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In Afghanistan, the Worst Is Yet to Come
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Say what you will about President Joe Biden, he has stuck to his guns on ending America’s 20-year involvement in Afghanistan’s forever war.

His decision not to delay our departure after Aug. 31 was fortified by hard intel that the terrorist ISIS-K was preparing attacks at Kabul airport.

Thursday evening, the two bomb attacks occurred.

It now seems inevitable that the withdrawal will be completed by Aug. 31, with all U.S. military forces following the last civilians out.

Before yesterday’s attacks, the airlift had been going far better than in its chaotic first days. Some 100,000 Americans and Afghans had gotten out of the country since Aug. 14.

Biden held his ground, refusing to be stampeded by Democratic critics, NATO allies, Republican hawks or media demanding he extend the deadline for departure until all Americans were out.

His adamancy testifies to the convictions Biden came by during decades at the apex of the U.S. government during our longest war.

Those convictions:

Even if the end result of a withdrawal is that Afghanistan falls to the Taliban, the cause is not worth a continuance of the U.S. commitment or the blood and treasure that four presidents have invested.

Better to accept a U.S. defeat and humiliation than re-commit to a war that is inevitably going to be lost.

Biden’s decision and the botched early days of the withdrawal have not been without political cost. Polls show the president’s approval rating sliding underwater. A Suffolk poll has him down to 41%.

Yet, on his basic decision to get out now and accept the costs and consequences, his country appears to be with him. After all, former President Donald Trump was prepared to depart earlier than Aug. 31, and a majority of Americans still support the decision to write off Afghanistan and get out.

Still, we need to realize what this means and what is coming.

According to the secretary of state, 6,000 Americans were still in Afghanistan when the Afghan army collapsed and Kabul fell. Some 4,500 of these have now been evacuated.

The State Department is in touch with 500 other U.S. citizens to effect their departure. As for the remaining 1,000, we do not know where they are.

What does this mean?

Hundreds of Americans are going to be left behind, along with scores of thousands of Afghan allies who worked with our military or contributed to the cause of crushing the Taliban. And many of those Afghans are going to pay the price of having cast their lot with the Americans.

After Aug. 31, the fate of those left behind will be determined by the Taliban, and we will be made witness to the fate the Taliban imposes.

This generation is about to learn what it means to lose a war.

When the war for Algerian independence ended in 1962, and the French pulled their troops out, scores of thousands of “Harkis,” Arab and Muslim Algerians who fought alongside the French, were left behind.

The atrocities against the Harkis ran into the tens of thousands. Such may be the fate of scores of thousands of Afghans who fought beside us.

ORDER IT NOW

Biden’s diplomats may be negotiating with the Taliban to prevent the war crime of using U.S. citizens left behind as hostages. But we are not going to be able to save all of our friends and allies who cast their lot with us and fought alongside us.

Yet, while the promises of the Taliban are not credible and ought not to be believed, we are not without leverage.

As The New York Times writes, the Afghan economy is “in free fall.”

“Cash is growing scarce, and food prices are rising. Fuel is becoming harder to find. Government services have stalled as civil servants avoid work, fearing retribution.”

The Taliban’s desperate need is for people to run the economy and for money from the international community to pay for imports of food and vital necessities of life.

What will also be needed from us, soon after the fall of Afghanistan, is a reappraisal of America’s commitments across the Middle East.

We have 900 U.S. troops in Syria who control the oil reserves of that country and serve as a shield for the Syrian Kurds.

How long should we keep them there?

We retain several thousand troops in Iraq. Why?

These are questions for which new answers are going to be needed.

Indeed, there will be a temptation to counter our defeat and humiliation with defiant gestures or precipitate action to restore our lost credibility. Henry Kissinger’s advice on any such action today seems wise:

“No dramatic strategic move is available in the immediate future to offset this self-inflicted setback, such as by making new formal commitments in other regions. American rashness would compound disappointment among allies, encourage adversaries, and sow confusion among observers.”

As for Afghanistan and the Kabul airport, there comes a time when even a great nation needs to accept the reality that Corregidor is lost.

Patrick J. Buchanan is the author of “Nixon’s White House Wars: The Battles That Made and Broke a President and Divided America Forever.”

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Afghanistan, American Military, Taliban 
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  1. Why do we still have troops in the ME?

    Well, gee…..is it to protect the Amish?

    • Agree: donut
  2. Dumbo says:

    Biden is fake.
    Elections are fake.
    Polls are fake.
    ISIS is fake.
    Perhaps even those explosions and the whole Taliban are fake.
    I don’t know.

    Or perhaps, they just removed the American troops in order to continue the “terrorism” psy-ops, and this gives them an excuse. As people get tired of Covid restrictions and the vaccination debacle, perhaps it’s time to “shock and awe” the population with a new 9/11.

    • Replies: @buckyinky
  3. Cheer up Pat –those ISIS ISIL ETA USA trained terrorists are doing a swell job and Wall Street –gated communities across the USA—the lobbyists and militia machine and contractors could not be more pleased because a new war is needed to keep the Christian Machine moving —perhaps Canada is the nail which the American Hammer needs to slam next —reason: Not allowed entry without proof of teast and mask –this is NOT Hallowe’en Night and Trumps miracle is coming –DEBT has no bounds !!!

  4. The Corregidor analogy implies that we’re eventually going to return.

    The sloppiness and incompetence of the withdrawal almost seems designed to create the propaganda environment demanding a retaliatory return..

    God forbid. Bring the troops home, and keep them here. For good.

    • Replies: @Prester John
  5. Renoman says:

    Get out of the Mid East completely, let them run their own show. The sooner they wipe each other out the better. We don’t need their oil and we sure don’t need Israel, they’ve brought nothing but misery.

  6. More Exceptional! whitewash, starting with the first paragraph:

    Say what you will about President Joe Biden, he has stuck to his guns on ending America’s 20-year involvement in Afghanistan’s forever war.

    A “great nation” had to get involved, and at least “we” staved off for a couple decades the “atrocities” and “war crime” of the Taliban.

    Uncle Sam can only do so much good, but he never does anything bad. If you don’t believe Mr. Buchanan, just ask Henry Kissinger.

    • Agree: GomezAdddams
  7. @Greta Handel

    Oh can it you sniveling pedant, Pat deserves credit for being right all along in his views on foreign policy, among about everything else to his writing. While he isn’t given to gloating – which seems now a prerequisite to appreciation among the right – the course of events prove Buchanan to be a formidable figure of conservatism.

    • Agree: TTSSYF
    • Disagree: schnellandine
  8. @Greta Handel

    And he might as well have quoted Madeleine “Worth It” Albright, too, when mongering the non-kinetic war to come.

    Yet, while the promises of the Taliban are not credible and ought not to be believed, we are not without leverage.

    As The New York Times writes, the Afghan economy is “in free fall.”

    “Cash is growing scarce, and food prices are rising. Fuel is becoming harder to find. Government services have stalled as civil servants avoid work, fearing retribution.”

    The Taliban’s desperate need is for people to run the economy and for money from the international community to pay for imports of food and vital necessities of life.

    Yeah, time for some Exceptional! “leverage.”

    • Replies: @Marshal Marlow
  9. Better to accept a U.S. defeat and humiliation than re-commit to a war that is inevitably going to be lost.

    While it’s pleasing “forever war” is entering the lexicon, it must do so with a proper definition:

    Forever War: a pretend war not fought to be won but prolonged, with victory measured by duration and profiteering

    There’s nothing worse than seeing the children of defense contractors shoeless and hungry.

    • LOL: animalogic
  10. After Aug. 31, the fate of those left behind will be determined by the Taliban, and we will be made witness to the fate the Taliban imposes.

    It’s an Afghanistan tradition.

    1842 retreat from Kabul
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1842_retreat_from_Kabul

  11. Now is the time to remember the Iraqi withdrawal from Kuwait in 1991. Defeated and depleted, the Iraqis abandoned their defenses and began a hasty retreat under cover of darkness.

    What did the American-led coalition do? It attacked without mercy, creating what is remembered in the history books as the Highway of Death.

    Strafed and bombed from above, Iraqi conscripts died by the thousands. The coalition of Western countries showed no regret, as they considered a retreating army a fair target.

    Why should Biden be getting huffy about attacks on Kabul airport? Having thrown out the rules against torture, invading and occupying sovereign countries, drone killing, and ignoring internationally accepted conduct of war, America has no moral authority to complain.

  12. More and more democrats are finally starting to realize that senile Old Joe is not fit for the presidency. His talk to the nation yesterday afternoon was pathetic, his dementia showing. Poor incompetent Biden has become a laughing stock on the world stage. No world power can put up with being ridiculed, especially by its Allies.

    Kamala was scheduled to campaign for Gavin Newsom today, but that appearance has been cancelled. She was ordered back to DC, perhaps to initiate the 25th Amendment if Biden refuses to resign. The Night of the Long Knives is coming for Biden. Expect to see other high level forced resignations. The democrats are preparing to take a flying leap into the abyss and install Kamala as potus. Lord help us!

    • Replies: @GomezAdddams
  13. Gordo says:

    Thirty pieces of silver not enough?

    What is the moral character of those you would import?

    • Agree: GomezAdddams
  14. buckyinky says:
    @Dumbo

    Agreed. It’s reasonable in our day to require establishing what is real before starting any discussion about what actions to take. Without that it’s likely just blather. Perhaps well-intentioned blather, as I believe to be the case with Mr. Buchanan. But still likely just blather.

  15. Americans – not trusting the trustworthy, not trusting the untrustworthy. Upside down Te in action!

  16. According to the secretary of state, 6,000 Americans were still in Afghanistan when the Afghan army collapsed and Kabul fell.

    Some 100,000 Americans and Afghans had gotten out of the country since Aug. 14.

    100 000 – 6000 = 94 000. 94 000 new “Americans” in just two weeks. So the military has been functioning as a taxi service for migrants the past couple of weeks, just like those NGOs in the Mediterranean.

    Let China and Russia have the rare earth minerals, we’re getting the people! Take that Xi and Putin!

  17. Wokechoke says:

    Mossad not so subtle punishment on Joe for defying Neocon policy.

  18. RVBlake says:

    “This generation is about to learn what it means to lose a war.” This wasn’t WWII. In what way was this generation involved in the Afghanistan debacle?

  19. Biden need not worry about losing the war in Afghanistan. His onward concern needs to be avoiding war with China, the conflict the US needs to avoid – is trying to avoid – but history is not on its side.
    https://www.ghostsofhistory.wordpress.com/

  20. @John Achterhof

    More grumping from another old fan who can’t refute criticism of what Mr. Paleoconservative’s been spewing here for years now.

    How much credit does he have left before you think we can snivel?

  21. gottlieb says:

    We can only hope the evacuation mission is completed and we have wheels up on all US forces in Afghanistan. This military action was illegal, irresponsible and immoral for 20 years. But today we have Mr. Political Establishment Panetta calling for a re-invasion of Afghanistan to once again chase terrorists.

    American Leadership has had the stamp of mediocrity for generations, but now? Good gods, US leadership barely rises to the level of mold.

  22. Currahee says:

    “6,000 Americans were still in Afghanistan”
    Americans? Define, please.

  23. This is rather indisputable:

    After Aug. 31, the fate of those left behind will be determined by the Taliban, and we will be made witness to the fate the Taliban imposes.

    Keep in mind that the Taliban are going to need external support in order to succeed and they know it. The withdrawal agreements were reached in negotiations which included the Chinese and Russians. All the Taliban proclamations so far indicate that they wish to be a legitimate government. China and Russia are going to be the external entities that provide the assistance. They have publicly stated that they don’t want to interfere with Afghanistan internals, but won’t tolerate it being used as a haven for their respective separatist movements.

    The Taliban want the foreigners out, and the talented natives to stay.

    I don’t think a hostage situation, or retributions, are on the horizon. Pat’s points on the mission in Syria and Iraq are spot on. My take is that the Kurd’s won’t get Kurdistan, and the oil underneath will eventually be agreed upon and will benefit the Kurds more than if they managed it themselves.

  24. @fitzhamilton

    Good point re: Corregidor.

    Totally agree re: the troops. As per the title of one of the author’s book, we are supposedly “a republic, not an empire.”

  25. SafeNow says:

    As Trump just observed, “a child” would have known the prudent evacuation sequence. This was very badly bungled. Not somewhat bungled, but exceedingly bungled. Thus, even if the bungling propensity is reduced, say, 50%, going forward, that still leaves a very large bungling propensity. This is scary, mainly in the context of bungling into war with China or Russia, or, the accidental detonation of a nuclear weapon, perhaps Pakistan’s.

    • Agree: Decoy
    • Replies: @Robert Dolan
  26. We have 900 U.S. troops in Syria who control the oil reserves of that country and serve as a shield for the Syrian Kurds.
    How long should we keep them there?
    We retain several thousand troops in Iraq. Why?

    Maybe because Eskimos control the US deep state?

  27. How about our ”brave Afghan allies” picking up some of the thousands of rifles I and other American taxpayers paid for and fighting their own battles? The Taliban is not even a formidable fighting force; the Afghans are renowned to be courageous tough fighters but seems the Afghans with the motivation and conviction were on the other side; most Americans dont give a rats ass about Afghanistan and are glad we are out; messes like Afghanistan are why I tell my two sons ages 22 and 19 to stay the hell of of the Wokefied watered down feminized US Military.

    • Replies: @follyofwar
    , @raga10
  28. Sisifo says:

    “Some 100,000 Americans and Afghans” means 1,000 Americans and 99,000 Afghans, just to be clear.

  29. Miro23 says:
    @beavertales

    Why should Biden be getting huffy about attacks on Kabul airport? Having thrown out the rules against torture, invading and occupying sovereign countries, drone killing, and ignoring internationally accepted conduct of war, America has no moral authority to complain.

    There is that general disbelief in US moral authority.

    It wasn’t always that way. After WW2 Anglo America did bring democracy to ex military dictatorships (Germany and Japan) and roll back their imperial projects plus rebuild the advanced world under Pax Americana.

    Accepted that it was mostly building markets for corporate America, but it could have been worse.

    In contrast, under the present system (Judaic America), America itself is being attacked and looted the same as the ROW (Rest Of the World). True “Homeland Security” would be the return of ( a reduced and wiser) Anglo America – something that’s not going to happen by voting.

  30. @SafeNow

    It wasn’t bungled.

    It was planned. Blood on TV is good for Israel.

    Create hate for muslims.

    Import “refugees” tp pimp our girls, blow shit up, and vote Democrat.

    Justify more wars for Israel.

    They know exactly what they are doing.

    • Agree: Kolya Krassotkin
    • Replies: @Dr. Charles Fhandrich
  31. @beavertales

    The UK troops who cleaned up the “highway of death’ said that the people who died there were fleeing civilians and that was reported in the UK media. That was probably why US pilots eventually protested about killing more and the war crime stopped.

    According to Keesing’s Contemporary Archives, the official US estimate of the total number of Iraqi troops who died in Kuwait was adjusted slightly from 100,000, give or take 50,000, to fewer than 1,500 though that took about 3 years. I checked that a few years later because, at the time, the USA refused to provide the names and serial numbers to the Red Cross, as required under the Geneva Conventions. That was enough for me to think “normal US lies”.

    US politicians habitually lie and the US media is untrustworthy. You should have more trust in Iranians, Syrians, Russians and Chinese who are more truthful. So are the Taliban. There really are people in the world who don’t think lying is wonderful. That doesn’t prevent them from trying to get an advantage from lying occasionally; the feeling of distaste just stops it from becoming the norm. [email protected]

  32. @Greta Handel

    Presumably the US has already frozen all Afghani accounts globally just to make sure that the Afghani’s remember the US occupation as the good ‘ol days.

    That said, I’m guessing that China might come to the rescue with non-military funds combined with tribally-neutral managers who are willing to do the non-glamorous work of governance. If China does intervene AND if it succeeds with a Chinese model, then that’ll convert a mere western tactical failure into a western strategic failure.

  33. I don’t care about s*hole countries, thousands of miles from CA.

    I don’t care about s*hole, US cities, thousands of miles from CA; nor even the ones in CA.

    What matters to me, and what I strongly oppose, btw, is public education in my own backyard and all across this state.

  34. @beavertales

    Rumsfeld’s war in Afghanistan is a bust and was implemented on hatred —along with Bush- Blair and Cheney—head to Hague –War Criminals — FO –Floyd Olson overdoes of LSD and they fly off the tower —10 !!!

  35. @follyofwar

    Might I suggest they apply the 25 th Amendment and allow Kamala Harris to rise to President and Hunter Biden or Hillary Clinton to serve as Vice —–Hillary lost that 2016 election but Hunter never missed an Erection.

  36. Decoy says:

    China is the winner of the Afghan war and they didn’t have to fire a single bullet. I doubt that there is even one country in the world that has confidence in the Biden administration and there will be a natural tendency to drift toward China for world leadership…which they might not want at this point in time.

    • Agree: GomezAdddams
  37. Wokechoke says:

    Bagram was a serious loss to global hegemony. Eisenhower wanted to have it for himself.

  38. The rancid ruling class of the Republican Party is using REFUGEE OVERLOAD as a demographic weapon to attack and destroy cultural cohesion in the USA.

    The treasonous and evil JEW/WASP Ruling Class of the American Empire is using REFUGEE OVERLOAD to attack and destroy the European Christian ancestral core of the United States of America.

    White Core America must politically decapitate the JEW/WASP Ruling Class of the American Empire.

    The Republican Party donors and the Republican Party politician whores are enemies of the historic American nation and the European Christian ancestral core of the USA.

    Tweets from 2015:

  39. nickels says:

    The hand of God has descended on the most flawed of his creatures and is guiding him one of the greatest acts in human history-the total destruction of the American MIC.

    I don’t think Biden even has a clue. Perhaps he will be redeemed, though unlikely.

    He got us out and when he keeps us out it will go down in history as the weirdest and best action by the most awful of creatures ever.

  40. Hundreds of Americans are going to be left behind

    maybe an informed choice, Pat.

    staying in Afghan better than returning stateside …

    in Asia I ran into a lot of americans who had made that decision …

    • Replies: @follyofwar
  41. @Robert Dolan

    All of the presidents seem to have left clues as to how the power structure is really set up. Even Roosevelt said that, ” in politics, nothing happens by accident. If it happens, you can bet that it was planned that way.” Americans never seem to have believed him.

  42. deanon says:

    I’m calling a Hoax and to hell with Joe Biden.
    The idea that there was no agreements under the Geneva Convention, for our occupying that country is just a plain old pulling the wool. There is no way we are leaving that country without satisfying our obligations under the Geneva Convention, because we occupied the country.
    Sorry Pat maybe you are getting old.

  43. gT says:

    Why do those in the west insist on judging other countries by Western standards?

    So what if the Afghan economy is in free fall, the Taliban don’t care. Food, fuel shortages, no problem, grow food and ride horses or donkeys. Government services have stalled, praise be to Allah, none of that is in the Koran anyway.

    “The Taliban’s desperate need is for people to run the economy and for money from the international community to pay for imports of food and vital necessities of life.” The Taliban don’t care, people will live and die as Allah wills it. The economy revolves around goats, the international community has got nothing to do with Afghanistan’s goats.

    People in the West think everyone wants to be Westernized, that is not true.

  44. “The war crime of using US citizens as hostages”

    Paddy’s insolence knows no bounds.

    Those “left behind” are aiding, abetting and in many cases perpetrating the real war crime of attacking occupying and slaughtering the citizens of a country that never attacked the US. The US should not be importing any Afghans. It is not short of people who will sell out their country for a couple of bucks. The Congress is full of them.

  45. @Arthur MacBride

    How many of them actually joined forces with the Taliban? The answer is certainly not none. How many are CIA/NGO types still working undercover to keep up the underground poppy trade? Again, certainly not none.

    There are millions of disgruntled expats living happily in a hundred different countries, who never want to set foot in the decaying US again. So, why not in Afghanistan? The narrative pushed daily on Fox News, Newsmax, and OAN is a fraud (just as the fraud pulled over our eyes that senile Biden actually won the election). But it sure must be good for their ratings.

  46. @Max Maxwell

    By some accounts I’ve read, the Afghan men who joined with the US only did it for the money, and had no allegiance to the Empire. Many were illiterate drug addicts who couldn’t even do jumping jacks, and “fragged” American soldiers when their backs were turned. It’s no wonder they folded like a cheap suit under the Taliban’s advance.

    How can you say that the Taliban wasn’t “a formidable fighting force” when they fought the Americans, with their vastly superior weaponry, to a 20-year stalemate, forcing their evacuation from the Graveyard of Empires? Given the gross imbalance of power, I’d guess they are much better fighters than the Americans, who only want to cowardly drop bombs so they don’t lose any soldiers, while they kill tens of thousands fighting valiantly against Western occupation.

    But, I wholeheartedly concur with your desire to keep your two grown sons out of the Biden regimes woke US military, which, according to General Milley, looks at every White recruit as a potential terrorist. Why would any young White man want to sign up with his enemy?

  47. TG says:

    I’ve said this before, please forgive the repetition, but the single major issue continues to be ignored.

    Afghanistan has the highest fertility rate outside of Africa, it’s a miserable third-world hell, one of the poorest nations in the world. The population was 20 million when the US invaded, and now it’s 40 million – and they can’t feed themselves without US aid, which has been cut off, as well as their external funds so they can’t import food from overseas. Meanwhile the population is set to double again to 80 million in another 20 years, and there is no prospect for the kind of real investment in infrastructure that would let them support these numbers.

    Afghanis are not fleeing because of the Taliban – they are fleeing because of the misery and poverty of their own miserable culture, turbo-charged by official US policy of now cutting them off from food supplies. Where are these miserably poor Afghanis going to go? Why the United States of course, because our elites just love cheap labor.

    Just what we need, a few more tens of millions of Islamic wife-beating pederasts most of whom hate the US and many of whom certainly fought for the other side…

    • Replies: @gT
  48. Islamic wife-beating pederasts most of whom hate the US and many of whom certainly fought for the other side…

    Remind me how many Afghans you killed in your 20-year illegal occupation ?
    What about your NGO’s, feminists, your Gay Parade “military” ?
    Your drones, your MOABs, your “American values” ? … for 20 years …
    And still the Afghans threw out of their country …

    Are all Islamists “wife-beating pederasts” ?

    Let me predict something for you — Afghan is not the first and it will not be the last country you will run out of in disarray.

    It will not be b/c they hate you (they don’t) but b/c you have NO BUSINESS invading/looting their country, killing their citizens, or telling them how to live.

    • Thanks: Greta Handel
  49. Anonymous[326] • Disclaimer says:

    Patty Pat Pat, Patty Booboo: Corregidor is the wrong example. Corregidor was an American victory.

  50. @John Achterhof

    the course of events prove Buchanan to be a formidable figure of conservatism.

    Joe Sobran was a formidable figure of conservatism, beside which PB is a puking drunk—probably now a ghostwritten puking drunk. Mr. Sobran never stopped learning and correcting youthful mistakes, primarily that of falling into sports team rah-rah-ism. PB? Look up ‘controlled opposition’ to see his glossy headshot. Or, in the usual style of ‘his’ dumb headlines,
    Will an Online Dictionary Be the Best Place to Find My Decrepit Mug?

    • Replies: @Rurik
  51. Franz says:

    Say what you will about President Joe Biden

    Got it!

    And say it while you can, Joe is not The Donald. I never saw a better model of two old dudes, one with more spark than a yard full of puppies and one who looks like the stiffest Frankenstein monster ever designed.

    Just watching Joe makes me tired. Trump (for good or ill) wakes the dead. How does that work?

  52. derer says:

    The Washington players, of both parties, still think that colonizing sovereign countries is USA right… because we are “strong” and have “ability” to do it. We have to defend that reputation.

  53. gT says:
    @TG

    If it is indeed the case that Afghanistan’s population now exceeds the carrying capacity of the land, then it can only mean that the plan is to flood Russia with refugees, most of whom will be terrorists.

    But the only job of the Red Army is to neutralize intruders, so its not a problem. Compare this to the US army whose job it is to ignore intruders coming into the States and just bomb people overseas to encourage more of them to come to the States. Some of the ex Russian Stans north of Afghanistan are going to come under pressure, but its nothing the Chechens can’t deal with. Its about time Russia started acting more aggressively, Russia has been doing the barest minimum for some time now and still achieving her objectives.

  54. Rurik says:
    @schnellandine

    Joe Sobran was a formidable figure of conservatism, beside which PB is a puking drunk

    I like reading Buchanan and appreciate his point of view, but he is no Joe Sobran [RIP]

  55. raga10 says:
    @Max Maxwell

    Exactly right! “Afghan allies” were simply working for Americans because they got paid well – and there is nothing wrong with that, but it also means limited obligation to them.

    It is said that “you get the government you deserve” and that is true for Afghans as well – if they were so afraid of Taliban, maybe they should’ve offered some resistance instead of surrendering basically without firing a shot?

    Taliban is a motley crew of about 70-80 thousand fighters; Afghanistan has a population of nearly 40 million people. You don’t get to run a country of that size with such small force unless large proportion of the population actively supports you, or at least accepts you as the lesser evil.

    The worst might be yet to come in Afghanistan, but it is of their own doing and for them to sort out, as it should’ve been all along.

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