flames Engulf Neighborhood.”

Consider the situation today in Russia’s “near abroad,” the former republics of the USSR that broke from Moscow’s rule between 1989 and 1991.

The Baltic States — Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia — are already in the U.S.-led NATO alliance. Georgia in the Central Caucasus, the birthplace of Stalin, fought a war against its Russian neighbor in 2008 and is now a friend and de facto ally of the United States.

Ukraine, the most populous of the 14 republics to break away from Moscow, is now the most hostile to Moscow, having watched its Crimean Peninsula in the Black Sea be amputated by Putin in 2014.

Now, Belarus, Russia’s closest neighbor to the west, is in a political crisis with weekly demonstrations demanding the ouster of Putin’s ally, longtime autocrat Alexander Lukashenko, after a fraudulent election.

Putin could be forced to do what he has no desire to do — forcefully intervene to put down a popular uprising that could cause Belarus to follow Ukraine into the Western camp.

Now, in the South Caucasus, two former republics of the USSR, Azerbaijan and Armenia, are again in an open war over Nagorno-Karabakh, an Armenian enclave wholly within Azerbaijan.

While Armenia, an ally of Russia, is pleading for intervention by Moscow to halt the war, Turkey is aiding the Azeris militarily, and they seem to be gaining the upper hand.

Four thousand miles away, in Russia’s Far East, in the city of Khabarovsk, which is as close to China as Dulles Airport is to D.C., anti-Putin rallies have become a constant feature of politics.

ORDER IT NOW

Last summer, Putin’s political rival Alexei Navalny was poisoned with Novichok, a nerve agent developed in Soviet laboratories. Navalny has now become a live martyr and more potent adversary as the Kremlin has failed to come up with a satisfactory explanation for what appears to have been an attempted assassination. New German and French sanctions on Russian officials could be forthcoming.

Russians are tiring of Putin’s 20-year rule. His popularity, though high by European standards, is near its nadir. And Russians have suffered mightily from the coronavirus and what it has done to their economy.

Now, the pro-Putin regime in Kyrgyzstan on the Chinese border appears to have been overthrown after another fraudulent election, and Beijing is telling everyone to stay out.

And how have Putin’s imperial adventures gone?

While his intervention in Syria saved the regime of Bashar Assad and Russia’s sole naval base in the Mediterranean, the war continues to bleed Mother Russia.

Putin’s intervention on the side of the rebels in Libya, however, has not gone well. Last year’s rebel drive to capture the capital of Tripoli failed, and the rebel forces have been forced to retreat back to the east.

Meanwhile, Russia’s economy remains only one-tenth the size of China’s economy, and its population is also only one-tenth that of China.

Perhaps time is on America’s side in the rivalry with Russia, and war avoidance remains as wise a policy as it was during the Cold War.

Patrick J. Buchanan is the author of “Nixon’s White House Wars: The Battles That Made and Broke a President and Divided America Forever.”

Copyright 2020 Creators.com.

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Belarus, China, Russia, Vladimir Putin 
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  1. This doesn’t sound like you Pat. Did someone ghost write it ?

    Andrea Iravani

  2. I couldn’t finish this article. The notion that Russia has any “expansionist aims” is so far-fetched that I wonder what the weather is like on “Planet Pat.” Pat, to summarize, has no real problems with a drive for American hegemony, but just thinks that it ought to be achieved for less.

    Pat was right and I was wrong back in the 1990s when he saw the threat of outsourcing. Now he’s wrong about Russia and Vladimir Putin. I saw a recent press conference in which Putin did an on-the-spot translation of a question asked by a German journalist (in German) into Russian for his Russian audience. Can anyone imagine the clowns that we’ve see on our screens in these “debates” doing anything like that? Russia is governed by serious men who are doing their best, although they make mistakes like everyone else. The United States is governed by freaks that should be in a circus sideshow.

    • Agree: Mulegino1
  3. gsjackson says:

    Pat really is a Beltway creature, isn’t he?

    • Replies: @Realist
  4. Though Buchanan has had a great career as a sceptic of yankee imperialism, some times his views are infected by the remnants of a belief in it he has been unable to fully shake.

  5. What a bunch of lies. Just plain old-fashioned lies. Quite refreshing after all the casuistry on this site.

  6. anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:

    He cultivates a reputation for “non-interventionism,” but Mr. Buchanan has been fundamentally faithful to the Establishment, always careful to leave Russia and China cast as enemies.

    It’s been a while since he has taken a break from carnival barking the next Most Important Election Ever with an Exceptional!, RussiaBadChinaToo column like this one. The propaganda pronouns, personalization of the autocratic bad guys, and cliché buzzwords are many, and it’s important to pull back a bit to examine how “Mr. Paleoconservative” wraps them in his faux dissidence:

    Can a nation as divided as we are and as distracted as we are by the most lethal pandemic in 100 years, the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, and the worst racial crisis since the 1960s, conduct a global policy to contain the ambitions of two rival great powers on the other side of the world and to create a U.S.-led democratic world order?

    Can we build, lead and sustain alliances of dozens of nations to contain Vladimir Putin’s Russia and Xi Jinping’s China as we did the Soviet Union during more than 40 years of the Cold War?

    Are we still up to it? And must we Americans do it?

    Or should we let the internal problems and pressures on these two nations do the primary work of containing their external ambitions?

    See how it works? Uncle Sam’s (our) prophylactic goodness goes unquestioned, the evil “ambitions” of others presumed. By suggesting that maybe “we” can’t afford to protect the rest of the world so much these days, Mr. Buchanan endorses the narrative.

    It’s telling that Mr. Buchanan remains on record endorsing the bipartisan Beltway premise that (July 7, 2017) “Americans are rightly angry that Russia hacked the presidential election of 2016.” (That bit’s omitted in today’s column, what with the more immediate need to herd enough GOP sheep back to the polls to legitimatize the system.) The columns and comment threads of July 20 and 24, 2018, and May 31, 2019 — where I first asked Mr. Buchanan’s fans why he seemed willfully ignorant of the observations of people like William Binney — are further evidence.

    His fans rationalize that he’s doing what he can without losing his platform, but Mr. Buchanan effectively serves Washington. Look around and think critically for yourself and you’ll see that when it comes to electoral politics he’s Stagehand Right in the puppet show, and in discussions of US imperialism the Right sash of the Overton window.

    • Agree: Realist
  7. Renoman says:

    Russia is not threatening or bothering anyone, the USA is threatening and bothering pretty well everyone. the people of Crimea overwhelmingly wanted and voted to leave Ukraine, Russia did not TAKE it. Get over it children.

    • Agree: Realist, RoatanBill
  8. Pat Buchanan is correct: “war avoidance remains as wise a policy as it was during the Cold War.”
    But it is a difficult policy when neither Washington nor Moscow has the control they had during the Cold War, especially with the hegemonic rise of China. Chaos is producing the conditions where any nation will have to go to war: existential threat. Ordering the world can avert our destruction – in theory – but only by accepting some harsh realities.
    https://www.ghostsofhistory.wordpress.com/

  9. Mikael_ says:

    The bullshit is strong in this one.

    I especially like amputated.

    • Agree: Realist, Rurik
  10. Realist says:

    Meanwhile, Russia’s economy remains only one-tenth the size of China’s economy, and its population is also only one-tenth that of China.

    It’s nuclear weapons are ten times China’s.

    • Replies: @Patricus
  11. Realist says:
    @gsjackson

    Pat really is a Beltway creature, isn’t he?

    Yes, and a doddering old fool to boot.

  12. I’ve always had a soft spot for Pat Buchanan. But lately (the last few years) his articles appear more and more workmanlike. In other words just going through the motioms.

    In this article he seems to have accepted the official narrative on almost everything.
    “Last summer, Putin’s political rival Alexei Navalny was poisoned with Novichok,”
    Novichok appears to be the most inefficient lethal poiaon in existence with around 75% survival rate, yet Buchanan accepts the narrative without question. Pat Buchanan up to the 90’s would have laughed at this.

    The fire in him appears to be waning.

    • Agree: GeneralRipper
  13. Petermx says:

    There is a liberal democratic strain in Russia with some power that wants what the west has, celebrations for homosexuals, radical feminism and maybe women with penises too. I have met a few young Russians that don’t like Putin. We will see. If by some miracle the US can continue to run an economy not thru work but by having the Federal Reserve creating money and distributing it, then maybe Russia will lose Putin and start looking more like a multi-culti western country too. But more likely, the US will suffer a major economic fall and then perhaps Russia will think twice before turning Russian beauties into western style women telling men to stop “mansplaining”.

    What Putin has to do if he hopes to keep Russia from turning into a Cultural Marxist cesspool is find someone that believes in and can continue his policies but if he’s like Trump and is surrounded by people that want to be far left, Russia will become a western style country too after Putin leaves office. If Russia wants to stay Russian and Europe has any hope of turning the tide against its destruction, a new international movement has to be popularized that values European / Western traditions and values the different peoples and cultures of the world. The western European countries will first need to develop some self respect so they have a reason to preserve their peoples and traditions.

    • Agree: GeneralRipper
    • Replies: @Rahan
  14. BuelahMan says:

    Koolaid Pat:

    distracted as we are by the most lethal pandemic in 100 years

    Had to stop right there seeing him regurgitate the official line.

  15. JonL says: • Website

    This article is surprising in its comprehensive lack of factuality.

    1. A gallop poll (not referenced) tells us what we already know: The American public does not think like the elite tell them to think. How rude. Well, our government might be ‘of, by, and for’ somebody, but it ain’t ‘The people.’
    2. Contain Russia? And the Soviet Union and China did not serve to contain the US?
    3. Are we still up to it? Up to what? American exceptionalism? The rest of the world is starting to take issue with that. A century of ‘Yankee Go Home’ has grown teeth.
    4. The Baltic states are as much use to Russia as they were to Sweden. Don’t overestimate their importance as anything other than a springboard for another group that does not represent its populace: NATO.
    5. Georgia ‘fought a war against Russia…’ and lost.
    6. Ukraine suffered a violet coup. Crimea ‘self-amputated’ via legal referendum.
    7. Belarus. Well, now. Belarus is like Ukraine pre-Maidan. The fog of diplomacy is much too thick and oily to really see who is pulling whose strings there.
    8. Putin could be forced to… do anything. Time will tell what he and Mr. Lavrov have in mind. Let’s not limit his set of options and condemn him for something he hasn’t done yet. That’s political TINA.
    9. Azerbaijan and Armenia are suddenly at war. Again, at whose instigation? Why now? Is this a resurrection of the Crusades since it is a Muslim country fighting a Christian country? Old bigotry drug out of history’s spare room and repurposed? Again, do either the Azerbaijanis or the Armenians personally want any of this? Maybe Gallup can take a poll.
    10. Khabarovsk is in an uprising? Again, who says? Why now? And aren’t the same things going on in American cities? You keep talking about sudden unprovoked uprisings as if they are popular revolutions. I don’t think that word means what you think it means.
    11. Navalny does Novichok. Really? The dissident with less than five percent popularity in Russia? The political court jester with Western style health issues taken down by the deadly poison genetically modified to miss its target? This is a joke, right?
    12. You’ve got a point about Russians being tired of Putin. I was there for three weeks in 2018 on a trip across Siberia on the Trans Siberian Railroad and spoke to people in places like Ulan Ude (as close to Mongolia as Dulles is the D.C.) and Khabarovsk (ditto.) I found that how people perceive Putin depends on which side of the ‘Crazy Nineties’ they sit. People who remembered the Soviet era and reconstruction were more likely to support Putin unconditionally, including a school teacher I spoke with who remembered trading lessons for lunch, whereas younger people acknowledged what he did for Russia but just wanted a change of face in the Kremlin. One man admitted that there are no alternatives worth considering. Hardly a stinging repudiation. By the way, I was also in Vladivostok, as close to North Korea as Dulles is to…, well, you know. Not much dissent there. Yes, it’s a military town but is as secular as any western jarhead city.
    13. Russia ‘remains’ one tenth the size of China? How imprudent.
    14. Putin’s imperial adventures are ‘failing’ and ‘bleeding’ Mother Russia? And how have ours been doing lately?
    15. Time is on America’s side? Time is a fickle ally and has a habit of switching sides in the long run.

    This article contains significant spin with little or no analysis. Did you have someone do your homework for you?

  16. Exile says: • Website
    @Diversity Heretic

    Exactly. The Pat Buchanan of the 1990’s or even the 00’s would rather have asked:

    “Is it in America’s interest to have either Russia or China so unstable and backed into a corner by NATO expansion or other U.S. policy that they and their large nuclear arsenals might come under the command and control of more desperate and unstable men than their current leaders?”

    As a previous commenter notes above, it’s as is someone else is writing these columns under Pat’s byline now.

    • Agree: follyofwar, GomezAdddams
  17. Patricus says:
    @Realist

    Russia has many nukes but it won’t do them any good. All the forces in WW II had extensive supplies for gas warfare. All had masks and elaborate tactics ready. No one used gas attacks because they knew about the gas horrors from WW I. Even facing destruction of an army or city no one wanted to release that genie from the bottle. Russia could let loose a nuclear barrage then quickly witness the end of Russia. The Chinese are sensible as they refrain from wasting money for a massive nuclear arsenal.

    • Disagree: GazaPlanet
    • Replies: @Ponder
    , @Exile
    , @Realist
    , @JL
  18. anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:

    Can we build, lead and sustain alliances of dozens of nations to contain Vladimir Putin’s Russia and Xi Jinping’s China

    Russia is not expanding. Rather, as pointed out, it’s the US/NATO that has expanded all the way up to the Russian border, a threatening move. China is a competitor, not a militarily expansionist country. With their economy they can wheel and deal better than the US but whose fault is that?

    forcefully intervene to put down a popular uprising that could cause Belarus to follow Ukraine into the Western camp.

    Just another made in the US color revolution, not popular at all. Ukraine is hardly an example to follow. Much of the rest is about how Russia is collapsing, people rising up against Putin, etc etc. All stuff that’s been said for the past hundred years. Before it was because they were communist. Now it’s because what?

    Perhaps time is on America’s side

    No. Demographics, Mr Buchanan, demographics. The US has turned itself into a semi-Brazil where a good third of the population is non-white and getting larger. The greatest resource of any country is it’s people and in this regard the US has diversified itself into chaos and a downward spiral.

    • Agree: RoatanBill
    • Troll: Corvinus
  19. Seldom have so many commentators agreed in their criticism of a post. Seldom has a post on UR been so inept, so unfit for publication. Maybe the truth is quite banal: aging commentators who once used to be intellectual powerhouses have simply succumbed to senile infantilism. In addition to Pat Buchanan, another obvious example is Michel Chossudovsky. Paul Craig Roberts is also not doing well. Like great athletes, they simply don’t know when to quit.

    • Replies: @Loldjdjdjdjd
  20. TGD says:

    I don’t see any deviation in Buchanan’s argument (since he turned “paleo right wing”) that the USA should mind its own business and stay out of foreign entanglements.

    Biden will surely win the US presidency over the dopey Trump. Biden is the perfect tool of the “deep state,” elements of which arranged for his winning of the Democrat’s nomination. Expect a hot war with Iran, the revival of the “Trans Pacific Partnership,” mass amnesty, continued loss of industry, curtailment of constitutional rights and much more money thrown at the educational establishment to train up the population for the “jobs of tomorrow” etc etc.

    • Replies: @Rurik
  21. tyrone says:

    Putin ?…..sower of instability????…..to quote the world’s most famous Alzhiemers patient “COME ON MAN”!

  22. Fr. John says:
    @No Friend Of The Devil

    Andrea- I will go further.

    Mr. Buchanan, RETIRE! Your BS rhetoric about the Cold War NO LONGER APPLIES.

    Your novus ordo Catholic-SCHISM is in complete shambles. The Antipope Bergoglio (using Catholic’s own terms for this spurious ‘Bishop of Rome’) is an evil man. This faux xtianity is no match for the virile, godly GROWTH OF CHRISTIANS in Russia and other Orthodox lands.

    As far as Crimea is concerned, the INDIGENOUS POPULACE VOTED OVER 90+% to REJOIN RUSSIA. Because they ARE Russians, and NOT Ukro-nutsees.

    Try reading something other than the J-Media bias, Pat.
    https://russia-insider.com/en/christianity/excellent-interview-top-russian-christian-conservative-activist-alexey-komov-dr-steve
    https://russia-insider.com/en/new-constitution-means-russias-political-stability-strong-while-west-sinks/ri30819

    Either that, or gracefully fade into the background. You’ve outlived your political capital.
    And you no longer are viable.
    https://truthtopowernews.com/culture/reagan-cia-spook-forecasts-next-100-years-consumerism-and-debt-slavery-ftn-podcast

  23. Rahan says:
    @Petermx

    What Putin has to do if he hopes to keep Russia from turning into a Cultural Marxist cesspool is find someone that believes in and can continue his policies but if he’s like Trump and is surrounded by people that want to be far left, Russia will become a western style country too after Putin leaves office.

    In the post-Soviet space the left-right divide is frequently the opposite of the current Western one.
    “Far left” over there would mean:
    1) The state encouraging birth-rates of Russians
    2) The state cooperating strongly with the Orthodox church
    3) Mandatory patriotic education in schools
    4) Law and order
    5) Anti-porn, anti-drugs, anti LGBT


    (around I think 90 memebers of the Russian Congress)

    From the horse’s mouth, the leader of the Communist Party of the Russian Federation, comrade Zuyganov (online translate works just fine):

    В 1990 году русских в России насчитывалось более 120 миллионов, а сегодня их на 10 миллионов меньше. Ещё 25 миллионов русских жили тогда за пределами Российской Федерации. Их число за последние 30 лет тоже сократилось на 10 миллионов. Двадцатимиллионное сокращение народа — жертвы, сопоставимые с теми, которые мы понесли в годы Великой Отечественной войны!

    Время жёстко ставит перед нами вопрос о выживании. О спасении гражданского мира и сохранении нашей государственности. Решить эти судьбоносные задачи можно только при условии принципиальной смены разрушительного компрадорского курса и реализации патриотической антикризисной программы, основанной на принципах народовластия и социальной справедливости. На восстановлении экономического и финансового суверенитета страны, без чего невозможен истинный политический суверенитет. Однако воплотить такую программу в жизнь нельзя без честного и вдумчивого обращения к русскому вопросу.

    Не умаляя достоинство и интересы других этносов, образующих многонациональный российский народ, необходимо признать: русский вопрос сегодня является самым острым и злободневным. От его решения зависит судьба России и всех народов, проживающих как в её границах, так и на территории бывшего СССР.

    Мы, коммунисты, — твёрдо убеждённые сторонники и приверженцы интернационализма. И хорошо понимаем: каждый народ заинтересован в том, чтобы сохранялся его язык, развивалась культура, сберегалась вера, оставался незыблемым традиционный образ жизни, крепло благополучие. Но русские — это духовный, нравственный и державный стержень страны. Так формировалась наша общая судьба. Так сложилась История. Отменить это невозможно. Отрицать, рассуждать и действовать вопреки этому — безумие, губительное для всех народов России. Если русские окончательно ослабнут и уйдут с главной исторической арены, что неизбежно при сохранении курса, проводимого в стране с начала 1990-х, это повлечёт за собой необратимую катастрофу. Подчёркиваю: катастрофу для всех граждан, живущих на наших огромных евразийских просторах. Россию попросту растопчут и растащат более сильные и удачливые соседи.

    What makes the Slavic “far left” different from the Western “literally Hitler far right” is mostly:
    a) that the eastern commies want to nationalize everything, and
    b) that the eastern commies believe in an international brotherhood of peoples, but preferably if everyone stays at home, aside from the occasional student exchange program.

    The people around Putin who will sell out to GloboHomo at the drop of a hat are not “far left” (the Russian far left would rather send all trannies to the Gulag), but the “liberals”, which in Russia is what they call the deregulation-obsessed corporate right wing.

    A “liberal” means someone larping as a local Tory, in the sense of wanting to privatize everything, sell it off, and then let in all of Central Asia as cheap workers. These days they are also the ones who will accept child trannies in exchange for offshore perks. Not the far left. The Russian far left would hang the Western far left on lamp posts, and send their families to fell wood in Siberia.

  24. Rurik says:

    Putin’s political rival Alexei Navalny was poisoned with Novichok, a nerve agent developed in Soviet laboratories. Navalny has now become a live martyr and more potent adversary as the Kremlin has failed to come up with a satisfactory explanation for what appears to have been an attempted assassination.

    Just as they’ve failed to “come up with a satisfactory explanation” for the Skripal obvious lies and idiocy.

    Ditto the MH17 lies and idiocy

    or the ‘Russian hacking’ lies and idiocy

    or the ‘Russian aggression in Ukraine’ lies and idiocy..

    Is that the way it works now Pat, you simply parrot the puerile piles of puke put out by the ((narrative machine)) as if it was all God’s truth?

    When we all know it’s the opposite.

    Perhaps time is on America’s side in the rivalry with Russia,

    You’re not Pat Buchannan.

    Buchannan simply could not have uttered such an egregiously grotesque gargantuan infamy of perfidious, pusillanimous palaver- even if he tried.

    He’d choke on such words, (I’d hope ; )

    “America’s side”

    If this is America’s side, then God speed to Vlad Putin!

    • Agree: FB
    • Replies: @Robert Konrad
    , @follyofwar
  25. Rurik says:
    @TGD

    Biden is the perfect tool of the “deep state,” elements of which arranged for his winning of the Democrat’s nomination. Expect a hot war with Iran, the revival of the “Trans Pacific Partnership,” mass amnesty, continued loss of industry, curtailment of constitutional rights and much more money thrown at the educational establishment to train up the population for the “jobs of tomorrow” etc etc.

    we’re going to get ‘wokeness’.

    Anti-White hatred on acid, codified into law, as a comeuppance for ‘four hundred years of slavery, genocide and a systemic racism that has had the White man’s knee on POC’s necks for four hundred years and counting..

    All of that ends in January, 2021.

    A packed SC will end the Second Amendment, and it will be all she wrote.

    So why does Buchannan allow an article full of horseshit about Putin and Russia to get published in his name? When the reason for the ‘most important election ever’, is wokeness’, and the war on Iran (and possibly Russia) that will come when ((wokeness) is firmly in power again?

  26. @Rurik

    “you simply parrot the puerile piles of puke put out by …,” “infamy of perfidious, pusillanimous palaver.”

    Wow, you are a master of alliteration. Can I quote you on that? Needless to say: agreed.

    • Thanks: Rurik
    • Replies: @Loldjdjdjdjd
  27. Ponder says:
    @Patricus

    The logic holds true unto a point but you reversed the order.
    • it was not Russia that tried to repudiated the MAD doctrine but the US. How you ask? By withdrawing from the ABM treaty which had ensured that MAD was in play. Then, the US started building ABM shield around itself (for a defensive nuclear counter strike). At that point, the actions could still be weaseled out as defense but still suspicious). Then, they started to surround Russia with the same types of ABM shields pretending to protect from rogue nations like Iran and North Korea. The Russian, if they had ever been in doubt, understood.
    • the Russians responded by developing their own ABM shields and hypersonic technologies. They understood that the US plan was to launch a nuclear missile attack against Russia first, aimed at its nuclear deterrence weapons and then, with most of Russia’s nuclear missiles disabled and destroyed, they could then try and intercept the remaining retaliatory nuclear counter strikes with their ABM shields. The Russian response was to try and intercept as many of those initial first strike US nuclear missiles, as well as punch through US ABM shields to restore MAD.
    • further, the US refused to denounce “first use of nuclear weapons” with a no first use policy. This indicated(s) their intention. Russia still has a no first use policy with caveats. US is the aggressor here.
    • if you understand the above, then all other US plays come into focus. Why they killed the INF treaty in order to move into Europe nuclear missiles of that prohibited range, why they have started to try and reduce nuclear payload so that they can use nuclear weapons without triggering the nuclear threshold of nuclear retaliation by pleading low yield etc.

  28. @Robert Konrad

    I thought I was the only one who cringed when Paul Roberts mixed in his obviously misguided opinions in with obvious facts. Seems Giraldi is the last man standing. We need new authorities on truth.

  29. @Robert Konrad

    That’s the guy from V for Vendetta. Didn’t you know? That P from Pendetta.

  30. I have been a fan of Pat Buchanan’s most of my life. But since the Trump phenomenon began I can’t for the life of me understand what has happened to him. It’s as if he has drunk the Qanon Kool-Aid.

    • Agree: GomezAdddams
  31. KenH says:

    Not sure if Pat is writing his own articles these days but this sure qualifies as establishment drivel. It’s America that has troops in Poland near Russia’s border as well as trying to topple leaders in the region that are friendly to Putin and Russia. If Putin moved troops and missile batteries near the Rio Grande the American establishment would literally have a coronary.

    Pat writes as if Putin is on a worldwide offensive against America and its interests but it’s been thankfully stymied. Most of what Putin and Russia have done and are doing has been a reaction and in response to the unrest and instability that American actions have helped bring to certain countries and regions.

  32. Anonymous[169] • Disclaimer says:

    “pusillanimous pussy-footers” – attributed to Spiro Agnew

    I do so pine for the days when Pat was making Agnew look bright.

    • Replies: @gsjackson
  33. Anonymous[169] • Disclaimer says:

    What with the proven sterling safety record that Novichok has demonstrated in recent assassination attempts, I understand it is now in Phase #3 trials as a treatment for covid.

    • LOL: Exile
    • Replies: @pogohere
  34. Toxik says:
    @No Friend Of The Devil

    i agree. doesn’t sound like pat.

    • Replies: @36 ulster
  35. @Rurik

    Yes! Well said, Rurik! I haven’t read such great alliteration since Spiro Agnew’s “nattering nabobs of negativity” when referring to the Nixon hating press. (Speech written by William Safire).

    Why have you become an Old Cold Warrior again, Pat?

    • Thanks: Rurik
  36. TG says:

    One is reminded – that pretty much all of the problems that Russia faces in its ‘near abroad’ – Ukraine, Belorussia, etc. – have been deliberately created by the west. Given that Russia could still obliterate the west if it really felt that it had been backed into a corner, is that wise?

    • Agree: Exile
    • Replies: @follyofwar
  37. pogohere says:
    @Anonymous

    What with the proven sterling safety record that Novichok has demonstrated in recent assassination attempts, I understand it is now in Phase #3 trials as a treatment for covid.

    Laugh out loud funny!

  38. What If says:

    First I thought it was a satire, sarcasm,,, Holly crap, Pat went Biden,

  39. Exile says: • Website
    @Patricus

    Nuclear weapons are first and foremost sovereignty insurance.

    I know Russians. If their leadership reflects the common Russian mindset as much as I think it does, they’d be willing to launch if we foolishly backed them into a corner. It was seriously discussed in the Kremlin in the 1980’s.

    China’s smaller arsenal is not a matter of the supposed uselessness of nukes. China has advantages over Russia in population, wealth and production, sea routes, and a number of other factors which make nukes less of a necessity, and they’re also building on their own past legacy as a poor nation, while Putin’s Russia is hanging on to the arsenal of a superpower whose infrastructure was laid down when the USSR had more resources and manpower to call on than Russia does today. Apple-Orange.

  40. @No Friend Of The Devil

    This actually sounds like someone telling the truth for once about Russia and the Putin regime!

    Unfortunately there’s been far to much blather about Putin over the years,oh and all his hyperbole about super weapons

    The Russian economy is not just one tenth of china its also not particularly competitive,languishing in 30 th position in terms of global business rating

    Its demographics are terrible without any chance of recovery

    And to cap it all China will soon try and claim parts of eastern Russia as Chinese

  41. Buchanan is 82 years old next month. For several years now, the input of his “assistants” has been more and more noticeable. This article, however, appears to have been entirely ghost written by one or more of them. It sounds entirely out of character with what Buchanan was writing even last year.
    Buchanan must retire immediately. If he does not, more ghost written articles like this will irremediably taint his legacy.
    I have held Mr Buchanan in high regard ever since I became aware of him in the 1990s. Sadly, I will not read any new articles “written” by him.

    • Thanks: Robert Konrad
    • Replies: @alwayswrite
  42. I am pretty ignorant about poisons, and I’m a bit allergic to conspiracy theories, but on this Novichok business I can’t help wondering, If the stuff is really so toxic as is claimed, then why is it that more than one supposed victim has survived?

  43. Corvinus says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    To the contrary, Patrick hit a home run with this post. Putin still uses his KGB tactics and allies to do his dirty work for him, especially poisoning political opponents and cracking down on the media. Putin has enriched himself and his oligarch pals under the guise of muscular Orthodoxism. Putin has always put into play policies designed to expand “Mother Russia”.

    You are just too damn stubborn to admit these facts.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    , @Exile
  44. @Verymuchalive

    Russia and the Putin regime have set themselves against the USA,therefore why should Buchanan agree with a regime who have people pushing for the destruction of America and the US led international order????

    Wouldn’t that simply make Buchanan a traitor by supporting a foreign regime ?

    Maybe Buchanan has woken up and smelt the coffee

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  45. @TG

    In hindsight, I wonder if Mr. Putin wishes he had rolled the Russian tanks into Kiev at the beginning of the US-initiated Color Revolution, and stopped the illegal coup dead in its tracks. It was a cowardly act to drive Ukrainian President Yanukovych from office when Putin was occupied with seeing that the 2014 Sochi Olympics be completed without a terrorist attack.

    I would have loved to see the faces of John McCain and “F the EU” Nuland if Putin had done so. The Russian forces would have mopped up the coup leaders in a week, and Obama/Biden could have done nothing but complain to the UN. It’s very likely that many Ukrainian lives would have been saved.

    Buchanan’s incredible statement that Putin “amputated” the Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine, when the vast majority of those who lived there voted to return to Mother Russia, is patently ridiculous. C’mon Pat, return to your senses or it’s time to retire.

  46. anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    Speaking of ghost writers, the Tom Parsons (1984) act here is a little too much for the real Corvinus. The “home run” and “damn” are out of character, too.

    Next time, aim more for that Unitarian Sunday School teacher voice.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  47. Dear lord, allowing such garbage will ruin the reputation of the unz blog.

  48. I haven’t read a Pat article in months but thought I’d give it one more try.

    I’m not reading any more of his prose as it is now about as coherent as Biden’s emanations.

    I guess we all get old and at some point things start to deteriorate. He was a good writer and thinker.

    • Agree: GomezAdddams
  49. Corvinus says:
    @anonymous

    “Speaking of ghost writers, the Tom Parsons (1984) act here is a little too much for the real Corvinus. The “home run” and “damn” are out of character, too.”

    Right on cue is the Russian bot. I guess your programming does not tire in trying to denigrate your social betters.

    “Next time, aim more for that Unitarian Sunday School teacher voice.”

    I will take that under advisement, Mel Blanc.

  50. @alwayswrite

    Your carer needs to stop you commenting under the influence ( CUI ) I will ignore all future comments from you in the future.

  51. Anonymous[285] • Disclaimer says:

    As to Russian aggressiveness, you have to admit they did have the temerity to expand right up to their own borders, thereby surrounding us on all sides: our NATO in the west, our Ukraine and Georgia in the south, our arctic in the north, and our Japan and South Korea in the east.

    • LOL: Exile
  52. Exile says: • Website
    @Corvinus

    Ashkepathic comment. Ukrainian Jew-grade Russophobia.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  53. Realist says:
    @Patricus

    Russia has many nukes but it won’t do them any good.

    Not true it is a great deterrent.

    Russia could let loose a nuclear barrage then quickly witness the end of Russia.

    Same can be said about the US… The US could let loose a nuclear barrage then quickly witness the end of the US.

    The Chinese are sensible as they refrain from wasting money for a massive nuclear arsenal.

    But they do have a nuclear arsenal…so they must see some value in it.

  54. Corvinus says:
    @Exile

    “Ashkepathic comment. Ukrainian Jew-grade Russophobia.“

    You have an odd way of characterizing my truth about Putin. But I get it, your Russian masters demand you be good lil Cossack.

    • Replies: @Exile
  55. Fester suggests USA should take preemptive action and drain the USA nuclear stockpile for the sake of South Chicago–the pinnacle of USA freedom -democracy and societal values. Then when global cooling returns to USA —re-open the coal mines and build gas guzzlers.

  56. Awash says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    Powerful nations tend to expand. I guess Pat is saying Russia is weak to make major expansions. They did destroy Syria and annexed Crimea, that is it for now. His assessment of Russia’s weakness is ok. I doubt though Putin poisoned the opposition leader, not because he cannot be mean. But because it seems amateurish. Russia failing to poison and kill an individual? I don’t know.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  57. anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @Awash

    They did destroy Syria and annexed Crimea, that is it for now.

    By “They,” do you mean Russia? If so, then how did Russia “destroy Syria”?

    • Replies: @Awash
  58. gsjackson says:
    @Anonymous

    I think Safire gets credit for “nattering nabobs of negativism” (the press). Pat was an alliterator too?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  59. Anonymous[281] • Disclaimer says:
    @gsjackson

    He alliterated with alacrity.

    It is said that Safire took credit for “nattering nabobs of negativism” and gave credit to Pat for “pusillanimous pussy-footers.”

    • Replies: @anonymous
  60. JL says:
    @Patricus

    I thought Pat’s article would be the stupidest thing I read all day. Of course, this being the internet, I then got to your comment and realized my mistake.

  61. @Anonymous

    No! They had the temerity to invade their neighbours,and anex Crimea

    Well Putin reckons he’s a bit of an historian,so he,brought up and indoctrinated into Soviet ideology,knows how to re- write history like he has about his stupid invasion of Crimea,or his recent stupidity about how WW2 started

    you couldn’t make it up could you,especially as it was the old Soviet system which actually admitted it had a role in the annexation of the Baltic states,the secret protocols of Molotov and his Nazi side kick!

    It baffles me why people think an ex Soviet KGB officer,totally brainwashed into thinking the USSR was the best thing in the world,is some sort of master of international diplomacy

    Well he’s not,Putin is a fanatical idiot who hates the west,he can’t come to terms with the total failure of the old system,so he’s rebuilt it around a bunch of crooks and ex KGB criminals

    Well here’s the news, this Putin system ain’t gonna last,just like the old system its gonna crash,but this time it will be the end of Russia as we know it

  62. Exile says: • Website
    @Corvinus

    We need to worry about what’s happening in America a lot more than what the ebil Russian spymaster Putler is planning. Your goofy Russophobia is decades out of date. Our own country is on fire and anarchists are shooting people in the streets.

    But criticizing the people behind that isn’t kosher-approved, while criticizing Putler is.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  63. anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Stale sophomoric stuff.

    But if you still dig it, Ilana Mercer’s your chick.

  64. Corvinus says:
    @Exile

    “We need to worry about what’s happening in America a lot more than what the ebil Russian spymaster Putler is planning.”

    You’re neglecting to take into serious account that Trump and Putin have been joined at the hip for a decade.

    “Your goofy Russophobia is decades out of date.”

    Why do you worship Putin and his KGB tactics?

    “Our own country is on fire and anarchists are shooting people in the streets.”

    By left and right extremists. So, if you that deathly concerned, are you going to do something about it, or just talk tough on a blog?

    • Replies: @showmethereal
  65. As a long-time Buchanan supporter, even working for one of his campaigns, I’m certainly sad to see him completely losing the thread, but here’s the deal for me; I don’t see Americans as my fellows. Approximately three quarters are socialists and/ or neocon saps hell-bent on destroying what’s left of our traditional way of life. Even if he’s right about Russia (he’s not), I see Russia, China, and Iran as the enemies of my enemies, doing right by patiently waiting for our “leaders” to finish their idiotic March through our institutions.

  66. Jimmy1969 says:

    The Soviet Union collapsed in the early 1990s. Russia alone is nothing but a figment of the imagination of idiots. Russia lingers on in the minds of our military industrial intelligence mafia and the Congress people with right wing think tanks and weapons plants in their district to further their own self interest. China is the only real threat to us. Instead brain dead little cold war boys in newsrooms and colleges fan flames about Russia. How silly.

  67. There’s an idea that dictators or autocrats oppress the masses. There is some truth to the assertion.

    The idea is that dwarfs are preferable to giants in politics because the former means more power to the people. Giants are more interesting but can be more terrifying. Dwarfs aren’t interesting but can’t do much harm. Most US presidents were dwarfs without the power of Hitler, Stalin, Mao, Napoleon, etc.

    But a problem with dwarfs is that the freedom isn’t really hogged by the people or masses. Rather, it is hogged by the oligarchs, the elites, and their status-minions. It turns into a plutocracy.

    FDR’s presidency came closest to autocracy in the US, but people regard that period as most pro-people at expense of the rich. Teddy Roosevelt had an autocratic style but he took on big business(somewhat).

    Yeltsin turned out to be a dwarf, but it didn’t lead to more freedom for the masses. It led to more freedom for oligarchs and globalist elites to rob and rape Russia. It took Putin the autocrat to restore some order and do what was good for the people.

    So, maybe what is needed in crisis times is a small giant. A big giant like Hitler, Stalin, and Mao are too powerful, too terrifying. But Deng, Putin, Ataturk, and etc were sensible autocrats who allowed more freedom but not to the extent that Money Power totally takes over the nation.

    This is why the elites hate Trump. They bitch about Trump being a dictator but what they really fear is that he stands for populism against elitism. Elites feel this way esp because they’re largely Jewish at the very top. But as the elites control the mass media, too many Americans are fooled into believing that Trump is literally hitler.

  68. @Anonymous

    Watch out: the sarcasm will be entirely lost on Corvinus and some others, who will now consider you one of their best russophobic pals. Enjoy.

  69. Did Pat Buchanan literally take a dump on Putin? I wonder why? Maybe the pressure to show how badly American Right hates Putin is too much.

    Anyways, a few points:
    1. Russia has amongst the best economy to deal with post-COVID scenario. Constant trade and fiscal surpluses, no excessive debt (unlike USA and China), an increasingly diversified industrial bases (one of the few economies that makes everything from rockets to cheese), export base that is increasingly diversifying from oil (Agriculture, arms and rockets). Russia IS NOT Germany, China or Japan in its sophistication but it is not Saudi Arabia either. It is a solid upper-middle income country with an economy certainly better than the likes of Italy, UK and France.
    2. Russia is actually 1/6th of China (4trillion Russia GDP PPP; China GDP PPP is 25 trillion); not one tenth. Nominal numbers simply dont matter in case of Russia because sanctions have pushed the Rouble to collapse.
    3. Russia is a fairly rich country (having a GDP PPP percapita of $30k/person makes you one).

  70. Awash says:
    @anonymous

    Syria is a colony of Russia.

  71. 36 ulster says:
    @Toxik

    You may be right; I couldn’t help but notice the paucity of rhetorical questions, one of Pat’s trademark devices.

  72. To say that Pat clearly let show whom butters his Shekels is glaringly obvious and a bit sad for whatever legacy he still hasn´t pawned away.

  73. @Diversity Heretic

    Putin is definitely a highly intelligent man. But – my question is – why has Eastern Europe been drifting toward western Europe and the US? I agree – I don’t think Russia is “expansionist”… But it is important for Russia to keep it’s border nations friendly… How have they been outmaneuvered? Also – I don’t understand why he got involved in Libya… Is it a competition with Edrogan in Turkey?

    • Replies: @Rurik
  74. Rurik says:
    @showmethereal

    Putin is definitely a highly intelligent man. But – my question is – why has Eastern Europe been drifting toward western Europe and the US? I agree – I don’t think Russia is “expansionist”… But it is important for Russia to keep it’s border nations friendly… How have they been outmaneuvered?

    because of the legacy of events like the Holodomor, the Red Army Rapists, and a lot of horrors visited upon the people of Eastern Europe and the Baltic states by the generations of Soviet slavery and genocide.

    Russia too suffered, but Russia refuses to repudiate the Soviet horrors and atrocities, out of vain Russian, chest-thumping uber-nationalism. They demand that Eastern Europe maintain the monuments to Soviet slavery that profane their sacred soil.

    Millions of patriotic Eastern Europeans and others fought against the Red Army rapists, like the Ukrainians, but to this day, Russia stupidly calls these patriots ‘fascists’, and ‘Nazis’.

    Imagine you were a Ukrainian teen who’d lost his whole family to the Holodomor, and decided to don the uniform of the Wehrmacht to kill as many of the Bolshevik scum as you could. Well today’s Russians would smear your grandfather as a fascist and Nazi for his trouble.

    When Russia repudiates the crimes of the Soviet period, and rightly joins Eastern Europe in lamenting all the horrors that were visited upon Russians as they were Poles and Ukrainians and Estonians and so many others, then NATO will rot on the vine, and Russia and Eastern (and Western) Europe will join hands in brotherhood and rapprochement. And the ZUS will be forced to pound sand.

    • Replies: @Showmethereal
  75. @Corvinus

    Trump is nowhere near Putin’s intelligence nor temperament. Do think Putin is in league with Trump is an insult to Putin. All Putin has to do is simply toy with Trump by stroking his ego a little. That’s not the same as being joined at the hip at all.

  76. @Rurik

    Thank you for the reply…

    If that is true – then I could see why there would be such a problem. Hopefully one of these days I can look more into it.

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