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The Great Parental Replacement
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It’s happening. It’s been happening. Parents, you are being replaced.

Where? Right under your noses, in your neighborhoods, in your public and private schools, and in your local children’s hospitals.

How? Under the guise of health, safety, compassion, tolerance, diversity, intellectual superiority and, of course, the public good.

By whom? Woke educators, radical school counselors, gender queer-promoting librarians, meddling school-based health clinic staffers, Big Pharma drug and jab peddlers, and medical establishment “experts” like the ones at the American Medical Association, who, as investigative researcher and City Journal writer Christopher Rufo reported this week, are “asking Big Tech and the Department of Justice to censor, deplatform, investigate, and prosecute journalists who question the orthodoxy of radical gender surgeries for minors, arguing that public criticism is ‘disinformation.'”

It’s not just journalists that the AMA is targeting, but outspoken parents on social media who dare to question State Science and who fearlessly assert and defend their family sovereignty. As usual, questioning the authority of the elites is tantamount to threatening “violence, intimidation, and physical harm” — even as these control freaks oversee the mass poisoning of vulnerable children’s minds and bodies across the country.

Why? Newly elected Italian Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni summarized it well in a viral 2019 speech at the World Congress of Families that Big Tech has tried to suppress.

“Why is the family the enemy?” she asked. “Why is the family so frightening?”

Answer: “Because family is our identity. Because everything that defines us is now the enemy for those who would like us to have no identity and simply be perfect consumer slaves. That’s why they attack national identity, that’s why they attack religious identity, attack sexual identity, attack family identity. I cannot define myself as Christian, Italian, wife, mother, no. I have to be citizen X, gender X, parent 1, parent 2. I have to be a number … That’s why we cause so much fear … Because we don’t want to be numbers. We will defend the value of the human being … We will defend God, country and family.”

Yes. We are more than just automatons and QR codes. Our children are more than just advertising-coveted eyeballs and addicted mouse-clickers, more than data-mining sitting ducks and docile worker cogs in the globalist machine. Our children are more than just bottomless receptacles for the next government-subsidized, billion-dollar experimental drugs from cradle to grave — be they puberty-blocking hormones, lifestyle vaccines (Gardasil, PrEP), ineffective and natural immunity-undermining flu shots, anti-anxiety and anti-depressant pills, or experimental bivalent COVID booster jabs that have only been tested on a handful of mice.

Moms and dads, you are more than a pesky nuisance to the architects and engineers of the Great Parental Replacement.

You are a hindrance.

At Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, the Daily Caller’s Chrissy Clark reported, a “Gender and Sexuality Development Clinic” has held 33 trainings in 15 schools over the past five years on “trans-inclusive policies” in which attendees are advised to “keep gender identity secret from parents.”

You are abusers.

At Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri, an academic “expert” claimed that parents “refusing puberty-blocking treatment” amounted to “psychological harm,” which she equated with physical abuse that should be subject to criminal prosecution.

You are nosybodies.

ORDER IT NOW

In the U.S., 17 children’s hospitals have now hidden information about their gender transmogrification programs after parents exposed their practices. Most prominent among them: Boston Children’s Hospital and its demented program, HOTT (Health Outreach to Teens), which advises boys on how to “tuck” and tape up their penises to make them look like vaginas.

To distract from this perversity, Boston Children’s is playing the victim, decrying alleged threats of “violence” (cue the Southern Poverty Law Center smear machine). We’ve seen this playbook before. Remember: In 2013, young Justina Pelletier was ripped from her parents’ custody by Boston Children’s Hospital. The teen, who lives with mitochondrial disease and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, had gone to BCH after coming down with a severe case of the flu. Instead of receiving top-notch care and attention at BCH, however, Justina was medically kidnapped and recklessly re-diagnosed with a psychological condition, “somatoform disorder.”

Justina was dragged from BCH’s neurology department to its infamous psych ward, where she was reprimanded for being unable to move her bowels or walk unassisted in her weakened state. At the Wayside Youth and Family Support Network residential treatment center, where she was confined, she and her family recounted to me in my 2018 documentary on the case, she was harassed by a staffer while taking a shower. The physical and mental torture lasted 16 months.

Doctors at BCH dubbed their evil practice a “parentectomy” — and this savage removal of parental rights has been repeated nationwide. The Pelletier family sued BCH and lost in early 2020, at exactly the time the World Economic Forum was ushering in the Great Reset and its replacement of sovereign nations and sovereign parents with drug-pushing, gender-destroying, child-kidnapping, surveillance-state managers of the “global commons.”

It’s time for nuclear families to go nuclear on their enemies. That’s not a call to violence, but a call to protect your children’s minds, hearts, bodies and souls from those who seek to obliterate our identity, bonds and God-given rights.

Michelle Malkin’s email address is [email protected]

 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Parenting, Political Correctness 
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  1. Americans, get your children out of the Government Schools!

    That separation alone won’t cut it, though, as far as ending the anti-family efforts that have been the hallmark of Communists since day 1. They will come at us harder with more rules. It’s like this: Years ago, I’d read Mrs. Malkin rightly deride the Secretary of Education but not understand the point that it’s not WHO is the S. of Ed. that’s the root problem – it’s that there IS a Feral Dept. of Education to begin with! You’ve got to strike the root.

    Big Gov is the enforcement arm for all of these hateful people and organizations. We need to take down the US Potomac Regime, one way or another – failing that, we can wait … once the financial SHTF that is inevitable happens, this can go one way or another. We can understand the problem and a Phoenix of Liberty can arise from the ashes. Or, we will let the Communists have full control – American has been their brass ring for over a century.

    • Replies: @WorkingClass
    @Achmed E. Newman

    ..... it’s not WHO is the S. of Ed. that’s the root problem – it’s that there IS a Feral Dept. of Education to begin with! You’ve got to strike the root.

    Same Same with the FED. The FBI, the CIA, the DHS, and on and on and on.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Exalted Cyclops
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Absolutely correct. The Government Schul Gulag is nothing but an indoctrination camp run by the Church of Woke. Even old Koba the Dread understood the nature of edumacation:


    "Education is a weapon whose effects depend on who holds it in his hands and at whom it is aimed." -- Josef Stalin
     
    It should be more than obvious by this stage who is holding this weapon and at whom it is aimed. How many times have the Republicans (Washington Generals) promised to abolish the Dept. of Edumacation? I've literally lost count. Like a malignant tumor, it just keeps growing. It even has its own police-army, ready to SWAT anyone they choose to target. Abolish the department, fire all of them and let them 'learn to code' or something.
  2. There are many thing that must be done and eliminating the Department of Education is certainly one of them. We won’t be able to accomplish that in the short term. However what does need to happen right now is for parents to remove their children from the public schools.

    If you have your children in a public school you are committing child abuse.

    • Agree: HbutnotG
  3. Dismayed parents recently recounted this to me. Their daughter had started the new school year. Middle school. Affluent. Suburban. Public. She was excited, she told her parents, to have learned she has five alternatives available – – those represented by the five initials in LGBTQ. She added that there is a sixth, something called heterosexual, she said, but this was only quickly mentioned in class, she said.

    And by the way her tone with her parents was hostile about this, saying I’ll bet you don’t even know what the initials stand for.
    My guess is that she had been prepared by the teacher to assume that her parents are ignorant so don’t listen to them.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  4. In 2013, young Justina Pelletier was ripped from her parents’ custody by Boston Children’s Hospital. The teen, who lives with mitochondrial disease and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, had gone to BCH after coming down with a severe case of the flu. Instead of receiving top-notch care and attention at BCH, however, Justina was medically kidnapped and recklessly re-diagnosed with a psychological condition, “somatoform disorder.”

    Just a friendly reminder that none of this would be possible without the participation of the little Eichmanns of your local police departments.

    Keep backing that blue, fucktards.

    • Replies: @George 1
    @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.

    Those stupid "back the blue" signs are all around my neighborhood. How deluded can people be. They live in the 80s. For anyone who is a back the blue conservative: Folks that time has passed. The police are not your friends.

    In any society the police work for the elites. That is universal. In our current society the elites have decided that people on the right are threats to their sodomy, money laundering, wars and global totalitarian schemes, otherwise known as democracy. The police have proven they will follow orders no matter how immoral or unconstitutional with very few exceptions.

    Couple the above with the general decline in national IQ and you have now have a situation where you are never in more danger than when police are nearby.

  5. Every time we feel the need to add “this is not a call to violence”, we lose just a little more ground.

    “If you mess with my kids, I WILL kill you”, how does that sound?

    Pretty definitive, ‘eh?

    • Thanks: HbutnotG
  6. @Achmed E. Newman
    Americans, get your children out of the Government Schools!

    That separation alone won't cut it, though, as far as ending the anti-family efforts that have been the hallmark of Communists since day 1. They will come at us harder with more rules. It's like this: Years ago, I'd read Mrs. Malkin rightly deride the Secretary of Education but not understand the point that it's not WHO is the S. of Ed. that's the root problem - it's that there IS a Feral Dept. of Education to begin with! You've got to strike the root.

    Big Gov is the enforcement arm for all of these hateful people and organizations. We need to take down the US Potomac Regime, one way or another - failing that, we can wait ... once the financial SHTF that is inevitable happens, this can go one way or another. We can understand the problem and a Phoenix of Liberty can arise from the ashes. Or, we will let the Communists have full control - American has been their brass ring for over a century.

    Replies: @WorkingClass, @Exalted Cyclops

    ….. it’s not WHO is the S. of Ed. that’s the root problem – it’s that there IS a Feral Dept. of Education to begin with! You’ve got to strike the root.

    Same Same with the FED. The FBI, the CIA, the DHS, and on and on and on.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @WorkingClass

    Yep.

  7. @WorkingClass
    @Achmed E. Newman

    ..... it’s not WHO is the S. of Ed. that’s the root problem – it’s that there IS a Feral Dept. of Education to begin with! You’ve got to strike the root.

    Same Same with the FED. The FBI, the CIA, the DHS, and on and on and on.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Yep.

  8. There are two basic problems with Ms Malkin’s argument. First, American parents started to fail with their parenting going back to the 1940s. All of the 1960s radicals, all of today’s narcissistic baby boomers, all of the Reagan 80s predatory capitalists had parents–and those parents created disastrous children. The 60s radicals and baby boomers had none of the things of which Michelle Talking complains, and they all turned out terrible anyway. Indeed, the people who are disconnecting parents and kids are the product of 40s, 50s, and 60s parenting.

    Second, today’s parental failure is that parents have stopped attending church and taking their kids to church and Sunday school. The antidote to bad schools is a good church. Parents are leaving churches in droves. That is the essence of the problem. It does not matter what a school is doing if the kids have been firmly grounded in faith. Parents are not doing that.

    Fair to say, given the history of parental failure, we do need to divest parents of their control.

    • Replies: @Brad Anbro
    @Harry Huntington

    Mr. Huntington,

    In regard to your opinion that churches are the "answer" to today's problems, I keep wondering why the churches in the USA are completely silent on what is happening in the USA, with the destruction of the American middle class, the non-stop wars since World War I, the Federal Reserve, etc.

    The only two individuals that I know of who are associated with churches and actually speak out on matters as I mentioned are Chuck Baldwin and Louis Farrakhan. There may be others, but I do not know of them.

    I do not know the reason for this. I am guessing that the churches are afraid of running afoul of the IRS and losing their tax-exempt status.

    I was brought up in Lutheran and Methodist churches and used to attend regularly. But I cannot see the point of attending a church and fooling myself into believing that things are "rosy" when they are not and, in fact, just keep getting worse year after year.

    Thank you.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @Harry Huntington, @Reactionary Utopian

  9. @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.
    In 2013, young Justina Pelletier was ripped from her parents’ custody by Boston Children’s Hospital. The teen, who lives with mitochondrial disease and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, had gone to BCH after coming down with a severe case of the flu. Instead of receiving top-notch care and attention at BCH, however, Justina was medically kidnapped and recklessly re-diagnosed with a psychological condition, “somatoform disorder.”

    Just a friendly reminder that none of this would be possible without the participation of the little Eichmanns of your local police departments.

    Keep backing that blue, fucktards.

    Replies: @George 1

    Those stupid “back the blue” signs are all around my neighborhood. How deluded can people be. They live in the 80s. For anyone who is a back the blue conservative: Folks that time has passed. The police are not your friends.

    In any society the police work for the elites. That is universal. In our current society the elites have decided that people on the right are threats to their sodomy, money laundering, wars and global totalitarian schemes, otherwise known as democracy. The police have proven they will follow orders no matter how immoral or unconstitutional with very few exceptions.

    Couple the above with the general decline in national IQ and you have now have a situation where you are never in more danger than when police are nearby.

  10. @Achmed E. Newman
    Americans, get your children out of the Government Schools!

    That separation alone won't cut it, though, as far as ending the anti-family efforts that have been the hallmark of Communists since day 1. They will come at us harder with more rules. It's like this: Years ago, I'd read Mrs. Malkin rightly deride the Secretary of Education but not understand the point that it's not WHO is the S. of Ed. that's the root problem - it's that there IS a Feral Dept. of Education to begin with! You've got to strike the root.

    Big Gov is the enforcement arm for all of these hateful people and organizations. We need to take down the US Potomac Regime, one way or another - failing that, we can wait ... once the financial SHTF that is inevitable happens, this can go one way or another. We can understand the problem and a Phoenix of Liberty can arise from the ashes. Or, we will let the Communists have full control - American has been their brass ring for over a century.

    Replies: @WorkingClass, @Exalted Cyclops

    Absolutely correct. The Government Schul Gulag is nothing but an indoctrination camp run by the Church of Woke. Even old Koba the Dread understood the nature of edumacation:

    “Education is a weapon whose effects depend on who holds it in his hands and at whom it is aimed.” — Josef Stalin

    It should be more than obvious by this stage who is holding this weapon and at whom it is aimed. How many times have the Republicans (Washington Generals) promised to abolish the Dept. of Edumacation? I’ve literally lost count. Like a malignant tumor, it just keeps growing. It even has its own police-army, ready to SWAT anyone they choose to target. Abolish the department, fire all of them and let them ‘learn to code’ or something.

  11. Few thoughts, words we’ve been twisted into using, should redirect ourselves, such as looking at article title words such as ‘great when talking about schemes, can make negative sound positive. Another was ‘great depression’, when scheme depression would be more accurate, another, ‘great’ reset’, when dictator schemes or freedom attack would be more accurate. Michelle using the word is probably from habit, time writing, which more important is the rest of us use tough words, makes strength if we label things or people what they are. Reminds part of an article title Anglin had some time ago –bullsht industrial complex, we should use it every day where we live. Writing a few notes is good to remind.

    On parts of article, results of selfish ignorance, add monopolized water, food, utilities, in-migration, surveilance, police state etc. Effort required. One small thing, the push back against masks and vaxs, don’t know if people realize was a small win for those who pushed back, which media and ‘state’ don’t want us to sense because we can draw strength from, to push back other things. Noticed a few media cons here or there lately pretending to ‘question’ vaxs or medical journal’ pretending to ‘question studies –but is only attempt to drag back people toward media -so they dictate at us again.

    Should keep thinking for ourselves and push back everything, before they come at us again with whatever else. Sun Tzu art of war, first moves is what makes motion. The cons know this, their incursions here have been incremental but now more aggressive, so should use our energy while it’s with us, to forward on.

    The identity subject is important, the electronics incursions against privacy, and division pushing, is so we don’t connect with others in mutual effort, while false systems function as a gang. Focus where we live is what matters anyway, sharing info etc it’s the simple that can be potent, if used.

  12. @Harry Huntington
    There are two basic problems with Ms Malkin's argument. First, American parents started to fail with their parenting going back to the 1940s. All of the 1960s radicals, all of today's narcissistic baby boomers, all of the Reagan 80s predatory capitalists had parents--and those parents created disastrous children. The 60s radicals and baby boomers had none of the things of which Michelle Talking complains, and they all turned out terrible anyway. Indeed, the people who are disconnecting parents and kids are the product of 40s, 50s, and 60s parenting.

    Second, today's parental failure is that parents have stopped attending church and taking their kids to church and Sunday school. The antidote to bad schools is a good church. Parents are leaving churches in droves. That is the essence of the problem. It does not matter what a school is doing if the kids have been firmly grounded in faith. Parents are not doing that.

    Fair to say, given the history of parental failure, we do need to divest parents of their control.

    Replies: @Brad Anbro

    Mr. Huntington,

    In regard to your opinion that churches are the “answer” to today’s problems, I keep wondering why the churches in the USA are completely silent on what is happening in the USA, with the destruction of the American middle class, the non-stop wars since World War I, the Federal Reserve, etc.

    The only two individuals that I know of who are associated with churches and actually speak out on matters as I mentioned are Chuck Baldwin and Louis Farrakhan. There may be others, but I do not know of them.

    I do not know the reason for this. I am guessing that the churches are afraid of running afoul of the IRS and losing their tax-exempt status.

    I was brought up in Lutheran and Methodist churches and used to attend regularly. But I cannot see the point of attending a church and fooling myself into believing that things are “rosy” when they are not and, in fact, just keep getting worse year after year.

    Thank you.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Brad Anbro

    Brad, the IRS 501(c)(3) exemption is likely part of it, though black churches are somehow exempt from the requirements of this exemption.

    However, read Christianity - Living for the next world, but what about this one?: Part 1 and Part 2, and see what you think.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Brad Anbro

    I don't mean to spam you, Brad, but I'd forgotten that I'd written parts 3 and 4 on that topic. (It's been a couple of years.)

    Here. Christianity – Living for the next world, but what about this one?
    Part 3
    Part 4

    Replies: @Brad Anbro

    , @Harry Huntington
    @Brad Anbro

    Brad, you perhaps need to get out more and see what churches are preaching every week. We know ELCA churches are a lost cause. They are part of the problem. Recall in California, the ELCA installed a transgender Bishop. There is hope and promise in other places.

    For example, check out the ministry in the Missouri Synod. Every morning while in session, the Lutheran Seminary at Concordia Fort Wayne puts its morning Chapel services live on the Internet. You will hear some fabulous preaching much of directed to ministerial candidates about what they will face in today's secular world.

    The Missouri Synod church at the University of Iowa in Iowa City puts their Sunday services on the Internet. Their work is great. Much of their preaching is directed to their large college student membership.

    St. James Lutheran in Chicago puts their Sunday morning services online. Last Sunday was about Justification. There was a clear message about personal responsibility and our tendency to place blame for things everywhere but on ourselves. It also spoke to our redemption and God's grace.

    Good church teaching trains up the mind to confront modern problems. It teaches one to locate the source of the problem (sin) and real agendas. It also teaches one to set priorities.

    Why do you need that new Cadillac? What's actually wrong with having that drunk guy as a neighbor? I wonder if he needs dinner? There are so many other questions but church has those answers.

    Replies: @Brad Anbro

    , @Reactionary Utopian
    @Brad Anbro

    Mr. Anbro, I substantially agree with the other replies you've gotten. I would add that it might be necessary to "think outside the box," as they say. I'm a committed Christian believer and was a member of a traditional church until 2020, when the congregation signed on to the covid panic and closed up shop for what turned out to be 6 months and more. I resigned and went without church for a bit. Talking to a fellow regular at my coffee spot one day, and it turned out that he's the Bible teacher of a little house church. 12 to 15 regular participants, meeting in one house after another in approximate rotation, twice every week regardless of alleged viruses, no masks, singing, communion, and the best, most solid and detailed Bible teaching I've ever heard. With that small a group, it can be interactive -- questions and discussion as things come to our minds. I don't anticipate ever returning to a pointy-roofed building again. "Where two or three are gathered," et cetera.

    God will indeed provide. Talk to people wherever you go and keep your eyes open for what God puts in your way.

    Replies: @Brad Anbro

  13. @Brad Anbro
    @Harry Huntington

    Mr. Huntington,

    In regard to your opinion that churches are the "answer" to today's problems, I keep wondering why the churches in the USA are completely silent on what is happening in the USA, with the destruction of the American middle class, the non-stop wars since World War I, the Federal Reserve, etc.

    The only two individuals that I know of who are associated with churches and actually speak out on matters as I mentioned are Chuck Baldwin and Louis Farrakhan. There may be others, but I do not know of them.

    I do not know the reason for this. I am guessing that the churches are afraid of running afoul of the IRS and losing their tax-exempt status.

    I was brought up in Lutheran and Methodist churches and used to attend regularly. But I cannot see the point of attending a church and fooling myself into believing that things are "rosy" when they are not and, in fact, just keep getting worse year after year.

    Thank you.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @Harry Huntington, @Reactionary Utopian

    Brad, the IRS 501(c)(3) exemption is likely part of it, though black churches are somehow exempt from the requirements of this exemption.

    However, read Christianity – Living for the next world, but what about this one?: Part 1 and Part 2, and see what you think.

  14. @Brad Anbro
    @Harry Huntington

    Mr. Huntington,

    In regard to your opinion that churches are the "answer" to today's problems, I keep wondering why the churches in the USA are completely silent on what is happening in the USA, with the destruction of the American middle class, the non-stop wars since World War I, the Federal Reserve, etc.

    The only two individuals that I know of who are associated with churches and actually speak out on matters as I mentioned are Chuck Baldwin and Louis Farrakhan. There may be others, but I do not know of them.

    I do not know the reason for this. I am guessing that the churches are afraid of running afoul of the IRS and losing their tax-exempt status.

    I was brought up in Lutheran and Methodist churches and used to attend regularly. But I cannot see the point of attending a church and fooling myself into believing that things are "rosy" when they are not and, in fact, just keep getting worse year after year.

    Thank you.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @Harry Huntington, @Reactionary Utopian

    I don’t mean to spam you, Brad, but I’d forgotten that I’d written parts 3 and 4 on that topic. (It’s been a couple of years.)

    Here. Christianity – Living for the next world, but what about this one?
    Part 3
    Part 4

    • Replies: @Brad Anbro
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I will check it out. Thank you.

  15. @Brad Anbro
    @Harry Huntington

    Mr. Huntington,

    In regard to your opinion that churches are the "answer" to today's problems, I keep wondering why the churches in the USA are completely silent on what is happening in the USA, with the destruction of the American middle class, the non-stop wars since World War I, the Federal Reserve, etc.

    The only two individuals that I know of who are associated with churches and actually speak out on matters as I mentioned are Chuck Baldwin and Louis Farrakhan. There may be others, but I do not know of them.

    I do not know the reason for this. I am guessing that the churches are afraid of running afoul of the IRS and losing their tax-exempt status.

    I was brought up in Lutheran and Methodist churches and used to attend regularly. But I cannot see the point of attending a church and fooling myself into believing that things are "rosy" when they are not and, in fact, just keep getting worse year after year.

    Thank you.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @Harry Huntington, @Reactionary Utopian

    Brad, you perhaps need to get out more and see what churches are preaching every week. We know ELCA churches are a lost cause. They are part of the problem. Recall in California, the ELCA installed a transgender Bishop. There is hope and promise in other places.

    For example, check out the ministry in the Missouri Synod. Every morning while in session, the Lutheran Seminary at Concordia Fort Wayne puts its morning Chapel services live on the Internet. You will hear some fabulous preaching much of directed to ministerial candidates about what they will face in today’s secular world.

    The Missouri Synod church at the University of Iowa in Iowa City puts their Sunday services on the Internet. Their work is great. Much of their preaching is directed to their large college student membership.

    St. James Lutheran in Chicago puts their Sunday morning services online. Last Sunday was about Justification. There was a clear message about personal responsibility and our tendency to place blame for things everywhere but on ourselves. It also spoke to our redemption and God’s grace.

    Good church teaching trains up the mind to confront modern problems. It teaches one to locate the source of the problem (sin) and real agendas. It also teaches one to set priorities.

    Why do you need that new Cadillac? What’s actually wrong with having that drunk guy as a neighbor? I wonder if he needs dinner? There are so many other questions but church has those answers.

    • Replies: @Brad Anbro
    @Harry Huntington

    Thank you for the courteous reply. I do still consider myself a "Christian," but in the "faith department," I am very much lacking. As I had mentioned in my post, I was brought up in Lutheran and Methodist churches. In 1972, I was "saved" at a "Pentecostal" church and after attempting to live the lifestyle they were espousing, I realized that I was living a lie. So, it was back to the "mainline" churches.

    I now try my best to live by the Golden Rule" and do not judge others for their choices of which churches they attend. If there is actually a hereafter, I hope that God shows me some mercy. I do not need any priest, pastor, imam or rabbi to tell me of my sins. I know them better than anyone else!

    I truly believe that if there is a God, He is taking a "hands off" approach to mankind and is simply standing by and watching mankind destroy himself.

    Thanks again.

  16. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Brad Anbro

    I don't mean to spam you, Brad, but I'd forgotten that I'd written parts 3 and 4 on that topic. (It's been a couple of years.)

    Here. Christianity – Living for the next world, but what about this one?
    Part 3
    Part 4

    Replies: @Brad Anbro

    I will check it out. Thank you.

  17. @Harry Huntington
    @Brad Anbro

    Brad, you perhaps need to get out more and see what churches are preaching every week. We know ELCA churches are a lost cause. They are part of the problem. Recall in California, the ELCA installed a transgender Bishop. There is hope and promise in other places.

    For example, check out the ministry in the Missouri Synod. Every morning while in session, the Lutheran Seminary at Concordia Fort Wayne puts its morning Chapel services live on the Internet. You will hear some fabulous preaching much of directed to ministerial candidates about what they will face in today's secular world.

    The Missouri Synod church at the University of Iowa in Iowa City puts their Sunday services on the Internet. Their work is great. Much of their preaching is directed to their large college student membership.

    St. James Lutheran in Chicago puts their Sunday morning services online. Last Sunday was about Justification. There was a clear message about personal responsibility and our tendency to place blame for things everywhere but on ourselves. It also spoke to our redemption and God's grace.

    Good church teaching trains up the mind to confront modern problems. It teaches one to locate the source of the problem (sin) and real agendas. It also teaches one to set priorities.

    Why do you need that new Cadillac? What's actually wrong with having that drunk guy as a neighbor? I wonder if he needs dinner? There are so many other questions but church has those answers.

    Replies: @Brad Anbro

    Thank you for the courteous reply. I do still consider myself a “Christian,” but in the “faith department,” I am very much lacking. As I had mentioned in my post, I was brought up in Lutheran and Methodist churches. In 1972, I was “saved” at a “Pentecostal” church and after attempting to live the lifestyle they were espousing, I realized that I was living a lie. So, it was back to the “mainline” churches.

    I now try my best to live by the Golden Rule” and do not judge others for their choices of which churches they attend. If there is actually a hereafter, I hope that God shows me some mercy. I do not need any priest, pastor, imam or rabbi to tell me of my sins. I know them better than anyone else!

    I truly believe that if there is a God, He is taking a “hands off” approach to mankind and is simply standing by and watching mankind destroy himself.

    Thanks again.

  18. I’ve seen videos where purple haired genderqueer ‘teachers’ describe parents as “caregivers”. How insulting that is to families.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  19. @Brad Anbro
    @Harry Huntington

    Mr. Huntington,

    In regard to your opinion that churches are the "answer" to today's problems, I keep wondering why the churches in the USA are completely silent on what is happening in the USA, with the destruction of the American middle class, the non-stop wars since World War I, the Federal Reserve, etc.

    The only two individuals that I know of who are associated with churches and actually speak out on matters as I mentioned are Chuck Baldwin and Louis Farrakhan. There may be others, but I do not know of them.

    I do not know the reason for this. I am guessing that the churches are afraid of running afoul of the IRS and losing their tax-exempt status.

    I was brought up in Lutheran and Methodist churches and used to attend regularly. But I cannot see the point of attending a church and fooling myself into believing that things are "rosy" when they are not and, in fact, just keep getting worse year after year.

    Thank you.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @Harry Huntington, @Reactionary Utopian

    Mr. Anbro, I substantially agree with the other replies you’ve gotten. I would add that it might be necessary to “think outside the box,” as they say. I’m a committed Christian believer and was a member of a traditional church until 2020, when the congregation signed on to the covid panic and closed up shop for what turned out to be 6 months and more. I resigned and went without church for a bit. Talking to a fellow regular at my coffee spot one day, and it turned out that he’s the Bible teacher of a little house church. 12 to 15 regular participants, meeting in one house after another in approximate rotation, twice every week regardless of alleged viruses, no masks, singing, communion, and the best, most solid and detailed Bible teaching I’ve ever heard. With that small a group, it can be interactive — questions and discussion as things come to our minds. I don’t anticipate ever returning to a pointy-roofed building again. “Where two or three are gathered,” et cetera.

    God will indeed provide. Talk to people wherever you go and keep your eyes open for what God puts in your way.

    • Replies: @Brad Anbro
    @Reactionary Utopian

    Thank you for the nice reply. I am glad that things worked out well for you. Before I moved here to NE Tennessee from the Rockford, Illinois area (90 miles west of Chicago), I regularly attended Rockford's oldest Lutheran church. It was over 100 years old and it was originally founded by a group of Swedish emigrants. It had a large, beautiful building and had one of the best pipe organs in all of Rockford. Actually, it had TWO pipe organs; one in front, in the sanctuary and the large main one back in the balcony.

    As I had said in an earlier post, I was raised in Lutheran and Methodist churches. What got me started into attending this church was an advertisement in the local paper that they were going to be having an organ recital. I had always liked organ music, as my mother was a semi-professional organist. As a child, we had an organ at home and my mother taught me how to play - reading music and playing chords with the left hand and the melody with the right hand. That was before I was 12 years old.

    Anyway, I had put on a suit and tie (!) and went to this organ recital at this OLD Rockford Lutheran church. The organist was a younger guy, who liked to joke around a lot and have a good time. He had the skill to back up his behavior - he could play ANYTHING - church hymns, contemporary music, classical music, etc. His talent just oozed out of his ears.

    I joined the church and became one of the ushers and also, being an electrician, served on their Building Committee. I helped maintain the building wiring & repairs at times. Most of the congregants were my age or older. The church was so big that it could easily seat 1,000 people. I got married and my wife went to church with me. After we got divorced, I worked until retirement and moved to Tennessee (long story).

    After attending for some time, things started "changing" in the church. They got in this female "new-age" pastor, did away with the older hymnals and started singing Mexican and other foreign hymns, which I did not like. They also began changing the Liturgy, etc. I was used to singing hymns that I had sung as a child and did NOT like this "new" music at all.

    After moving here, I discovered that things were just the opposite of back home. Here, churches outnumbered the bars (taverns), while back home, the bars outnumbered the churches. I never have been able to figure this out. I always thought that Tennessee was a "drinking state" (moonshine, etc.), but bars in this area are few and far between.

    Here in NE Tennessee, there is very little money. A few have really nice houses, but many people live in trailers (mobile homes). Everywhere one looks, there are trailer parks and trailers set on pieces of land practically anywhere one looks. I once went to the big Baptist church at the end of our road, but decided that it was not for me. They wouldn't take too kindly to me smoking my pipe and listening to rock & roll and country music. also, I wasn't about to give 10% of my Social Security check to them and I was not into gossiping and over-eating, as many of them are.

    The Baptist church decided that they were going to build a BIG addition, as their nice brick structure was not adequate for containing the people for the one morning meeting. What immediately came to my mind was the parable in the Bible about "building a bigger barn" and in my opinion, if these people were so concerned with saving souls, they would forgo the new building and have an additional service.

    If these churches, in my opinion, were really concerned with saving souls, they would be meeting in tents and sitting on wood benches; not building fancy heated & air-conditioned structures, having the latest in audio-visual technology and the mandatory digital signs out front. But that's just me. I think that the reason why so many here in Tennessee go to these churches here, most of which are Baptist, is that people here really don't have much else. Sure, a lot of money is wasted by people on their tattoos and piercings and probably a lot of drug use, but they really don't have much else. Maybe their church attendance lets them forget just how poor the area actually is. Just a guess.

    Also, as I said in an earlier post, I think that God is taking a "hands off" approach to what mankind is doing to the world in general, and to our country in particular. I doubt very much that this subject is broached in any church around here, just as practically all of the other churches in the United States are completely silent as to what is happening to our once great country.

    Best of luck to you and yours. I think in the (near) future, we are going to need all the "luck" that we can get!

  20. @Reactionary Utopian
    @Brad Anbro

    Mr. Anbro, I substantially agree with the other replies you've gotten. I would add that it might be necessary to "think outside the box," as they say. I'm a committed Christian believer and was a member of a traditional church until 2020, when the congregation signed on to the covid panic and closed up shop for what turned out to be 6 months and more. I resigned and went without church for a bit. Talking to a fellow regular at my coffee spot one day, and it turned out that he's the Bible teacher of a little house church. 12 to 15 regular participants, meeting in one house after another in approximate rotation, twice every week regardless of alleged viruses, no masks, singing, communion, and the best, most solid and detailed Bible teaching I've ever heard. With that small a group, it can be interactive -- questions and discussion as things come to our minds. I don't anticipate ever returning to a pointy-roofed building again. "Where two or three are gathered," et cetera.

    God will indeed provide. Talk to people wherever you go and keep your eyes open for what God puts in your way.

    Replies: @Brad Anbro

    Thank you for the nice reply. I am glad that things worked out well for you. Before I moved here to NE Tennessee from the Rockford, Illinois area (90 miles west of Chicago), I regularly attended Rockford’s oldest Lutheran church. It was over 100 years old and it was originally founded by a group of Swedish emigrants. It had a large, beautiful building and had one of the best pipe organs in all of Rockford. Actually, it had TWO pipe organs; one in front, in the sanctuary and the large main one back in the balcony.

    As I had said in an earlier post, I was raised in Lutheran and Methodist churches. What got me started into attending this church was an advertisement in the local paper that they were going to be having an organ recital. I had always liked organ music, as my mother was a semi-professional organist. As a child, we had an organ at home and my mother taught me how to play – reading music and playing chords with the left hand and the melody with the right hand. That was before I was 12 years old.

    Anyway, I had put on a suit and tie (!) and went to this organ recital at this OLD Rockford Lutheran church. The organist was a younger guy, who liked to joke around a lot and have a good time. He had the skill to back up his behavior – he could play ANYTHING – church hymns, contemporary music, classical music, etc. His talent just oozed out of his ears.

    I joined the church and became one of the ushers and also, being an electrician, served on their Building Committee. I helped maintain the building wiring & repairs at times. Most of the congregants were my age or older. The church was so big that it could easily seat 1,000 people. I got married and my wife went to church with me. After we got divorced, I worked until retirement and moved to Tennessee (long story).

    After attending for some time, things started “changing” in the church. They got in this female “new-age” pastor, did away with the older hymnals and started singing Mexican and other foreign hymns, which I did not like. They also began changing the Liturgy, etc. I was used to singing hymns that I had sung as a child and did NOT like this “new” music at all.

    After moving here, I discovered that things were just the opposite of back home. Here, churches outnumbered the bars (taverns), while back home, the bars outnumbered the churches. I never have been able to figure this out. I always thought that Tennessee was a “drinking state” (moonshine, etc.), but bars in this area are few and far between.

    Here in NE Tennessee, there is very little money. A few have really nice houses, but many people live in trailers (mobile homes). Everywhere one looks, there are trailer parks and trailers set on pieces of land practically anywhere one looks. I once went to the big Baptist church at the end of our road, but decided that it was not for me. They wouldn’t take too kindly to me smoking my pipe and listening to rock & roll and country music. also, I wasn’t about to give 10% of my Social Security check to them and I was not into gossiping and over-eating, as many of them are.

    The Baptist church decided that they were going to build a BIG addition, as their nice brick structure was not adequate for containing the people for the one morning meeting. What immediately came to my mind was the parable in the Bible about “building a bigger barn” and in my opinion, if these people were so concerned with saving souls, they would forgo the new building and have an additional service.

    If these churches, in my opinion, were really concerned with saving souls, they would be meeting in tents and sitting on wood benches; not building fancy heated & air-conditioned structures, having the latest in audio-visual technology and the mandatory digital signs out front. But that’s just me. I think that the reason why so many here in Tennessee go to these churches here, most of which are Baptist, is that people here really don’t have much else. Sure, a lot of money is wasted by people on their tattoos and piercings and probably a lot of drug use, but they really don’t have much else. Maybe their church attendance lets them forget just how poor the area actually is. Just a guess.

    Also, as I said in an earlier post, I think that God is taking a “hands off” approach to what mankind is doing to the world in general, and to our country in particular. I doubt very much that this subject is broached in any church around here, just as practically all of the other churches in the United States are completely silent as to what is happening to our once great country.

    Best of luck to you and yours. I think in the (near) future, we are going to need all the “luck” that we can get!

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