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Notes on the Coming Meat Shortage
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The Great Toilet Paper Scare of 2020 has come to end, but don’t breathe a sigh of relief just yet. The Spring Meat Stampede is here.

At my local Costco in Colorado Springs on Monday, fresh chicken breast was nowhere to be found. Nationwide, bacon prices doubled. Wholesale pork prices for ham, ribs and loins rose between 12% and 32% over the last seven days. COVID-19 outbreaks among the nation’s major meat processing plants have shut down nearly 20% of the country’s fresh pork production. Chinese-owned Smithfield Foods has shuttered five facilities so far because of sick and no-show workers; Tyson Foods warns “the food supply is breaking” and “millions of pounds of meat will disappear” by May 1 after the mega-corporation idled its largest pork plant in Iowa, a beef plant in Washington state and another meatpacking facility in Indiana.

On Tuesday, President Donald Trump invoked the Defense Production Act to compel the nation’s biggest meat processors to stay open and stave off shortages. How exactly the feds will “address liability issues” (which Tyson Foods execs complained about to Trump) and force union leaders to comply remains unclear. Whether the order actually heads off mass hysteria is also iffy. As we saw with the toilet paper rush, Chicken Little-ism is contagious. Warnings about shortages induce shortages. Admonitions of “Don’t hoard the Charmin” failed in the face of mob behavior. Same with “Don’t hoard the hocks.”

With meat prices rising, the economic landscape looks bleak. While gas is less than $2 a gallon, much of the nation is still locked down and off the streets, out of the cars and in no hurry to get on planes or trains. The latest Consumer Price Index summary reveals rising rent prices and costs of medical care services on top of spiking meat prices. With nearly 26 million Americans now out of work, signs of impending stagflation loom. That “V-shaped recovery” is more like a “P.D.” recovery: Pipe Dream.

More candor from all the Beltway “experts” about what we face would be helpful to our suffering citizenry. While we’re at it, this nation must confront the dangers of dependency on the globalized, homogenized methods of producing meat and other key products in our food supply, which is concentrated in the hands of a quarter of giant multinational corporations who press for unlimited alien workers in exchange for low food prices. An estimated 30% of America’s meat production employees are foreign-born. As usual, “Open Borders Inc.” reaps all the benefits while we’re left holding an empty grocery bag.

ORDER IT NOW

Just one example: Tyson fundamentally transformed Waterloo, Iowa, by working with faith-based government contractors to ship in thousands of low-wage Burmese refugees to fill jobs at the meat plant now at the center of a coronavirus outbreak. Since 2002, 9,143 refugees from 37 countries have resettled in Iowa (which doesn’t include so-called secondary migration, or friends and relatives moving to Iowa from their primary settlement location). Taxpayer-subsidized Catholic Charities, Lutheran Services and the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants have reaped millions dumping them across Central Iowa — and abandoning them in cultural, linguistic and economic ghettos at the mercy of exploitative employers.

As Refugee Resettlement Watch founder and investigator Ann Corcoran reports, “The dark underbelly of the giant globalist meatpacking industry in the US is being exposed as large numbers of slaughterhouse workers are creating US hotspots for the spread of the Chinese virus.”

A decentralized system of meat and poultry production would enhance food security, national security and public health. Demographic conquest fueled by big business’ insatiable appetite for cheap labor, by contrast, is making us sick to our stomachs in more ways than one.

Michelle Malkin’s email address is [email protected] To find out more about Michelle Malkin and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.

 
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  1. anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:

    My newest hobby is looking for Chinadidit propaganda, especially the stuff nooked and crannied into discussion of other subjects.

    The quoted reference at the end to “China virus” is a standard smear, easy to spot. But of what relevance to this article is the fact that Smithfield Foods is “Chinese-owned”? That firm, we’re told, has been forced to close facilities due to employee absences. Tyson’s politicking is what’s criticized, but for some reason the author doesn’t mention the ownership of that food company.

    Exceptional!

    • Replies: @RSDB

    The quoted reference at the end to “China virus” is a standard smear, easy to spot.
     
    Why is it a smear?
    , @unit472
    The first reference to Smithfield ham dates to 1779! It references the geographic locale and method of curing where this type of ham originated. I don't think we need any Chink hasbara cluttering Unz threads so why don't you go steal some intellectual property or sell defective medical equipment Beijing boy!
  2. That’s a great tie-in between the Kung Flu hysteria and many of the root causes of the spreading of it to begin with. I appreciate the shout-out to Ann Corcoran who does yeowoman’s work in getting out the word on the Refugee Racket and the corrupt “Christian” organizations that cause Americans so much harm in order to feel good about themselves … and make money. What a scam!

    You have become my favorite syndicated columnist here on unz, and top 5 to read (gotta give credit to Mr.’s Sailer, Epigone, Kersey, and Derbyshire, with credit also to Dr. Paul and Mr. Buchanan.) I wish President Trump would read your stuff as much as he has been said to read Ann Coulter’s material. (Of course, he may just get distracted by a squirrel and forget what you wrote, but still …)

    Of course, the immigration boosters may see the connections between the open borders and Kung Flu madness that you describe, but that doesn’t mean they will admit to it. Just as the Sierra Club whored-out to one big donor* and has not talked about America’s huge population increases’ effect on the environment, these people just don’t want to talk about it. You’ve gotta break some eggs, and all… eggs in this case, meaning former best countries in the world.

    .

    * See “More on the destruction of California”.

  3. There is no meat/protein calorie shortage. The issue is the “At Home” grocery store purchases versus “Away from Home” restraint purchases. The lockdown has significantly reduced “Away from Home” creating a supply chain issue: (1)

    First, there is no shortage of meat protein products: beef, pork and chicken at the farm level. However, the problems arise within processing, manufacturing and more importantly binding legal contracts and liabilities within the supply-chain. Additionally, there are national and multinational aspects to the protein food supply.

    Today President Trump remarked the White House and Dept of Agriculture are drawing up a plan for the president to invoke the defense production act as a tool to cut through some of the liabilities present within the supply-chain dynamic.

    … the Defense Production Act [DPA], and the extreme sensitivity around the food supply, can benefit these food processing stations by providing exemptions from the COVID-19 rules.

    Additionally, the invocation of the DPA can, likely will, allow farmers who are contracted to specific suppliers, to legally break the contract and sell their supply into any market that will purchase their products.

    If you want more information on this issue, look here:

    https://www.unz.com/anepigone/from-stock-market-to-supermarket/

    PEACE 😷
    _______

    (1) https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2020/04/28/president-trump-may-use-defense-production-act-for-u-s-food-supply-chain/

    • Replies: @RSDB
    Mrs. Malkin's article centers on this particular aspect among those you mentioned: However, problems arise within processing [and] manufacturing

    I don't know how well the govt.'s temporary measures will succeed but I would certainly like to see farmers who are contracted to specific suppliers [able] to legally break the contract and sell their supply into any market that will purchase their products and, hopefully, a decentralized system of meat and poultry production.

  4. This is insanity there is no shortage. Look what they are making farmers and ranchers do. This is sickening watch and share like crazy!! Please

    • Replies: @paranoid goy
    What, you want them to keep feeding those hormone-soaked, antibiotic-drenched, carcinogenic lumps of meat-like products like they are pets? The reason one farmer has twenty million cattle, is because he only makes a dolar per carcass. One day of extra feed destroys the entire "business plan".
    Instead of shock, you should show nausea at the concept of factory farming, the cause. Your inaction on that front, has necessitated the actions you now deride meat-like product producers for. Learn where your food comes from, there is no religion on earth that allows those practices. Except communism of course.
  5. Working in a high production slaughterhouse is not for the fainthearted. People just don’t want to know how meat gets from the farm to the table. Many new American hires at slaughterhouses quit pretty soon after arriving. Hence meat packing companies are always looking for people to staff their facilities. Immigrants including the illegal kind are the preferred workers as they don’t and can’t complain.

    • Agree: Realist
    • Replies: @NameAlreadyTaken
    I have know many native born Americans that have worked at kill plants. During the "farm crisis" of the mid-eighties, when large plant closures were commonplace, being replaced by less centralized, much smaller kill/slaughter houses. Practically every farmer or "townie" stood in line, praying to get a jog.

    ALL of the employees were native born Americans. They worked all of the overtime that they could get. Inflation adjusted, the wages were lower then, than now. Unless the younger generation(s) are simply lazier and more shiftless than those before them, I must take exception and vigorously disagree with your comment.

    Where do you get your information/data?
    , @a guy named me
    that it is why it used to be one of the highest paid blue collar jobs a guy could get.
    , @Biff
    When I was eighteen(1981) a kid my age got a job at Monfort(now Cargill) cattle slaughter house, and cut his finger off in the first week.
    , @anon
    They must keep some skilled americans on and fill the unskilled jobs with the imports. From my memory of working on slaughter floors in Australia in the 1970s, a man legging beef on the chain would have to be able to flay hide left handed and right handed while the beast is going past at near walking pace, hanging by one back leg and still with the potential to lash out with it's hoof..
    The tiniest cut or graze on the inside of a beef hide downgrades it's value considerably, and the quality of hides used for making saddles can sell for A$1,500 tanned.
    How can they train a 5 foot tall Burmese just off the plane to do that critical job?
  6. @A123
    There is no meat/protein calorie shortage. The issue is the "At Home" grocery store purchases versus "Away from Home" restraint purchases. The lockdown has significantly reduced "Away from Home" creating a supply chain issue: (1)

    First, there is no shortage of meat protein products: beef, pork and chicken at the farm level. However, the problems arise within processing, manufacturing and more importantly binding legal contracts and liabilities within the supply-chain. Additionally, there are national and multinational aspects to the protein food supply.

    Today President Trump remarked the White House and Dept of Agriculture are drawing up a plan for the president to invoke the defense production act as a tool to cut through some of the liabilities present within the supply-chain dynamic.

    ... the Defense Production Act [DPA], and the extreme sensitivity around the food supply, can benefit these food processing stations by providing exemptions from the COVID-19 rules.

    Additionally, the invocation of the DPA can, likely will, allow farmers who are contracted to specific suppliers, to legally break the contract and sell their supply into any market that will purchase their products.
     
    If you want more information on this issue, look here:

    https://www.unz.com/anepigone/from-stock-market-to-supermarket/

    PEACE 😷
    _______


    (1) https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2020/04/28/president-trump-may-use-defense-production-act-for-u-s-food-supply-chain/

    Mrs. Malkin’s article centers on this particular aspect among those you mentioned: However, problems arise within processing [and] manufacturing

    I don’t know how well the govt.’s temporary measures will succeed but I would certainly like to see farmers who are contracted to specific suppliers [able] to legally break the contract and sell their supply into any market that will purchase their products and, hopefully, a decentralized system of meat and poultry production.

  7. @anonymous
    My newest hobby is looking for Chinadidit propaganda, especially the stuff nooked and crannied into discussion of other subjects.

    The quoted reference at the end to “China virus” is a standard smear, easy to spot. But of what relevance to this article is the fact that Smithfield Foods is “Chinese-owned”? That firm, we’re told, has been forced to close facilities due to employee absences. Tyson’s politicking is what’s criticized, but for some reason the author doesn’t mention the ownership of that food company.

    Exceptional!

    The quoted reference at the end to “China virus” is a standard smear, easy to spot.

    Why is it a smear?

    • Replies: @anonymous
    Because the provenance of the virus(es) has not been determined.
    , @Waclaw
    :"Anonymous" reveals his true colors of an America hating/ Enemy Sympathizer -typical Socialist trash.
  8. @anonymous
    My newest hobby is looking for Chinadidit propaganda, especially the stuff nooked and crannied into discussion of other subjects.

    The quoted reference at the end to “China virus” is a standard smear, easy to spot. But of what relevance to this article is the fact that Smithfield Foods is “Chinese-owned”? That firm, we’re told, has been forced to close facilities due to employee absences. Tyson’s politicking is what’s criticized, but for some reason the author doesn’t mention the ownership of that food company.

    Exceptional!

    The first reference to Smithfield ham dates to 1779! It references the geographic locale and method of curing where this type of ham originated. I don’t think we need any Chink hasbara cluttering Unz threads so why don’t you go steal some intellectual property or sell defective medical equipment Beijing boy!

    • Replies: @Realist
    The fact is unit472 has always been defective...there is a recall on this unit, but his location has not been determined. A dog turd was maliciously substituted for his processing component.
    , @Daemon
    The chinese hasbara is not welcome, but the regular Hasbara is?

    Dont you have something better to do? Like evicting schwartzes from your broken down tenement, hook-nose?
  9. Meat is murder, anybody who isn’t a vegan in 2020 has the ethics of an amoeba.

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    Agree. BATS HAVE RIGHTS!
    , @anon
    Says a shill for Big Ag.
    There's never been a vegan civilisation and there never will be, for the simple reason that humans digest non animal products poorly.
    The end of meat and animal fat is the end of humans and it's close to happening, imo.
    , @orionyx
    A simple inspection of the human digestive system would show you you're flat-out wrong.
    , @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, vegans/vegetarians (like Hitler!) condone the brutal ripping of young carrots from Ma Earth's breast...rippers sometimes eating the unwashed, unskinned victims alive right in the fields!

    At harvest time, corn and lettuce and beets and potatoes are subjected to horrible Holocaust harvests.

    Oh, the humanity! Oh, the hominy grits!

    Let us, therefore, liberate legumes. In fact, I say lettuce turnip and pea...all in the name of peace!
    , @NameAlreadyTaken
    Anyone that IS a "vegan", in 2020, has the intellect of an amoeba.
  10. We have nothing to cure but the cure itself.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2aBn-QuPVw
  11. Thankfully our glorious overlords have a plan for us…

    http://www.fao.org/3/i3253e/i3253e.pdf

  12. These idiots printed more money than ever before at the same time they ordered everyone to stop working.

    The inflation that is already here will bring fresh cries for new “stimulus” money, which will stimulate nothing but prices, and bring more cries for free money.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Nah, we'll lick this, Bob.

    WIN! (Whip Inflation Now!)

  13. I have traded live cattle, feeder cattle, and lean hog index, since 1980. Point of fact, when actual hogs (live hogs), live 44,000 pound contract feeder cattle, and frozen pork bellies (no longer on the board), I was on the floor, of the CME, leasing a seat, filling paper, and trading my own account.

    Every spring, it is commonplace for kill plants to go through a rolling closure, in order for extreme cleaning and retooling. It happens every year.

    Now, the talky-talkers have something, to actually blame for a normal procedure. Oh, no …. it’s Covid-19 … Oh no………

    The price of the lean hog index, June contract, has PLUMMETED from 83.00 cwt to well under 50.00 cwt. Trading now at around 55.00.

    And, wholesale prices for pork bellies, loins, and hams (uncured raw meat) is substantially lower than just a month, or so, ago.

    Most of the huge increases, in prices, are at the retail level, having NOTHING to do with any shortage of slaughtered meat.

    Oh no …. Covid-19.

    How stupid do “they” think that the American public actually is?

    • Replies: @Realist

    How stupid do “they” think that the American public actually is?
     
    I am sure it is underestimated.
    , @Bill Jones
    You have entirely missed the point.
    There is no demand (i.e. low prices) in the wholesale animal market because there are fewer operating processing plants to get them as meat products to the retail markets (higher prices).

    It's not brain surgery.
    , @Unanimous
    So why am I seeing the Pork Producers trying to line up trucking companies in IL to haul up to 1/2 million hogs to landfills because they won't get slaughtered before they exceed the allowable weight? Seems like a shortage in the making.
  14. @TGD
    Working in a high production slaughterhouse is not for the fainthearted. People just don't want to know how meat gets from the farm to the table. Many new American hires at slaughterhouses quit pretty soon after arriving. Hence meat packing companies are always looking for people to staff their facilities. Immigrants including the illegal kind are the preferred workers as they don't and can't complain.

    I have know many native born Americans that have worked at kill plants. During the “farm crisis” of the mid-eighties, when large plant closures were commonplace, being replaced by less centralized, much smaller kill/slaughter houses. Practically every farmer or “townie” stood in line, praying to get a jog.

    ALL of the employees were native born Americans. They worked all of the overtime that they could get. Inflation adjusted, the wages were lower then, than now. Unless the younger generation(s) are simply lazier and more shiftless than those before them, I must take exception and vigorously disagree with your comment.

    Where do you get your information/data?

    • Replies: @TGD
    You are referencing 35 to 40 years ago when work expectations and conditions were different.

    I had a relative who was an "order buyer." I'm talking 60 years ago. During summer vacation, I often accompanied him to farms where he would buy calves and lambs and take them to a local slaughterhouse (which company now goes by the name of "Atlantic Veal and Lamb"). They were killed kosher as these animals were too young to be stunned- a very unpleasant place to work at or visit. All of the employees at that time were white Americans.

    Now, that company is regularly raided by ICE as most of their employees are central Americans.
  15. Adequately written piece, good journalism. Lays out problems, assigns blame, prattle a bit of economics theory, hell, why not blame the christians while you’re at it? I especially like the proferred solution to the underlying problem.
    What, no underlying problem? “See what they make the farmers do” says one commenter, meaning they are culling millions of livestock, and throwing away millions of tons of “perfectly good food”. Its like a few months ago, when a rainstorm “devastated the beef industry, with millions of drowned cattle”. Now you-all gonna starve, because a few abbatoirs are closed down. See the underlying problem?
    When a million cows drown in a rainstorm, when a million people go hungry when one butchery closes, when millions of tons of food has to be destroyed because it cannot be delivered to that one abbatoir…
    Do you see that when one farmer breeds twenty million cattle in their own crap, and he has one contractual customer, and that abbatoir ships product thousands of miles, and one single thing goes wrong, millions of people will be affected.
    America is sending her soldiers around the world, salting our crops with Uranium ashes, and our farms are attacked by USAID-sponsored “warlords” and the families brutally tortured and raped and murdered “to send a message”, so the land can be given to Fed-supported mining corporations.
    Because America will do all agriculture, China does manufacturing, the rest do tourism and mining. That is the Globalist plan, and it is progressing splendidly. So now we blame the christians for importing cheap labour?
    This ‘crisis’ is the best example of that so-called Just-in-Time Globalist efficiency we have yet seen, in that it is a royal eff-up creeping up mankind’s behind, and it’s gonna bite, hard! Get back to community markets, small local farms, and local distribution. And close down fascilities that feed millions, one thing goes wrong, millions are in danger, my goodness, even a child can comprehend that much!
    Sorry for ranting.

    • Replies: @Realist

    Sorry for ranting.
     
    Then why do it?
  16. @Wildwestwishes
    This is insanity there is no shortage. Look what they are making farmers and ranchers do. This is sickening watch and share like crazy!! Please https://youtu.be/T2ortQpF-5I

    What, you want them to keep feeding those hormone-soaked, antibiotic-drenched, carcinogenic lumps of meat-like products like they are pets? The reason one farmer has twenty million cattle, is because he only makes a dolar per carcass. One day of extra feed destroys the entire “business plan”.
    Instead of shock, you should show nausea at the concept of factory farming, the cause. Your inaction on that front, has necessitated the actions you now deride meat-like product producers for. Learn where your food comes from, there is no religion on earth that allows those practices. Except communism of course.

  17. @RSDB

    The quoted reference at the end to “China virus” is a standard smear, easy to spot.
     
    Why is it a smear?

    Because the provenance of the virus(es) has not been determined.

    • Replies: @RSDB
    What seems most likely at the moment?
    , @Joe Schmoe

    Because the provenance of the virus(es) has not been determined.
     
    China has pretty much claimed the virus, and the outbreak started there. So, even if we can't determine the absolute genesis with 100% metaphysical certainty, it is still reasonable to refer to the virus as coming from China because it came from China. But you knew that.
  18. @Backwoods Bob
    These idiots printed more money than ever before at the same time they ordered everyone to stop working.

    The inflation that is already here will bring fresh cries for new "stimulus" money, which will stimulate nothing but prices, and bring more cries for free money.

    Nah, we’ll lick this, Bob.

    WIN! (Whip Inflation Now!)

  19. @Priss Factor
    We have nothing to cure but the cure itself.

  20. A good source of meat would be venison,which is not legal now in the US, that law should be changed.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    It's true, Republic, that a lot of states have more deer than people now. For a few 10's of thousands of rural dwellers to use deer at their only source of meat is feasible. However, if the whole country tried to, there would be no deer left in short order. This is just something the preppers will note - not necessarily a correction to what you wrote.
    , @orionyx
    I eat plenty of venison, which I kill myself, perfectly legally. It's not legal to sell it, though. But there are ways around that too.
  21. @unit472
    The first reference to Smithfield ham dates to 1779! It references the geographic locale and method of curing where this type of ham originated. I don't think we need any Chink hasbara cluttering Unz threads so why don't you go steal some intellectual property or sell defective medical equipment Beijing boy!

    The fact is unit472 has always been defective…there is a recall on this unit, but his location has not been determined. A dog turd was maliciously substituted for his processing component.

  22. @NameAlreadyTaken
    I have traded live cattle, feeder cattle, and lean hog index, since 1980. Point of fact, when actual hogs (live hogs), live 44,000 pound contract feeder cattle, and frozen pork bellies (no longer on the board), I was on the floor, of the CME, leasing a seat, filling paper, and trading my own account.

    Every spring, it is commonplace for kill plants to go through a rolling closure, in order for extreme cleaning and retooling. It happens every year.

    Now, the talky-talkers have something, to actually blame for a normal procedure. Oh, no .... it's Covid-19 ... Oh no.........

    The price of the lean hog index, June contract, has PLUMMETED from 83.00 cwt to well under 50.00 cwt. Trading now at around 55.00.

    And, wholesale prices for pork bellies, loins, and hams (uncured raw meat) is substantially lower than just a month, or so, ago.

    Most of the huge increases, in prices, are at the retail level, having NOTHING to do with any shortage of slaughtered meat.

    Oh no .... Covid-19.

    How stupid do "they" think that the American public actually is?

    How stupid do “they” think that the American public actually is?

    I am sure it is underestimated.

  23. @paranoid goy
    Adequately written piece, good journalism. Lays out problems, assigns blame, prattle a bit of economics theory, hell, why not blame the christians while you're at it? I especially like the proferred solution to the underlying problem.
    What, no underlying problem? "See what they make the farmers do" says one commenter, meaning they are culling millions of livestock, and throwing away millions of tons of "perfectly good food". Its like a few months ago, when a rainstorm "devastated the beef industry, with millions of drowned cattle". Now you-all gonna starve, because a few abbatoirs are closed down. See the underlying problem?
    When a million cows drown in a rainstorm, when a million people go hungry when one butchery closes, when millions of tons of food has to be destroyed because it cannot be delivered to that one abbatoir...
    Do you see that when one farmer breeds twenty million cattle in their own crap, and he has one contractual customer, and that abbatoir ships product thousands of miles, and one single thing goes wrong, millions of people will be affected.
    America is sending her soldiers around the world, salting our crops with Uranium ashes, and our farms are attacked by USAID-sponsored "warlords" and the families brutally tortured and raped and murdered "to send a message", so the land can be given to Fed-supported mining corporations.
    Because America will do all agriculture, China does manufacturing, the rest do tourism and mining. That is the Globalist plan, and it is progressing splendidly. So now we blame the christians for importing cheap labour?
    This 'crisis' is the best example of that so-called Just-in-Time Globalist efficiency we have yet seen, in that it is a royal eff-up creeping up mankind's behind, and it's gonna bite, hard! Get back to community markets, small local farms, and local distribution. And close down fascilities that feed millions, one thing goes wrong, millions are in danger, my goodness, even a child can comprehend that much!
    Sorry for ranting.

    Sorry for ranting.

    Then why do it?

    • Replies: @RSDB
    Why not?

    If one a) has something to say and b) is not entirely happy with the manner in which one expresses oneself, where is the problem in saying what one has to say and stating b) as well?

  24. @unit472
    The first reference to Smithfield ham dates to 1779! It references the geographic locale and method of curing where this type of ham originated. I don't think we need any Chink hasbara cluttering Unz threads so why don't you go steal some intellectual property or sell defective medical equipment Beijing boy!

    The chinese hasbara is not welcome, but the regular Hasbara is?

    Dont you have something better to do? Like evicting schwartzes from your broken down tenement, hook-nose?

  25. The last three weeks when I went to the meat store there was hardly anyone there. Thanks to the media panic mongering there was a line out the door when I arrived on Tuesday to get some meat. Amazingly they still had ample supply of most meats but that probably won’t lats long.

    A decentralized system of meat and poultry production would enhance food security, national security and public health.

    Yes it would. We wouldn’t have to worry about meat shortages if the food supply was largely local and regional like it used to be decades ago. In areas where I live a lot of prime farm land has been paved over to make way for more useless eaters living in cookie cutter homes.

    America’s population explosion via mass immigration is the reason we keep appropriating farm land for housing and other commercial uses. Before long we’ll be forced to eat bat soup and monkey testicles like the Chinese.

    • Replies: @orionyx
    And where would we get a steady supply of monkey testicles?
  26. I wouldn’t buy Tyson meat if it were the last meat on earth. Factory farming, shoddy environmental practices, allowing chicken waste to “fowl” local waterways — how about a big fat no. They’re also tied in historically with the Clinton machine. Hillary’s big cattle futures score was actually done by a Tyson lobbyist who wanted Arkansas environmental regs weakened. (That is to say, Tyson wanted to keep dumping chicken shit into the rivers) A quick visit to the Bell & Evans site (my go-to chicken) indicates no shortages and the prices at the grocer confirm this.

  27. @NameAlreadyTaken
    I have know many native born Americans that have worked at kill plants. During the "farm crisis" of the mid-eighties, when large plant closures were commonplace, being replaced by less centralized, much smaller kill/slaughter houses. Practically every farmer or "townie" stood in line, praying to get a jog.

    ALL of the employees were native born Americans. They worked all of the overtime that they could get. Inflation adjusted, the wages were lower then, than now. Unless the younger generation(s) are simply lazier and more shiftless than those before them, I must take exception and vigorously disagree with your comment.

    Where do you get your information/data?

    You are referencing 35 to 40 years ago when work expectations and conditions were different.

    I had a relative who was an “order buyer.” I’m talking 60 years ago. During summer vacation, I often accompanied him to farms where he would buy calves and lambs and take them to a local slaughterhouse (which company now goes by the name of “Atlantic Veal and Lamb”). They were killed kosher as these animals were too young to be stunned- a very unpleasant place to work at or visit. All of the employees at that time were white Americans.

    Now, that company is regularly raided by ICE as most of their employees are central Americans.

  28. @TGD
    Working in a high production slaughterhouse is not for the fainthearted. People just don't want to know how meat gets from the farm to the table. Many new American hires at slaughterhouses quit pretty soon after arriving. Hence meat packing companies are always looking for people to staff their facilities. Immigrants including the illegal kind are the preferred workers as they don't and can't complain.

    that it is why it used to be one of the highest paid blue collar jobs a guy could get.

  29. @anonymous
    Because the provenance of the virus(es) has not been determined.

    What seems most likely at the moment?

    • Replies: @anonymous
    Still trying to learn. What’s increasingly apparent, though, is that the Establishment is impeding that effort. This morning, our host announced that this entire website has now been banished from Facebook. (I will speculate that this wasn’t because of the recent addition of Mrs. Malkin.)

    People drawn to government and other institutional authority, as always, are exploiting the crisis to gain more money, power, and whatever else motivates them, and to damage and deflect their failures onto adversaries. Their propaganda campaign is aided, whether nefariously or naively, by the Chinadidits.
  30. @Realist

    Sorry for ranting.
     
    Then why do it?

    Why not?

    If one a) has something to say and b) is not entirely happy with the manner in which one expresses oneself, where is the problem in saying what one has to say and stating b) as well?

    • Replies: @Realist
    Why do something you're sorry for?
  31. @anon
    Meat is murder, anybody who isn't a vegan in 2020 has the ethics of an amoeba.

    Agree. BATS HAVE RIGHTS!

  32. @TGD
    Working in a high production slaughterhouse is not for the fainthearted. People just don't want to know how meat gets from the farm to the table. Many new American hires at slaughterhouses quit pretty soon after arriving. Hence meat packing companies are always looking for people to staff their facilities. Immigrants including the illegal kind are the preferred workers as they don't and can't complain.

    When I was eighteen(1981) a kid my age got a job at Monfort(now Cargill) cattle slaughter house, and cut his finger off in the first week.

  33. @RSDB
    Why not?

    If one a) has something to say and b) is not entirely happy with the manner in which one expresses oneself, where is the problem in saying what one has to say and stating b) as well?

    Why do something you’re sorry for?

    • Replies: @RSDB

    where is the problem in saying what one has to say and stating b) as well?
     
  34. To enhance food security, national security, and public health, the USA should become vegan. No decent society slaughters billions.

  35. anon[522] • Disclaimer says:
    @TGD
    Working in a high production slaughterhouse is not for the fainthearted. People just don't want to know how meat gets from the farm to the table. Many new American hires at slaughterhouses quit pretty soon after arriving. Hence meat packing companies are always looking for people to staff their facilities. Immigrants including the illegal kind are the preferred workers as they don't and can't complain.

    They must keep some skilled americans on and fill the unskilled jobs with the imports. From my memory of working on slaughter floors in Australia in the 1970s, a man legging beef on the chain would have to be able to flay hide left handed and right handed while the beast is going past at near walking pace, hanging by one back leg and still with the potential to lash out with it’s hoof..
    The tiniest cut or graze on the inside of a beef hide downgrades it’s value considerably, and the quality of hides used for making saddles can sell for A$1,500 tanned.
    How can they train a 5 foot tall Burmese just off the plane to do that critical job?

    • Replies: @TGD

    How can they train a 5 foot tall Burmese just off the plane to do that critical
    job?
     
    The employee who skins the carcasses in a big modern slaughter house stands on a platform that he can raise or lower. They use mechanized "hide pullers," which skin the animal cleanly. An immigrant can be taught how to make the right cuts.

    Warning: the photo linked below is gruesome. It shows old dairy cows bleeding to death in a Cargill facility. Note the holes in their heads where they were shot with a captive bolt pistol.

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/46/6e/ab/466eab7220f08cb446105759fa479387.jpg
  36. @anon
    Meat is murder, anybody who isn't a vegan in 2020 has the ethics of an amoeba.

    Says a shill for Big Ag.
    There’s never been a vegan civilisation and there never will be, for the simple reason that humans digest non animal products poorly.
    The end of meat and animal fat is the end of humans and it’s close to happening, imo.

  37. anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @RSDB
    What seems most likely at the moment?

    Still trying to learn. What’s increasingly apparent, though, is that the Establishment is impeding that effort. This morning, our host announced that this entire website has now been banished from Facebook. (I will speculate that this wasn’t because of the recent addition of Mrs. Malkin.)

    People drawn to government and other institutional authority, as always, are exploiting the crisis to gain more money, power, and whatever else motivates them, and to damage and deflect their failures onto adversaries. Their propaganda campaign is aided, whether nefariously or naively, by the Chinadidits.

    • Replies: @RSDB

    People drawn to government and other institutional authority, as always, are exploiting the crisis to gain more money, power, and whatever else motivates them, and to damage and deflect their failures onto adversaries. Their propaganda campaign is aided, whether nefariously or naively, by the Chinadidits.
     
    That's a fair enough point, but the conventional wisdom has been for several months that the point of origin was in or near Wuhan, and I doubt people assuming this as a fact do so as an intentional smear.
  38. @Republic
    A good source of meat would be venison,which is not legal now in the US, that law should be changed.

    It’s true, Republic, that a lot of states have more deer than people now. For a few 10’s of thousands of rural dwellers to use deer at their only source of meat is feasible. However, if the whole country tried to, there would be no deer left in short order. This is just something the preppers will note – not necessarily a correction to what you wrote.

  39. I have a small herd of Belted Galloway cattle. It used to be bigger but I simply couldn’t afford it anymore. My cattle are totally free range grass fed. I am not certified organic because that is a scam and just costs money and invites silly scrutiny. The point I wish to lead to is that there is simply no way to have a small farming operation and make it profitable.

    I was perfectly positioned when the grass fed foodie craze was peaking about 10 years ago. I advertised and had affiliations with trendy restaurants sold meat to satisfy whatever demand there was but it never went anywhere big nor did I really expect it to. The great push towards eating naturally was a trend embraced mostly by the ” Little Greta” types who had an Achilles heel in this particular form of virtue signalling- they were broke. To walk the walk in this case meant to pay more for good food. They simply couldn’t or wouldn’t do it. Screaming about climate change by contrast didn’t cost anything. The grass fed free range crusade quickly faded away without fanfare.

    To people who are sincere in stating that we should have a decentralized food structure and maybe perhaps even consider becoming a part of it I should suggest that you talk to someone who is doing it. You cannot compete with economies of scale. This planet would not have 8 billion people if there were not economies of scale in agriculture. Period.

    My only satisfactions are watching families stop their cars and get out to photograph the unique looking herd. That and having a freezer full of my own beef. The downsides would probably exceed my word limit on this post.

    Still, I couldn’t imagine quitting. Maybe I should see a head carpenter-ha!

    Cheers-

    • Replies: @JMcG
    I split half a steer with a friend last year. I’ll probably get a half on my own this year. I got it from a local dairy farmer who keeps a few steers for beef every year. A local butcher does the killing and processing. It’s more expensive, but the beef is noticeably better. Especially the ground beef. I can’t imagine it would scale up to well for the farmer.
    I get local bacon and sausage too. At least I’m told it’s local. Unlike the beef, the supply chain is opaque to me.
  40. TGD says:
    @anon
    They must keep some skilled americans on and fill the unskilled jobs with the imports. From my memory of working on slaughter floors in Australia in the 1970s, a man legging beef on the chain would have to be able to flay hide left handed and right handed while the beast is going past at near walking pace, hanging by one back leg and still with the potential to lash out with it's hoof..
    The tiniest cut or graze on the inside of a beef hide downgrades it's value considerably, and the quality of hides used for making saddles can sell for A$1,500 tanned.
    How can they train a 5 foot tall Burmese just off the plane to do that critical job?

    How can they train a 5 foot tall Burmese just off the plane to do that critical
    job?

    The employee who skins the carcasses in a big modern slaughter house stands on a platform that he can raise or lower. They use mechanized “hide pullers,” which skin the animal cleanly. An immigrant can be taught how to make the right cuts.

    Warning: the photo linked below is gruesome. It shows old dairy cows bleeding to death in a Cargill facility. Note the holes in their heads where they were shot with a captive bolt pistol.

  41. @RSDB

    The quoted reference at the end to “China virus” is a standard smear, easy to spot.
     
    Why is it a smear?

    :”Anonymous” reveals his true colors of an America hating/ Enemy Sympathizer -typical Socialist trash.

  42. @anonymous
    Because the provenance of the virus(es) has not been determined.

    Because the provenance of the virus(es) has not been determined.

    China has pretty much claimed the virus, and the outbreak started there. So, even if we can’t determine the absolute genesis with 100% metaphysical certainty, it is still reasonable to refer to the virus as coming from China because it came from China. But you knew that.

    • Replies: @anonymous

    China has pretty much claimed the virus, and the outbreak started there.
     
    You are begging the question. Readers can easily find articles and credible comments on this website that pretty much refute this. Please see my response upthread (#37) to RSDB.

    Other than the word salad served by unit472 (#8), no one has defended Mrs. Malkin's ham handed sleight using Smithfield to tag China with the accusations about Tyson. But you knew that.

    This is how rulers sell wars. Remember The Maine? Tonkin? Kuwaiti incubator babies? The vile vial of Colin Powell? Recognized lies only in retrospect, the new ones always work. Most people in this country — including some of the “dissidents” published on this website — are scared stupid, incapable of even reflecting on whether they’re being propagandized and infecting others.
  43. Meat slaughter and packing, like banking, needs to go back to being a more local business.

    The NYT did a piece on the impact of COVID-19 on the industry, noting that 98% of the USA’s beef is processed in just over 50 plants. This screams of fragility of our food chain by over-concentration, as does allowing local and community banks to be replaced by a handful of banking titans. The oligarchs are winning a one-way bet at the expense of risking entire countries’ ability to continue as going concerns.

    • Replies: @anon
    Are these 50 plants serving the domestic market, the export market, or both?
    The U.S. has been a big importer of beef at times, and even when foreign beef was embargoed, it still came in the back door through Mayaguez, Puerto Rico.
  44. Would this be the time they did of renewal fuel nonsense that has 25% of corn production going to ethanol?

  45. JMcG says:
    @Timur The Lame
    I have a small herd of Belted Galloway cattle. It used to be bigger but I simply couldn't afford it anymore. My cattle are totally free range grass fed. I am not certified organic because that is a scam and just costs money and invites silly scrutiny. The point I wish to lead to is that there is simply no way to have a small farming operation and make it profitable.

    I was perfectly positioned when the grass fed foodie craze was peaking about 10 years ago. I advertised and had affiliations with trendy restaurants sold meat to satisfy whatever demand there was but it never went anywhere big nor did I really expect it to. The great push towards eating naturally was a trend embraced mostly by the " Little Greta" types who had an Achilles heel in this particular form of virtue signalling- they were broke. To walk the walk in this case meant to pay more for good food. They simply couldn't or wouldn't do it. Screaming about climate change by contrast didn't cost anything. The grass fed free range crusade quickly faded away without fanfare.

    To people who are sincere in stating that we should have a decentralized food structure and maybe perhaps even consider becoming a part of it I should suggest that you talk to someone who is doing it. You cannot compete with economies of scale. This planet would not have 8 billion people if there were not economies of scale in agriculture. Period.

    My only satisfactions are watching families stop their cars and get out to photograph the unique looking herd. That and having a freezer full of my own beef. The downsides would probably exceed my word limit on this post.

    Still, I couldn't imagine quitting. Maybe I should see a head carpenter-ha!

    Cheers-

    I split half a steer with a friend last year. I’ll probably get a half on my own this year. I got it from a local dairy farmer who keeps a few steers for beef every year. A local butcher does the killing and processing. It’s more expensive, but the beef is noticeably better. Especially the ground beef. I can’t imagine it would scale up to well for the farmer.
    I get local bacon and sausage too. At least I’m told it’s local. Unlike the beef, the supply chain is opaque to me.

  46. anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @Joe Schmoe

    Because the provenance of the virus(es) has not been determined.
     
    China has pretty much claimed the virus, and the outbreak started there. So, even if we can't determine the absolute genesis with 100% metaphysical certainty, it is still reasonable to refer to the virus as coming from China because it came from China. But you knew that.

    China has pretty much claimed the virus, and the outbreak started there.

    You are begging the question. Readers can easily find articles and credible comments on this website that pretty much refute this. Please see my response upthread (#37) to RSDB.

    Other than the word salad served by unit472 (#8), no one has defended Mrs. Malkin’s ham handed sleight using Smithfield to tag China with the accusations about Tyson. But you knew that.

    This is how rulers sell wars. Remember The Maine? Tonkin? Kuwaiti incubator babies? The vile vial of Colin Powell? Recognized lies only in retrospect, the new ones always work. Most people in this country — including some of the “dissidents” published on this website — are scared stupid, incapable of even reflecting on whether they’re being propagandized and infecting others.

  47. anon[185] • Disclaimer says:

    The employee who skins the carcasses in a big modern slaughter house stands on a platform that he can raise or lower.

    That’s the 2 guys either side of the beast who use air knives to free the hide along the belly of the beast at the same time as the winch like hide puller is removing the hide clean off the beast.

    They use mechanized “hide pullers,” which skin the animal cleanly.

    Just a winch motor with chains that are wrapped around the hide that has already been flayed from both both back legs legs and the flanks.
    Don’t forget to skin the front legs, around the shoulders and sides of the neck, or the hide puller will tear the beast in 2.

    An immigrant can be taught how to make the right cuts.

    As I said earlier, any knife damage, however minor, takes hundreds of dollars from the value of the hide to the tanneries and is a huge big deal.
    Washington must be paying massive subsidies for the meatpackers to be able to afford to take on these people.

  48. @The Alarmist
    Meat slaughter and packing, like banking, needs to go back to being a more local business.

    The NYT did a piece on the impact of COVID-19 on the industry, noting that 98% of the USA's beef is processed in just over 50 plants. This screams of fragility of our food chain by over-concentration, as does allowing local and community banks to be replaced by a handful of banking titans. The oligarchs are winning a one-way bet at the expense of risking entire countries' ability to continue as going concerns.

    Are these 50 plants serving the domestic market, the export market, or both?
    The U.S. has been a big importer of beef at times, and even when foreign beef was embargoed, it still came in the back door through Mayaguez, Puerto Rico.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    I don't know, but after reading this, and figuring my savings are soon going to be worth far less, I invested in a couple pieces of Wagyu beef yesterday. Some say it's not so good for steaks as it is too fatty, but they're full of sh!t and I'm full of fatty steak.

    Dr. Basel praised Smithfield for encouraging its employees, many of whom are refugees and immigrants from Latin America and Asia and speak 80 different dialects, to get tested. Doctors made instructional videos in Nepalese and Spanish, and tracked down and tested workers who had been in close contact with infected employees.
     
    Note that Smithfield merely encouraged its employees to get tested.

    Some meat companies have expressed reluctance to test workers, saying such targeted testing creates the false impression that meat plants are the main culprits for the spread of the virus. The more aggressively employees are tested, the more cases emerge, putting pressure on plants to shut down.
     
    Yes, that's why they don't want their slaves tested.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/18/business/coronavirus-meat-slaughterhouses.html

    I don't know

  49. @ JMCG,

    What you did should no doubt have saved you money and given you a healthier animal. I can’t see how it was more expensive. Dairy cattle and beef cattle are distinct but hey, beef is beef. Male animals are discards for a dairy operation. On the topic of selling meat, the woes of the smaller beef farmer in my province (Ontario) have greatly increased in that around 15 years ago there were over 800 abattoirs but now there are only about a 100. The constant increase in regulations, all costing strong money literally strangled the family run outfits to death.

    I asked the owner of my local facility whether this trend is being done on purpose to consolidate the processing into fewer and larger operations and though not a worldly person he replied “I reckon so”. He too soon sold out. So another choke point was created and one of the downsides is now seen with Cargil in Canada and Tyson and Smithfield locations in the States being close to shut down. If this virus situation persists look for less and less beef, pork and poultry on the store shelves at any price.

    An interesting thing to note is that in my neck of the woods many of the regular abattoirs that sold out were taken over by Muslim entities who process halal goats and the like. I have it on strong hearsay that these new owners flaunt all the onerous regulations and when inspectors show up they encounter confusing ownership papers, language problems and not so subtle threats. These places are subsequently not shut down and continue to operate at will. A local good ole’ boy who tried this with an inspector some years back had the police called on him and after a little scuffle on what he considered private property, he was hauled in and ended up doing some jail time. At least there was no racism in his case.

    I cannot sell anything without the beef being officially inspected and stamped and that step is for all intents and purposes closed to me now. I am lucky enough to be allowed to eat my own beef however I get it processed. In any event I would suggest that you get the whole side of beef with your next buy. You will be the envy of your neighbours.

    Cheers-

  50. @anon
    Meat is murder, anybody who isn't a vegan in 2020 has the ethics of an amoeba.

    A simple inspection of the human digestive system would show you you’re flat-out wrong.

  51. @Republic
    A good source of meat would be venison,which is not legal now in the US, that law should be changed.

    I eat plenty of venison, which I kill myself, perfectly legally. It’s not legal to sell it, though. But there are ways around that too.

  52. @KenH
    The last three weeks when I went to the meat store there was hardly anyone there. Thanks to the media panic mongering there was a line out the door when I arrived on Tuesday to get some meat. Amazingly they still had ample supply of most meats but that probably won't lats long.

    A decentralized system of meat and poultry production would enhance food security, national security and public health.
     
    Yes it would. We wouldn't have to worry about meat shortages if the food supply was largely local and regional like it used to be decades ago. In areas where I live a lot of prime farm land has been paved over to make way for more useless eaters living in cookie cutter homes.

    America's population explosion via mass immigration is the reason we keep appropriating farm land for housing and other commercial uses. Before long we'll be forced to eat bat soup and monkey testicles like the Chinese.

    And where would we get a steady supply of monkey testicles?

  53. @anon
    Are these 50 plants serving the domestic market, the export market, or both?
    The U.S. has been a big importer of beef at times, and even when foreign beef was embargoed, it still came in the back door through Mayaguez, Puerto Rico.

    I don’t know, but after reading this, and figuring my savings are soon going to be worth far less, I invested in a couple pieces of Wagyu beef yesterday. Some say it’s not so good for steaks as it is too fatty, but they’re full of sh!t and I’m full of fatty steak.

    Dr. Basel praised Smithfield for encouraging its employees, many of whom are refugees and immigrants from Latin America and Asia and speak 80 different dialects, to get tested. Doctors made instructional videos in Nepalese and Spanish, and tracked down and tested workers who had been in close contact with infected employees.

    Note that Smithfield merely encouraged its employees to get tested.

    Some meat companies have expressed reluctance to test workers, saying such targeted testing creates the false impression that meat plants are the main culprits for the spread of the virus. The more aggressively employees are tested, the more cases emerge, putting pressure on plants to shut down.

    Yes, that’s why they don’t want their slaves tested.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/18/business/coronavirus-meat-slaughterhouses.html

    I don’t know

  54. Hi Michelle, I tried to share this article on Facebook…

    “Your message couldn’t be sent because it includes content that other people on Facebook have reported as abusive.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    “Herr Zuckerberg, I am graciously sending you to Treblinka Hotel...with its famous soapless-shower spa...because other people in the Fatherland have reported your presence as repulsive.”

    SS Fraucensorfuhrer Susan von Goebbels-Wojcicki
    ReichTube Ministry of Propaganda
    Director of THE ETERNAL FLU

  55. @Realist
    Why do something you're sorry for?

    where is the problem in saying what one has to say and stating b) as well?

  56. RSDB says:
    @anonymous
    Still trying to learn. What’s increasingly apparent, though, is that the Establishment is impeding that effort. This morning, our host announced that this entire website has now been banished from Facebook. (I will speculate that this wasn’t because of the recent addition of Mrs. Malkin.)

    People drawn to government and other institutional authority, as always, are exploiting the crisis to gain more money, power, and whatever else motivates them, and to damage and deflect their failures onto adversaries. Their propaganda campaign is aided, whether nefariously or naively, by the Chinadidits.

    People drawn to government and other institutional authority, as always, are exploiting the crisis to gain more money, power, and whatever else motivates them, and to damage and deflect their failures onto adversaries. Their propaganda campaign is aided, whether nefariously or naively, by the Chinadidits.

    That’s a fair enough point, but the conventional wisdom has been for several months that the point of origin was in or near Wuhan, and I doubt people assuming this as a fact do so as an intentional smear.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    I’m not talking about conventional wisdom, what people assume in good faith. I’m talking about the cultivation of the convention, how they’re led to that assumption by writers who (should) know better.

    The report and “independent investigation” now being demanded of China are explicitly limited by the Chinadidit presumption. (I noted this ploy in a comment under a new article here today by Mr. Kirkpatrick. Please read the crafted words of the Australian PM, preceded by the columnist’s cherrypicked facts and innuendo used to mask the arrogance of the constrained demand that China alone must give an account.) The ass-covering politicians are enabled in this by the Exceptional! media, so-called journalists who should be holding those politicians’ feet to the fire, not propagandizing on their behalf.

    Again: Mrs. Malkin’s ham handed sleight using Smithfield to tag China with the accusations about Tyson is an intentional smear (which you’ve yet to address). So are “Wu Flu,” “Kung Flu,” and “China Virus” when the writer knows that provenance of the virus(es) is unresolved.

    Another again: This is how rulers sell wars. Remember The Maine? Tonkin? Kuwaiti incubator babies? The vile vial of Colin Powell? Recognized lies only in retrospect, the new ones always work, at least in part because there are always craven hacks jumping on the bandwagon.

    , @anonymous
    You don't think that Ms. Malkin's use of Smithfield to make people associate China with Tyson was intentional?

    The "conventional wisdom" is being cultivated in Petri dishes of propaganda.
  57. China Virus?
    “Spanish Flu”!

  58. @NameAlreadyTaken
    I have traded live cattle, feeder cattle, and lean hog index, since 1980. Point of fact, when actual hogs (live hogs), live 44,000 pound contract feeder cattle, and frozen pork bellies (no longer on the board), I was on the floor, of the CME, leasing a seat, filling paper, and trading my own account.

    Every spring, it is commonplace for kill plants to go through a rolling closure, in order for extreme cleaning and retooling. It happens every year.

    Now, the talky-talkers have something, to actually blame for a normal procedure. Oh, no .... it's Covid-19 ... Oh no.........

    The price of the lean hog index, June contract, has PLUMMETED from 83.00 cwt to well under 50.00 cwt. Trading now at around 55.00.

    And, wholesale prices for pork bellies, loins, and hams (uncured raw meat) is substantially lower than just a month, or so, ago.

    Most of the huge increases, in prices, are at the retail level, having NOTHING to do with any shortage of slaughtered meat.

    Oh no .... Covid-19.

    How stupid do "they" think that the American public actually is?

    You have entirely missed the point.
    There is no demand (i.e. low prices) in the wholesale animal market because there are fewer operating processing plants to get them as meat products to the retail markets (higher prices).

    It’s not brain surgery.

    • Replies: @NameAlreadyTaken
    I truly hope that do not you trade. Because, you'd be debit your first day.

    Forkin' May lean hogs have rallied $27.825 in the past two weeks. That's $10,810.00 for only ONE contract.

    Kill plants are open and slaughtering ... Or spot (May) wouldn't have rallied a very sizeable amount.

    Your warped "logic" would have you short ... and losing HUGE money. Ten caks, and you're in the hole for$108,100.00.

    And, ten cars is not a very large position.

    It takes idiots that think the way that you do, to keep me rollin'

    "It's not brain surgery".
  59. Virus must have arisen from Philippine. It has been laying dormant here in USA for over 40 years or so.

  60. @Bill Jones
    You have entirely missed the point.
    There is no demand (i.e. low prices) in the wholesale animal market because there are fewer operating processing plants to get them as meat products to the retail markets (higher prices).

    It's not brain surgery.

    I truly hope that do not you trade. Because, you’d be debit your first day.

    Forkin’ May lean hogs have rallied $27.825 in the past two weeks. That’s $10,810.00 for only ONE contract.

    Kill plants are open and slaughtering … Or spot (May) wouldn’t have rallied a very sizeable amount.

    Your warped “logic” would have you short … and losing HUGE money. Ten caks, and you’re in the hole for$108,100.00.

    And, ten cars is not a very large position.

    It takes idiots that think the way that you do, to keep me rollin’

    “It’s not brain surgery”.

  61. anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @RSDB

    People drawn to government and other institutional authority, as always, are exploiting the crisis to gain more money, power, and whatever else motivates them, and to damage and deflect their failures onto adversaries. Their propaganda campaign is aided, whether nefariously or naively, by the Chinadidits.
     
    That's a fair enough point, but the conventional wisdom has been for several months that the point of origin was in or near Wuhan, and I doubt people assuming this as a fact do so as an intentional smear.

    I’m not talking about conventional wisdom, what people assume in good faith. I’m talking about the cultivation of the convention, how they’re led to that assumption by writers who (should) know better.

    The report and “independent investigation” now being demanded of China are explicitly limited by the Chinadidit presumption. (I noted this ploy in a comment under a new article here today by Mr. Kirkpatrick. Please read the crafted words of the Australian PM, preceded by the columnist’s cherrypicked facts and innuendo used to mask the arrogance of the constrained demand that China alone must give an account.) The ass-covering politicians are enabled in this by the Exceptional! media, so-called journalists who should be holding those politicians’ feet to the fire, not propagandizing on their behalf.

    Again: Mrs. Malkin’s ham handed sleight using Smithfield to tag China with the accusations about Tyson is an intentional smear (which you’ve yet to address). So are “Wu Flu,” “Kung Flu,” and “China Virus” when the writer knows that provenance of the virus(es) is unresolved.

    Another again: This is how rulers sell wars. Remember The Maine? Tonkin? Kuwaiti incubator babies? The vile vial of Colin Powell? Recognized lies only in retrospect, the new ones always work, at least in part because there are always craven hacks jumping on the bandwagon.

    • Replies: @RSDB

    Again: Mrs. Malkin’s ham handed sleight using Smithfield to tag China with the accusations about Tyson is an intentional smear (which you’ve yet to address). So are “Wu Flu,” “Kung Flu,” and “China Virus” when the writer knows that provenance of the virus(es) is unresolved.
     
    I think it's perfectly fair to mention if a company that readers who have not checked up would assume to be American-owned is actually foreign-owned. If you think Malkin is encouraging war with China, you will need more than that to convince most people. If on the other hand you think Malkin doesn't like the Chinese government, you're probably right, but I'm not sure why anyone should care.

    With regard to provenance, can you point readers to a source giving cases outside China contemporaneous with the earliest Wuhan cases? This would convince more people than anything else you might say.

    At any rate even if it is eventually shown that point of origin was outside China, it is likely however unfortunately that the initial conception will still hold in popular discourse. After all, it's 2020 and we still talk about the "Spanish flu".
  62. The immigrants live twenty to an apartment and rotate in and out of their beds according to working hours. Pretty simple this.

  63. anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @RSDB

    People drawn to government and other institutional authority, as always, are exploiting the crisis to gain more money, power, and whatever else motivates them, and to damage and deflect their failures onto adversaries. Their propaganda campaign is aided, whether nefariously or naively, by the Chinadidits.
     
    That's a fair enough point, but the conventional wisdom has been for several months that the point of origin was in or near Wuhan, and I doubt people assuming this as a fact do so as an intentional smear.

    You don’t think that Ms. Malkin’s use of Smithfield to make people associate China with Tyson was intentional?

    The “conventional wisdom” is being cultivated in Petri dishes of propaganda.

  64. Anonymous[401] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    Meat is murder, anybody who isn't a vegan in 2020 has the ethics of an amoeba.

    Meanwhile, vegans/vegetarians (like Hitler!) condone the brutal ripping of young carrots from Ma Earth’s breast…rippers sometimes eating the unwashed, unskinned victims alive right in the fields!

    At harvest time, corn and lettuce and beets and potatoes are subjected to horrible Holocaust harvests.

    Oh, the humanity! Oh, the hominy grits!

    Let us, therefore, liberate legumes. In fact, I say lettuce turnip and pea…all in the name of peace!

  65. Anonymous[401] • Disclaimer says:
    @Zorro
    Hi Michelle, I tried to share this article on Facebook...

    "Your message couldn't be sent because it includes content that other people on Facebook have reported as abusive."

    “Herr Zuckerberg, I am graciously sending you to Treblinka Hotel…with its famous soapless-shower spa…because other people in the Fatherland have reported your presence as repulsive.”

    SS Fraucensorfuhrer Susan von Goebbels-Wojcicki
    ReichTube Ministry of Propaganda
    Director of THE ETERNAL FLU

  66. RSDB says:
    @anonymous
    I’m not talking about conventional wisdom, what people assume in good faith. I’m talking about the cultivation of the convention, how they’re led to that assumption by writers who (should) know better.

    The report and “independent investigation” now being demanded of China are explicitly limited by the Chinadidit presumption. (I noted this ploy in a comment under a new article here today by Mr. Kirkpatrick. Please read the crafted words of the Australian PM, preceded by the columnist’s cherrypicked facts and innuendo used to mask the arrogance of the constrained demand that China alone must give an account.) The ass-covering politicians are enabled in this by the Exceptional! media, so-called journalists who should be holding those politicians’ feet to the fire, not propagandizing on their behalf.

    Again: Mrs. Malkin’s ham handed sleight using Smithfield to tag China with the accusations about Tyson is an intentional smear (which you’ve yet to address). So are “Wu Flu,” “Kung Flu,” and “China Virus” when the writer knows that provenance of the virus(es) is unresolved.

    Another again: This is how rulers sell wars. Remember The Maine? Tonkin? Kuwaiti incubator babies? The vile vial of Colin Powell? Recognized lies only in retrospect, the new ones always work, at least in part because there are always craven hacks jumping on the bandwagon.

    Again: Mrs. Malkin’s ham handed sleight using Smithfield to tag China with the accusations about Tyson is an intentional smear (which you’ve yet to address). So are “Wu Flu,” “Kung Flu,” and “China Virus” when the writer knows that provenance of the virus(es) is unresolved.

    I think it’s perfectly fair to mention if a company that readers who have not checked up would assume to be American-owned is actually foreign-owned. If you think Malkin is encouraging war with China, you will need more than that to convince most people. If on the other hand you think Malkin doesn’t like the Chinese government, you’re probably right, but I’m not sure why anyone should care.

    With regard to provenance, can you point readers to a source giving cases outside China contemporaneous with the earliest Wuhan cases? This would convince more people than anything else you might say.

    At any rate even if it is eventually shown that point of origin was outside China, it is likely however unfortunately that the initial conception will still hold in popular discourse. After all, it’s 2020 and we still talk about the “Spanish flu”.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    If you want to discuss this with me, please don’t dissemble or change the subject.

    As an American who wants to know what actually happened and hopes not to see another war, the Chinadidit propaganda campaign annoys and concerns me. Pointing out the apparent effort by this columnist to misleadingly associate China with the conduct of Tyson doesn’t assume any burden to demonstrate provenance of the virus(es). If Chinareallydidit, that should be demonstrated with evidence and good faith argument, not smears.

    Did you notice as you were working on your last reply that Mrs. Malkin has pulled the same trick in her current column? See my comment (#1) on that thread.
  67. anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @RSDB

    Again: Mrs. Malkin’s ham handed sleight using Smithfield to tag China with the accusations about Tyson is an intentional smear (which you’ve yet to address). So are “Wu Flu,” “Kung Flu,” and “China Virus” when the writer knows that provenance of the virus(es) is unresolved.
     
    I think it's perfectly fair to mention if a company that readers who have not checked up would assume to be American-owned is actually foreign-owned. If you think Malkin is encouraging war with China, you will need more than that to convince most people. If on the other hand you think Malkin doesn't like the Chinese government, you're probably right, but I'm not sure why anyone should care.

    With regard to provenance, can you point readers to a source giving cases outside China contemporaneous with the earliest Wuhan cases? This would convince more people than anything else you might say.

    At any rate even if it is eventually shown that point of origin was outside China, it is likely however unfortunately that the initial conception will still hold in popular discourse. After all, it's 2020 and we still talk about the "Spanish flu".

    If you want to discuss this with me, please don’t dissemble or change the subject.

    As an American who wants to know what actually happened and hopes not to see another war, the Chinadidit propaganda campaign annoys and concerns me. Pointing out the apparent effort by this columnist to misleadingly associate China with the conduct of Tyson doesn’t assume any burden to demonstrate provenance of the virus(es). If Chinareallydidit, that should be demonstrated with evidence and good faith argument, not smears.

    Did you notice as you were working on your last reply that Mrs. Malkin has pulled the same trick in her current column? See my comment (#1) on that thread.

  68. @NameAlreadyTaken
    I have traded live cattle, feeder cattle, and lean hog index, since 1980. Point of fact, when actual hogs (live hogs), live 44,000 pound contract feeder cattle, and frozen pork bellies (no longer on the board), I was on the floor, of the CME, leasing a seat, filling paper, and trading my own account.

    Every spring, it is commonplace for kill plants to go through a rolling closure, in order for extreme cleaning and retooling. It happens every year.

    Now, the talky-talkers have something, to actually blame for a normal procedure. Oh, no .... it's Covid-19 ... Oh no.........

    The price of the lean hog index, June contract, has PLUMMETED from 83.00 cwt to well under 50.00 cwt. Trading now at around 55.00.

    And, wholesale prices for pork bellies, loins, and hams (uncured raw meat) is substantially lower than just a month, or so, ago.

    Most of the huge increases, in prices, are at the retail level, having NOTHING to do with any shortage of slaughtered meat.

    Oh no .... Covid-19.

    How stupid do "they" think that the American public actually is?

    So why am I seeing the Pork Producers trying to line up trucking companies in IL to haul up to 1/2 million hogs to landfills because they won’t get slaughtered before they exceed the allowable weight? Seems like a shortage in the making.

  69. I’ve heard ridiculous stories, such as that, since the seventies.

    Nothing new here.

    I asked someone, that was spouting that line. She had listened to “market news”. Pork producers were killing off their herd, because they didn’t want to “sell at a loss”.

    Current cash, lean hog index, is slightly over 61.00 per cwt, with price on the hoof around 40.00 cwt.

    That puts each hog, on average, at around $104.00.

    So, I’d rather get nothing than $104.00 per head (multiply that by how many tens of thousands you desire).

    So, she sent me some picture of a pile of dead hogs. The damned picture was from Germany, when hoof and mouth disease was swamping the continent, in the early 2000s.

    You cannot make up this stupidity.

    • Replies: @Unanimous
    This is not a story. I work in the IL trucking industry and just received this request for proposal. Unfortunately this is not some conspiracy theory which can be dismissed. You can speculate why but I gave you the facts as presented in the RFP.
  70. @NameAlreadyTaken
    I've heard ridiculous stories, such as that, since the seventies.

    Nothing new here.

    I asked someone, that was spouting that line. She had listened to "market news". Pork producers were killing off their herd, because they didn't want to "sell at a loss".

    Current cash, lean hog index, is slightly over 61.00 per cwt, with price on the hoof around 40.00 cwt.

    That puts each hog, on average, at around $104.00.

    So, I'd rather get nothing than $104.00 per head (multiply that by how many tens of thousands you desire).

    So, she sent me some picture of a pile of dead hogs. The damned picture was from Germany, when hoof and mouth disease was swamping the continent, in the early 2000s.

    You cannot make up this stupidity.

    This is not a story. I work in the IL trucking industry and just received this request for proposal. Unfortunately this is not some conspiracy theory which can be dismissed. You can speculate why but I gave you the facts as presented in the RFP.

    • Replies: @NameAlreadyTaken
    And, I'm the rightful heir to the throne of the British Isles.

    TOO funny. Do you actually expect to find a human being STUPID enough to believe your lie(s)?
  71. @anon
    Meat is murder, anybody who isn't a vegan in 2020 has the ethics of an amoeba.

    Anyone that IS a “vegan”, in 2020, has the intellect of an amoeba.

  72. @Unanimous
    This is not a story. I work in the IL trucking industry and just received this request for proposal. Unfortunately this is not some conspiracy theory which can be dismissed. You can speculate why but I gave you the facts as presented in the RFP.

    And, I’m the rightful heir to the throne of the British Isles.

    TOO funny. Do you actually expect to find a human being STUPID enough to believe your lie(s)?

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