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Nine years ago, I warned readers about “eyelock biometric readers” adopted by Florida schools to track them on buses. Under the guise of fighting guns and vaping, countless schools this year are now installing surveillance sensors in bathrooms that can spy and record students’ alleged “aggression” and red-flag “spoken key words.”

Eight years ago, I warned readers about a company called Teaching Strategies Gold that created an “early childhood assessment system” for “social emotional, physical, language and cognitive development” that documents student behaviors with videos, audio files, journals and photos — which are then uploaded to a central database cloud. In Jefferson County, Colorado, TS Gold was used to monitor and shape preschoolers’ bathroom trips, hand-washing habits and other “socially acceptable behavior.”

Three years ago, I warned readers about a company called e-Hallpass and the increasing student health data mining hijacking America’s schools. As I reported at the time, my then-high school sophomore son’s public high school in Colorado Springs told every student to download e-Hallpass, which is seamlessly connected to every student’s mandatory Google login, to track how much time students spend in the bathroom. It was done all in the name of “safety,” of course, with no parental consent.

Biometric surveillance edu-technology has spread rapidly, with fingerprint and facial recognition tools proliferating worldwide on K-12 and college campuses as a result of the COVID global track-and-trace regime and pandemic profiteers. In 2020, I noted the spread of “electronic beacons” to track student movements and apps like Google’s ClassDojo, which mines intimate student behavioral data and creates long-term psychological profiles that can be shared and sold to third parties unbeknownst to kids and their families. The Pioneer Institute reported that government at all levels had spent \$30 billion in 2018 on such intrusive, brainwashing “social-emotional learning” surveillance in K-12.

Over the years, my incessant warnings about the Edutech surveillance machine have been mocked, belittled, attacked and ignored as baseless “paranoia” and “conspiracy”-mongering by the likes of the anti-right, anti-white, anti-parent Southern Poverty Law Center. But now, the truth is permeating the mainstream. As the school year ramps up, watchdogs have finally discovered insidious little behavior modification tools like e-Hallpass masquerading as protection measures.

The Arizona Informer tweeted this week that Pinnacle High School in Paradise Valley, Arizona, will use e-Hallpass to track social distancing and other student movements with no parental consent.

A Twitter user named @hannahposts wrote this week: “Looks like school is gonna make us use ehallpass, the program where we track how long, at what time, and how often each child goes to the restroom and store that information on third party servers run by a private for-profit company. … If you’re a parent and your kid’s school uses e-hallpass, politely yet firmly ask for your kid to be opted out. If we have enough opt outs the system won’t work.”

Security researcher Peter Lowe, who is now belatedly awake to e-Hallpass, also tweeted important fundamental questions this week that every parent should be asking:

“Hey @Software4Ed, the privacy policy which you use for e-hallpass states that you release data to third parties ‘working directly with Eduspire Solutions to support our software’. Which third parties are those? Can you provide a full list?”

ORDER IT NOW

And one online student petition calling for repeal of the e-Hallpass system at Lewisburg Area High School in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, blew the whistle on how “E-hallpass knows your age, who your parents are, who your friends are, what classes you’re taking, and what classes you’re struggling in. That’s a lot of very sensitive information the school is forcing you to give to this company, leaving it vulnerable for hackers to hold for ransom, or to sell to identity thieves so they can ruin your life.”

Beware of Big Bathroom Brother. He’s not in Beijing or Moscow or Pyongyang. He’s here, clothed in public service and public safety, sacrificing your children’s autonomy and serving the Silicon Valley masters of American “capitalism.”

Michelle Malkin’s email address is [email protected]

 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Political Correctness, Transgenderism 
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  1. We want this level of government tracking so that we can better manage schools and help kids. Everyone knows that kids typically escape to the bathroom at school for one of two reasons: (1) to do bad things like smoke or use drugs; or (2) to escape bad classroom situations or bad personal situations. Kids never talk about that and they never tell their parents, indeed their parents are one of the things kids are seeking to escape. With good data, school administrators can find the kids doing bad acts and those kids that are having trouble. Often kids go to the bathroom to cry because their parents are abusive at home. The school bathroom is the safe private place. With these tools, school administrators can ferret out abusive parents and put an end to the abuse. Most school problems, unprepared students, discipline problems, and other issues actually begin at home with bad parents. Time to use all tools at our disposal to hold parents accountable.

    • Troll: pyrrhus
    • Replies: @RoatanBill
    @Harry Huntington

    You forgot the sarcasm tag.

    , @animalogic
    @Harry Huntington

    Your faith in authority is truly dumbfounding.

    Replies: @Harry Huntington

    , @Longrange
    @Harry Huntington

    Way to paintbrush parents! Prying into premenstrual response to mean chicks or menstrual messes is nobody’s business! I can see a smoke/vape detector, but is there no respect for privacy? Check out state proficiency rates & stick your noses into 3 Rs. Let teachers teach! Bring in more to allow them to get to know students AND parents.

    Replies: @Harry Huntington

    , @Luddite in Chief
    @Harry Huntington


    We want this level of government tracking so that we can better manage schools and help kids. Everyone knows that kids typically escape to the bathroom at school for one of two reasons: (1) to do bad things like smoke or use drugs; or (2) to escape bad classroom situations or bad personal situations. Kids never talk about that and they never tell their parents, indeed their parents are one of the things kids are seeking to escape. With good data, school administrators can find the kids doing bad acts and those kids that are having trouble.
     
    For a long time, I did not grasp the full meaning behind this quote from C.S. Lewis:


    “Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience."
     
    However, after reading your post, I understand it now. I also see how a certain mindset is able to rationalise turning schools into mini-panopticons provided it's for "the good of the students."

    Thank you for the insight (and for helping to propel thinking people toward homeschooling their children).

    Replies: @Harry Huntington

  2. Nine years ago, I warned readers about […]

    And fourteen?

    You can’t connect the dots if you don’t collect them.

    Flashback: The left’s selective outrage over privacy invasion.

    Look for the ACLU to go after Amtrack’s newly announced random bag search policy.

    America, 1. ACLU, 0. Supreme Court ruling supports domestic terrorism surveillance” Michelle Malkin, February 19, 2008

    Selective outrage, indeed.

    • Agree: Liberty Mike
    • Thanks: Kali
  3. Thank you for this column. I have been following your columns on the Orwellian policies of the government schools for years, Michelle. I had no idea about this time-in-the-bathroom bit – it seems a bit weird in addition to being part of the usual quest for tracking and control.

    We are blessed in that the schools here (at least elementary) have none of the iCrap, at least anything portable that the students carry. We will be homeschooling next year, due more to the Wokeness and threat of unsolicited vaccinations than the Orwellian stuff. However, if you (or the reader) really want to see what this can lead to, you should read a book about China called We Have Been Harmonized by German author Kai Strittmatter. He has a chapter about the Orwellian conditions in the schools there.

    Here are the 4 parts of a detailed review on Peak Stupidity:

    Part 1
    Part 2
    Part 3
    Part 4

    This book will scare the Bejesus out of you. It’s not about the future – it’s about NOW, in China – not the place to be.

    Finally, I disagree with this part – not your writing, Mrs. Malkin, but a quote in this column:

    “If you’re a parent and your kid’s school uses e-hallpass, politely yet firmly ask for your kid to be opted out. If we have enough opt outs the system won’t work.”

    No, we all must drop this “politely” business. Do you think Big Brother will be polite to us all once he has full control? No, “fuck that shit!” is much more appropriate phraseology, if you’re taking this seriously.

    • Agree: René Fries
    • Replies: @animalogic
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Don't disagree in principle with your views on "politeness" here. However with the State happy to label parents as "domestic terrorists"
    I wonder whether it's a good tactic......

  4. What parents should be doing is removing their kids from public school en masse so that there’s no one in class. The intent should be to tear down the entire public school propaganda / indoctrination system, not tinker around the edges by begging for these control freaks to please not use some new surveillance system.

    The public schools are staffed by union teachers. The schools are run by gov’t bureaucrats in unaccountable school boards. The taxes paid are exorbitant for the value received if student test scores are to be the measure.

    A nationwide revolt is needed to end the whole country’s public school systems and eliminate all taxation associated with public education so that money can be used for private schools where the teachers are responsible to parents via their choice of which schools get their money. The school properties should be sold off, the teachers fired and the free market in education created that will quickly reoccupy the building and find teachers that aren’t woke drones.

  5. @Harry Huntington
    We want this level of government tracking so that we can better manage schools and help kids. Everyone knows that kids typically escape to the bathroom at school for one of two reasons: (1) to do bad things like smoke or use drugs; or (2) to escape bad classroom situations or bad personal situations. Kids never talk about that and they never tell their parents, indeed their parents are one of the things kids are seeking to escape. With good data, school administrators can find the kids doing bad acts and those kids that are having trouble. Often kids go to the bathroom to cry because their parents are abusive at home. The school bathroom is the safe private place. With these tools, school administrators can ferret out abusive parents and put an end to the abuse. Most school problems, unprepared students, discipline problems, and other issues actually begin at home with bad parents. Time to use all tools at our disposal to hold parents accountable.

    Replies: @RoatanBill, @animalogic, @Longrange, @Luddite in Chief

    You forgot the sarcasm tag.

    • Agree: Kali
    • LOL: Jim Christian
  6. @Harry Huntington
    We want this level of government tracking so that we can better manage schools and help kids. Everyone knows that kids typically escape to the bathroom at school for one of two reasons: (1) to do bad things like smoke or use drugs; or (2) to escape bad classroom situations or bad personal situations. Kids never talk about that and they never tell their parents, indeed their parents are one of the things kids are seeking to escape. With good data, school administrators can find the kids doing bad acts and those kids that are having trouble. Often kids go to the bathroom to cry because their parents are abusive at home. The school bathroom is the safe private place. With these tools, school administrators can ferret out abusive parents and put an end to the abuse. Most school problems, unprepared students, discipline problems, and other issues actually begin at home with bad parents. Time to use all tools at our disposal to hold parents accountable.

    Replies: @RoatanBill, @animalogic, @Longrange, @Luddite in Chief

    Your faith in authority is truly dumbfounding.

    • Replies: @Harry Huntington
    @animalogic

    You misread me. I have little faith in authority. I have less faith in parents. Recall, the children of the 1960s all had parents. Those kids protesting in the streets, driving cross country to anti-war rallies, wearing long hair, starting the sexual revolution, all had parents. Those kids all attended old fashioned schools with good teachers and discipline. Say what you will. The failure was by the parents.

    Flash forward to the 1980s. The greedy jerks who gave us Reagan and Bush tax cuts and deregulation (which created today's wealth inequality and gutted American manufacturing) all had parents. Their parents taught them to lying, greedy, unprincipled, self-centered idiots. Again, not the schools.

    Intermezzo course-- I have a very unique background. Today I exclusively practice fancy law. In my misspent youth in graduate school and law school I coached high school debate. As a college professor I coach college and high school debate. In the early years of my law practice, I coached high school debate. In my misspent youth days, I did some awesome original education research on things like "ability grouping." Based on my experience working with parents, administration, and teachers, and hundreds of kids (in many schools), parents are at fault for most everything wrong in schools. As a high school debate coach I got to work with typically the best students in a school. I can recall saturday mornings where seniors would show up to leave for a debate trip totally hung over from the night before. Excuse me mom and dad? Did you know your son was drunk? I had a school principal tell kids they could feel safe coming to my house drunk, if they were afraid to go home (when their parents too would be drunk). I had parents (in divorces) swearing out protective orders against half the planet. I had kids move in with friends because their parents "hit on" their friends. I have lurid stories.

    Flash forward to today--I still hire college students to provide support for me when I write academic papers. These kids keep me plugged into much of what is going on. I also have a "side practice" for school discipline and Child Protective Services cases.

    Bottom line, virtually everything wrong with schools is on parents.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @animalogic

  7. @Achmed E. Newman
    Thank you for this column. I have been following your columns on the Orwellian policies of the government schools for years, Michelle. I had no idea about this time-in-the-bathroom bit - it seems a bit weird in addition to being part of the usual quest for tracking and control.

    We are blessed in that the schools here (at least elementary) have none of the iCrap, at least anything portable that the students carry. We will be homeschooling next year, due more to the Wokeness and threat of unsolicited vaccinations than the Orwellian stuff. However, if you (or the reader) really want to see what this can lead to, you should read a book about China called We Have Been Harmonized by German author Kai Strittmatter. He has a chapter about the Orwellian conditions in the schools there.

    Here are the 4 parts of a detailed review on Peak Stupidity:

    Part 1
    Part 2
    Part 3
    Part 4

    This book will scare the Bejesus out of you. It's not about the future - it's about NOW, in China - not the place to be.

    Finally, I disagree with this part - not your writing, Mrs. Malkin, but a quote in this column:

    "If you’re a parent and your kid’s school uses e-hallpass, politely yet firmly ask for your kid to be opted out. If we have enough opt outs the system won’t work.”
     
    No, we all must drop this "politely" business. Do you think Big Brother will be polite to us all once he has full control? No, "fuck that shit!" is much more appropriate phraseology, if you're taking this seriously.

    Replies: @animalogic

    Don’t disagree in principle with your views on “politeness” here. However with the State happy to label parents as “domestic terrorists”
    I wonder whether it’s a good tactic……

  8. Simple! Leave your phone in your locker. All day. Thwarts the entire program. Kids as a population could do this and that would be that. Michelle mentioned no penalties for not participating in e-hallpass so even deleting the app would be the first thing. Logging out of fb and Gmail would be next. Not carrying your phone at all is best because they can sneak it onto the phone anyway.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Catdompanj
    @Jim Christian

    But then how will they all call 911 during a drill, erm I mean shooting?

  9. Here in Australia there are stores that now make use of facial recognition cameras and software to spy on customers without informing them. And here I thought only China did that sort of thing.

  10. @Harry Huntington
    We want this level of government tracking so that we can better manage schools and help kids. Everyone knows that kids typically escape to the bathroom at school for one of two reasons: (1) to do bad things like smoke or use drugs; or (2) to escape bad classroom situations or bad personal situations. Kids never talk about that and they never tell their parents, indeed their parents are one of the things kids are seeking to escape. With good data, school administrators can find the kids doing bad acts and those kids that are having trouble. Often kids go to the bathroom to cry because their parents are abusive at home. The school bathroom is the safe private place. With these tools, school administrators can ferret out abusive parents and put an end to the abuse. Most school problems, unprepared students, discipline problems, and other issues actually begin at home with bad parents. Time to use all tools at our disposal to hold parents accountable.

    Replies: @RoatanBill, @animalogic, @Longrange, @Luddite in Chief

    Way to paintbrush parents! Prying into premenstrual response to mean chicks or menstrual messes is nobody’s business! I can see a smoke/vape detector, but is there no respect for privacy? Check out state proficiency rates & stick your noses into 3 Rs. Let teachers teach! Bring in more to allow them to get to know students AND parents.

    • Replies: @Harry Huntington
    @Longrange

    I responded above.

    I will add one more anecdote. In "debate coach" days it was not uncommon that on the way out of town I ran in the grocery store to pick up hose, tampons, eye lashes, a sack of bagels, and who knows what else that mom and dad failed to get for the kids before coach dragged them to a debate tournament.

    When I was their high school debate coach, I knew when their period was. Did mom and dad?

    Replies: @Bro43rd

  11. @animalogic
    @Harry Huntington

    Your faith in authority is truly dumbfounding.

    Replies: @Harry Huntington

    You misread me. I have little faith in authority. I have less faith in parents. Recall, the children of the 1960s all had parents. Those kids protesting in the streets, driving cross country to anti-war rallies, wearing long hair, starting the sexual revolution, all had parents. Those kids all attended old fashioned schools with good teachers and discipline. Say what you will. The failure was by the parents.

    Flash forward to the 1980s. The greedy jerks who gave us Reagan and Bush tax cuts and deregulation (which created today’s wealth inequality and gutted American manufacturing) all had parents. Their parents taught them to lying, greedy, unprincipled, self-centered idiots. Again, not the schools.

    Intermezzo course– I have a very unique background. Today I exclusively practice fancy law. In my misspent youth in graduate school and law school I coached high school debate. As a college professor I coach college and high school debate. In the early years of my law practice, I coached high school debate. In my misspent youth days, I did some awesome original education research on things like “ability grouping.” Based on my experience working with parents, administration, and teachers, and hundreds of kids (in many schools), parents are at fault for most everything wrong in schools. As a high school debate coach I got to work with typically the best students in a school. I can recall saturday mornings where seniors would show up to leave for a debate trip totally hung over from the night before. Excuse me mom and dad? Did you know your son was drunk? I had a school principal tell kids they could feel safe coming to my house drunk, if they were afraid to go home (when their parents too would be drunk). I had parents (in divorces) swearing out protective orders against half the planet. I had kids move in with friends because their parents “hit on” their friends. I have lurid stories.

    Flash forward to today–I still hire college students to provide support for me when I write academic papers. These kids keep me plugged into much of what is going on. I also have a “side practice” for school discipline and Child Protective Services cases.

    Bottom line, virtually everything wrong with schools is on parents.

    • Disagree: Bro43rd
    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @Harry Huntington


    I also have a “side practice” for school discipline and Child Protective Services cases.
     
    No doubt it is a very lucrative side practice, too, seeing as how schools are no longer allowed to discipline students and CPS is all-too-happy to discipline parents who "get out of line."

    (Particularly as the definition of "getting out of line" seems to be an ever-expanding one.)
    , @animalogic
    @Harry Huntington

    Having been a high school teacher on & off for some years I can only agree with you that parents are highly responsible for their kids' outcomes.
    Funny coincidence, the least successful kids, had parents most likely not to turn up to teacher/parent evenings. Funny indeed.

  12. @Longrange
    @Harry Huntington

    Way to paintbrush parents! Prying into premenstrual response to mean chicks or menstrual messes is nobody’s business! I can see a smoke/vape detector, but is there no respect for privacy? Check out state proficiency rates & stick your noses into 3 Rs. Let teachers teach! Bring in more to allow them to get to know students AND parents.

    Replies: @Harry Huntington

    I responded above.

    I will add one more anecdote. In “debate coach” days it was not uncommon that on the way out of town I ran in the grocery store to pick up hose, tampons, eye lashes, a sack of bagels, and who knows what else that mom and dad failed to get for the kids before coach dragged them to a debate tournament.

    When I was their high school debate coach, I knew when their period was. Did mom and dad?

    • Replies: @Bro43rd
    @Harry Huntington

    There's no "that's just weird" button so I'm saying That is just weird. Maybe you should have had kids of your own to control like little automatons instead of practicing your authoritarianism on other people's children.

    Replies: @Harry Huntington

  13. That’s a lot of very sensitive information the school is forcing you to give to this company, leaving it vulnerable for hackers to hold for ransom, or to sell to identity thieves so they can ruin your life.

    Ransom? Identity thieves? Why bother?

    Hackers could simply sell it outright to marketers, who would love to know which kids have ADHD, drink/drug problems, so-called “anti-social” behaviour, etc.

    Stuff like this is an absolute treasure trove for people who have services to sell to parents.

    I bet no one here remembers the controversy 30-odd years ago when US school districts wanted to put Channel One News into classrooms. The parents said, “Subject the kids to ads in school? No way!”

    Now, in the 2020s, the parents put up with more, much more.

    No doubt the kids can look forward to cameras that monitor their blink rate in the classroom (assuming they haven’t already been installed). Blinking “too much”? You must be under stress! Time for a quick visit to the counselor’s office to find out what’s bothering you.

    (George Orwell, eat your heart out!)

  14. @Harry Huntington
    @animalogic

    You misread me. I have little faith in authority. I have less faith in parents. Recall, the children of the 1960s all had parents. Those kids protesting in the streets, driving cross country to anti-war rallies, wearing long hair, starting the sexual revolution, all had parents. Those kids all attended old fashioned schools with good teachers and discipline. Say what you will. The failure was by the parents.

    Flash forward to the 1980s. The greedy jerks who gave us Reagan and Bush tax cuts and deregulation (which created today's wealth inequality and gutted American manufacturing) all had parents. Their parents taught them to lying, greedy, unprincipled, self-centered idiots. Again, not the schools.

    Intermezzo course-- I have a very unique background. Today I exclusively practice fancy law. In my misspent youth in graduate school and law school I coached high school debate. As a college professor I coach college and high school debate. In the early years of my law practice, I coached high school debate. In my misspent youth days, I did some awesome original education research on things like "ability grouping." Based on my experience working with parents, administration, and teachers, and hundreds of kids (in many schools), parents are at fault for most everything wrong in schools. As a high school debate coach I got to work with typically the best students in a school. I can recall saturday mornings where seniors would show up to leave for a debate trip totally hung over from the night before. Excuse me mom and dad? Did you know your son was drunk? I had a school principal tell kids they could feel safe coming to my house drunk, if they were afraid to go home (when their parents too would be drunk). I had parents (in divorces) swearing out protective orders against half the planet. I had kids move in with friends because their parents "hit on" their friends. I have lurid stories.

    Flash forward to today--I still hire college students to provide support for me when I write academic papers. These kids keep me plugged into much of what is going on. I also have a "side practice" for school discipline and Child Protective Services cases.

    Bottom line, virtually everything wrong with schools is on parents.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @animalogic

    I also have a “side practice” for school discipline and Child Protective Services cases.

    No doubt it is a very lucrative side practice, too, seeing as how schools are no longer allowed to discipline students and CPS is all-too-happy to discipline parents who “get out of line.”

    (Particularly as the definition of “getting out of line” seems to be an ever-expanding one.)

  15. @Harry Huntington
    @Longrange

    I responded above.

    I will add one more anecdote. In "debate coach" days it was not uncommon that on the way out of town I ran in the grocery store to pick up hose, tampons, eye lashes, a sack of bagels, and who knows what else that mom and dad failed to get for the kids before coach dragged them to a debate tournament.

    When I was their high school debate coach, I knew when their period was. Did mom and dad?

    Replies: @Bro43rd

    There’s no “that’s just weird” button so I’m saying That is just weird. Maybe you should have had kids of your own to control like little automatons instead of practicing your authoritarianism on other people’s children.

    • Replies: @Harry Huntington
    @Bro43rd

    You need to get out more. The kids who compete in high school and college debate are some of the smartest and most independent kids you will ever will meet. No teacher practices authoritarianism on them--because those are the kids who think for themselves and who talk back. That's why they join the debate team in the first place. There are crazy talented kids in our schools. Teachers cherish the opportunity to work with the talented ones. Ultimately the problem is their parents. Parents are the ones who compel kids to join too many activities and be over scheduled so that their college applications look "full." Parents are the ones who compel their children to spend time in special SAT/ACT prep courses. Parents are the ones who put the kids on the traveling sports teams. Parents are the ones who compel their kids to work with extra tutors. Parents are the ones who pay for video games. Parents are the ones who plan kids time and manage who they may befriend. Parents are the ones who complain about the teacher when their son or daughter gets a B in a class. B means bad. when it comes to grades. None of that is done by schools. Indeed, teachers dread giving B and C grades because they know such grades will only generate time consuming complaints from mom and dad. Mom and dad, why don't you make little Susie and Johnny do their homework instead of playing on the traveling soccer team and learning violin?

    In the meanest case I recently saw, a woman went to court to obtain a order of protection against her neighbor. The neighbor was a single mom with a special needs child. The purpose of the order of protection was to prevent the special needs child from being able to play with other kids in the neighborhood. The woman seeking the protective order has two kids of her own and the purpose of the order was so that she could call the police if the special needs child approached her children. That case is disgusting. But again, the problem is parents.

    To get back to Ms Malkin's article; schools need as much data as they can obtain to understand which parents are the problem.

    Replies: @Greta Handel, @Ummm

  16. @Bro43rd
    @Harry Huntington

    There's no "that's just weird" button so I'm saying That is just weird. Maybe you should have had kids of your own to control like little automatons instead of practicing your authoritarianism on other people's children.

    Replies: @Harry Huntington

    You need to get out more. The kids who compete in high school and college debate are some of the smartest and most independent kids you will ever will meet. No teacher practices authoritarianism on them–because those are the kids who think for themselves and who talk back. That’s why they join the debate team in the first place. There are crazy talented kids in our schools. Teachers cherish the opportunity to work with the talented ones. Ultimately the problem is their parents. Parents are the ones who compel kids to join too many activities and be over scheduled so that their college applications look “full.” Parents are the ones who compel their children to spend time in special SAT/ACT prep courses. Parents are the ones who put the kids on the traveling sports teams. Parents are the ones who compel their kids to work with extra tutors. Parents are the ones who pay for video games. Parents are the ones who plan kids time and manage who they may befriend. Parents are the ones who complain about the teacher when their son or daughter gets a B in a class. B means bad. when it comes to grades. None of that is done by schools. Indeed, teachers dread giving B and C grades because they know such grades will only generate time consuming complaints from mom and dad. Mom and dad, why don’t you make little Susie and Johnny do their homework instead of playing on the traveling soccer team and learning violin?

    In the meanest case I recently saw, a woman went to court to obtain a order of protection against her neighbor. The neighbor was a single mom with a special needs child. The purpose of the order of protection was to prevent the special needs child from being able to play with other kids in the neighborhood. The woman seeking the protective order has two kids of her own and the purpose of the order was so that she could call the police if the special needs child approached her children. That case is disgusting. But again, the problem is parents.

    To get back to Ms Malkin’s article; schools need as much data as they can obtain to understand which parents are the problem.

    • Replies: @Greta Handel
    @Harry Huntington

    Have you ever been a parent?

    Replies: @Harry Huntington

    , @Ummm
    @Harry Huntington

    I mean, I'm not sure if you're being sarcastic or not but I'll assume that you have good faith reasons for saying these things.



    > schools need as much data as they can obtain to understand which parents are the problem.

    Unfortunately, though, the "problem parents" are actually you.

    Because you successfully raised responsible, free thinking children.

    So you're not wrong in theory, but unfortunately, your government hates people like you.

    I'm sorry to tell you.

  17. @Harry Huntington
    @Bro43rd

    You need to get out more. The kids who compete in high school and college debate are some of the smartest and most independent kids you will ever will meet. No teacher practices authoritarianism on them--because those are the kids who think for themselves and who talk back. That's why they join the debate team in the first place. There are crazy talented kids in our schools. Teachers cherish the opportunity to work with the talented ones. Ultimately the problem is their parents. Parents are the ones who compel kids to join too many activities and be over scheduled so that their college applications look "full." Parents are the ones who compel their children to spend time in special SAT/ACT prep courses. Parents are the ones who put the kids on the traveling sports teams. Parents are the ones who compel their kids to work with extra tutors. Parents are the ones who pay for video games. Parents are the ones who plan kids time and manage who they may befriend. Parents are the ones who complain about the teacher when their son or daughter gets a B in a class. B means bad. when it comes to grades. None of that is done by schools. Indeed, teachers dread giving B and C grades because they know such grades will only generate time consuming complaints from mom and dad. Mom and dad, why don't you make little Susie and Johnny do their homework instead of playing on the traveling soccer team and learning violin?

    In the meanest case I recently saw, a woman went to court to obtain a order of protection against her neighbor. The neighbor was a single mom with a special needs child. The purpose of the order of protection was to prevent the special needs child from being able to play with other kids in the neighborhood. The woman seeking the protective order has two kids of her own and the purpose of the order was so that she could call the police if the special needs child approached her children. That case is disgusting. But again, the problem is parents.

    To get back to Ms Malkin's article; schools need as much data as they can obtain to understand which parents are the problem.

    Replies: @Greta Handel, @Ummm

    Have you ever been a parent?

    • Replies: @Harry Huntington
    @Greta Handel

    The basic rules for the kids growing up were:
    -Church on Sunday, Sunday school, church on other days where there was church, join the church youth group. Summer vacation bible school.
    -No television. We didn't own a television at first. Got one later to watch DVDs of classic movies. Eventually broke down and got cable, but the rule was only baseball, football, or basketball. Family enjoyed watching college football games as a family.
    -No video games.
    -No contemporary music; classical, jazz, and blues music only.
    -As the Internet grew, go anywhere on the Internet you want, but you may not delete your history and we will talk about your choices.
    -Buy and read lots of books on any subject. Already had a ton of books in the house when kids were born. No books off limits at any age.
    -Family subscribed to lots of magazines and newspapers (in paper when you could still get paper magazines and newspapers). And we had boys and we know boys are curious so we had lots of carefully selected art books with pictures of naked people. Started going to art museums at young ages for the kids.
    -No traveling sports teams.
    -Public school only.
    -No guns.
    -Regular age appropriate chores including make beds, take out garbage, clean and dust, cut the grass.
    -No participation in "fashion contests" with other kids. We had the family "school uniform" and kids wore essentially the same clothes to school every day. Kids loved the "uniform." Dad (me) wore khaki pants and a white shirt most every day in the 80s and 90s. Job shifted and I travelled extensively. Shifted the uniform to black jeans and black shirts (they travel much better than Khaki and white). Mom wore simple conservative clothes.
    -Encouraged the kids to create their own things--art, photography, carpentry.
    -Told kids to follow all the teacher's rules. Teacher and principal are always right. We would talk about it at the backside at home. Mom would always leave a bunch of things out of the dish washer after family dinner and talk with the kids about schools while they dried dishes.
    -Family dinner every night.
    -Made sure the kids had drivers licenses at 16 and their own cars (and a gas credit card).
    -No drugs or smoking (sniff the kids and their clothes).
    -Made kids own their grades. They had to explain the results for every class. We never really checked on homework, but kids figured out quickly they doing homework led to better grades. Would talk with kids when they got B grades and ask what concrete steps they could take to improve them.
    -No swearing. Parents never swore.
    -Interesting family vacations to historical places.
    -Regular visits to extended family. Lots of grandparent and cousin time.
    -Avoided "organized" activities like scouting and little league that were not church affiliated.
    -Avoided saying "no" when kids wanted to hang with friends, go on school trips, or as they got older attend parties. Just reminded them of personal accountability. The reason kids had drivers license and car at 16 was so they were the one giving rides (not taking rides).
    -Encouraged lots of exercise. Made walking and bike riding something expected. Borrowed a page from my dad. "Dad can you take me to the library?" Dad back to me, "Don't you own a bike?" Had home gym equipment in the basement.
    -Educated kids before college that your college professors are supposed to shock and offend you.
    -Educated kids before college that notwithstanding how crazy the other kids may be, treat college like a job, plan a regular schedule, keep it, and good grades will come easy. Enjoy all the "free" very good stuff like music department concerts and art department art shows and theatre department plays.
    -Gave kids credit cards in high school (that were branches off dad's cards and had strict sublimits) that meant kids always felt "safe" because they could spend their way out of problems, but I always got to see the bill. Kids had to explain bad bills. My dad had given me 2 gas credit cards and a Mastercard at 16 and that had worked well. My dad was a genius. Learned my one son had a very warm heart when he was in graduate school. Son bought a lot of large pizzas (which he shared with classmates). That was the exact same thing I had done in graduate school.

    So yes Greta, that is how we did things in our house.

    Replies: @Liberty Mike

  18. And posting this goes against FB community standards

  19. @Harry Huntington
    @animalogic

    You misread me. I have little faith in authority. I have less faith in parents. Recall, the children of the 1960s all had parents. Those kids protesting in the streets, driving cross country to anti-war rallies, wearing long hair, starting the sexual revolution, all had parents. Those kids all attended old fashioned schools with good teachers and discipline. Say what you will. The failure was by the parents.

    Flash forward to the 1980s. The greedy jerks who gave us Reagan and Bush tax cuts and deregulation (which created today's wealth inequality and gutted American manufacturing) all had parents. Their parents taught them to lying, greedy, unprincipled, self-centered idiots. Again, not the schools.

    Intermezzo course-- I have a very unique background. Today I exclusively practice fancy law. In my misspent youth in graduate school and law school I coached high school debate. As a college professor I coach college and high school debate. In the early years of my law practice, I coached high school debate. In my misspent youth days, I did some awesome original education research on things like "ability grouping." Based on my experience working with parents, administration, and teachers, and hundreds of kids (in many schools), parents are at fault for most everything wrong in schools. As a high school debate coach I got to work with typically the best students in a school. I can recall saturday mornings where seniors would show up to leave for a debate trip totally hung over from the night before. Excuse me mom and dad? Did you know your son was drunk? I had a school principal tell kids they could feel safe coming to my house drunk, if they were afraid to go home (when their parents too would be drunk). I had parents (in divorces) swearing out protective orders against half the planet. I had kids move in with friends because their parents "hit on" their friends. I have lurid stories.

    Flash forward to today--I still hire college students to provide support for me when I write academic papers. These kids keep me plugged into much of what is going on. I also have a "side practice" for school discipline and Child Protective Services cases.

    Bottom line, virtually everything wrong with schools is on parents.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @animalogic

    Having been a high school teacher on & off for some years I can only agree with you that parents are highly responsible for their kids’ outcomes.
    Funny coincidence, the least successful kids, had parents most likely not to turn up to teacher/parent evenings. Funny indeed.

  20. @Jim Christian
    Simple! Leave your phone in your locker. All day. Thwarts the entire program. Kids as a population could do this and that would be that. Michelle mentioned no penalties for not participating in e-hallpass so even deleting the app would be the first thing. Logging out of fb and Gmail would be next. Not carrying your phone at all is best because they can sneak it onto the phone anyway.

    Replies: @Catdompanj

    But then how will they all call 911 during a drill, erm I mean shooting?

  21. @Greta Handel
    @Harry Huntington

    Have you ever been a parent?

    Replies: @Harry Huntington

    The basic rules for the kids growing up were:
    -Church on Sunday, Sunday school, church on other days where there was church, join the church youth group. Summer vacation bible school.
    -No television. We didn’t own a television at first. Got one later to watch DVDs of classic movies. Eventually broke down and got cable, but the rule was only baseball, football, or basketball. Family enjoyed watching college football games as a family.
    -No video games.
    -No contemporary music; classical, jazz, and blues music only.
    -As the Internet grew, go anywhere on the Internet you want, but you may not delete your history and we will talk about your choices.
    -Buy and read lots of books on any subject. Already had a ton of books in the house when kids were born. No books off limits at any age.
    -Family subscribed to lots of magazines and newspapers (in paper when you could still get paper magazines and newspapers). And we had boys and we know boys are curious so we had lots of carefully selected art books with pictures of naked people. Started going to art museums at young ages for the kids.
    -No traveling sports teams.
    -Public school only.
    -No guns.
    -Regular age appropriate chores including make beds, take out garbage, clean and dust, cut the grass.
    -No participation in “fashion contests” with other kids. We had the family “school uniform” and kids wore essentially the same clothes to school every day. Kids loved the “uniform.” Dad (me) wore khaki pants and a white shirt most every day in the 80s and 90s. Job shifted and I travelled extensively. Shifted the uniform to black jeans and black shirts (they travel much better than Khaki and white). Mom wore simple conservative clothes.
    -Encouraged the kids to create their own things–art, photography, carpentry.
    -Told kids to follow all the teacher’s rules. Teacher and principal are always right. We would talk about it at the backside at home. Mom would always leave a bunch of things out of the dish washer after family dinner and talk with the kids about schools while they dried dishes.
    -Family dinner every night.
    -Made sure the kids had drivers licenses at 16 and their own cars (and a gas credit card).
    -No drugs or smoking (sniff the kids and their clothes).
    -Made kids own their grades. They had to explain the results for every class. We never really checked on homework, but kids figured out quickly they doing homework led to better grades. Would talk with kids when they got B grades and ask what concrete steps they could take to improve them.
    -No swearing. Parents never swore.
    -Interesting family vacations to historical places.
    -Regular visits to extended family. Lots of grandparent and cousin time.
    -Avoided “organized” activities like scouting and little league that were not church affiliated.
    -Avoided saying “no” when kids wanted to hang with friends, go on school trips, or as they got older attend parties. Just reminded them of personal accountability. The reason kids had drivers license and car at 16 was so they were the one giving rides (not taking rides).
    -Encouraged lots of exercise. Made walking and bike riding something expected. Borrowed a page from my dad. “Dad can you take me to the library?” Dad back to me, “Don’t you own a bike?” Had home gym equipment in the basement.
    -Educated kids before college that your college professors are supposed to shock and offend you.
    -Educated kids before college that notwithstanding how crazy the other kids may be, treat college like a job, plan a regular schedule, keep it, and good grades will come easy. Enjoy all the “free” very good stuff like music department concerts and art department art shows and theatre department plays.
    -Gave kids credit cards in high school (that were branches off dad’s cards and had strict sublimits) that meant kids always felt “safe” because they could spend their way out of problems, but I always got to see the bill. Kids had to explain bad bills. My dad had given me 2 gas credit cards and a Mastercard at 16 and that had worked well. My dad was a genius. Learned my one son had a very warm heart when he was in graduate school. Son bought a lot of large pizzas (which he shared with classmates). That was the exact same thing I had done in graduate school.

    So yes Greta, that is how we did things in our house.

    • Thanks: Greta Handel
    • Replies: @Liberty Mike
    @Harry Huntington

    This is your best post.

    I commend you for being an outstanding parent. There are only 4 items upon which we differ: (1) the absolute ban on contemporary music; (2) prohibiting any participation in organized sports; (3) public school only; and (4) the rules of the academy, its employees, and its myrmidons are always right.

    In our family, we have not had guns, but my wife and I would not have prohibited them.

  22. @Harry Huntington
    We want this level of government tracking so that we can better manage schools and help kids. Everyone knows that kids typically escape to the bathroom at school for one of two reasons: (1) to do bad things like smoke or use drugs; or (2) to escape bad classroom situations or bad personal situations. Kids never talk about that and they never tell their parents, indeed their parents are one of the things kids are seeking to escape. With good data, school administrators can find the kids doing bad acts and those kids that are having trouble. Often kids go to the bathroom to cry because their parents are abusive at home. The school bathroom is the safe private place. With these tools, school administrators can ferret out abusive parents and put an end to the abuse. Most school problems, unprepared students, discipline problems, and other issues actually begin at home with bad parents. Time to use all tools at our disposal to hold parents accountable.

    Replies: @RoatanBill, @animalogic, @Longrange, @Luddite in Chief

    We want this level of government tracking so that we can better manage schools and help kids. Everyone knows that kids typically escape to the bathroom at school for one of two reasons: (1) to do bad things like smoke or use drugs; or (2) to escape bad classroom situations or bad personal situations. Kids never talk about that and they never tell their parents, indeed their parents are one of the things kids are seeking to escape. With good data, school administrators can find the kids doing bad acts and those kids that are having trouble.

    For a long time, I did not grasp the full meaning behind this quote from C.S. Lewis:

    “Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.”

    However, after reading your post, I understand it now. I also see how a certain mindset is able to rationalise turning schools into mini-panopticons provided it’s for “the good of the students.”

    Thank you for the insight (and for helping to propel thinking people toward homeschooling their children).

    • Replies: @Harry Huntington
    @Luddite in Chief

    Home schooling is socially destructive. Recall in Plato's Republic the children who would be Guardian were raised by the state. Home schooled children lack exposure to difficult ideas (at least those ideas difficult for their parents) and they lack socialization with kids who are different. Children are not their parents property. Parents arguably had a property interest of sorts in their children when children served as the parent's retirement plan. That long since died with Social Security.

    If you look at the history of education you see (1) rich children were educated (2) the occasion very special child was given an education typically to go into the ministry (3) most others had enough education do to simple math and to read a Bible. That changed in the late 19th century when we realized we needed scientists, engineers, accountants and others to make a complex economy work. Further, we needed to turn immigrant children into citizens. The focus of public education from about the 1870s through at least the 1980s was to turn children into good citizens and prepare them for college engineering school. I recall the science and math courses at my high school were coordinated with the engineering program at the University of Illinois.

    Schooling has changed when the 1% and Republican trade policies gutted American manufacturing by offshoring all those jobs. Engineering school graduates today can be unemployed. A generation to two of Midwestern engineering school graduates trained up as auto engineers, or manufacturing engineers had to find other things to do.

    Public school today has a tough job to overcome racism (from parents), sexism (from parents) and to teach kids to get along culturally with the myriad of different races and social groups who have immigrated to the US since immigration law changes in the 1960s. Home schooling is fundamentally incapable of doing that.

  23. @Luddite in Chief
    @Harry Huntington


    We want this level of government tracking so that we can better manage schools and help kids. Everyone knows that kids typically escape to the bathroom at school for one of two reasons: (1) to do bad things like smoke or use drugs; or (2) to escape bad classroom situations or bad personal situations. Kids never talk about that and they never tell their parents, indeed their parents are one of the things kids are seeking to escape. With good data, school administrators can find the kids doing bad acts and those kids that are having trouble.
     
    For a long time, I did not grasp the full meaning behind this quote from C.S. Lewis:


    “Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience."
     
    However, after reading your post, I understand it now. I also see how a certain mindset is able to rationalise turning schools into mini-panopticons provided it's for "the good of the students."

    Thank you for the insight (and for helping to propel thinking people toward homeschooling their children).

    Replies: @Harry Huntington

    Home schooling is socially destructive. Recall in Plato’s Republic the children who would be Guardian were raised by the state. Home schooled children lack exposure to difficult ideas (at least those ideas difficult for their parents) and they lack socialization with kids who are different. Children are not their parents property. Parents arguably had a property interest of sorts in their children when children served as the parent’s retirement plan. That long since died with Social Security.

    If you look at the history of education you see (1) rich children were educated (2) the occasion very special child was given an education typically to go into the ministry (3) most others had enough education do to simple math and to read a Bible. That changed in the late 19th century when we realized we needed scientists, engineers, accountants and others to make a complex economy work. Further, we needed to turn immigrant children into citizens. The focus of public education from about the 1870s through at least the 1980s was to turn children into good citizens and prepare them for college engineering school. I recall the science and math courses at my high school were coordinated with the engineering program at the University of Illinois.

    Schooling has changed when the 1% and Republican trade policies gutted American manufacturing by offshoring all those jobs. Engineering school graduates today can be unemployed. A generation to two of Midwestern engineering school graduates trained up as auto engineers, or manufacturing engineers had to find other things to do.

    Public school today has a tough job to overcome racism (from parents), sexism (from parents) and to teach kids to get along culturally with the myriad of different races and social groups who have immigrated to the US since immigration law changes in the 1960s. Home schooling is fundamentally incapable of doing that.

  24. @Harry Huntington
    @Greta Handel

    The basic rules for the kids growing up were:
    -Church on Sunday, Sunday school, church on other days where there was church, join the church youth group. Summer vacation bible school.
    -No television. We didn't own a television at first. Got one later to watch DVDs of classic movies. Eventually broke down and got cable, but the rule was only baseball, football, or basketball. Family enjoyed watching college football games as a family.
    -No video games.
    -No contemporary music; classical, jazz, and blues music only.
    -As the Internet grew, go anywhere on the Internet you want, but you may not delete your history and we will talk about your choices.
    -Buy and read lots of books on any subject. Already had a ton of books in the house when kids were born. No books off limits at any age.
    -Family subscribed to lots of magazines and newspapers (in paper when you could still get paper magazines and newspapers). And we had boys and we know boys are curious so we had lots of carefully selected art books with pictures of naked people. Started going to art museums at young ages for the kids.
    -No traveling sports teams.
    -Public school only.
    -No guns.
    -Regular age appropriate chores including make beds, take out garbage, clean and dust, cut the grass.
    -No participation in "fashion contests" with other kids. We had the family "school uniform" and kids wore essentially the same clothes to school every day. Kids loved the "uniform." Dad (me) wore khaki pants and a white shirt most every day in the 80s and 90s. Job shifted and I travelled extensively. Shifted the uniform to black jeans and black shirts (they travel much better than Khaki and white). Mom wore simple conservative clothes.
    -Encouraged the kids to create their own things--art, photography, carpentry.
    -Told kids to follow all the teacher's rules. Teacher and principal are always right. We would talk about it at the backside at home. Mom would always leave a bunch of things out of the dish washer after family dinner and talk with the kids about schools while they dried dishes.
    -Family dinner every night.
    -Made sure the kids had drivers licenses at 16 and their own cars (and a gas credit card).
    -No drugs or smoking (sniff the kids and their clothes).
    -Made kids own their grades. They had to explain the results for every class. We never really checked on homework, but kids figured out quickly they doing homework led to better grades. Would talk with kids when they got B grades and ask what concrete steps they could take to improve them.
    -No swearing. Parents never swore.
    -Interesting family vacations to historical places.
    -Regular visits to extended family. Lots of grandparent and cousin time.
    -Avoided "organized" activities like scouting and little league that were not church affiliated.
    -Avoided saying "no" when kids wanted to hang with friends, go on school trips, or as they got older attend parties. Just reminded them of personal accountability. The reason kids had drivers license and car at 16 was so they were the one giving rides (not taking rides).
    -Encouraged lots of exercise. Made walking and bike riding something expected. Borrowed a page from my dad. "Dad can you take me to the library?" Dad back to me, "Don't you own a bike?" Had home gym equipment in the basement.
    -Educated kids before college that your college professors are supposed to shock and offend you.
    -Educated kids before college that notwithstanding how crazy the other kids may be, treat college like a job, plan a regular schedule, keep it, and good grades will come easy. Enjoy all the "free" very good stuff like music department concerts and art department art shows and theatre department plays.
    -Gave kids credit cards in high school (that were branches off dad's cards and had strict sublimits) that meant kids always felt "safe" because they could spend their way out of problems, but I always got to see the bill. Kids had to explain bad bills. My dad had given me 2 gas credit cards and a Mastercard at 16 and that had worked well. My dad was a genius. Learned my one son had a very warm heart when he was in graduate school. Son bought a lot of large pizzas (which he shared with classmates). That was the exact same thing I had done in graduate school.

    So yes Greta, that is how we did things in our house.

    Replies: @Liberty Mike

    This is your best post.

    I commend you for being an outstanding parent. There are only 4 items upon which we differ: (1) the absolute ban on contemporary music; (2) prohibiting any participation in organized sports; (3) public school only; and (4) the rules of the academy, its employees, and its myrmidons are always right.

    In our family, we have not had guns, but my wife and I would not have prohibited them.

  25. I commend you for being an outstanding parent. There are only 4 items upon which we differ: (1) the absolute ban on contemporary music; (2) prohibiting any participation in organized sports; (3) public school only; and (4) the rules of the academy, its employees, and its myrmidons are always right.

    The wife and I both grew up with similar rules and like them.

    (1) Music–teach kids music appreciation with classical music to start. Move on to other forms. You cannot control the kids in college when they meet contemporary and country music. They will like some old country music first. They will learn which contemporary music has value. Someone who knew music and looked at my college music collection once remarked that for a musically ignorant person like me, moving across genres, I was amazing consistent in judgment and taste. To pick an example, watch the Prince “my guitar gently weeps” solo at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. That is great guitar. But you learn to know that with tons of blues guitar.

    (2) organized sports–bad coaching, bad rules. Many years ago we did not move to Naperville Illinois becuae the rules in the Naperville T-Ball league prohibited keeping score. That soured us on Naperville parents generally. Most local organized sports suffer from bad parents. Teach kids lifetime health. Recall, we had a basement of home gym equipment.

    (3) public school only–my dad went to religious school, the wife was a catholic school religion teacher. She said public school only. The reason was socialization. We can fix at the back end at home anything bad the school does. But we cannot replace the socialization anywhere else. Our kids can deal with anything and be nonplussed. My wife did not like Catholic school teachers or parents (and she was one of them). I was Lutheran.

    (4) rules of the academy– when playing someone else’s game, they make the rules. That is how life works. When you own the team, the venue or whatever, you make the rules. Teach kids (and college is the best) how to prosper and win from a position of weakness. Teach kids how to lose and survive. In Golf, only one golfer wins the tournament, everyone else is a loser. In tennis, only one player wins the tournament, everyone else is a loser. We dont need to tach kids about winning. We need to teach kids about losing and moving on and prospering. You can be a millionaire and have generational wealth by coming in 7th and 10 years of golf tournaments. Leadership courses in college are stupid. Teach “followership” or “team play”. That is what folks used to learn on sports fields. When folks used to talk about British nobility they sometimes said “lessons learned on the fields of Rugby” (Rugby was a British boarding school) they meant that kids learned lifelong lessons about team play and trust. Teach the kids to follow the professors rules–but that does not mean you trust the professor. you play by the professors rules in the professors venue.

    Above all, teach the kids their obligation is to God. All the Earthly contests are silly. They have no bearing on anything important.

    If anything the wife and I were too timid. The kids did college (and graduate school). A buddies friend is a welder. He loves his job. Robots might replace welders. They may not.

  26. @Harry Huntington
    @Bro43rd

    You need to get out more. The kids who compete in high school and college debate are some of the smartest and most independent kids you will ever will meet. No teacher practices authoritarianism on them--because those are the kids who think for themselves and who talk back. That's why they join the debate team in the first place. There are crazy talented kids in our schools. Teachers cherish the opportunity to work with the talented ones. Ultimately the problem is their parents. Parents are the ones who compel kids to join too many activities and be over scheduled so that their college applications look "full." Parents are the ones who compel their children to spend time in special SAT/ACT prep courses. Parents are the ones who put the kids on the traveling sports teams. Parents are the ones who compel their kids to work with extra tutors. Parents are the ones who pay for video games. Parents are the ones who plan kids time and manage who they may befriend. Parents are the ones who complain about the teacher when their son or daughter gets a B in a class. B means bad. when it comes to grades. None of that is done by schools. Indeed, teachers dread giving B and C grades because they know such grades will only generate time consuming complaints from mom and dad. Mom and dad, why don't you make little Susie and Johnny do their homework instead of playing on the traveling soccer team and learning violin?

    In the meanest case I recently saw, a woman went to court to obtain a order of protection against her neighbor. The neighbor was a single mom with a special needs child. The purpose of the order of protection was to prevent the special needs child from being able to play with other kids in the neighborhood. The woman seeking the protective order has two kids of her own and the purpose of the order was so that she could call the police if the special needs child approached her children. That case is disgusting. But again, the problem is parents.

    To get back to Ms Malkin's article; schools need as much data as they can obtain to understand which parents are the problem.

    Replies: @Greta Handel, @Ummm

    I mean, I’m not sure if you’re being sarcastic or not but I’ll assume that you have good faith reasons for saying these things.

    > schools need as much data as they can obtain to understand which parents are the problem.

    Unfortunately, though, the “problem parents” are actually you.

    Because you successfully raised responsible, free thinking children.

    So you’re not wrong in theory, but unfortunately, your government hates people like you.

    I’m sorry to tell you.

  27. Porky’s goes into big data. Also they’re perverts.

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