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Trump’s Trade Threats Are Really Cold War 2.0
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President Trump has threatened China’s President Xi that if they don’t meet and talk at the upcoming G20 meetings in Japan, June 29-30, the United States will not soften its tariff war and economic sanctions against Chinese exports and technology.

Some meeting between Chinese and U.S. leaders will indeed take place, but it cannot be anything like a real negotiation. Such meetings normally are planned in advance, by specialized officials working together to prepare an agreement to be announced by their heads of state. No such preparation has taken place, or can take place. Mr. Trump doesn’t delegate authority.

He opens negotiations with a threat. That costs nothing, and you never know (or at least, he never knows) whether he can get a freebee. His threat is that the U.S. can hurt its adversary unless that country agrees to abide by America’s wish-list. But in this case the list is so unrealistic that the media are embarrassed to talk about it. The US is making impossible demands for economic surrender – that no country could accept. What appears on the surface to be only a trade war is really a full-fledged Cold War 2.0.

America’s wish list: other countries’ neoliberal subservience

At stake is whether China will agree to do what Russia did in the 1990s: put a Yeltsin-like puppet of neoliberal planners in place to shift control of its economy from its government to the U.S. financial sector and its planners. So the fight really is over what kind of planning China and the rest of the world should have: by governments to raise prosperity, or by the financial sector to extract revenue and impose austerity.

U.S. diplomacy aims to make other countries dependent on its agricultural exports, its oil (or oil in countries that U.S. majors and allies control), information and military technology. This trade dependency will enable U.S. strategists to impose sanctions that would deprive economies of basic food, energy, communications and replacement parts if they resist U.S. demands.

The objective is to gain financial control of global resources and make trade “partners” pay interest, licensing fees and high prices for products in which the United States enjoys monopoly pricing “rights” for intellectual property. A trade war thus aims to make other countries dependent on U.S.-controlled food, oil, banking and finance, or high-technology goods whose disruption will cause austerity and suffering until the trade “partner” surrenders.

China’s willingness to give Trump a “win”

Threats are cheap, but Mr. Trump can’t really follow through without turning farmers, Wall Street and the stock market, Walmart and much of the IT sector against him at election time if his tariffs on China increase the cost of living and doing business. His diplomatic threat is really that the US will cut its own economic throat, imposing sanctions on its own importers and investors if China does not acquiesce.

ORDER IT NOW

It is easy to see what China’s answer will be. It will stand aside and let the US self-destruct. Its negotiators are quite happy to “offer” whatever China has planned to do anyway, and let Trump brag that this is a “concession” he has won.

China has a great sweetener that I think President Xi Jinping should offer: It can nominate Donald Trump for the Nobel Peace Prize. We know that he wants what his predecessor Barack Obama got. And doesn’t he deserve it more? After all, he is helping to bring Eurasia together, driving China and Russia into an alliance with neighboring counties, reaching out to Europe.

Trump may be too narcissistic to realize the irony here. Catalyzing Asian and European trade independence, financial independence, food independence and IT independence from the threat of U.S. sanctions will leave the U.S. isolated in the emerging multilateralism.

America’s wish for a neoliberal Chinese Yeltsin (and another Russian Yeltsin for that matter)

A good diplomat does not make demands to which the only answer can be “No.” There is no way that China will dismantle its mixed economy and turn it over to U.S. and other global investors. It is no secret that the United States achieved world industrial supremacy in the late 19th and early 20th century by heavy public-sector subsidy of education, roads, communication and other basic infrastructure. Today’s privatized, financialized and “Thatcherized” economies are high-cost and inefficient.

Yet U.S. officials persist in their dream of promoting some neoliberal Chinese leader or “free market” party to wreak the damage that Yeltsin and his American advisors wrought on Russia. The U.S. idea of a “win-win” agreement is one in which China will be “permitted” to grow as long as it agrees to become a U.S. financial and trade satellite, not an independent competitor.

Trump’s trade tantrum is that other countries are simply following the same economic strategy that once made America great, but which neoliberals have destroyed here and in much of Europe. U.S. negotiators are unwilling to acknowledge that the United States has lost its competitive industrial advantage and become a high-cost rentier economy. Its GDP is “empty,” consisting mainly of the Finance, Insurance and Real Estate (FIRE) rents, profits and capital gains while the nation’s infrastructure decays and its labor is reduced to a prat-time “gig” economy. Under these conditions the effect of trade threats can only be to speed up the drive by other countries to become economically self-reliant.

 
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  1. Rational says:

    TRUMP, IMPOSE TARIFFS ON ALIENS.

    The 3rd world’s biggest dumping on America is not goods, it is aliens.

    Trump can win any “trade war” by imposing tariffs on aliens.

    Eg.

    $50,000 student visa application fee.

    $15,000 tourist visa application fee.

    $20,000 J1 visa application fee.

    $5000 per day fine for Chinese overstays.

    $1 million fine for EWI (Entrants without inspection, ie. Those who enter illegally).

    Or Death penalty for EWI’s, as it is an act of war, an invasion of a superpower.

    America is a superpower, they claim. So, show it. Shoot at sight alien invaders at the border. Jail for Chinese overstays and fine them like crazy.

    • Replies: @Thinking Out Loud
  2. Anon[375] • Disclaimer says:

    China’e average IQ and EQ (ethnocentrism quotient) are a safeguard against it being “democraticized” by the “democracy” compellers.

  3. @Rational

    I agree. Even more importantly:

    $100,000 per H1b visa; $25,000 per spousal/dependent visa

    $10 million per EB5 visa; $5m per dependent visa

    $1 million per green card

    Require at least 30 years on green card before one can apply for citizenship. Anyone who has ever served in the military of another country is automatically disqualified for green card or citizenship.

    Anyone who has ever voted illegally will be denied legal status, visa renewal, green card or citizenship, permanently, without appeal.

    • Replies: @Realist
  4. nsa says:

    The crux of the “trade” dispute is never discussed: the Chinese refusal to allow the international financial services sector to penetrate the Chinese economy and operate freely. Get it? The Chinese won’t let the Jews in to loot the place and the Jews are pissed. Trumpstein, the cryto Jew, has promised his sponsors to rectify the situation. The Chinese witnessed what happened when Yeltsin allowed the IMF to parachute Jeffrey Sachs and his Jew Boys into Russia in 1991……Jews looted the place mercilessly, calling it democracy and capitalism, and Russia is still recovering. The Chinese have a bright future, as long as they keep the Jews out.

  5. sally says:

    I agree.
    I am afraid spokes person Trump and those he is speaking for have it wrong. They believe external trade is interfering with the La-Zi-Faire fat cat monopoly powered corporations the CPI (congress, president and Israeli governance represent.
    Few western companies can compete because only monopoly endowed Global corporations are allowed or licensed to compete. Individual ability, the creative mind of the lone rangers with highly disruptive inventions and ideas, are not allowed access to the knowledge or money to play. Making people pay for sleazy operating systems when better ones are free, allowing big corporations to hack the data of everyone, and on and on.

    Even when a person finds a way to play and actually produces a product or concept, the financial condition of the inventor is so weak or the barriers to promote his product is so strong that as soon as the idea or product is patented or copyrighted it somehow absorbed into one of the monopoly powered giants; in other words, competition is only allowed if the competitor gives the profits to one of the monopoly powered giants. China should be complaining, at least their competitors can produce, in the USA governed America unlicensed competition is denied.

    Copyright, patents, standardized testing and licensing every breath have terminated competition in America.
    America still competes with Americans as long as the business does not compete with the global corporations.

    The problem Trump thinks he can solve, is not sourced in India, China, Iran, Russia, or any other nation. The problem is at home, in government policy, laws that turn capitalistic competition into monopolistic fat-cat wealth storing private domain havens. Education by degree and license by examination and standardization of performance are used to restrict competition. Education, is a bureaucracy and no matter its efficiency; a degree cannot provide competitive performance. The USA governance over America has served only the interest of monopoly endowed corporations and their oligarch owners and investors. Trump is trying to overcome foreign competition, by threat and blocking maneuvers, to deny foreigners the fruits of their competitive successes I do not believe he can be successful. Already the Russian and Chinese have developed a new currency and banking system to circumvent the Trump block. Work around-s are in progress everywhere.. Soon even the USA will not be allowed to compete I fear.
    It is not a matter of where the competition comes from, its that the monopoly powers have used the behavior enforcing rule making capacity of the USA to deny native American creativity; creativity that America needs to be competitive. USA policy continues to be to enrich a few by channeling and encapsulating all effort within the confines of the monopoly holders instead of encouraging every back yard to be a new competitor. It will be many years before Americans will be able to compete..

    Trade is not the issue, competition is!

    • Agree: CanSpeccy
  6. Atalanta says:

    Hudson left out China’s rare earth metals as leverage. US military can’t operate without them. So he wouldn’t even be able to offer those military toys to the other little boys without China giving over their rare earths. Hudson also left out the fact that China prints its own money, so the plan must also be to control that. That will likely NEVER happen. And Trump has done absolutely squat to at least develop hemp or anything remotely intelligent in the US. These old stupid 19th-century Rockefeller OIL and GAS techs are fatal to our planet and they have no real future. Let’s move on please. We need more real women, real feminists, like Marilyn Waring in power. This economy is a joke made of male excrement.

    • Replies: @RoatanBill
    , @Declane
  7. Atalanta says:
    @nsa

    Couldn’t agree more. The Chinese don’t like wars. They have a magnificent traditional medical system and martial arts traditions. They’ve got to defend it from the likes of the perennial thieves. ACtually the word Hebrew meant ‘bandit’ in early languages.

    From Habiru to Hebrews: The Roots of the Jewish Tradition

    The Habiru

    It was at this point in time that I discovered the Habiru. Even though I was a professional historian, I had never heard of them until I began to study Jewish history. A hot topic in the small world of “Biblical scholarship,” their existence had remained almost completely unknown to everyone else. For 100 years, archaeologists had been unearthing clay tablets in the Middle East which made reference to a group of people variously described as “Habiru” or “Apiru” in the scholarly literature. Hundreds of such references were found, all dating from the 2nd millenium BCE. None of these clay tablets discussed the Habiru at length but rather made reference to them in passing in some larger context. Sometimes the Habiru were described as mercenaries, other times as day laborers, yet other times as bandits. The Biblical scholars were in general agreement that the reality behind these different descriptions was that of bands of armed men, most of them fugitives, who camped on the outskirts of the more settled areas and made a living as best they could. References to such Habiru bands were found in many different parts of the Middle East, making it clear that they did not constitute a tribe or nation but rather a social class, one that was generally viewed by the scribes who mentioned them with a mixture of fear and contempt.

    From Habiru to Hebrews: The Roots of the Jewish Tradition > Robert Wolfe

  8. schrub says:

    What Trump is now demanding reminds me of the brutally efficient system that Trump grew up in: New York City business. (Author Tom Wolfe has a great line in his book The Bonfire Of The Vanities that the strange, unrelenting background droning sound one hears in NYC is that of “people constantly braying for money”).

    New York City real estate in particular is an area of business that is so brutally competitive, unscrupulous , and backstabbing that it is best described as war under another name. It is a business arena where a close friend one day can turn into a staunch enemy the next. Trust is rare.

    New York real estate, in fact, brings to mind the old saying about sausage making: You would never eat it if you saw it being made. Yet deals are made. In fact, a lot of them. This is the milieu Trump comes from.

    Trump isn’t one of those more genteel, old-time American negotiators of prior years the author of this article speaks fondly of. These are the very same people who so readily agreed to disasters like NAFTA or allowed, for instance, Or allowed Japan to levy two hundred percent duties on things like American made Harley Davidson motorcycles while the USA was pressured (or bribed) to apply few if any comparable duties on Japanese motorcycles or automobiles (or virtually anything else Japan sold in the USA). These toothless. genteel types also stood back for decades and allowed Japan to use red tape (like obscure safety regulations for instance) to make it almost impossibly difficult to sell American products like automobiles in Japan.

    These very same US negotiators, politicians, and bureaucrats have more recently stood back and allowed China to absolutely devastate American manufacturing.

    Screw China, It’s now payback time. The Chinese are shaking in their boots because the previously hoodwinked and comatose Americans are finally waking up. No more wimpy Obama or Bush looking out for our interests. It is now Truly Scary Trump instead.

    Wait until the negotiations are concluded to see if they are successful. The sausage that comes out of them might be very appealing for the first time in many, many decades.

  9. Sam J. says:

    “…His diplomatic threat is really that the US will cut its own economic throat, imposing sanctions on its own importers and investors if China does not acquiesce…”

    I get that the US financial system is up to no good with their positions on China but the criticisms Trump made of China are correct. They have lots of tariffs on finished goods from the US. They require technology transfer to do business there. Their government and industry are tied at the hip and they are manipulating their currency. All these things are true and if we keep trading with them with the same terms we have been we would lose ALL our industrial infrastructure. Now we hear over and over how we can’t build anything but the Chinese went from being dirt farmers to the largest industrial power in a fairly short period of time. Could we not do the same at least for our own countries market? Certainly global trade destruction between countries is not a good thing but we’d be fools to keep on as we are now. At some point when you dig a hole you have to stop to get yourself out.

    I don’t think we have a choice if we wish to continue to be an industrialized country. All those that say China will do fine without us are not taking into account how all the other countries who are being handled the exact same way as we are, are going to handle China’s trade with them. Will they keep allowing China to have large tariffs on their products while they Chinese ship whatever they wish into theirs? I’m not so sure they will. If the US starts refusing the Chinese free entry without reciprocal trade then I can easily see others following our lead.

    We should have stopped this many years ago but as bad as the situation is now it will only get worse if we don’t act.

    Let them remove their tariffs. We should take every single anti-trade act and tariff they have on us, weigh them on China and “then” negotiate. If they don’t wish to it’s their country they can do what they please and so can we.

    • Replies: @foolisholdman
  10. “The crux of the “trade” dispute is never discussed: the Chinese refusal to allow the international financial services sector to penetrate the Chinese economy and operate freely. Get it? ”
    Absolutely. Like inviting a handful of worms into your apple — economy hollowed out in an eye blink.
    However, there is another side to this “trade dispute” coin.
    FIRE want to economicly destroy China. The neocon’, MIC, security sector wants to destroy China’s 2025 plan to become high-tech world leaders. 5G, AI, semi conductors etc are some of the areas that China’s public/private sectors are voraciously pushing. Hence, the (wonderfully “free market”) US attacks on Heiwai.
    These short term US gambles are more than likely to pay off by the medium-long term undermining of US hegemony via Eurasian integration led by China & Russia.
    And all the time we are left wondering whether the US will choose the “Samson Option” rather than accept reduced status. (Insane with power lust, the US can’t even accept “first among equals”)

  11. Wally says:

    Trump tariffs on Chinese goods are merely retaliatory and long overdue.

    They are relatively much, much smaller than the massive tariffs that the Chinese have imposed of US goods for decades.

    So if Trump is trying to start another Cold War by retaliating, what war have the Chinese been waging for decades?

  12. How many members of Manhattan Project would have chosen to come to murika if the orange thug was acting as President in the 1930’s?
    How many OsamaS he has created, world wide?

  13. The US is making impossible demands for economic surrender – that no country could accept. What appears on the surface to be only a trade war is really a full-fledged Cold War 2.0

    .

    Typical mobster protection racket threats. Now the US has moved from waging military wars on behalf of their Jewish owners to aggressively push their neoliberal economic warfare for them. The facade for promoting democracy and human rights is no longer required.

    And to call attempts at starving the population and murdering children by denying them essential medicines as has happened in Iraq and now is going on in Iran and Venezuela, a Cold War 2.0 is a gross understatement. It is a flagrant act of war. America is launching a war of attrition on the world and who better to spearhead that war than an idiot manipulated by Zionist Jews? The fact that many countries remain silent is testament to their surrender. But China may prove to be a different proposition.

  14. PeterMX says:

    “the United States achieved world industrial supremacy in the late 19th and early 20th century” That is a myth. The US may have had the highest GDP because it was the leader in manufacturing, as China is now, but Europe and in particular Germany was far ahead of the US in technology and science. If you compare China to the US today the situation is very similar to comparing the US to Germany before 1939. Germany was far ahead of the US in the number of Nobel Prizes received thru 1945 and very few of the Americans that did receive the Nobel Prize were native born. The US received a few Nobel Prizes starting in the 1940’s because some recent European immigrants that became US citizens received it for work they had done in Europe. The three biggest technological breakthroughs of WW II were the jet, the rocket and the atomic bomb. Germany invented the jet, built the first modern rockets and the German scientist Otto Hahn split the atom in 1939 (for which he received the Nobel Prize in 1944) kicking off the USA’s atomic bomb project and Germany’s limited attempt. The people that eventually achieved success in the US were almost all recent European immigrants (Bethe, Teller, etc.), many being Jewish.

    I basically agree with the rest of the article. I believe Trump’s tactics make sense. The problem is it’s too late. The US economy can’t be fixed by anyone. The US has 22 trillion dollars in debt and will never be able to pay it back. The dollar is going to take a deep dive within the next few years and it will lose its status as the reserve currency. I believe this based upon what people like Peter Schiff, Paul Craig Roberts, David Stockman and Ron Paul say.

    I think the two biggest events of the last 75 years were WW II, completely changing the countries that run the world and the emergence of a backwards and dirt poor China to become an economic powerhouse and I think they will get stronger.

    • Replies: @Rogue
    , @foolisholdman
  15. Sean says:

    The US is making impossible demands for economic surrender – that no country could accept.

    Yes country. If the world was one big free trade area, it there were no bloks or even no countries in the sense we understand them then the population of the would be wealthier, on average. But countries are not primarily economic units, even if one can look at them as such.

    Nation states exist and have the emergent quality that they to survive against other nation states and the best way to do that is to gain extra power relative to other states, or at least maintain their position. Why would America agree to terms of trade that do not maintain its position relative to China.

    U.S. negotiators are unwilling to acknowledge that the United States has lost its competitive industrial advantage

    There is no absolute standards by which such an advantage could be judged. The terms of trade that are finally settled on will be a compromise and reflect the interests of both, and the total balance of forces between the two.

  16. As shown in this article, both Russia and China have plans in place to work around American sanctions:

    https://viableopposition.blogspot.com/2019/06/putin-and-xi-defeating-american.html

    The combination of both nations will make it extremely difficult for Washington to impose its hegemonic agenda without serious repercussions as two of the world’s leading military forces seek to increase the level of co-operation between their nations.

  17. Incitatus says:

    Trump’s Trade Tariff Theatre 2018 results:
    Country/Trade Balance/2018 vs. 2017

    Mexico: trade DEFICIT -$81.5 billion; up 14.9% from 2017;
    Canada: trade DEFICIT -$19.8 billion; up 15.8% from 2017;
    China: trade DEFICIT -$375.6 billion; up 11.6% from 2017;
    South Korea: trade DEFICIT -$17.9 billion; down 22.4% from 2017;
    Japan: trade DEFICIT -$67.7 billion; down 1.8% from 2017
    Germany: trade DEFICIT -$68.3 billion; up 7.2% from 2017;
    France: trade DEFICIT -$16.2 billion; up 5.8% from 2017;
    Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: trade DEFICIT -$10.5 billion; up 313.3% from 2017;
    Russia: trade DEFICIT -$14.1 billion; up 40.9% from 2017;

    Asia: trade DEFICIT -$622.2 billion; up 8.8% from 2017;
    Europe: trade DEFICIT -$202.4 billion; up 16.6% from 2017;
    World: trade DEFICIT -$795.7 billion; up 10.4% from 2017

    https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/index.html

    ‘Art of the Deal’?

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  18. To all of the “free traders”, the media ,and academia ,i have this simple question:
    why i cant purchase a Toyota work van(the best and must popular of the world),neither here in the USA nor abroad and bring it in?
    how come that even in Cuba there are more of those Toyota work van than here in all continental USA.
    In 25 year i has to purchase more than 6 work vans,and like Penelope i have been waiting for the Toyota ,and still waiting.
    They ,the free traders,did not has allowed not even one.

  19. The problem with the zio/US is the control of the US by the zionists and this control is derived via the zionist privately owned FED and IRS that they got installed in 1913 and then came the debt and wars and the hijacking of the foreign policy by the satanic zionists and the US gov was started on a down hill slide pushed started by the zionists!

    The trade policy of the zio/US has turned Russia into the largest grain exporter in the world and turned Russia into an agriculture miracle , this can be shown by watch videos of Russian agriculture on youtube. Germany is also in Russia building cars and other industrial products for Russia thus bypassing the zio/US trade sanctions and last but not least Russia is trading in non dollars in trade with more and more countries such as China thus effectively rendering the dollar non and void in international trade.

    So the people of the zio/US can thank their zionist masters for the demise of America and true to form the zionist parasites are killing their American host!

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @foolisholdman
  20. Anonymous[226] • Disclaimer says:

    Uncle Chang has only to wait it out. Another 20 years of open borders and we’ll be indistinguishable from the mestizo sh#thole of our southern conquerors.

    F Trump for betraying his base, and F his base for not screaming for the Orange Windbag’s head.

    • Agree: DESERT FOX
  21. Agent76 says:

    May 14, 2019 Trade Wars: The Truth About Tariffs

    Join Mike Maloney as he examines the latest moves in the US/China trade war, and visits some compelling arguments from the Foundation for Economic Education.

    Aug 26, 2015 How the West Re-colonized China

    The “Chinese dragon” of the last two decades may be faltering but it is still hailed by many as an economic miracle. Far from a great advance for Chinese workers, however, it is the direct result of a consolidation of power in the hands of a small clique of powerful families, families that have actively collaborated with Western financial oligarchs.

    • Replies: @Sean
  22. George says:

    “Threats are cheap, but Mr. Trump can’t really follow through without turning farmers, Wall Street and the stock market, Walmart and much of the IT sector against him at election time if his tariffs on China increase the cost of living and doing business. ”

    Tariffs are taxes and both governments like collecting taxes.

    Farmers. Farmers sell a commodity so if they cannot sell to China one result is they will sell to other customers while China buys more from other producers.

    Cost of living. DC does not care. There is a solid inflation lobby in the fed that supports increasing the cost of living.

    “Walmart and much of the IT sector against him.” I am not buying it.

    • Replies: @Wally
  23. When Trump had Prime Minister Xi of China at Mar Largo, he made sure to seal the deal for Ivanka’s businesses in China and didn’t do anything else. Trump, like all presidents, will leave office much, much, much richer than when he entered, because we live in a kleptocracy. Supported by the voting class, aka Zombie Morons.

    When the morons read the scribbling of economic hitman Hudson they believe in an alternate reality where a buffoon actually makes decisions about anything and their vote really, really matters. The US military destroyed the American working class – not China.

    • Agree: DESERT FOX, bluedog
  24. Miggle says:

    Trumpty Dumpty with or without his Wall will have a great fall.

  25. Wally says:

    “When Trump had Prime Minister Xi of China at Mar Largo, he made sure to seal the deal for Ivanka’s businesses in China and didn’t do anything else.”

    Proof?

    • Replies: @Incitatus
  26. Rogue says:
    @PeterMX

    Germany invented the jet

    Well, more accurate to say that Germany and Britain invented the jet engine independently of each other. Just as they both invented radar independently of each other as well.

    As it is, the post-war jet engine was based primarily on the British design of Frank Whittle, though some of the German ideas were also later incorporated.

    But, overall, the British design was superior.

    • Replies: @PeterMX
  27. Miggle says:
    @schrub

    It wasn’t the Chinese who hoodwinked the Americans, it was American financiers who hoodwinked the Americans.

  28. Wally says:
    @George

    “Threats are cheap, but Mr. Trump can’t really follow through without turning farmers, Wall Street and the stock market, Walmart and much of the IT sector against him at election time if his tariffs on China increase the cost of living and doing business. His diplomatic threat is really that the US will cut its own economic throat, imposing sanctions on its own importers and investors if China does not acquiesce.”

    Hypocrisy.

    The same can be said about the huge Chinese tariffs hurting it’s people.

    But no, old Communists like Hudson will say whatever is necessary to protect his comrades.

    I say tit for tat.
    China, you want trade with the US? Great. Then remove your massive tariffs and we’ll remove our much smaller retaliatory tariffs.

    • Replies: @Thinking Out Loud
  29. anonymous[204] • Disclaimer says:

    The the progressive audience:

    The site ANTIWAR.COM is a US government front who spread propaganda to fool the illiterate dumb Americans for a war against Iran to benefit Israel. All these site including
    lobeblog.com are run by the Jewish mafia propagandist with different style of propaganda. The following garbage has been posted at Anitwar.com

    Why would Iran attack two tankers near the Strait of Hormuz?

    https://www.militarytimes.com/flashpoints/2019/06/13/why-would-iran-attack-two-tankers-near-the-strait-of-hormuz/

    The attack on tankers ARE NOT IRAN’S RESPONSIBILITIES, but the work of the criminal jewish mafia and their traitor stooge TRUMP.

    The attack on tankers, many believe, is by United Arab Emirates or Israel to force Iran to surrender, meaning accept NEGOTIATION where Iran, rightfully, refuses because Iran already has done that.

    The traitor Trump knows that. The only is either to force this traitor out or remove him from the page of history by ANY MEANS.

    Don’t trust ANITWAR.COM OR LOBEBLOG.COM

    Both are Jewish mafia propagandists, with different style, where are spreading lies of the US government, the biggest terrorist in the history of the planet.

  30. Yee says:

    Without re-making rules for the financial sector, problems of the US will not be solved, even if China would open for looting.

    It’ll only make the financial capital more powerful and more greedy. Perhaps even worse, because more industrial capital will be seduced to enter financial sector.

  31. China should sanction Walmart. They should suspend all shipments to Walmart into the foreseeable future. That would get the MAGA crowd’s attention for sure. It might even send a weak signal into Trump’s brain that threats can operate both ways.

    Also, I’d like to see some world ‘leader’ simply tell the US to shove it, in so many word; a big middle finger to US ‘diplomacy’ which is in fact just naked aggression. Germany should tell the US to get all its military out of the country. Turkey should get out of NATO and close the Incirlik air base. South Korea should form their own deal with the DPRK independent of DC, etc. At some point some entity will be rude enough to tell the truth and that will open the flood gates to others following suit. The US will then be shown as the naked emperor.

    • Replies: @Sam J.
  32. @nsa

    nsa, you are so right, so true, so un-jew

  33. nickels says:

    I like commies like Hudson usually, as they tend to have a solid critique of neoliberalism and the financialization of western economies, but their mantra always seems to go off the rails when it comes to trade and national issues:

    GLOBALISM IS KILLING US!!!
    WHAT WE NEED IS MORE GLOBALISM!!!!

    The simple fact is that de-industrialization cannot stand, and will not stand. It is an economic impossibility. Labor is the only source of wealth and the absence of labor means we are running on fumes.
    Now one might certainly critique Drumpf on how he is going about things (America’s own companies and offshoring are the main enemy), but the sort of left field attack we see here on economic nationalism seems to fall rather flat.

  34. @Atalanta

    The US has enough rare earth minerals if only the laws would allow for their exploitation. Rare earth minerals are also tied up with Thorium mining restrictions. The nuclear industry doesn’t want Thorium to produce the next generation of reactor that no longer relies on their outdated technology. It’s corporate greed keeping LFTR tech from happening in the US.

    LFTR – look it up. It’s nuclear that’s safe and clean. So clean in fact that it can use the existing ‘spent fuel’ as a source of energy while simultaneously eliminating if from inventory.

  35. The tariff war was started by China 40 years ago. All china has to do to end the “war” is lower their tariff. Trump should just match China tariffs and be done with it.

    • Replies: @Herald
  36. sally says:

    Are you by chance a Rhodes Scholar?
    Recall the First Zionist congress Switzerland, 1897.. consider the intrigue that preceded that global organizational success ??

    I would love to hear you answer to the question What did the fine upstanding *&%$#&* Cecil Rhodes (died 1902 and left his fortune to the care of his banker, guess who?) .. contribute to Zionism.

    Zionism has proven itself, it is the tool that has weaponized immigration and developed the methods, know how, knowledge and experience to invade and take over nation states.. and to pit one nation state against another and to divide the people of the world to make them prey for conquest by the Zionist ?

    Can you name the 200 or so that were at the first congress?

    The Habiru at Salonika ~1908 (can’t remember the date exactly of the fire) when the Ottoman burned them out.. Recall the Hibiru at Salonika were decedents of Jewish immigrants forced from Spain 1392 and Portugal 1401 . The Hibiru in those two countries where engaged in every kind of racket (trade) you could name all over the world , but they had no where to go,, …only the Ottoman would deal with them and allowed them to continue their economy from Salonika ( a place at the crossroads of the East and the West at the top of the Med.).. yet the Zionist, organized in 1897, used propaganda, infiltrated the Ottoman army and organized the Young Turks against the Ottoman.. seeking to remove the Ottoman from their oil rich empire. Why because the Ottoman were sharing their oil with the Germans, and the Germans not the British, French and Italians were encouraged to build railroads through the empire. 1/2 of the disbursed went to NYC (NYC changed from Iris majority to Jewish majority) and the other half went to St. Petersburg, Russia (Wonder why?).. which eventually lead to the Federal Reserve Act, the imposition of income taxes on Americans, WWI, massive immigration into Palestine, the Balfour Agreement, and the replacement of the Catholic Czar with Lenin’s communist bunch.
    Follow the succession of presidents and Czars and read their acts.. and encouragements <= this stream of events happened in invisible sync, executed with military like precision and occurred with nearly unlimited access to needed financing, across nations, over oceans: by land, by sea and by air. How did this happen? The Zionist Congress in Switzerland set it in motion in a series of parallel happening implementations.. .

    Still I would like your take on Cecil Rhodes?

    • Replies: @DESERT FOX
  37. @schrub

    The likes of poster schrub, reminds me of someone that reads to many comic books and still lives with his mommy

  38. Junior says:

    After all, he is helping to bring Eurasia together, driving China and Russia into an alliance with neighboring counties, reaching out to Europe.

    Utter bullshit. Trump is doing the exact opposite. Apparently the author wants to pretend that BRICS wasn’t formed and that they weren’t already trying to bring the neighboring countries from the ASEAN group into the fold until after Trump’s tariff threats.

    Trump has been busy dismantling BRICS by bringing Brazil and India and the ASEAN countries closer into America’s sphere of influence and interests. Meanwhile the author and others of his ilk have been busy whining about about a President who is actually trying to do something about trade imbalance.

  39. China realizes that Americans are now just Dunning-Kruger Retards (basically women) and will just let the CIA Mockingbird Media fight Trump for them – and remove him in 2020. The USA only has the gun-backed Dollar propping it up now. The Chinese snubbed Obama back in 2016 for a reason.

  40. PeterMX says:
    @Rogue

    No. Germany had the first operational jet and the US and others got the technology after the war. I’m aware the British developed a jet engine at the same time, but they didn’t have a jet. Germany’s jets beginning in 1944 were fully operational when at best, if they even had one (and I never heard they did), the British were in the testing phase. If I’m wrong and the British had a jet, show me a film of it. Here are Germany’s jets in action. They are 150 mph faster than anything the allies had. The commentator calls it the first operational jet.

    • Replies: @Rogue
    , @Rogue
    , @Sam J.
  41. Herald says:
    @FeelTheBern

    That was quick and easy, the trade war solved in two short sentences. You should run for president.

    • Replies: @FeelTheBern
  42. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Incitatus

    World: trade DEFICIT -$795.7 billion; up 10.4% from 2017

    Let it rip. And let the dollar dive. See how well the Chinese and other cheap labor jurisdictions compete then.

    The most fundamental economic challenge for the US and other Western nations is cheap labor competition combined with economic factor mobility. As long as the globalist Corpos. are free to move capital and technology to where labor is cheapest and where environmental and workplace health and safety standards are lowest the industrial base of the Western nations will continue to wither and die, and with it the means of territorial defense.

    What is pathetic about Trump’s trade policy is the failure to protect domestic industry and the industrial work force through the imposition of an all encompassing tariff wall. Tariffs on China will benefit American industry little if at all, since the cheap labor crowd will just move their operations from China to Vietnam, Bangladesh, Indonesia, etc. Meantime, American workforce skills die, as do the incentives for young people to study engineering and other hard subjects, and for the entrepreneurial to invest the time and savings in home-based industrial start-ups.

    The dream of the Anglo-American elite has been to rule the world by financial means. But the Chinese have already figured out the few mundane tricks of swindling that underlie the banking racket. Moreover, with a bigger real economy than the US, China can out-swindle the Anglo-American Money Power at its own game.

    The only hope for the Western nations is to re-industrialize behind a tariff wall, while rewarding intellectual achievement and entrepreneurial initiative. That means chucking out the entire bureaucratic-PC-bullshit education system beginning with Harvard and ending with crap inner city schools and setting up a meritocratic education system where kids that learn fast and well are recognized for their achievement and effort (not their bloody meaningless IQ): you know, have kids ranked and recognized by merit and promoted at public expense to the best schools.

    At the same time, to generate greater entrepreneurial effort, the income tax should be abolished and replaced by a 1% capital tax. Taxing Buffet, Gates and Bezos a billion or two a year won’t halt their money-making efforts in the least. But freeing the little guy with an idea from the imposition of income tax will transform the economy.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
    , @Incitatus
    , @Miro23
  43. @sally

    Cecil Rhodes was a peophile!

  44. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @CanSpeccy

    In addition to a tariff, there must, of course, be a break-up of the monopolies thereby to create a fiercely competitive internal market. Bye-bye Google, FaceBook, Apple, MicroSoft, Ford, GM, Boeing, etc. Break them up and make the pieces compete not only with one another but with a whole bunch of startups.

  45. Agent76 says:
    @anonymous

    You might as well go live in a cave. I read everything from numorus sources and recommend you do the same.

    September 21, 2015 Blame America? No, Blame Neocons!

    It has become common to discount any criticism of US foreign policy as “blaming America first.” It is a convenient way of avoiding a real discussion. If aggressive US policy in the Middle East – for example in Iraq – results in the creation of terrorist organizations like al-Qaeda in Iraq, is pointing out the unintended consequences of bad policy blaming America?

    http://original.antiwar.com/paul/2015/09/20/blame-america-no-blame-neocons/

    • Replies: @anonymous
  46. @nsa

    Trumpstein, I like that, how appropriate.

    China is wise to the ways of the Jews, which is why they are expanding trade with Europe, Russsia and the rest of Asia, areas that are not directly under the control of the Jews like US & UK:

    https://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-us-china-trade-stalemate-20190531-story.html

    Instead, a member of the Chinese Politburo harangued them for almost an hour, describing the U.S.-China relationship as a “clash of civilizations” and boasting that China’s government-controlled system was far superior to the “Mediterranean culture” of the West, with its internal divisions and aggressive foreign policy.

    The Chinese are fully aware they are dealing with Israel’s vessel state.

    • Replies: @Thinking Out Loud
    , @Anon
  47. A government-controlled “Borg Collective” is always the right thing to do.

  48. @Junior

    Trump has been busy dismantling BRICS by bringing Brazil and India and the ASEAN countries closer into America’s sphere of influence and interests.

    Not really. No one cares about BRICS, it’s a joke, a meaningless acronym started by a Wall Street trader. These countries are as far apart economically, culturally and politically as you can imagine.

    Meanwhile, ASEAN is inextricably intertwined with China culturally and economically. They may gripe about China every now and then, and the US media is doing its best to stir up shite between China and all its neighbors to try to isolate China, but mostly ASEAN countries are happy to do business and get rich with China. Trump’s cancellation of the TPP didn’t exactly warm these countries to the US. Mahathir of Malaysia despises the Jews and have been wise to their greedy, wreckless ways since the 90’s.

    • Replies: @Junior
  49. @schrub

    How could a person be so wrong about everything?

    This is more than ignorance, although it includes ignorance.

    This is even more wrong than Hudson himself.

    The economic fact is that a country exports in order to import. The historical fact is that it was the loosening of state control, not its expansion, that brought prosperity to the world, for reasons well known and enunciated by generations of economists during that age of increasing prosperity, now ignored because the state has once again become the tool for favoritism that so called liberals and conservatives fight over.

    It is so hard to understand that a country tends to do better with free trade even if everyone else in the world is protectionist.

    Because you export in order to import.

    • Replies: @Futurethirdworlder
  50. @Herald

    Yes…USA matching Chinese tariffs will push economic growth into south korea, vietnam, japan, india, mexico, brazil…A much better situation.

  51. EdNels says:

    It’s way late in the game for Tariffs to do any good. That was 40 years ago, when the Japnese cars and TVs etc. and other high manufactured (replacement) goods started to ramp up. But it was seen as opportunity to grab some easy profits on the differential prices paid rather than to protect native industry, like historic when they made a big deal on Steel tariffs back in the 60’s, much less any real Tariff action like in the school books from earlier times…

    But Wall street extorted American manufacturing to off shore or get ”Green mailed” or put out of business if they don’t through lots of different financial tricks, and the ”good guys” who would have held on and stayed and continued a strong American based industry were wiped out with the help of easy money… print as much as needed to do what is wanted to do, no object, crooks took over, now America is screwed as far as the peeps go. I mean somebody ought to say this nice an pretty too…!

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
  52. renfro says:

    On the way to hot war…..same lying liars as before.

    Japanese Ship Owner Contradicts US Officials on Tanker Attack
    Trump Reiterates Pompeo’s Claims, Britain Agrees With US Assessment
    Dave DeCamp/ Posted on June 14, 2019/Categories News

    The owner of the Japanese tanker that was attacked on Thursday in the Gulf of Oman, the Kokuka Outrageous, contradicted the US military’s claims about the attack. Central Command reported that the two tankers were hit with limpet mines, a type of mine that is attached to the hull of a ship below the waterline using magnets. But Yutaka Katada, the owner of the Kokuka Outrageous, said he received reports a projectile hit the ship.

    “We received reports that something flew towards the ship,” Katada said at a press conference, “The place where the projectile landed was significantly higher than the water level, so we are absolutely sure that this wasn’t a torpedo. I do not think there was a time bomb or an object attached to the side of the ship.”

    US Central Command released a grainy black and white video of a boat alongside a ship, claiming it was an Iranian patrol boat removing a limpet mine from the Kokuka Outrageous, the claim being they were getting rid of the evidence. The video does not conclusively prove anything, as it is hard to tell what the boat is doing. Iranian state media said Iran rescued the crew of both tankers, so the video could have just been a recording of the rescue efforts.

    In an interview with Fox and Friends Friday morning, President Trump blamed Iran for the attacks on the tankers. Trump cited the video as proof, “Well Iran did do it, and you know they did it because you saw the boat. I guess one of the mines didn’t explode and it’s probably got essentially Iran written all over it.”

  53. Rogue says:
    @PeterMX

    No, you need to do more research.

    The British, specifically Frank Whittle, came up with a jet-engine design completely independent of the Germans.

    The British air ministry were a bunch of blinkered fossils who weren’t interested in pushing Whittle’s ideas, and primarily for that reason the Germans were able to test a jet-aircraft prototype well before the British. Actually, even the USA tested a jet-plane prototype before the British with kindly donated British technology.

    That the Germans were more adventurous in this and other fields is almost certainly due to the restrictions placed upon them by the treaty of Versailles – and the mindset of insecurity even when said treaty was repudiated by the National Socialist German state.

    Fact: the British design became the main basis for post-war jet engine technology. Of course, elements of the German design would also be incorporated.

    Frank whittle is considered the “father” of the jet engine. Now, I could be wrong, but I don’t think this has anything to do with who won the Second World War.

    The highly successful Soviet Mig 15’s in the Korean war used almost identical engines to the British jet engines of 1945.

    Anyway, I was making a mild correction to your original comment and not stating a fundamental disagreement.

    • Replies: @voicum
    , @Sam J.
  54. Anon[134] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thinking Out Loud

    You know how the US MSM distort or mislead or lie? This article is a good example of that. After reading the article, some might think that the aggressive Chinese were out of their mind or did this out of blue.

    The fact is that they just merely responded to the comment of Dr. Kiron Skinner, director of policy planning at the State Department.

    Instead, a member of the Chinese Politburo harangued them for almost an hour, describing the U.S.-China relationship as a “clash of civilizations

    The article didn’t mention Dr. Skinner at all. Here is what Dr. Skinner said:

    “This is a fight with a really different civilization, and a different ideology, and the United States hasn’t had that before. I think it’s also striking that it’s the first time that we will have a great power competitor that is not Caucasian.”

    • Replies: @Thinking Out Loud
  55. Rogue says:
    @PeterMX

    Britain had operational jets during WWII.

    They weren’t as good as the ME262 it’s fair to say – because of the airframe design – not because of the engines.

    The Gloster Meteor flew operationally in 1944 for the first time.

  56. Incitatus says:
    @Wally

    GI: “When Trump had Prime Minister Xi of China at Mar Largo, he made sure to seal the deal for Ivanka’s businesses in China and didn’t do anything else.”
    Wally: “Proof?”

    Good question! Thank God for Wally!

    GI is wrong. DJT’s main emphasis was:

    “I was sitting at the table, we had finished dinner,” Trump told Fox Business host Maria Bartiromo. “We’re now having dessert—and we had the most beautiful piece of chocolate cake that you’ve ever seen—and President Xi was enjoying it.”

    https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2017/04/trump-syria-chocolate-cake-mar-a-lago/

    Footnote: Trump had just launched “incredible” missile strikes on a Syria.

    MAGA!

  57. @schrub

    Inclined to agree, but the tariffs seem likely merely to move factory jobs from China to other countries where labor and enviro costs are much lower than the USA.

    We would need a substantial tariff, or a border-adjusted federal sales tax or VAT, on ALL foreign goods, not just China’s, to induce companies to move factories back here instead of to the Philippines, Vietnam, and Mexico.

    • Replies: @Thinking Out Loud
  58. @anonymous

    I went to antiwar.com and I see these headlines:

    Buchanan: Russiagate is No Watergate
    Tanker Owner Contradicts US Over Attack
    End America’s Illegal Occupation of Syria Now
    Rand Paul Condemns Arm Sales to Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar
    Putin: US-Russia ties getting worse by the hour

    I think they are more balanced than Breitbart, which is a straight-up Zionist mouthpiece.

  59. @Anon

    Actually the article did mention Kiron Skinner later on and quoted those exact words from her.

    The irony is Kiron Skinner is a black woman. I thought I was listening to a Jew.

    I’m disgusted that she twisted the words of the great Samuel Huntington to justify the JWO. Huntington divided the world into 8 “civilizations” (Western, Orthodox, Sinic, Islamic, Japanese, Latin American, Indian and African) in his amazing book Clash of Civilizations, and warned specifically that the US needs to stick to the Western Civilization, eschew multiculturalism, and avoid meddling into the affairs of all other civilizations. I am amazed that Kiron Skinner could read the same book and use it as justification to wage wars against other civilizations — because “they are not like us.”

    It’s just like Pompeo shamelessly twisting the words of George Washington about not having any special relationship with any other nation so we are not enslaved by it, and claimed that GW meant we should have such a relationship with Israel. It’s simply mind boggling how shameless and twisted these Ziocon warmongers are.

    • Replies: @Anon
  60. @RadicalCenter

    That might be true, but it takes time to move factories, and also cost money. Just today 600 companies including Costco, Walmart and Target wrote a letter to Trump warning him that additional tariffs would cost prices to rise, costing each American family $2,000 per year. Frankly that was lower than I thought.

    I honestly have mixed feelings about this trade war. On the one hand I agree with Trump that either everyone has tariffs, or no one has tariffs. You could say that countries that impose tariffs hurt their own people, but they also protect certain industries and keep the jobs at home. It’s good to be self-sufficient. And what happens when goods are more expensive? We consume less. It’s a good thing. We all need to consume less. How many cheap plastic toys does each American kid need?

    On the other hand I’m not sure what the end goal is. If it is to bring home manufacturing, I used to think that’s good, but I’m not so sure anymore. In order to keep prices competitive, we would have to lower labor cost, which means we would have to bring a lot of cheap labor into this country, i.e. more 3rd world immigration. As Trump told us, he wants to see “the largest number ever” of immigrants to come in, because “we are bringing all these jobs back”. Maybe it’s better to keep these jobs and their cheap labor overseas.

    • Replies: @Amon
    , @Twodees Partain
  61. @Sam J.

    I think what you have left out of account in your thinking is the effect of the bankers in the USA lending money to drive up the price of buildings and land. This means that in order to pay for the cost of the factories, warehouses, houses for the workers, roads ports….you name it, the cost of goods manufactured in the USA cannot compete with the cost of the same goods manufactured in China, let alone in India, Vietnam, Indonesia or the Philippines even if the US industry were completely automated. If you want a beautifully clear explanation of what I am trying to say watch Prof Werner on YouTube.

  62. renfro says:

    Who’s paying Jared and for what?

    Want to secretly, legally send money to Jared Kushner? Here’s how to do it.

    By Anne Applebaum
    Columnist
    June 13 at 6:14 PM

    [MORE]

    Imagine there was a completely secret, perfectly legal way to bribe a government official. Well, let’s not say “bribe”: Let’s imagine that you could channel money to this official — large amounts of money — and never have to reveal your name. Imagine that this official could accept this money, and then use it to make more money, without ever revealing that fact to the public.

    Actually, there is no need to imagine such a thing, because it already exists. The thing is called an “opaque offshore vehicle.” Although that sounds like a motorboat with blackout curtains, this one is in fact a kind of bank account, based in the Cayman Islands, a tax haven where business deals are legally shrouded in secrecy. According to a report this week in the British newspaper the Guardian, Goldman Sachs, the investment bank, uses an account like this to funnel money from unnamed investors to a company called Cadre. Cadre, to oversimplify slightly, pools investments in real estate. One of Cadre’s co-founders is Jared Kushner; another co-founder is Kushner’s brother. Cadre’s headquarters are in a building in Manhattan owned by Kushner’s family real estate company.

    Kushner — the United States’ prime envoy to the Middle East, to Mexico and to much else — seems to be nervous about Cadre. When he joined the White House, he resigned from the board and reduced his stake to less than 25 percent, though his holding is, according to the Guardian, now worth between $25 million and $50 million. When he filled out his first disclosure form, he somehow forgot to list Cadre, though later, under pressure, he added the company’s name. His forgetfulness is unsurprising: Other investors in the company include George Soros, a hate figure of the right. The company is already the subject of a conflict of interest complaint because it benefits from “Opportunity Zones,” part of a new tax law — a program that was specifically advocated by Ivanka Trump.

    Now the Guardian reports that $90 million has come into Cadre via the opaque offshore vehicle. But from where? According to the report, which has not had much of an echo in the United States, at least $1 million has come from an unnamed Saudi investor. Other investments have arrived from an anonymous fund based in the Virgin Islands, another tax haven where business deals are shrouded in secrecy. Who is the real owner of this fund? We don’t know.

    We don’t know and, thanks to the extraordinary system of tax havens and shell companies that we have allowed to flourish all around the world, we may never know. Shell companies can be owned by other shell companies; opaque offshore vehicles are carefully designed so that regulators can’t identify who is using them; with the right accountants, they can be set up quickly and easily. As Oliver Bullough puts it in his book, “Moneyland,” “You can wrap a paper chain of paper people around the world in an afternoon, but it will take investigators years of patient detective work to unpick it, and years more to prosecute.”

    It’s perfectly possible that Kushner, who has not commented on the Guardian report, himself has no idea who put this large sum of money in his company’s opaque offshore vehicle, which is what Goldman Sachs is claiming. But it’s also possible that, privately, he has a pretty good idea. The fact that we don’t know, and may never know, points to yet another deep conflict of interest inside the Trump administration. More important, it points to a major flaw in Western capitalism.

    By some calculations, more than 10 percent of the world’s wealth is held offshore, in places such as the Cayman Islands.Some of this money is obtained illegally, which is why it is hidden; some of it is just money that is not taxed to pay for the schools that educated its owners or the infrastructure that was used to build their companies. This is money that can be used for political purposes or simply for the excessive spending — on yachts, mansions, jewelry — that has contributed to so much anger and ill will around the world.

    There is nothing inevitable about this secret, offshore world. It is not a fact of nature: Our laws created tax havens, and our laws can also end them. We could forbid Goldman Sachs from owning opaque offshore vehicles. We could prevent companies such as Cadre from accepting anonymous investments. Not only that, my guess is that the politician who decides to do so will discover that this is a popular cause, among not only those fighting inequality on the center-left but also those promoting entrepreneurship on the center-right. There is no reason a completely secret, perfectly legal way to channel money to a government official, or anybody else, needs to exist at all. The fact that we have come to accept this as “normal” is one of the symptoms of a deeper democratic disease.

  63. @PeterMX

    Germany invented the jet,

    Frank Whittle, an Englishman, took out a patent (or maybe more than one) on the gas turbine in 1933.

    Typically, the British government did not get interested in it until part-way into WW2.

  64. @renfro

    Pompeo is full of shite as usual. The US might even be the one to send off the torpedo.

    The bombing achieved its aim. The Senate today voted down Rand Paul’s bill to block sale of arms to Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Qatar. Just 2 days ago the bill was gaining support, then the attack happened, and several GOP senators switched their vote. The sale will go through, thanks to the bombing, whatever it takes to prop up the Military Industrial Complex:

    https://news.antiwar.com/2019/06/13/us-senate-upholds-arms-sales-to-bahrain-and-qatar/

    There needs to be an independent investigation into this bombing. The US can no longer be trusted to carry out such an investigation. Russia, Germany and China should jointly conduct the investigation. Btw Japanese PM also said today that Iran has no plans for nuclear proliferation, directly contradicting Netanyahu’s “intelligence”.

  65. Bass says:

    Wow. The quote from LA times pretty much spells it out. Didn’t realize they were talking that frankly at the diplomatic levels.

    This means things are changing quicker than anticipated. By changing I mean the decline of the West is happening quicker than the Chinese (and probably others) anticipated.

  66. Junior says:
    @Thinking Out Loud

    No one cares about BRICS, it’s a joke, a meaningless acronym started by a Wall Street trader.

    Interesting that a meaningless acronym has been holding summits for the past decade with the leaders of all the BRICS countries at the summits agreeing to form a BRICS Development Bank and trying to figure out ways to replace the dollar as the global reserve currency. Meaningless?

    And interestingly enough, it appears that China might be backing away from BRICS if their recent lack of participation at a recent BRICS conference is an early indicator. Trump’s maximum pressure seems to be working as China appears to not be taking to kindly to Trump fostering relationships with Brazil’s Bolsanaro and India’s Modi. It’s the exact same strategy that Trump has been using with the ASEAN countries as he attempts to form tight personal bonds with their leaders by making visiting them all personally a top priority.

    https://thediplomat.com/2019/05/chinas-curious-absence-from-a-brics-business-conference/

  67. Anon[134] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thinking Out Loud

    Okay. There was no mention of Dr. Skinner when I read the article a couple weeks ago. It must be added later on. I don’t know if all the comments are left untouched. There were only a few comments when I read it, and I wrote about Dr. Skinner to a commenter who riled up about that.

  68. @Wally

    China, you want trade with the US? Great. Then remove your massive tariffs and we’ll remove our much smaller retaliatory tariffs.

    It’s a lot more than just tariffs. The US sent China a list of 142 items that they want China to comply with. These include:

    1) Halting IP theft and technology transfer requirement from US companies operating in China
    2) Stop subsidizing the high tech industry that’s vital to China’s strategic growth
    3) Stop complaining when US bans China from investing in US tech firms, just shut up and accept
    4) Allow US to invest in Chinese tech firms and other critical industries
    5) Withdraw the WTO complaint that US labels China a “non-market economy” that justifies the tariffs
    6) Reduce trade deficit with US by $200B by 2020

    There is also something that pertains to clarifying ownership of Chinese companies, what % owned by Chinese government etc. and perhaps demands for those companies to sever those relationships to do business with US.

    • Replies: @Wally
  69. alexander says:
    @renfro

    Are people really “sending money” to Jared ?

    • Replies: @renfro
  70. @renfro

    Something real Mueller could’ve looked into, instead of the Russian hoax.

    I’m all for anything that will take down Javanka and boot them out of the WH.

    • Replies: @DESERT FOX
  71. Incitatus says:
    @CanSpeccy

    Interesting post, thanks.

    “The most fundamental economic challenge for the US and other Western nations is cheap labor competition combined with economic factor mobility. As long as the globalist Corpos. are free to move capital and technology to where labor is cheapest and where environmental and workplace health and safety standards are lowest the industrial base of the Western nations will continue to wither and die, and with it the means of territorial defense.”

    Agree it’s a vital challenge. There are many – e.g. miserably expensive/substandard/dysfunctional US health care, totally out-of-control/corrupt defense industry, etc.

    The process is not just an international ‘race to the bottom’, but a similar domestic strip-tease in the US, where corporations extort tax exemptions, direct subsidies, and labor/environmental blindness from eager host states.

    Amazon not only evades taxes: it receives a multi-million dollar subsidy. Why?

    Corporate Feudalism? Anciene Régime?

    “The only hope for the Western nations is to re-industrialize behind a tariff wall, while rewarding intellectual achievement and entrepreneurial initiative.”

    Don’t necessarily disagree. Most of US historic growth depended on industry protected by tariffs that funded government. But re-industrialization is oft likely to include (human job-killer) automation (subsidized in the tax code). How do we account for that?

    Another problem, if I read Hudson correctly (not saying I do), is rewarding financial services [speculation] more than productive enterprise.

    “the United States has lost its competitive industrial advantage and become a high-cost rentier economy. Its GDP is “empty,” consisting mainly of the Finance, Insurance and Real Estate (FIRE) rents, profits and capital gains while the nation’s infrastructure decays and its labor is reduced to a prat-time “gig” economy.”

    Brill’s ‘Preditors’ Ball’, ‘Barbarians at the Gate’, ‘Den of Thieves’ and many other works were ample warning from the 80s on. Those least responsible for production profited the most.

    To say nothing of insider pirates like William E. Simon [SecTreas ’74-77], who (after-office) borrowed cheap money to buy and break up companies. Many in that ‘entrepreneurial’ class promised to ‘unlock hidden value’ as they raided their targets pension funds to defraud workers and force them to finance their own ruin.

    On the finance side? Junk-bond king/felon Michael Milken. Later (appropriately) founder of the Prostate Cancer Foundation (“84 cents of every dollar donated goes to our prostate cancer research mission”). No worry, Milken retained a modest $3.7 billion in net worth after fines and jail time].

    Nothing personal for/against Trump, but his rise to power (‘debt is good’, ‘I’m the king of debt’) and POTUS seems a legacy of corruption. Four+ bankruptcies? A generation ago, that would’ve killed political aspiration. Were our parent’s right?

    “That means chucking out the entire bureaucratic-PC-bullshit education system beginning with Harvard and ending with crap inner city schools and setting up a meritocratic education system where kids that learn fast and well are recognized for their achievement and effort (not their bloody meaningless IQ): you know, have kids ranked and recognized by merit and promoted at public expense to the best schools.”

    What a wonderful statement.

    Agree, but there are many conditions. Don’t worry about Harvard: it’s a [tax-exempt] business, as most in Cambridge might affirm. It’s had one too many bites of the apple [i.e. it’s political]. Agree completely on IQ and other stupid ‘tests’. Achievement is key. The record [what have you done] should rule.

    “to generate greater entrepreneurial effort, the income tax should be abolished and replaced by a 1% capital tax. Taxing Buffet, Gates and Bezos a billion or two a year won’t halt their money-making efforts in the least. But freeing the little guy with an idea from the imposition of income tax will transform the economy.”

    All for entertaining alternatives to support government (defense, infrastructure, legal protection, etc.). It has everything to do with posterity and sustainability. Payed in my life combined tax well over 40%. Don’t begrudge it, if it buys tomorrow for me and my children.

    No objection to taxing pirate Gates (if -after raping North America and most of the world – he’s not too busy saving souls on the dark continent). Or Bezos.

    Buffet, sems a bit different. He’s admitted he should pay more than his secretary. What a guy!

    What about Walton heirs (Asia’s biggest customer, shipping cheap goods back tariff-free)? Think our insane ME energy policy has something to do with daily dispatch of container ships serving the pre-eminent ‘consumer economy’?

    “break-up…monopolies thereby to create a fiercely competitive internal market. Bye-bye Google, FaceBook, Apple, MicroSoft, Ford, GM, Boeing, etc. Break them up and make the pieces compete not only with one another but with a whole bunch of startups.”

    You may well be right. Well past my expertise.

    Recall the AT&T divorce, dealt since with an orphan that seemed just as insatiable as the parent.

    Corporate Feudalism?

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
    , @CanSpeccy
    , @Miro23
  72. Great article as usual by Prof. Hudson.

  73. @renfro

    Tillerson was right , Trump is a f##king moron and a judas goat leading America into the kosher slaughter house for Israel!

  74. @renfro

    In my opinion , Kushner is mossad and Trumps handler for Israel!

    • Replies: @renfro
  75. @Thinking Out Loud

    Agree, and kick out all the rest of the dual Israelis who inhabit the swamp, the zio/US gov is filled up with these Israeli traitors!

  76. slorter says:

    Great article!

    What did the Chinese do thirty years ago, they made a decision, a strategic economic development decision
    They were going to do what the Soviet Union couldn’t and didn’t do they were not going to hitch their store and there hope to go from being a poor backward country to becoming an industrial powerhouse.

    They were going do it by becoming an exporting company, they were going do it by producing cheaply better quality than the West was producing for itself and they knew they could not do that by themselves they needed two things which they didn’t have:

    One the technology to produce efficiently cheaply and number two entry, because it’s one thing to produce the stuff you have to distribute it, you have to get a way to get your better cheaper stuff into the markets, that the mass of people with money go to.

    The Chinese decision therefore meant they had to cut a deal with the West, they had to cut a deal to acquire the technology and to acquire the distribution system.

    Here’s how they did that, they invited companies in Britain, German companies, Japanese companies and American and Canadian companies to come.

    They said to them very explicitly we are going to provide you with cheaper labor than you ever dreamed, you would have not just cheap but well-educated disciplined, used to working hard work and we will take care of all of that.

    Number two as we develop our economy we will give you entree to sell your products here in China you get the workers and you get the market but the deal was we get the technology; nobody’s stealing anything, no American company had to go there and no one had a gun to their head.

    These companies climbed over themselves to sell out the workers of their country in the best of neoliberal tradition!

    • Replies: @Miro23
    , @Parfois1
  77. Miro23 says:
    @CanSpeccy

    Let it rip. And let the dollar dive. See how well the Chinese and other cheap labor jurisdictions compete then.

    The dollar has an artificially high value from its reserve status. Arguably the real value is 50% lower, which would quickly change outsourcing calculations (and wreck corporate profits).

    The most fundamental economic challenge for the US and other Western nations is cheap labor competition combined with economic factor mobility. As long as the globalist Corps. are free to move capital and technology to where labor is cheapest and where environmental and workplace health and safety standards are lowest the industrial base of the Western nations will continue to wither and die, and with it the means of territorial defense.

    Exactly.

    What is pathetic about Trump’s trade policy is the failure to protect domestic industry and the industrial work force through the imposition of an all encompassing tariff wall. Tariffs on China will benefit American industry little if at all, the cheap labor crowd will just move their operations from China to Vietnam, Bangladesh, Indonesia, etc. Meantime, American workforce skills die, as do the incentives for young people to study engineering and other hard subjects…

    True enough.

    The only hope for the Western nations is to re-industrialize behind a tariff wall, while rewarding intellectual achievement and entrepreneurial initiative. That means chucking out the entire bureaucratic-PC-bullshit education system beginning with Harvard and ending with crap inner city schools and setting up a meritocratic education system where kids that learn fast and well are recognized for their achievement and effort (not their bloody meaningless IQ): you know, have kids ranked and recognized by merit and promoted at public expense to the best schools.

    Also critically important.

    In addition to a tariff, there must, of course, be a break-up of the monopolies thereby to create a fiercely competitive internal market. Bye-bye Google, FaceBook, Apple, MicroSoft…

    Agreed. They’re the modern water and electricity companies.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  78. bluedog says:
    @Junior

    That’s strange for I was just reading this morning that India is moving much closer to Russia and China,Trump is a looser but we knew that before the election by simply looking at his background which resembles more of a mob family then again else, endless loss’s endless banruptcies,Trump ain’t dismantling jack shit except that now more countries hate us then before he took office, as he runs around sanctioning this or that, tariffs that don’t work and never will at least not in these times, while he spews forth his endless lies that rattles around that endless space where most peoples brains are.!!!

    • Replies: @Junior
  79. Anon[424] • Disclaimer says:

    What to say . We , the europeans have run the world for about 500 years , in the last 200 years
    the anglosaxons have run the show . But other cultures have learnt from us , they are doing well , even they are surpassing us , and we have to recognize that we are in a panic , spetially the anglosaxon masters .

    Maybe we europeans should do some self criticism , we have done wonderful things , great achievements . We have a great history . But we have to recognize that now we are in severe decadence . Maybe we should quietly and humbly ask ourselves why have we arrived to this point ,and see if we we want , and if we can , revigorate ourselves .

    • Replies: @Sam J.
  80. The great race to waste non renewable resources on useless trinkets as fast as possible is on. It does not matter who is winning because at this time neither China, nor USA or Russia or anyone else has anything alternative to offer.

    • Replies: @Parfois1
  81. Miro23 says:
    @slorter

    These companies climbed over themselves to sell out the workers of their country in the best of neoliberal tradition!

    It’s corporate profitability ahead on national interest. Hence the “World is Flat” argument and globalist efficiency dogma. Referencing Comparative Advantage – but ignoring the fact that Ricardo was dealing with cloth from England and wine from Portugal – not electronics and everything else from Asia.

  82. Agent76 says:

    November 24, 2017 America’s Enemies, Who’s On the List? Prospects and Perspectives

    For almost 2 decades, the US pursued a list of ‘enemy countries’ to confront, attack, weaken and overthrow.

    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/48275.htm

  83. voicum says:
    @Rogue

    The jet engine principle were discovered by Henry Coanda at the early 1900 .

    • Replies: @Biff
  84. It would have been Cold War 2.0 if the adversaries were on similar trajectories. As it is, it’s death throes of desperate dying Empire.

  85. Sean says:
    @Agent76

    Far from a great advance for Chinese workers, however, it is the direct result of a consolidation of power in the hands of a small clique of powerful families, families that have actively collaborated with Western financial oligarchs.

    If you are looking at international politics then the relevant thing is hardly domestic class political power struggles, and it’s pretty clear that the only reason America has turned against China was the US lead in total power was disappearing much faster and more consistently than made America comfortable. I think it should be remembered that the US establishment since Carter was committed to helping China’s economic development, and were in fact giving it preferential treatment. Free ride is over.

  86. Biff says:
    @voicum

    The jet engine principle is basically the rocket engine principle, and it dates back a thousand years.

    The first rockets were used as propulsion systems for arrows, and may have appeared as early as the 10th century in Song dynasty China. However more solid documentary evidence does not appear until the 13th century. The technology probably spread across Eurasia in the wake of the Mongol invasions of the mid-13th century. Usage of rockets as weapons before modern rocketry is attested in China, Korea, Europe, Middle East, Mongolia and Indian subcontinent. One of the first recorded rocket launchers is the “wasp nest” fire arrow launcher produced by the Ming dynasty in 1380.

    • Replies: @Sam J.
  87. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Incitatus

    But re-industrialization is oft likely to include (human job-killer) automation (subsidized in the tax code). How do we account for that?

    If the automated factories are at home, at least the jobs in robot maintenance will go to the locals. Moreover,local firms will have a better chance of getting the business of building the robots than if the manufacturing is done abroad by foreign contractors.

    Those least responsible for production profited the most.

    Yes, here in Canada, banks are among the largest corporations by revenue, ranking 3rd, 4th, 9th , 13th and 17th in 2018.

    Meantime, in the most expensive cities, Toronto, Vancouver, and Victoria some first-time home buyers are committing more than half their family income to mortgage payments.

    No point in manufacturing anything but housing. Folks don’t have money to buy anything else, the result of a combination of immigration, which the present government wishes to raise to a rate equal to an annual rate of 1% of population, and money printing by the banks, made possible by near zero real interest rates.

  88. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Miro23

    The dollar has an artificially high value from its reserve status. Arguably the real value is 50% lower, which would quickly change outsourcing calculations (and wreck corporate profits).

    I suppose this has suited the Chinese (and some others) as it induced off-shoring of manufacturing to China whereby the technology could be assimilated, and the workforce trained. But with ten times as many engineering graduates as the US and a larger manufacturing base than the US, China has a diminishing need for Western technology, and seems intent on dispensing with the dollar. Thus the outlook is for America to have neither a strong home manufacturing base nor an everlasting supply of cheap foreign-made goods.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  89. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Incitatus

    Payed in my life combined tax well over 40%. Don’t begrudge it, if it buys tomorrow for me and my children.

    “If it buys tomorrow…” Yeah, that is the question. And the answer for the European people of both the Old World and the New is pretty certainly that it will not. Instead it will pay for the destruction of freedom and the imposition of an anti-white, anti-nationalist, multi-culti regime that will result in social disintegration, and civilizational collapse.

    • Replies: @Incitatus
  90. renfro says:
    @alexander

    Are people really “sending money” to Jared ?

    Some of the money sent to Jared’s company, ( a firm that purports to match up investors with real estate opportunities) was from Saudi….soooo ask yourself why Saudi who has “real experts” to handle their investments would invest money with Jared and his brother when Jared has a history of lousy real estate judgment (666 Park) and his brother has absolutely no experience with real estate?

    The Saudis are despicable but not stupid.

  91. renfro says:
    @DESERT FOX

    To repeat myself……silver bullets and wooden stakes needed reclaim America.

    • Replies: @DESERT FOX
  92. @donald j ringle

    China’s protectionist policies have brought it to where it is today. America and Germany were built with protectionism. Freetrade has now destroyed the US and Britain.

    You manufacture so that you don’t have to import.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  93. Parfois1 says:
    @slorter

    They were going do it by becoming an exporting company, they were going do it by producing cheaply better quality than the West was producing for itself and they knew they could not do that by themselves

    Good summary of what the “Chinese economic miracle” was all about. And they killed two birds with one stone so to speak: they jump-started their economy development while degrading the capitalist economies simultaneously using capitalist greed as the tool and lubricant! Doubly clever indeed! Although at the cost of offending Mao’s strictures and discrediting their “communist” credentials. Lets face it, there has never been a Communist country ever (maybe only in pre-historic small tribe-sized societies) so they have not committed ideological heresy; only a pragmatic application of Confucian logic to a modern sui-generis problem.

    The Soviets committed a similar “sin” with their New Economic Policy and the rise of the hated Nepmen, the equivalent to today’s Chinese millionaires. I wonder whether they know about what happened to the Nepmen…

  94. Parfois1 says:
    @Sergey Krieger

    Very true. Everyone is in the race towards doom – and that is the power and logic of Capitalism in its insatiable search for greater profits. It cannot stop and will bring its own downfall, either by: (1) Hegelian dialectics (proletarian rebellion), (2) nuclear self-destruction in war, (3) exhaustion of natural resources. There is only one way out of this conundrum and that is No. 1.

    An alternative scenario is that the Chinese socialist pause is only to play the catch-up economic game and then bring a Stalinist-style collectivisation phase, depopulate the capitalist roaders, use the new BRI project to defang the dollar and finally hear the last growls of the swan song of Capitalism.

    • Replies: @Galan
  95. Erebus says:
    @nsa

    The crux of the “trade” dispute is … the Chinese refusal to allow the international financial services sector to penetrate the Chinese economy and operate freely.

    You nailed it nsa. That’s what’s got the US’ knickers in a twist.

    When China joined the WTO in 2001, one of the requisites was opening their financial sector to Wall St’s predations. The boys in NY & London were drooling with excitement, but the Chinese, fully aware of the traps being set outfoxed ’em.

    They negotiated a phased entry of foreign firms as their financial sector development achieved certain milestones. The foreigners were so excited that they didn’t see the strategy. The Chinese, knowing that burdening an economy with a blanket of financial legerdemain is no advantage for China, set milestones they had no intention of hitting.

    Fast forward a couple of decades and the world’s top 4 banks by assets are Chinese (the 5th is HSBC (Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank Corp)), but their financial system remains too “immature” to accept foreign firms. Entirely within the letter of WTO law, but it grates so on Wall St who gleefully traded America’s real economy and its people’s well-being away and got nothing but a bunch of their own USTs back.

    An own goal, on a grand scale.

  96. @renfro

    To reclaim America we need to abolish the unconstitutional privately owned zionist FED and IRS and return to the US government printing debt free money as it was prior to 1913. The zionist owned FED and IRS have destroyed America.

    I get what you inferred.

  97. Miro23 says:
    @Incitatus

    Most of US historic growth depended on industry protected by tariffs that funded government. But re-industrialization is oft likely to include (human job-killer) automation (subsidized in the tax code). How do we account for that?

    Re-industrialization is not so easy. It’s the existing world manufacturers/exporters who are automating along with their local supply networks. They are the leaders in the adoption of robots since they already have the factories and are in an evolutionary process.

    If you adjust for international wage levels (theory that high wages should equal greater automation), then low wage Asia is far ahead (particularly China). Even if the US, could for example, start an automated electronics industry from scratch (where it was once the world leader), it would also have to build local supplier networks, making a truly difficult project.

    Existing US automation is mostly concentrated in the auto industry.

    http://www2.itif.org/2018-industrial-robot-adoption.pdf?_ga=2.231812575.1945806934.1560601266-2099618245.1560601266

  98. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @CanSpeccy

    And Trump’s energy policy supports the dollar, by reducing energy imports and driving down the the price of oil, thus lowering the US import bill. Trouble is, by increasing world production the US oil industry is driving down the price of oil, which is lethal to US shale producers. Maybe the solution to that will be an import tax on oil.

  99. Sean says:

    Hudson was on RT the other day saying that China with its mixed economy and state spending on infrastructure was just doing what America did when it was successful before ” Finance, Insurance and Real Estate (FIRE) rents, profits and capital gains” became paramount, “while the nation’s infrastructure decays and its labor is reduced to a prat-time “gig” economy”.

    Yet, America is not restricted to using only its productive capacity, exerting diplomatic leverage and military pressure to achieve economic goals is als part of the mix for America. In the final analysis countries as such are not primarily attempting to improve their population’s standard of living, they are trying to be too big and powerful for anyone to get the ideas America could be taken on.

  100. Wally says:
    @Thinking Out Loud

    So what would be wrong with each of those on your list?

    Thanks.

  101. Wally says:
    @nsa

    I get it that China doesn’t want foreigners to muck about in their economy.

    Yet China operates freely in the US.

    It’s called a double standard.

    China can’t have it both ways.

  102. Amon says:
    @Thinking Out Loud

    Trump ia a bozo plain and simple.

    The absolute lack of tariffs on imports to the US was a calculatored moved sponsored by wall street to maximise profits by making manufacturering as cheap as possible.

  103. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Futurethirdworlder

    You manufacture so that you don’t have to import.

    Or you import from Asian sweatshops to keep prices under control as you allow banks to create a flood of mortgages, auto loans and credit card debt.

    Twenty or thirty years ago, business guru, Peter Drucker, concluded that banking was an inconsequential book-keeping business with nothing much to sell.

    Boy was he wrong. Banks had money to sell: money they created out of thins air, the greatest achievement in manufacturing technology the world has ever seen.

    And now banks now account for a huge proportion of corporate profits as they soak up the greater part of the the working population’s income in interest payments. They transformed usury from a small-time racket into a holocaust of the Western nations: when folks can’t pay off the debt on a house until they reach retirement age, a woman’s gotta go out to work and having a family, certainly having a large family, becomes an intolerable expense.

    Hence the death of the West, with not a single Western nation has a fertility rate to match the replacement rate, and some have rates that are barely half that. Hence mass replacement immigration: gotta keep up the demand for housing otherwise the demand for debt would collapse.

  104. anonymous[204] • Disclaimer says:
    @Agent76

    You are naive and don’t know how the Zionists and imperialists fool people!

    Look at Noam Chomsky who fooled a lot of people like YOU.

    Why an ‘antiwar’ site should copy the lies of the Jewish mafia? Is this part of the ‘balancing act’?

  105. Junior says:
    @bluedog

    Aside from your Trump Derangement Syndrome ramblings, you bring up a good point about India still not having chosen a side. The key is going to be the Trump and Modi meeting at the G20. Both sides are attempting to woo India as Modi will also be meeting with Xi at the G20 but as a result of Trump’s tariffs the Chinese will be at a huge disadvantage.

    Something that you don’t seem to get is that the tariffs are not the end goal for Trump. The tariffs are just a tool Trump uses for leverage to get better deals. And as to your claims about tariffs never working, I suggest that you ask Mexico what sent them scurrying to send 6000 troops to their southern border and what made them change their protocols for having asylum seekers wait to be processed in Mexico. Trump’s tariffs AKA winning.

    • Replies: @bluedog
  106. bluedog says:
    @Junior

    And yet the brown tide keeps on rolling along as Trump wants to admit more but with the exception that they must get a green card, and as they are finding out tariffs are little more than blackmail except China not willing to pay it,meanwhile its cost the American taxpayer billions to subsidize the farmers,and those billions are only the beginning for those markets are lost forever,meanwhile the items at Wal-Mart and the rest will go up to off-set the tariffs and the loser’s are the brain dead American people.AGAIN.!!!

    • Replies: @Junior
  107. Junior says:
    @bluedog

    Short term losses for long term gains.

    • Replies: @bluedog
  108. Incitatus says:
    @CanSpeccy

    Interesting posts, thanks again.

    “If the automated factories are at home, at least the jobs in robot maintenance will go to the locals. Moreover, local firms will have a better chance of getting the business of building the robots than if the manufacturing is done abroad by foreign contractors.”

    Very true. Agree.

    But what of those still thus unemployed? How are they engaged to earn income, what promise do they have of useful lives?

    Vonnegut’s ‘Player Piano’ (1952) foretold the problem. Do we reduce the workweek, like France? Sponsor superfluous occupations?

    Confess I have no answers.

    “in Canada, banks are among the largest corporations by revenue”

    Dangerous perhaps. But [correct me if wrong] none failed 2007-08? None needed government bailouts?

    Compare that with Senator [now USB AG vice-chairman of Investment Banking] Phil Gramm. Killed (with Clinton) Glass-Steagall. Wife Wendy enabled Enron to evade ‘OTC derivatives market’ restrictions as Chair of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Resigned and became an Enron Director. Amazing both aren’t in jail.

    Americans should envy Canada.

    “Meantime, in the most expensive cities, Toronto, Vancouver, and Victoria some first-time home buyers are committing more than half their family income to mortgage payments”

    Absurd isn’t it? There’s no genuine excuse. Victimizing the very generation intended to carry on.

    Lived in San Francisco in the 80s. Real Estate? No different from a Los Vegas casino craps table. Annual double-digit price escalation. Nothing to do with inherent value. Everything to do with buying-into the Ponzi scheme. Gleefully advanced by RE agents/CA government/taxpayer policy.

    Haves vs. Haves-Not. Unsustainable. Insane.

    That said, it’s a beautiful city, wonderful people, great region.

    Regional [national] insanity is, after all, not unreasonable. Doesn’t make it right or sustainable.

    “the answer for the European people of both the Old World and the New is pretty certainly that it [taxes] will not [buy tomorrow]. Instead it will pay for the destruction of freedom and the imposition of an anti-white, anti-nationalist, multi-culti regime that will result in social disintegration, and civilizational collapse.”

    That’s pretty bleak. Canada is what – 20+% foreign emigrant? I’d be interested in how you feel about that. Daily experience/encounters?

    Lived decades in a NE 90+% minority city. Served on a civic board. Never had a problem. Think most people just want to earn a comfortable living, put a little aside for their kids, retire above penury, and die honorably fulfilled. The dream all believed in was the freedom of self-advancement.

    Tend to think ‘collapse’ will come from our insatiable elites. The ‘invader vanguard’ is as much [more] a victim of them as are we.

    But, of course, I could be wrong.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  109. bluedog says:
    @Junior

    Lol your dreaming for there will be no long term gains, for when its done and over China will dictate the terms not Washington, for after all how can the auto industry and every other American company and corporation survive with out the stamp made in China stamped on it.!!!

    • Replies: @Junior
  110. Galan says:
    @Parfois1

    Proletarian rebellion will not solve the problem. Last time we had a socialist camp they were at each others throat. They say that the USSR considered nuking communist China. Also the Bolsheviks killed each other like crazy. Capitalism too may not be the basic problem, for it can be regulated, and social democracy is possible. What is now needed is away of regulating destructive competition among countries. We need some form of world government, something like a global EU.

  111. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Incitatus

    But what of those still thus unemployed?

    In times past, much of the (otherwise surplus) population was engaged in service, butlers, footmen, doormen, chambermaids gardeners and dolly mops. To some extent this will come back as income differentials continue to grow. There is, after all, something ego enhancing to have an entourage, or to be advised by an intelligent butler (rather than that Amazon or Google gadget), and to be waited up on by real people, rather than served by a soulless replicator. It will be the middle classes who will rely on automatons for help around the house and garden.

    … what promise do they have of useful lives?

    I doubt if anyone much cares. The choice will be universal basic income, i.e., welfare ad lib, combined with ever more cheap electronic distraction, or an exterminationist policy. But Hitler gave that idea a bad name so it will likely be avoided — at least for the current generation. Other policies will by deployed (in addition to those already in effect) to ensure that the useless eaters mostly fail to reproduce, and thus gradually disappear (mechanical whores, free porn, early death by opiates, etc.).

    But [correct me if wrong] none failed 2007-08? None needed government bailouts?

    They did get one in disguise. According to .this report, a total of over $100 billion.

    As for,

    Victimizing the very generation intended to carry on.

    I doubt if they are intended to carry on. The Money Power seeks the disappearance of the sovereign nation state (hence the elite opposition to Brexit, which has resulted in an open split in Britain’s Tory Party). How to do that? Get rid of the people. None of the European peoples have a replacement fertility rate, all are being progressively replaced by people from elsewhere — people habituated in their home country to corruption and exploitation, and without any silly ideas about human rights and individual liberties. The goal, in other words, is to replace white populations with a mongrelized breed of relatively energetic people (immigrants being generally from among the more fit and able of the population from which they originate) who will provide the elite class with the services they need to maintain their estates and global life style.

    Canada is what – 20+% foreign emigrant? I’d be interested in how you feel about that. Daily experience/encounters?

    As you are likely aware, Canada has run a eugenic (i.e., health- and education-based selective) immigration policy since the current Prime Minister’s father was Prime Minister. So the immigrant population is mainly well educated and civilized. So no problems. On the whole I have enjoyed living in a mixed race community, but with only about 10% being the mixture. However, we will have serious problems if immigration ratchets up much further as there will be less motive for integration, Muslims, it seems, being particularly reluctant to shed their culture of origin. But also some other groups can be problematic, for example, London’s recent arrivals from the Caribbean, among whom are not a few with an inclination to acid throwing, drug dealing and assault with a knife.

    Tend to think ‘collapse’ will come from our insatiable elites. The ‘invader vanguard’ is as much [more] a victim of them as are we.

    Yes, but when the immigrants become the majority, as they have in Britain’s largest cities, and especially when a large proportion of them belong to a particularly fanatical religion, you see them acting not as people anxious to integrate but as settlers intent on making their new home just like the one the left, complete with female genital mutilation and a contempt for the infidel. The Brits have been largely ethnically cleansed from their own capital city, from their second largest city, Birmingham, and from my father’s home town of Leicester, which was 99% white in the 1960’s when I attended university there, and many other urban areas. London is firmly in the anti-Brexit camp. The immigrants there have more than their foot in the door and with the aide of the EU there it will firmly remain, intent on allowing in an endless number of additional settlers.

    • Replies: @Incitatus
  112. Hail says: • Website

    King Baeksu
    ‏@KingBaeksu
    14 Jun 2019

    National socialism versus global neoliberalism: Which will win?

    It’s a good bet that China will still be around a hundred years hence and going strong.

    The US? It’s merely a looting operation at this point.

    It cannot last.

  113. Junior says:
    @bluedog

    Nope. Maybe in the far future but for right now we still hold a lot of leverage over them. As things start to tighten up from the tariffs their government is going to be forced to reveal its communist authoritarianism more and more. Once they begin seizing control of companies that they think are not acting in ways that they consider beneficial for their State, China will be screwed for a long time to come. What company is going to want to do business in a communist state where their company can be seized on a whims notice.

    • Replies: @bluedog
    , @denk
  114. FB says: • Website

    A great article by Prof Hudson…

    Just about every line is quotable…

    [Trump’s] diplomatic threat is really that the US will cut its own economic throat, imposing sanctions on its own importers and investors if China does not acquiesce.

    Simple truth…it’s hard to imagine how deluded some people may be to think that the US can actually ‘win’ this trade war…

    Trump campaigned on making the country ‘great’ by not throwing away money on imperialist wars…and even getting rid of useless but expensive baggage like the Nato alliance…but since the establishment won’t let him do that, plan B is to pick fights he can’t win…neither with China…nor with Iran…nor even gritty little Venezuela…

    Meanwhile the useless wars continue while American infrastructure crumbles…

    What a joke…time for a real president…

    • Replies: @EdNels
  115. EdNels says:
    @FB

    What a Joke! is right and the comedy is really the main thing, when the campaign bs is compared to the performance, well it is a good comedic Performance!

    But if a real President ever ran for government… sorry Charlie, he would never get elected, nor nominated nor wtf, and the idea wouldn’t be the least bit Amusing, much less funny, to the E-lite MOTU’s who do the script, insert the laugh loops etc.

    I think that’s the real aha moment to take away there: The Funnies, like imagine the way it hits their funny bone when T-rump puts in every single one of the worst NeoCons from going back to Contra costa wtf, that are still 90 degrees warm, after all that talk about chchch change! Change: the onliest constant… Hate to thing Changey will always own that.

    And it seemed to me, T-rump didn’t used to be a “redhead’’ back when, but orange is the preferred color of Clowns usually, ( comedy 101.)

    Hudson’s good for some laughs too though, he has to put with all this abuse, even on Cross Talk yesterday! same thing, he’s too far out front.

    A ‘’real president’’, might have to be appointed.

  116. bluedog says:
    @Junior

    Your still dreaming our so called leverage over other countries are becoming a thing of the past,and any leverage over China, Russia and India are limited indeed,if there had been any chance of a trade agreement its gone for if there had been it would have been made long ago, and believe me American corporations and companies would do business with the devil as long as the profits are there,hell they sold America down the drain for the profit ,and that alone speaks volumes about American business and those that control and runs the government.!!!

    • Replies: @Junior
  117. @EdNels

    You said it just fine, Ed. No need for nice and pretty when you cut to the bone of the subject as you just did.

  118. @Thinking Out Loud

    ” In order to keep prices competitive, we would have to lower labor cost, which means we would have to bring a lot of cheap labor into this country,”

    That would only be true if labor cost was the only item in a manufacturers P&L ledger. Federal regulations place prohibitive costs on manufacturing in the US. Some of those regulations concern labor and labor relations, of course, but the rest are as expensive, if not more expensive than labor.

    Manufacturing could be lured back to the US without imposing huge tariffs, simply by abolishing existing regulations and dismantling the regulatory agencies which issue those regulations at will.

  119. Junior says:
    @bluedog

    hell they sold America down the drain for the profit ,and that alone speaks volumes about American business and those that control and runs the government.

    And yet here you are all over this thread parroting the false talking points of those same corporations and their corporate owned media who want to continue selling America down the drain.

    Interesting.

    • Replies: @bluedog
  120. anon[189] • Disclaimer says:

    “Hudson left out China’s rare earth metals as leverage. US military can’t operate without them.”

    That just goes to further demonstrate how inefficient and incompetent the American democratic system is. The United States once had its own rare earth mines, but they shut them down so they could more cheaply import the materials from overseas. Obviously, the government should have subsidized these mines and kept them open as an emergency fallback, but they were too greedy and short-sighted to do that. These idiots did the same for their helium supplies, a critical element used in many medical devices. As history demonstrates, when the empire has the opportunity, they choose looting the treasury and short-term profits over long-term planning that’s in the overall interest of the nation-state. And that’s why they are destined to be conquered by China in the end. I expect Trump to lose in 2020, and by 2022 most of these Chinese tariffs will be lifted again so the ruling class can continue making money – looting the treasury, outsourcing industry, etc. Business as usual.

  121. bluedog says:
    @Junior

    Nope simply facts which you seem short as you parrot the orange clown,those tariffs will not effect the American companies and corporations doing business there as they park their money into off-shore accounts, but only the Chinese business sector,in fact I was reading that even some parts for the F-35 was being built there with taxpayer monies while they they are busy selling .America down the river.!!!

    • Replies: @Junior
  122. Sam J. says:
    @Rogue

    “…Fact: the British design became the main basis for post-war jet engine technology. Of course, elements of the German design would also be incorporated…”

    I don’t believe this to be true. Whittle’s design was a centrifugal design like a centrifugal fan. The Germans design was an axial fan which was more advanced and smaller in frontal area. Here’s a picture of his engine and the difference between the type of fans.

    https://www.pelonistechnologies.com/blog/axial-vs.-centrifugal-fans

    I’m not saying the centrifugal-fan is good for nothing. I think most helicopters use centrifugal-fans because it’s more compact and works at lower rpm.

    https://www.quora.com/Why-do-airplanes-use-an-axial-flow-jet-engine-instead-of-a-more-compact-centrifugal-jet-engine-Helicopters-use-them-and-they-work-fine-so-why-not-on-a-fixed-wing-aircraft

    • Replies: @Rogue
  123. Sam J. says:
    @RoatanBill

    “…China should sanction Walmart…”

    I wish they would. Walmart would immediately find a new supply chain. It would, over a bit of time, be the greatest boost to American manufacturing in all of it’s history. With 3-d manufacturing of molds, robots and modern processing I think manufacturing could come back to the US but it takes a lot of cash to get it rolling and no one wants to bet on that.

    • Replies: @RoatanBill
  124. Sam J. says:
    @PeterMX

    “…Germany had the first operational jet and the US and others got the technology after the war…”

    A lot of good it did them. They may have been better off not having them. The engine life was so low they never got much use out of them.

  125. Sam J. says:
    @Anon

    “…we have to recognize that now we are in severe decadence . Maybe we should quietly and humbly ask ourselves why have we arrived to this point…”

    Well I have the answer to that. It’s the Jews. Now let’s stop the anti-White criticism and move on. Let’s move to the root of the problem and find a way to get rid of the Jews. Deport them all. Let them go to China and fuck up their country for a few decades.

  126. Sam J. says:
    @Biff

    “…The jet engine principle is basically the rocket engine principle…”

    Uhhh….no it’s not. Rockets don’t have compressors.

    • Replies: @FB
  127. @Sam J.

    The reason manufacturing left originally was because it’s too expensive in the US given labor rates, environmental costs, taxes, regulations, etc. Other places in the world have a lower cost of production and cost is always a consideration in a competitive market.

    When the first widget maker left the US, his competitors were almost forced to follow or suffer a major competitive disadvantage. Nothing has changed to bring manufacturing back to US shores, at least not the way it was after WWII.

    Maybe after the next depression when the Dollar loses its reserve status, the Federal Reserve is shown the door, sound money returns and ridiculous wars actually have to be paid for with something tangible instead of worthless green paper, then sanity and manufacturing just might return to the US.

    • Replies: @Miro23
  128. Miro23 says:
    @RoatanBill

    The reason manufacturing left originally was because it’s too expensive in the US given labor rates, environmental costs, taxes, regulations, etc. Other places in the world have a lower cost of production and cost is always a consideration in a competitive market.

    When the first widget maker left the US, his competitors were almost forced to follow or suffer a major competitive disadvantage. Nothing has changed to bring manufacturing back to US shores, at least not the way it was after WWII

    In the 1950’s the US was world leader in many classes of manufactured products, in fact it was the world’s nº1 manufacturing power.

    With digitalization and the internet, modern style globalized production became a possibility. Manufacturers could very profitably cut their production costs to 60c an hour Asian rates, plus avoid all the US bureaucratic costs and hassles. All it needed was the political OK which they got (bought) with the convenient NeoLiberal political philosophy of tariff free globalization.

    The point is, that it didn’t have to happen this way. Japan and Germany are still leading manufacturing powers. For example, Sony in Japan is still developing key technologies in cameras and is producing and marketing world class products. They outsource production of non-key components to China, Thailand etc. but with detailed quality control (not just lowest price as with the US). Same with the German auto industry and East European outsourcing.

    There was a decision somewhere, that these industries and their advanced technologies would remain Japanese and German. They had local and world markets that would pay for premium products. US manufacturers simply went for the lowest cost, and fully bought into the Neoliberal philosophy that the US was an advanced and clean post-industrial service economy, (with the myth that the workforce would be freed up to retrain for higher value added jobs).

    The US seems to be a market with little loyalty to US manufactured products, combined with a destructive cult for ever lower prices.

    • Replies: @Sam J.
  129. The decision made was to replace blue collar manufacturing with white collar finance. Everything became a finance transaction. As manufacturing jobs dwindled, finance jobs multiplied. The banking sector along with Wall St, insurance, higher education and legislation all aimed to fleece the average Joe as much as possible and supply products with a shorter useful life. The Japanese and Germans have some pride in what they produce. Not so for the average US corporation.

    Just look at the rubbish universities are teaching. All the ‘Social Sciences’, ‘Humanities’ and ‘Liberal Arts’ programs turn out dolts that can’t balance a checkbook. Degrees in what I call ‘Basket Weaving’ professions abound. PhD’s are available for things that are just opinion like law, economics, huge portions of medicine, astrophysics and a host of other ‘professions’ that don’t have to prove a damned thing.

    A huge portion of the workforce is incapable of and allergic to anything to do with producing something real. They want to become movie stars, hedge fund managers, politicians, etc; all people that make a lot of money for doing next to nothing in the current US system. Why would anyone in the US culture want to stoop so low as to become a professional that requires a STEM degree? Math is hard!

  130. Sam J. says:
    @Miro23

    “…Japan and Germany are still leading manufacturing powers…”

    Exactly but somehow the HATE USA crowd comes out in droves telling us we can’t do anything. Whine, whine, whine, Americans can’t do anything. Lies. We have a massive large country with a big population, a huge farming sector, minerals and lots of oil and gas. We have one of the best river systems on the entire planet and while our roads could use a little work we can certainly get around.We have a huge amount of advantages if our elites would stop strip mining the country for profits we might could get somewhere.

    People who whine about us not being a part of the Chinese market are STUPID. We’re not going to be part of it now if we keep on our present path. All the Chinese initiatives so far have been to invite our manufacturers into China, copy what they can from them then ease them out of business. The corporate leaders are making bank, but just for long enough to transfer decades of tech and fill their pockets then…it all goes away. There is no upside to the present structural trade system with China. We’ll lose all of the business anyways. Therefore the only alternative is to stop supporting their mercantilist system and compete with them in the US and as we get better, the rest of the world. Exactly like the Japanese they will NEVER allow us to trade at par in their countries if we stay with the present trade system. Any one believing they will open their markets if not forced is an imbecile.

    Here’s a simple idea. Copy the “structure” of the Germans and the Japanese. Their banking structure is different from ours. They have structured their banking to support the country instead of allowing them to scoop up everything with fiat and ship the manufacturing overseas. There’s no reason we can’t do the same. All the excuses about not enough engineers or technical workers are…just excuses. When we need more of them they will raise their wages and “shazam” we’ll have more of them. They don’t want to pay workers. They only want to pay insider financial types who are of very little use to the economy.

    We should limit banks to funding “things” not speculation. Banks should not be owning businesses and there should be capital requirements that don’t allow insiders to finance all their buddies differently.

    We could end any tax write offs for foreign workers and any manufactured goods or parts. They will of course say they will have to move. I say let them go. The Chinese will rape them. Many of the corporate leaders are fuck witts who only know spreadsheets and nothing about actual manufacturing(obviously not all, but more than is necessary). A good example is the Women who runs Lockheed-Martin who used to run a bread company. She’s made a dogs mess out of the F-35.

    People and Nations have done this before, including us, there’s no reason we can’t do the same again. The Chinese started from nothing. How much faster could we do the same if we made serious strident effort to make all areas of manufacturing ours again?

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  131. denk says:
    @Junior

    Once they begin seizing control of companies that they think are not acting in ways that they consider beneficial for their State, China will be screwed for a long time to come. What company is going to want to do business in a communist state where their company can be seized on a whims notice.

    The unitedsnakes, being a ‘democracy’ and its vaunted exceptionalism, would’ve no such qualm of course….

    THE MURIKKAN TRAP….

    ‘In April 2013, Pierucci was arrested in New York by the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation. A year later, Alstom was asked to pay a huge fine of 772 million U.S. dollars, which eventually led to the partial acquisition of the French company by General Electric, its arch rival.

    “My book describes my descent into hell, and shows how the DOJ used me to make Alstom pay the biggest fine in its history for having broken the FCPA,” Pierucci told Xinhua.

    That facilitated the buyout of 70 percent of Alstom by its main American competitor General Electric, blocking a potential merger between Alstom and Shanghai Electric Comp

    A precise and detailed analysis of the facts and of jurisprudence shows clearly that the United States uses its own judiciary system as an economic weapon with the objective of weakening competitors, going sometimes as far as to buy them up cheaply, said Pierucci.

    “By buying out Alstom, the United States gained control of the maintenance of all the French nuclear power plants, which produce 75 percent of the electricity produced in the country,” he recalled.

    The United States is now using a very similar strategy against Huawei, said the erstwhile Alstom executive of Washington’s recent unilateralist sanctions against the Chinese telecom giant.

    The U.S. Commerce Department earlier this month put Huawei and its affiliates on a blacklist that requires the federal government approval for any sale and transfer of U.S. technologies to the Chinese firm. Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou has been arrested in Canada at the request of U.S. authorities.

    Noting that “in the background there is of course a trade war between China and the United States,” Pierucci said “everyone knows Huawei has taken the lead compared to its competitors” in terms of 5G technology.

    Now that it is widely known that the United States uses law as an economic weapon of war, all other countries in the world should unite in order to counteract such U.S. unilateralism, he suggested.

    Otherwise, “yesterday Alstom, today Huawei, and tomorrow?”

    http://www.ecns.cn/voices/2019-05-29/detail-ifziupva1112797.shtmlFreder

    • Replies: @Junior
  132. Junior says:
    @bluedog

    Nope simply facts which you seem short as you parrot the orange clown,those tariffs will not effect the American companies and corporations doing business there as they park their money into off-shore accounts, but only the Chinese business sector

    Wow, you clearly have no idea what’s going on if you think the tariffs don’t effect American companies. I think you better re-check your “facts”. From the below article: “The United States has rejected separate requests from General Motors Co and Chinese-owned Volvo Cars for an exemption to a 25% U.S. tariff on their Chinese-made sport utility vehicle models.”

    https://mobile.reuters.com/article/amp/idUSKCN1T530U?utm_campaign=trueAnthem%3A%2BTrending%2BContent&utm_content=5cf76c152866ef00011d5a25&utm_medium=trueAnthem&utm_source=twitter&__twitter_impression=true

    Trump is putting these US companies, like Ford, on notice that if they choose to get in bed with China and try to ship their Made-In-China bullshit over here then they’re going to have to pay the price for trying to screw over American workers.

    Your Trump-hatred is blinding you to the fact that a President is FINALLY trying to do something to stop the selling out of America to China by our corrupted politicians. Do you understand that you are listening to those exact same corrupted politicians and pundits who purposefully got us into this mess to line their pockets and believing them when they tell you that trying to fix it using tariffs won’t work even though tariffs are working to get better deals with Mexico?

    Get on board, bluedog. We’re going to try something new and the corrupted politicians on BOTH sides of the aisle, who have been getting literal fortunes out of their chinese cookies, are raising hell about it. Just because your bludog democrat party is no more and has turned communist on you, doesn’t mean that you have to join them 😉

  133. Junior says:
    @denk

    “My book describes my descent into hell, and shows how the DOJ used me to make Alstom pay the biggest fine in its history for having broken the FCPA,” Pierucci told Xinhua.

    So let me get this straight, the guy broke this law but it was the DOJ that made him do it? BWAHHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHA! That is rich! It would be more believable if he went with “the devil made me do it”. I didn’t know that we were exporting our dindu nuffin culture over to France. With his french accent he should’ve called the book “Je Zinzu Nuzzin”.

    And yes we put a ban on Huawei. And then the Chinese turned around and began threatening our tech companies that they will be blacklisted on an “unreliable entities list” and face permanent consequences if they try to move any of their production out of China.

    USA – Face legal consequences if you try to do business with a company that is trying to steal everything thing that they can by puting a backdoor into their systems.

    China- Get all your foreign assets confiscated by the government and your orginization labeled an enemy to the state if you commit the grave act of trying to leave.

    See the exceptional difference now?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/08/business/economy/china-huawei-trump.html

    • Replies: @denk
  134. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Sam J.

    All the Chinese initiatives so far have been to invite our manufacturers into China, copy what they can from them then ease them out of business.

    Reminds me of a young friend who went to China to manage the manufacturing subsidiary of a US-based multinational. It was a difficult assignment he told me, since the local competition had begun producing an identical product and selling it at half the price his firm was obliged to charge to cover its costs.

  135. denk says:
    @Junior

    USA – Face legal consequences if you try to do business with a company that is trying to steal everything thing that they can by puting a backdoor into their systems.

    backdoor your ass !

    UNtil this day,
    The only backdoors were found in……CISCO kits.

    Ergo,
    Accusing Huawei ‘security risk’ sounds like another….
    ROBBER CRYING ROBBERY !

    IOW, the unitedsnakes is using false pretext of ‘security risk’ to persecute Huawei and other Chinese tech firms.
    Exactly the way it using false pretext to wage hundreds of wars of aggression since ww2

    Exceptionalism

    How come murikkan jurisdiction extends all the way to a ‘corruption’ charge in iNdonesia ?
    Who the hell except the unitedsnake invoke such ‘long arm jurisdiction’ ?

    “unreliable entities list”

    If Fedex ends up in that list,
    it’d have only itself to blame, doncha think so ?
    https://www.asiatimes.com/2019/05/article/fedex-apologizes-for-diverting-huawei-parcels/

    • Replies: @Junior
  136. FB says: • Website
    @Sam J.

    Rockets don’t have compressors…

    And you would be the ‘rocket scientist’ from Bugs Bunny…?

    Look up turbopump moron…how do you think the fuel and oxidizer are pressurized to as high as 250 atmospheres…in order to produce thrust…?

    A turbopump is basically a gas turbine engine that burns some amount of fuel and oxidizer in its own combustion chamber…which gas then drives a turbine that spins the propellant PUMPS by means of a common shaft…

    Ie…the heart of EVERY liquid fuel rocket engine is basically a very powerful ‘jet’ engine of the turboshaft variety…no different than the aircraft jet engines modified to drive a generator in stationary power applications or ships…like the GE LM2500…the only difference is in the propellants…

    BTW the most powerful turbopumps dwarf any jet engine…the pump on the RD170 puts out 230,000 hp…

    Amazing the bullshit you find among the comments here…

  137. Incitatus says:
    @CanSpeccy

    Sorry for the delay.

    “In times past, much of the (otherwise surplus) population was engaged in service, butlers, footmen, doormen, chambermaids gardeners and dolly mops.”

    Don’t necessarily disagree, but calling people “surplus population” is very uncomfortable. Prelude to ‘sub-human’ labeling?

    The Kardashian’s butler is doubtless genius if he survives for a week in that nutty household. A lot smarter than Trump.

    Better candidate for public office or the Nobel Prize?

    “I doubt if anyone much cares [vis-à-vis useful lives]. The choice will be universal basic income…”

    Sadly, you’re probably right.

    Hiking the minimum wage (with plenty of loopholes) makes political parties and candidates feel good, provides sound-bites. Then goal posts shift, and – guess what – there’s no real improvement at the ‘minimum’ end.

    Victimizing the very generation intended to carry on.
    “I doubt if they are intended to carry on. The Money Power seeks the disappearance of the sovereign nation state…”

    Disagree. Elites intend new generations carry on, no questions asked. It’s vital. They believe nothing else.

    That’s the systemic weakness.

    New generations may wake up to debt slavery (college, housing, consumer, financial, medical) attended by an elite that eschews nationality, law, and the all normal constraints. Global princes/princesses. Ancien Régime reborn.

    You’re right in identifying immigration policy as a helpful policeman in correcting dissenters and suppressing wages. Nothing like being undercut by someone who works for less. As DJT and the US Chamber of Commerce well know.

    Even better? An illegal threatened daily with deportation if performance isn’t up to snuff. Best lever any employer has. Employers (like DJT) are the reason for illegal immigrants in the US.

    “the [Canadian ] immigrant population is mainly well educated and civilized. So no problems. On the whole I have enjoyed living in a mixed race community, but with only about 10% being the mixture. However, we will have serious problems if immigration ratchets up much further as there will be less motive for integration, Muslims, it seems, being particularly reluctant to shed their culture of origin. But also some other groups can be problematic, for example, London’s recent arrivals from the Caribbean, among whom are not a few with an inclination to acid throwing, drug dealing and assault with a knife.”

    Integration – buying into shared values – seems key. Time to acclimate seems wise.

    Take your point on those who invite foreign hegemony (re-deal the cards). Scrutiny is wise. Very wise. Essential.

    ‘No tolerance’ for seditious behavior the standard? I agree to that, if fairly monitored.

    “when the immigrants become the majority, as they have in Britain’s largest cities, and especially when a large proportion of them belong to a particularly fanatical religion, you see them acting not as people anxious to integrate but as settlers intent on making their new home just like the one they left…”

    Agree if immigrants are “fanatical” (some London mullahs certainly qualify), but that puts it in on us to monitor behavior. Salafist nuts are pretty up-front with their belief. Much/most despised by other Muslims.

    Lived in a majority-minority (90% Black/Hispanic) NE city for 25 years. Never had a problem. Lived in KSA in the 90s. Never had a problem.

    Most people just want to make an honest living, sponsor a better future for their kids, have dinner and make love with their spouse.

    Simple as that.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  138. Rogue says:
    @Sam J.

    Sorry, only saw your comment now.

    I’m not an expert, merely a layman on this issue.

    Whether you’re right or not I couldn’t say.

    I read somewhere a couple of decades ago that the postwar jet engine was based on Whittle’s design.

    I assumed that to be true.

    Obviously, I could be wrong.

  139. Junior says:
    @denk

    UNtil this day,
    The only backdoors were found in……CISCO kits.

    Well it appears you are right about the Huawei backdoor allegation having been found being false. It was indeed Cisco that was found to have a backdoor in their systems.

    But considering that Huawei stole their code from Cisco to create the system in the first place, just as China decided to change the tags on their items like they’ve been caught doing trying to sneak their products into the USA by labeling them Made-In-Mexico and Made-In-Vietnam, I’m sure that China put in a Cisco backdoor and labeled it Huawei lol

    • Replies: @denk
  140. denk says:
    @Junior

    Im not interested in hearsay, here’r the facts.
    CISCO backdoor, not once, not twice…..

    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=cisco+backdoor&t=h_&ia=web

    bUT YOU aint seen nuthin yet,

    Do you know how the 5eyes [aka 5liars] got their name ?
    Ever heard of the Prism , Snowden ?
    The entire world is under surveillance 24×7 by the 5eyes alliance, just ask Angela Merkel !

    Or Dr Mahathir of Malaysia,
    ”CIA knows what happened to mh370′
    ————————————————————-
    Everybody knows huawei backdoor is B.S.

    so why do unitedsnake go out its way to strangle the Chinese firm ?

    One obvious reason is to kill off a competition, like what they did to Alstom, Fujitsu, Toshiba, BOmbardier…..Blueberries.

    Another equally obvious reason is ,if everybody start using Huawei kits, NSA would’ve a tougher time to snoop on the world, not that the assholes wouldnt
    find a work around for that…they virtually live on lies and skullduggery .

    hehehehe

    • Replies: @Junior
  141. Junior says:
    @denk

    so why do unitedsnake go out its way to strangle the Chinese firm ?

    Because here in “unitedsnake” we believe in “Don’t Tread On Me” and if the Chinese continue to steal our intellectual property then they are going to have to live with those consequences.

    • Replies: @denk
  142. Arioch says:

    > Trump may be too narcissistic to realize….. sanctions will leave the U.S. isolated in the emerging multilateralism.

    Or he pretends he does not.

    1. Trump for years yet before election called for USA self-isolation
    2. Trump knows how to play a total idiot
    3. Since Trump elected, all his actions in foreign policy without a single miss led to increased isolation of USA

    Game is names “plausible deniability”

  143. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Incitatus

    Don’t necessarily disagree, but calling people “surplus population” is very uncomfortable. Prelude to ‘sub-human’ labeling?

    That was the implication I intended. The British upper classes have mostly hated the mass of their lower class compatriots. In the 19th and the first two-thirds of the 20th Century these stinking masses were needed of course, to man the industrial machine, “solve the servant problem” to use a Bushism, staff the brothels, and as necessary, lay down their lives in wars with European rivals.

    But they were always hated.

    Hence the Duke of Wellington’s characterization of the troops he used to win the Battle of Waterloo:

    scum of the earth.

    Hence the Disraeli’s quote from his novel Sybil, about:

    Two nations; between whom there is no intercourse and no sympathy; who are as ignorant of each other’s habits, thoughts, and feelings, as if they were dwellers in different zones, or inhabitants of different planets; who are formed by a different breeding, are fed by a different food, are ordered by different manners, and are not governed by the same laws . . . . THE RICH AND THE POOR.

    Hence the motion carried by the Eton College debating society in the 1930’s:

    The faces of the poor should be ground,

    with the amendment that:

    the faces of the poor should be underground.

    That was a time of open upper class advocacy of eugenics — people like Francis Darwin, Maynard Keynes, Winston Churchill and the Fabian socialists H.G. Welles and George Bernard Shaw, the latter appealing to scientists to develop a painless gas for exterminating the unproductive.

    Today, the same hatred manifests in a genocidal policy of reproductive suppression and mass replacement immigration (yes they need people to keep the real estate development racket going, the greatest source of wealth in Britain), but not the hated white lower classes. Any people are considered better than that, even the settler Muslims who parade with signs with announcements such as “Europe is the Cancer, Islam is the answer.”

    This is how liberals do genocide — in Britain, in France, in Canada, in the US of A.

  144. denk says:
    @Junior

    IP theft by Huawei

    In case you havent noticed…
    Verizon owes billions of royalties to Huawei.

    Dont tread on us

    The unitedsnakes have trashed hundreds of countries since ww2…you mean cuz they all ‘treaded on’ you ?

    Care to explain whats prez Sukarno’s crime , when he’s liquidated by CIA, with 3000000 collateral damages in 1965, dubbed as one of the worst genocide of the 20C ?

    Or how did KIng Birendra of Nepal ‘tread on ‘ you, warranting his entire family to be wiped out by CIA../RAW IN 2001 ?

    Or why’s tiny Grenada ‘s invaded in 1983. ?

    Tip of an iceberg,
    [These are just for starters/]

    • Replies: @Junior
  145. Declane says:
    @Atalanta

    Hudson left out China’s rare earth metals as leverage. US military can’t operate without them.

    Without Chinese earth, how can we fight Israel’s wars?
    America was really just muddling through until we learned that other nations just have so much that we don’t. I wish I’d been born in China!

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  146. Junior says:
    @denk

    In case you havent noticed…
    Verizon owes billions of royalties to Huawei.

    Oh I did more than notice. I damn near died of laughter this week when I read about the patent thieves accusing others of patent theft. Hilarious!

    And the best part is that now Verizon and any other companies who were joining in or even thinking about joining in the selling out of America have found out what happens when they get in bed with said patent thieves.
    That’s a win in my book.

    ***On an interesting side note…
    Did you know that the Chinese word for “Patent” is 專利 and it is composed of two Chinese characters respectively signifying “steal” and “opportunity”?
    The more you know 😀

    • Replies: @anon
    , @denk
  147. anon[487] • Disclaimer says:
    @Junior

    專 = specialization, expertise
    利 = benefit, profit, advantage

    You didn’t even bother looking up a dictionary before posting that nonsense did you? Go peddle your disinfo elsewhere please.

    • Replies: @Junior
  148. denk says:
    @Junior

    kid,
    Is English your native language ?

    Huawei didnt accuse Verizon of IP theft, its demanding royalties cuz Verizon suppliers are using hundreds of Huawei patents, all officially registered.

    unitedsnake is the one accusing Huawei of Ip theft AND spying for CCP, without a shred of evidence.
    Zero, none, nada, zilch.
    —————-

    Im still waiting for you to explain how did these countries ‘tread on you’ …?

    [Not holding my breath]
    ————————

    专利= theft, opportunity !

    ROFLMAO
    whoever told you that is either pulling your leg or a moron !

    Not gonna waste more time with you,
    I rest my case,

    • Replies: @Junior
  149. Junior says:
    @anon

    It was a play on the saying about the Chinese word for “chaos”.

    Not attempted disinfo. Just attempted bad joke 🤣

    • Replies: @Junior
  150. Junior says:
    @denk

    “unitedsnake is the one accusing Huawei of Ip theft AND spying for CCP, without a shred of evidence.
    Zero, none, nada, zilch.”

    Oh please Huawei even admitted themselves that they stole code from Cisco.

    https://www.prosperousamerica.org/top_five_cases_of_huawei_ip_theft_and_patent_infringement

    “Im still waiting for you to explain how did these countries ‘tread on you’ …?”

    They treaded on us by not being us.
    I’m no fan of imperial wars but I’ll take our actions any day over the Communists who tread all over their own people by enslaving them and massacring their own people if they don’t toe the party line.

    “Not gonna waste more time with you,
    I rest my case,”

    Not gonna waste your time with me? But you’ve been doing such a good job of upping your social credit score, comrade. Are you sure that your party leaders in Beijing are gonna be alright with you taking off early? 😱

    • LOL: RadicalCenter
  151. Junior says:
    @Junior

    Oops I screwed up again. Not “chaos”. It was supposed to be a play on the Chinese word for “crisis” that motivational speakers always say characters mean danger and opportunity.

    You’ll have to excuse me. They all can’t be gems. 🤣

    As Confucius said, “If you’re going to tell a joke, make sure you don’t have to explain it and whatever you do definitely don’t use two posts to do it.”

    A wise man, that Confucius. 😉

    • Replies: @anon
  152. anon[487] • Disclaimer says:
    @Junior

    That’s a fifth grader joke that only works because 危机 and 机会 share a character. It’s like saying neocons are all conmen because they both contain the letters ‘con’, that’s not funny at all.

    You claiming 專利 stands for ‘steal’ and ‘opportunity’ is outside the realm of humor because neither word even come close to your claimed meanings; at this point you’re simply trying to brush off a blatant lie as ignorance.

    Having read the rest of your posts however, I see that’s just par for the course.

    • Replies: @Junior
  153. Junior says:
    @anon

    Given your lack of understanding of my cultural reference about “crisis” and your apparent expertise in the chinese language, I’m going to go out on a limb here(please note that going out on a limb is what we call a figure of speech, no actual trees were climbed during the making of this post) and assume that you are Chinese.

    And that’s why I want to thank you for your post because it PERFECTLY encapsulates exactly why Communist China is forced to steal all their intellectual property… lack of creativity. Kind of hard to think outside-the-box when the government keeps the communist skinner-box’s lid locked.

    Aside from all that, I can not even believe that we’re still talking about this stupid damn joke. But since you want to accuse me of lying, I’ll break it down one last time for you.

    I looked up the chinese word for patent using google translate.

    I then used the following sentences from the wikipedia entry for Chinese word for “crisis as a template:
    “The Chinese word for “crisis” (simplified Chinese: 危机; traditional Chinese: 危機; pinyin: wēijī) is frequently invoked in Western motivational speaking as being composed of two Chinese characters respectively signifying “danger” and “opportunity”. ”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_word_for_%22crisis%22

    I replaced the word crisis with the word patent and replaced the word danger with the word steal when I wrote:
    “Did you know that the Chinese word for “Patent” is 專利 and it is composed of two Chinese characters respectively signifying “steal” and “opportunity”?”

    Understand now? Good.

    And now that you have successfully tricked me into giving you the blueprint for how to create a joke, I have no doubt that there will be cheap chinese knock-offs of it all over the internet.
    Well played, sir. Well played.

    And to your party bosses monitoring all your activity I say: Give this man an extra two points on his Social Credit Score! He’s earned it. 😀

    • Replies: @anon
  154. anon[487] • Disclaimer says:
    @Junior

    Ha, I wish I was good enough to pick up a language that wasn’t already drilled into me via public education. In fact your ‘joke’ nearly got me and if I didn’t go look up the words myself I may have repeating your bullshit to someone else. Are you beginning to understand why I’m pissed now?

    You frame it as a joke and pat yourself on the back for ‘creativity’, but the fact is you’re a petty little man who spreads lies in hopes that no one cares enough to call you out for your bullshit. No amount of squirming will change that fact.

    • LOL: Junior
    • Replies: @Junior
  155. @Declane

    Yeah until you write the wrong thing online.

    Don’t be gullible and think China gov is good or fair or compassionate merely because they oppose the evil us gov out of self interest.

    Chinese gov are vicious and corrupt authoritarians with no respect for individual life and dignity, just like the US gov; watch as they become more powerful and much less constrained by the declining and eventually perhaps fragmenting USA.

  156. Junior says:
    @anon

    In fact your ‘joke’ nearly got me and if I didn’t go look up the words myself I may have repeating your bullshit to someone else. Are you beginning to understand why I’m pissed now?

    Damn. Yep, I see what you’re saying and I appologize for any confusion it may have caused. That definitely wasn’t my intention. That’s the last thing I would want to happen. I gotta work on making things like that more obvious.

    P.S. my lol on your last post above was directed at your second paragraph, definitely not the first paragraph. Thought I should clear that up lol

    Take care and havva good one, anon 😉

  157. Threats are cheap, but Mr. Trump can’t really follow through without turning farmers, Wall Street and the stock market, Walmart and much of the IT sector against him…

    And these people are worthy of our ears because…?

    It is no secret that the United States achieved world industrial supremacy in the late 19th and early 20th century by heavy public-sector subsidy of education, roads, communication and other basic infrastructure.

    And the Protestant countries became rich by having established state churches. So we should follow that model, too.

    If the state knows more about economics than you do, wouldn’t it follow that it would know more about theology as well?

  158. Miggle says:

    I just noticed The Diminishing American Economy in which PCR, not for the first time, refers to out author as

    Michael Hudson, the world’s best economist, …

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