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As of Dec. 26, Kim Jong Un’s “Christmas gift” to President Donald Trump had not arrived. Most foreign policy analysts predict it will be a missile test more impressive than any Pyongyang has yet carried off.

What is Kim’s game? What does Kim want?

He cannot want war with the United States, as this could result in the annihilation of the Kim family dynasty that has ruled North Korea since World War II. Kim is all about self-preservation.

What he appears to want in his confrontation with Trump is a victory without war. In the near-term, Kim seeks three things: recognition of his regime as the legitimate government of North Korea and its acceptance in all the forums of the world, trade and an end to all U.S. and U.N. sanctions, and a nuclear arsenal sufficient to deter a U.S. attack, including missiles that can strike U.S. bases in South Korea, Japan, Guam, and the Western Pacific. And he seeks the capability to deliver a nuclear warhead on the U.S. mainland.

Nor is this last goal unreasonable from Kim’s vantage point.

For he knows what became of the two other nations of George W. Bush’s “axis of evil” that failed to develop nuclear weapons.

Saddam Hussein’s Iraq was invaded, and he was hanged and his sons hunted down and killed.

The Ayatollah’s Iran negotiated a 2015 nuclear deal with America and opened up its nuclear facilities to intrusive inspections to show that Tehran did not have a nuclear weapons program.

Trump came to power, trashed the deal, reimposed sanctions and is choking Iran to death.

Moammar Gadhafi surrendered his WMD in 2004 and opened up his production facilities. And in 2011, the U.S. attacked Libya and Gadhafi was lynched by a mob.

Contrast the fate of these regimes and rulers with the Kim family’s success. His father, Kim Jong Il, tested nuclear weapons and missiles in defiance of U.S. warnings, and now the son is invited to summits with the U.S. president in Singapore and Hanoi.

If Kim did not have nuclear weapons, would American presidents be courting him? Would U.S. secretaries of state be visiting Pyongyang? If Kim did not have nuclear weapons who would pay the least attention to the Hermit Kingdom?

Undeniably, with his promised “Christmas gift,” possibly a missile capable of hitting the U.S., Kim is pushing the envelope. He is taunting the Americans. We have told him what he must do. And he is telling us where we can go.

But by so doing, Kim has put the ball squarely in Trump’s court.

The question Trump faces: Is he prepared to accept North Korea joining Russia and China as a third adversarial power with the ability to launch a nuclear strike on the continental United States?

And if U.S. sanctions are insufficient to force Kim to “denuclearize,” as seems apparent, is Trump prepared to force him to do so? Is Trump prepared to use “fire and fury” to remove Kim’s nukes?

With 28,500 U.S. troops and thousands of U.S. citizens in South Korea, many within artillery range of the DMZ, is Trump prepared to risk a clash that could ignite a second Korean War in the election year 2020?

Is the president prepared for whatever that might bring?

How does this confrontation play out?

ORDER IT NOW

A guess: The U.S. has lived with North Korea’s nuclear weapons for a decade, and Trump is not going to risk a second Korean conflict with a military attack on Kim’s nuclear and missile arsenals. Kim Jong Un and his father have created a new reality in Korea, and we are going to have to live with it.

Where does East Asia go from here?

South Korea has twice the population of the North and an economy 40 times as large. Japan has a population five times that of North Korea and an economy 100 times as large.

If the U.S. treaty guarantees, dating to the 1950s, to fight for these two nations come into question as a result of America’s reluctance to face down Pyongyang more forcibly on its nuclear arsenal, these nations are almost certain to start considering all options for their future security.

Among these are building their own nuclear arsenals and closer ties to the one nation that has shown it can discipline North Korea — China.

Much is on the line here.

Kim’s challenge is ultimately about the credibility of the United States, which has treaty commitments and issued war guarantees to scores of nations in NATO Europe, the Mideast and East Asia, but whose people have zero interest in any new war, especially a second Korean War.

If the world sees that America is reluctant to face down, or fight a North Korea that is threatening us, will they retain the old confidence that the United States will risk war for them?

What Kim is undermining is not just U.S. security but U.S. credibility.

Patrick J. Buchanan is the author of “Nixon’s White House Wars: The Battles That Made and Broke a President and Divided America Forever.”

Copyright 2019 Creators.com.

 
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  1. WHAT says:

    Murricans simply don`t have the balls to go against peer, and there are two in the neighborhood. Kim is not worried.

  2. nsa says:

    Curtis Bombs Away Lemay bragged about his bombing campaign which leveled every city, town, village: “Over a three year period, we managed to kill off 20% of the Korean population”. When this did not result in surrender, all the dams in northern Korea were bombed in order to drown and starve the remaining population……pure murderous vindictiveness as by that time the Chinese had entered the conflict and victory was totally out of reach. That’s a lot of wanton killing. Any wonder why they developed nuclear weapons and the means to deliver them……..and what their fate would be without them?

    • Agree: Chinaman
    • Replies: @Chinaman
  3. Plantman says:

    This article is not merely misleading, it is fundamentally wrong on many levels and unworthy of a truth-teller like buchanan.

    Kim does not seem a nuclear missile that can strike the U.S. mainland. That is a myth. What he wsnts, and what he asked for at both meetings with Trump, is a formal end to the war, an institution that will foster peaceful relations between the U.S. and the north, and a gradual lifting of sanctions as the denuclearization process takes place. That is all he asked for, and that is all he wants. He wants to reestablish business and cultural relations with the south, ease travel restrictions and pave the way for eventual reunification, which is the dream of the vast majority of Korean people.

    Washington does not want reunification. Washington wants a permanently divided peninsula that houses it’s army, follows its diktats, and serves as a launching pad for its missile systems that are aimed at Russia and china. In other words, Washington wants to preserve the status quo at all cost.

    Readers who followed negotiations between trump and Kim in vietnam, know I am right. John Bolton intentionally sabotaged the talks at the 11 th hour by making surprise demands that Kim eliminate all his missiles and chemical weapons as well as decommissioned his nukes! these demands had never been made in prior discussions. They were designed to blindside Kim and force him to withdraw from the talks, which he did. Once again, Bolton had worked his magic and the opportunity for peace had been subverted.

    The blame should be placed where it belongs, on the United states, not kim.

  4. Pat’s article makes the dangerous assumption that the only “enemy” nuclear weapons other than North Korea are in Russia and China. Bad assumption. The U.S. always should assume it is threatened by nukes in Pakistan, India, Israel, Turkey (even though those are US bombs), and even the UK and France. Today’s friend may be tomorrow’s enemy. When PIA resumes direct flights to the US there is nothing to say that one day there won’t be a nuke in the cargo hold to be air burst over Manhattan while the plane is en route to JFK. There is nothing to suggest that Israel would not use nukes to blackmail the US at some point into waging war against Iran. There is nothing to suggest that one day Turkey will not seize the US nukes in Turkey and threaten US interests with those weapons. All nuclear powers must be treated to some degree as enemy–and all must equally be treated as friend. The US must accord North Korea with the respect do any nuclear power. The puzzling question is this, why does the US trade openly with China, who is building a military to rival the US military, while at the same time imposing sanctions on North Korea, who threatens no one. There is not a single vital US interest threatened by North Korea. South Korea is barely an interest and certainly not a vital interest.

    • Replies: @TGD
  5. There is nothing better than “a victory without war”: the sure way to self-preservation. But history shows that powers – great and small – eventually get the very war they seek to avoid. President Trump might be tempted to allow Kim join the nuclear club. Attacking North Korea might lead to World War Three, but so might appeasing it. That’s the conundrum.
    https://www.ghostsofhistory.wordpress.com/

  6. Hail says: • Website

    Kim is all about self-preservation.

    If the U.S. treaty guarantees..come into question…[South Korea and Japan] are almost certain to start considering all options for their future security [i.e., nuclear armament]

    There are some substantial mis-analyses in this column, of both North Korea’s and South Korea’s motivations. The core (or most egregious) ones I quote above.

    “All about self-preservation,” as a reading of the political situation wrt the North Korean regime, has a long pedigree now, dating to the early 1990s at the very latest. I believe it had become the majority view in US academia-policy circles already in the 1980s, promoted by various US scholars for their own reasons at the time and since. One of the most successful pushers of this idea was Bruce Cumings, a left-wing “the US is always wrong” academic and DPRK sympathizer who is not fluent in Korean.

    The “NK as a state desperate for self-preservation” idea was wrong in the 1980s, wrong in the 1990s, and it is wrong now. Charitably, we can say it has been an easy misreading to make (or misdirection to buy into) since the mid-late 1990s famine. But still wrong.

    As surprising at it may seem, this “NK as a state desperate for self-preservation alone” idea, which serves the Pyongyang regime’s interests so well, has also also been the Washington consensus view, emanating out from a core around the US “North Korea-watching policy community” (though not the formal US government / State Dept view).

    As for the implied picture of South Korea as a kind of agency-less, terrified state very worried about attack from the north, and totally dependent on the US. This is about fifty years out of date; Pat was born in Nov. 1938 and to him it may still be the 1960s and 1970s in more ways than one.

    What Pat misses wrt South Korea is there is also a powerful political element in South Korea that is likewise highly soft on North Korea.

    I would not fault Pat Buchanan for parroting the wrong views here. He is simply repeating the establishment view, and being a non-expert on the matter, who else is he supposed to trust?

    • Replies: @SolontoCroesus
  7. anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @Plantman

    “ .. a truth-teller like buchanan.”

    Not for a long time, especially when it comes to whitewashing Exceptionalia’s efforts to run the rest of the world.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
  8. Svevlad says:

    An analyst of ours (don’t know what’s his name, posts via a facebook page) said that in the modern day, having nuclear weapons is the ONLY guarantor of actual independence and sovereignty, and the nuclear non-proliferation meme will end sooner or later, as everyone and their dog will start seeking to produce one.

    Which makes sense, when you look at the historical perspective – everyone wants the biggest stick, and eventually they get it, even if centuries later.

    • Replies: @Rurik
  9. Dumbo says:
    @Plantman

    NK is a useful boogeyman. It’s not on the interest neither of the US nor of China to end this charade, otherwise, Korea would have probably reunified long ago.

  10. Kim would be a fool to make a deal with Washington and a bigger fool to make a deal with Trump. Kim must continue to endure the sanctions and continue to develop his nuclear capability.

    Soon Imperial Washington will be neutered by a currency crisis. It won’t be sanctioning anybody ever again. The dollar fuels all the machinery of Empire.

  11. Rurik says:
    @Svevlad

    having nuclear weapons is the ONLY guarantor of actual independence and sovereignty, and the nuclear non-proliferation meme will end sooner or later, as everyone and their dog will start seeking to produce one.

    Which makes sense, when you look at the historical perspective – everyone wants the biggest stick, …

    It’s not about having the ‘biggest stick’, but rather simply an effective deterrent to the drooling goon on the world’s stage, smashing country after country in its insane imperative to slavishly serve zion.

    As Buchannan mentions,

    Kim seeks three things: recognition of his regime as the legitimate government of North Korea and its acceptance in all the forums of the world, trade and an end to all U.S. and U.N. sanctions, and a nuclear arsenal sufficient to deter a U.S. attack..

    It was what the drooling goon did to Libya, that motivated Putin to draw a red line in Syria.

    These are not aggressive weapons, but rather defensive, as a deterrent to the drooling goon – who would, if ((it)) could, dismantle Russia into a thousand pieces, the better to feast on its carcass.

    The drooling goon menaces everyone, including its ‘allies’. Because the drooling goon isn’t really allied with anyone, but is rather simply a mindless golem in abject, slavish service to zion. And zion hates everyone.

  12. TGD says:
    @Harry Huntington

    The U.S. always should assume it is threatened by nukes in Pakistan, India, Israel, Turkey (even though those are US bombs), and even the UK and France.

    It is unlikely and indeed unthinkable that the UK or France would launch a nuclear attack on the USA. Ditto for Pakistan and India although Islamist Pakistan would like to.

    The only “friendly ally” that has fully developed plans and the means to annihilate the USA and possibly Europe is Israel. It’s called the “Samson Option,” which will be implemented if the Zionist Entity faces sure destruction.

    The means for carrying out this operation are the 6 “Dolphin” submarines in Israel’s navy, which were built in Germany. They are the most advanced non-nuclear submarines in the world and can stay hidden deep under the sea at full power for 30 days at least. They carry thermonuclear tipped missiles targeted for a lethal EMP attack.

    Mr. Kim may be able to hit one or two US cities, but can’t destroy the entire country.

  13. SafeNow says:

    Kim and his inner circle have 100 personal cheerleaders, dubbed the “Pleasure Squad” by insiders. No analysis of N. Korea’s thinking is complete without factoring this in.

    https://nypost.com/2018/02/23/defector-claims-north-koreas-cheerleaders-are-actually-sex-slaves/

    • LOL: bluedog
  14. Why does anyone pretend that Kim is anything other than a Chinese puppet? China is losing the trade war so the puppet must dance. If china and the Dems can’t crash the economy, Trump will be reelected. Then and only then, China will come to the table. In the meantime, the frenetic dancing of their puppet will only increase.

  15. Anon[229] • Disclaimer says:

    “ .. a truth-teller like buchanan.”

    “Not for a long time, especially when it comes to whitewashing Exceptionalia’s efforts to run the rest of the world.”

    WHEN was Pat Buchanan more of a truth teller, then? When he was writing speeches for and advising Richard Nixon? When he joined Black radical Lenora Fulani to run on the Reform Party ticket in 2000?

    https://lyndonlarouchewatch.org/index.html

  16. Anon[422] • Disclaimer says:

    “ .. a truth-teller like buchanan.”

    Not for a long time, especially when it comes to whitewashing Exceptionalia’s efforts to run the rest of the world.

    Just WHEN was Pat Buchanan a “truth-teller”? Was it when he wrote speeches for and advised Dick Nixon? What was his position on U.S. aggression in Asia and later, under Reagan, in Latin American– including supporting death squads in El Salvador?

    Or perhaps Buchanan was a “truth-teller” in 2000, when he joined Black radical Lenora Fulani* on the Reform Party ticket?

    * Fulani and (((Fred Newman))) led a weird Marxist psychotherapist cult:
    https://lyndonlarouchewatch.org/index.html

  17. Chinaman says:
    @nsa

    You should write the introduction to Pat’s article. It would allow people to make sense of what Pat writes.

  18. barr says:

    You don’t kill people to preserve honor or dignity . That what certain segments of citizens of Pakistan Iraq Afghanistan and Jordan do .

    You might have forgot the algorithm that was agreed between Trump and NK .
    Media and Bolton type of un-elected psycho then tore it apart asking NK to fulfill what was at the end of the algorithm without America meeting any of the interim demands .

  19. @Rurik

    My guess is that the last thing that the South Koreans and the Japanese want is to be saved by the Americans. If the US goons initiated a conflict, it could involve perhaps hundreds of thousands of their people vaporized, as Kim would have no choice but to fire off his nukes before he, himself, was decapitated. How many US soldiers stationed along the DMZ would die from a DPRK artillery bombardment? How many of the 10 million Koreans who live in Seoul?

    If the US really wanted to end the impasse on that war-torn peninsuela (which it does not) it would have removed its troops decades ago. Nothing more would have been needed. The North and South would have reunited long ago if not for the American bullies. How many more years can this quickly declining world hegemon continue to terrorize countries which have done it no harm?

    • Replies: @Rurik
  20. Anonymous[284] • Disclaimer says:
    @WHAT

    HOW is NKorea and other ANTI American nations being encourage by the DEM impeachment threats ???the way the DEMs prolongued the Vietnam war..weakening Nixon.. I think that the DEMs insane anti Trump focus has only forged a coalition of Russia+China+NKorea+Iran and it is spreading into SAmerica (Cuba+Venezuela+Nicaragua)…NOW Pelosi is pushing for another Impeachment Hearing..what? when will this END?? will it be longer than the Jason/Friday the 13th series???

  21. Mark12345 says:

    Buchanan needs to retire. Trump’s sanctions aren’t burying Iran. They just got a 400 million dollar infrastructure deal from China. Pat is one big phony.

  22. Rurik says:
    @follyofwar

    How many US soldiers stationed along the DMZ would die from a DPRK artillery bombardment? How many of the 10 million Koreans who live in Seoul?

    I suspect you’re right about your entire post, only I wonder if Kim would actually want to vaporize is fellow Koreans, even if they’re ideologically and politically at odds with him. At the end of the day, they’re still all Koreans.

    But as to the American soldiers over there, I suspect that most Koreans, North and South, wouldn’t mind seeing them turned into molten globs or vapor, as the case may be.

    The main and glairing justification for repressive regimes like North Korea’s today having nuclear weapons, is as a resistance to the drooling goon menacing everyone on the planet.

    If Gadhafi would have had sufficient WMD deliverable to Tel Aviv’s doorstep, then Libya would be a vastly better place to live in today.

  23. I’m not entirely a fan of Peter Zaihan, but I think he’s on to something when he offers his analysis of Kim Jong-Un’s predicament.

    Kim is Western-educated, unlike his father (whose entire education happened in a bubble).

    People who knew Kim well (at school in Switzerland) speak of him as reasonably bright and not remotely aberrant in his behaviour – i.e., the exact opposite opinion of people who were at school with any of the Saud ‘princes’.

    He clearly has a plan to liberalise the NorK economy and the political system, preparatory to the fulfilment of a pretty deep desire to reunite the Koreas.

    If he was to take concrete steps in that direction the remaining Generals from his father’s generation would have him killed. Their entire livelihoods rely on the current system (and they were pretty much the people who killed Kim’s grandfather).

    So what he is doing now, is very similar to what Trump is doing: behaving apparently-erratically, to keep his competitors off-balance.

    In a probabilistic game, it can be very useful if you can prevent other people in the game from knowing the epistemic typespace (if counterparties can’t form a decent guess about what you think you’re doing, it increases their uncertainty as to what the payoff space is: arguably they can’t even know their own doxastic state, let alone yours).

    As Max would say

    “Ah yes, Chief. The good old ‘decision-making in non-cooperative games under uncertainty’”.

    KAOS thinks that I will do X. But I know that they think that, but they know I know, so they’ll expect me to do Y. Their best-response if I do Y is R, in which case I should do X… but they’ll expect that so I should do Y… Sorry Chief… what was the question again?

    …. and so on and so on and so on.

    .

    Just to be clear: I’m not a “4D-chess” theorist when it comes to #OrangeManBad. Trump’s not pulling his own strings, but the effect is the same.

    It looks to me like Trump’s quite a bit dumber than Dubya. Dubya often had to suppress laughter when he was doing his “Shoot, I ain’t but a dumb cowboy, y’all“… hence all the smirking.

    By contrast, Trump’s extemporising – and his genuine inability to stop talking FFS – are hallmarks of raw narcissism, which is not a symptom of cognitive grunt.

    Still, I do think his schtick is orchestrated.

    .

    Anyway… back to Kim’s dilemma.

    Kim will have a NorK “Nacht der langen Messer” when the conditions are right – at which point he will have the remaining ‘dead-enders’ from his father’s regime killed. (He got rid of a some of them when he had his step-brothers killed: that was a very specific clique who were unpopular with key old-line generals).

    Killing off the ‘core’ of the old network takes a lot of organising behind the scenes – it’s easiest to achieve when the second-level military are strongly in your corner, and in Kim’s case they’re not.

    Approach the wrong guy, and the dead-enders get wind of it. Kill all the dead-enders except a couple… still got a big problem.

    .. and next thing you know there’s a new item in your feed about Kim dying from a massive coronary.

    “Makes sense”, you’ll think to yourself. “He was a fat little fuck.”

    .

    Kim’s keeping everybody on the hop; acting like a bit of a looney but not actually doing anything genuinely hostile. Being unpredictable is a good strategy if you’ve got internal and external hostiles.

    Gaddafi did the same type of thing, and so did Saddam. They didn’t have a nukular umbrella, though.

  24. JasonT says:

    Kim wants the U.S. to back off with the threats and sanctions so North Koreans can enjoy a better standard of living without fear. The solution to all the U.S. problems with North Korea is for the U.S. to stop being a bully and agree to let everyone else live in peace.

    Simply put, the problem is the U.S., not North Korea.

    • Agree: Ghan-buri-Ghan, Herald
    • LOL: Colin Wright
  25. Biff says:

    The corporations that own the U.S. government want N.K.
    They want the cheap labor – they want the unused resources – they want to monopolize goods and services – they want to break up the infrastructure and sell it off like an old used ship yard – they want to pick it apart and leave an empty husk like any typical predator does after it feeds on prey. They just need the chance(the most recent chance was in Bolivia). Can’t we give piece a chance?

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  26. @Rurik

    ‘… The drooling goon menaces everyone, including its ‘allies’. Because the drooling goon isn’t really allied with anyone, but is rather simply a mindless golem in abject, slavish service to zion. And zion hates everyone.’

    About right. I wish it weren’t so, but…

    • Agree: bluedog
  27. On Planet Reality, China is a great power now and Russia still is, and we can only effectively do anything about North Korea if it is done in cooperation with China and Russia.

    So, we have a sit down, and find out to what extent those two powers are prepared to cooperate in reigning North Korea in, and in exchange for what.

    Any other approach is pointless posturing.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  28. Why doesn’t the USA just withdraw from Asia?

    • Replies: @Just passing through
  29. @anonymous1963

    The US could withdraw from a lot of places, but lobbying efforts by a military-industrial complex keeps them engaged around the world.

  30. Piglet says:
    @Plantman

    “…eventual reunification, which is the dream of the vast majority of Korean people.”

    It depends upon whom you ask. Reunification is more popular among the younger generation, but those who experienced the war years or grew up in post-war South Korea have much less enthusiasm for it. They realize that merging with the North would create a massive financial burden as southern taxpayers would be on the hook to raise the North from basket case status to the same level as South, and they want no part of it.

    Also, if the North were to collapse and be merged into the South, there would be a lot of northern people in the military, government, intelligence services, etc., who would be displaced from their currently comfortable lifestyles of power and authority, and they wouldn’t like it one bit. Absorbing the North would just be the beginning of what would eventually erupt as a civil war for control of the country. And again, many southerners realize this and want no part of it.

    Since the end of WW II the two Koreas have been culturally developing as two very different countries and by now it may be too late to have any hope of peaceful reconciliation and merger.

    Keep in mind that, during the era of Japanese occupation, there were large numbers of Koreans who quite willingly cooperated with the Japanese, to included serving in its police, armed forces, and even anti-partisan units that hunted down and killed Koreans seeking independence from the occupiers. Yes, Koreans, in the pay of the Japanese, were killing other Koreans. After WW II, anti-Japanese communists formed the government and military in the North, while the government and military in the South were created with former collaborators and those who had served in the Japanese military.

    A brutal occupier is bad enough, but for a collaborator of your own blood, there is no forgiveness. One or the other has to go, and it’s going to be bloody. If you think the Irish or the Hatfields and McCoys hold the worst grudges, you haven’t seen a Korean grudge yet.

    If you delve into Korean history you’ll see there were centuries when the Three Kingdoms existed on the peninsula. Really, there’s no reason why everyone must be under one government and one flag. Let the people go their separate ways. Forcing mergers will only backfire.

  31. @anonymous

    Agree.
    Paddy has not aged well.

  32. KenH says:

    So the saga of The Rocket Man vs. the orange doofus continues. Part of me is rooting for the rotund little rocket man since he doesn’t cower before the U.S. as does practically every other world leader, including Putin, who seems only to vacillates between whining about violations of international law and empty threats about his hypersonic missiles and other weapons.

    Rocket Man has a great advantage in that he is a one man tyranny and can militarily respond and inflict serious casualties on on U.S. troops stationed near the border and S. Korea. Soon he may have the capability to strike the West Coast which is probably a good thing since it would rid the nation of a bunch of Mestizos and white social justice warriors.

    The proper U.S. response is to completely withdraw from the region and let China, S. Korea, N. Korea and Japan sort things out. That was what Trump basically campaigned on until he got stricken with an indefinate case of Potomac fever which will probably worsen in his second term with a war on Iran.

  33. @Biff

    ‘The corporations that own the U.S. government want N.K.
    They want the cheap labor – they want the unused resources – they want to monopolize goods and services – they want to break up the infrastructure and sell it off like an old used ship yard – they want to pick it apart and leave an empty husk like any typical predator does after it feeds on prey…’

    Have you looked at a map? You might as well claim that Costco is conspiring to drive Mrs. Tigglewinkle’s corner store out of business.

    North Korea’s a mouse-sized hole with nothing in it but a few million starving and oppressed peasants. There’s nothing much to take.

  34. Anon[144] • Disclaimer says:
    @Plantman

    Peter Lee had one of many articles about this:
    https://chinamatters.blogspot.com/2016/12/great-game-on-north-korea-chessboard.html

    It is about the american nuclear ‘umbrella’ : is american nuclear deterrence ‘credible’

    Why is this related to Fukushima ?
    Fukushima was made much worse because of all the spent fuel rods stockpiled there.
    Why ? Maybe to enable japan to have plenty of material to create highly enriched uranium.

    america does not want a japanese bomb nor an independent japan.
    america has to ‘prove’ to japan that it can contain north korea aggression .

    japan does not want a unified korea
    china wants us troops out of korea, can live with a unified korea
    russia wants normalized trade with north korea to ship fuel to south korea through pipeline and rail.
    south korean people want peace
    south korean business want economic unification – cheap labor and cheap shipping by rail
    south korean security establishment wants the threat of war

    the leaders ‘lead’ and we are passive spectators.

    As for Buchanan’s thesis, he jumped the gun, “idle speculation” the clue is in the name.

  35. @Hail

    It’s not difficult to understand that “Kim is all about self-preservation” is not what Kim, or NK, are all about.
    What IS the primary motivation of the North Koreans — sovereignty? dignity? self-determination?

  36. @WHAT

    Anyone who breaks foreign policy down to a measure of “who has the balls” is a dum-dum overcompensating for his shame of being a pussy who in real life has always been the biggest coward in the room.

  37. This thread is full of godforsaken pro-communist losers. How morally obtuse can one get?

    • Replies: @bluedog
  38. bluedog says:
    @Gleimhart Mantooso

    And then you have the other side the warmongers who’s at endless war with everyone on the planet,so which is the greater of the two evils, those who attack no one or those who attack everyone,now that’s the question that begs to be answered.!!!

  39. Adûnâi says:

    Kim Jong Il’s legacy of songun and Juche is the greatest moral threat to the Christian-Capitalist American empire since the time of Adolf Hitler.

    The only thing the DPRK has to do is to wait until the US Dollar collapses and the Seoul regime degenerates to the point where they accept the LGBT community and where their population’s median age reaches 51 years in 2035. Kim Jong Un will reunite the peninsula in a few short decades.

    And America? Hwasong-15 can already reach the mainland with a vengeful strike. But will that be needed?

    “The ability to destroy a planet is insignificant next to the power of the Force”. – A New Hope.

    …massive destruction is unavoidable because after the Second World War the Allies must pay a massive karmic debt.

    https://chechar.wordpress.com/2019/12/12/sticky/

    Is Brazil a Great Power? Is Rome? Is the USSR? All gone with the wind of miscegenation and sodomy. The law of the Universe is Order and Beauty.

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