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This article is merely a curiosity dealing with language and culture but may be of interest to a few readers, and perhaps of occasional assistance in assessing comments made by others. My observations were prompted by my notice of a few persons commenting here who pretend to be something (or someone) they are not, in particular one person masquerading as a Chinese. It isn’t common, but perhaps interesting. Let’s look at a few cultural differences and see where this takes us.

Canadians and Americans particularly, in spite of their “melting pots” of peoples and cultures, generally display little to no understanding of other cultures and tend to interpret differences through ideological lenses and their lack of a culture, usually resulting in misunderstanding or misinterpreting comments or points of view, often arriving at conclusions that are wrong.

In your face

As one example, a high-ranking American politician said recently that the Chinese need to rid themselves of what she termed their “shyness and lack of confidence”. It was beyond the limits of her understanding to realise that what she was seeing was neither shyness nor a lack of confidence, but modesty, one of the more charming characteristics of typical Chinese and Asians generally. American women as a class are not modest, are typically neither “shy” nor lacking “confidence” and tend to have a bolder “in your face” attitude compared to Asian women.

Thus, a typical Chinese female pretending to be an American girl would probably do it badly, and an American female pretending to be native Chinese would have no idea how to behave and would likely fool no one. In this same context, a Frenchman pretending to be a German cannot fool an Italian for very long. The national characteristics of peoples are powerfully affected by their culture and religion, with traits emanating directly from the psyche and not easily imitated. The fundamentals are simply too different.

Judge not that ye be not judged

As another comparison, many nations of people, the Chinese being a prime example (but perhaps Asians generally), do not judge others, at least not in the way Westerners do, because the tendency to judge (as good or bad, right or wrong) is largely a Christian trait, not a Confucian or Buddhist characteristic. We see this in all comment sections here where judging, and often judging harshly, is ubiquitous. It is especially easy to identify Americans: “I don’t disagree with you because you have a different point of view. I disagree because I am right and you are wrong.” It’s even worse than that because in a large number of instances “You are not only factually wrong but morally wrong.” Hence the rudeness, the nasty personal attacks, the name-calling, the often obscene insults directed to those presenting a differing point of view. And, usually, the greater the gap in viewpoint the more vehement the attacks and insults.

This is especially true of Americans of low intellect but, to be fair, the US is the only country in the world where a full 75% of the population is below average in intelligence. Another kind of American exceptionalism.

Spare the rod and spoil the child

This is also true with punishment, the Christian and Jewish religions (perhaps primarily Christian) responding in this manner when someone is “wrong”. Confucianism and Buddhism focus on gentleness, forgiveness and correction, while Christian Americans know in their hearts you deserve to be pummeled mercilessly if your wrong position disagrees with their right one. Hence the violent attacks, and they know they are righteous because God is on their side; He wants heathens to be destroyed. It’s a short step from here to racism, isn’t it?

Another cultural attitude that is primarily Western but especially American, is the tendency to solve all disputes with a hammer. A difference of opinion or viewpoint is not something to understand or discuss, but to be eliminated, usually by force. Thus, if I disagree with you, I am not only factually and morally wrong while you are correct and righteous but I deserve to be beaten until I accept your version of the truth. Hence, the insults and name-calling. This is so true that even if I know I am wrong, the mere fact that I dislike what you say is sufficient to produce the same attacks. People in many other nations, Asians in particular, are more likely to try to understand your point of view and negotiate a meeting-in-the-middle, while Americans, living in a black and white world, are generally unable to do this. In any disagreement, they need a ‘winner’ and a ‘loser’, an attitude that exists almost no place else. This American cultural attitude is not easy to disguise and the Chinese attitude is extremely difficult to falsely imitate.

Having “the last word” is another trait common to Americans (actually Canadians, Aussies and the English too), stemming again from the black and white mentality and the need for a winner and a loser. My parting shot at you is my way of “winning”. Asians almost never exhibit this characteristic. If they feel unable to discuss and negotiate a happy medium, they will almost inevitably (and quickly) drop the subject and will almost never make parting provocations. Americans are generally much more aggressive, often seeking open conflict; others avoid this and look for areas of peace rather than war. There is also what I might call a “disguised parting shot”, where I avoid open conflict and name-calling and pretend to be understanding and accommodating but where I take multiple cheap parting shots as I go out the door with my halo intact. And I still win. But no Chinese have such an attitude.

Heartaches by the number, insults by the score

I took the time to list a sample of insults posted to my article: A Few Historical Frauds.[1]https://www.unz.com/lromanoff/a-few-historical-frauds/ I hoped posting that list might improve the environment, but sadly no change. If you haven’t seen enough insults and want more, click on the link and see my list at comment #550.

By their idioms ye shall know them.

Language also plays a large part in national characteristics in a multitude of ways, and hence also in the identification of people and their cultural and ethnic backgrounds. One of these is metaphors and idiomatic cultural references. I was in a meeting where an American couldn’t fathom the puzzled looks after stating that a number was “in the ballpark”. But he was in a country that doesn’t play baseball and in a room where no one knew what a ballpark was. Idioms and slang exist in all languages and cultures and are equally poor travelers in all of them. One American was denigrating the ability of Chinese to comprehend English, claiming none of them seemed to understand anything. I had difficulty explaining to him that most Chinese will understand when you say, “I was angry”, while not everyone will understand “Like man, I was some pissed, you know?” Idioms, metaphors, and much slang, are deeply cultural.

Another notable one is references to the Jewish ‘holocaust’. Very recently there was a substantial effort made in China (on Weibo posts) to create sympathy for the Jews and their ‘persecution’. It failed miserably and the posts were deleted. Chinese have little knowledge of, and even less interest in, the suffering of the Jews since they have had their own holocausts – which were much worse, and the Chinese culture does not look favorably on pity-collection by whining. But the point is that while Westerners, and particularly Jews, might make frequent references to the Jews’ ‘holocaust’, this is a purely Western construct and has no meaning in China nor in much of the world. Similarly, references to Hitler or Stalin as the poster-boys of atrocities will fall on deaf ears in most of the world, and if Chinese want an atrocity poster-boy, they will use either Americans or Jews, or maybe Japanese, their version of history being at odds with much of the West. Chinese never make reference to ‘Nazis’ or ‘Huns’ and they never refer to the Japanese as “Japs”. These are American and/or Jewish racist constructs.

Thus, even a cursory examination of metaphors and cultural references can often positively identify a person’s ethnic background or at least negate the possibility of some backgrounds.

From a recent comment posted on an article here, by a person purporting to be Chinese:

“It is all about socioeconomic status. I can f… your daughter or your wife and turn them against you tomorrow if I wanted to.”

No Chinese would ever express such a sentiment. Forgive me if I offended you by repeating this.

Puella, puellae; puellae, puellarum . . .

Another part is language construction itself. The Cyrillic languages, as with Latin, have declensions for their nouns which in part substitute for the prepositions in the English language. This means the endings of nouns change according to their use in a sentence. As an example, ‘puella’ means ‘girl’ in Latin and is used when the subject of the sentence. ‘Puellae’ can mean the possessive – ‘of the girl’. So whereas in English we would say “the girl’s dress”, Latin will say “vestis puellae”, the change in spelling eliminating the preposition.

To be or not to be

Another of these is the verb “to be”. English has only one such verb, but Chinese, Italian, and some other languages have two such verbs, one literally meaning ‘to exist’ and the other meaning ‘to be in a place’ or to have a particular feeling. English says “I am” at the mall, which is a bit silly because it means I exist at the mall, but the language has no other way to express this sentiment. Italian has ‘essere’ – to be, and ‘stare’ – to be somewhere or feel something.

We all make mistakes

These items are important in identification because foreigners who are not fluent in English will all make mistakes, but the kinds of mistakes they make differ markedly according to their native language since they rely on the construction and grammar of that language. Because Russian has the same noun declensions, the expression is “I go store”, whereas English says “I am going to the store.” The words carry the identical meaning but the method of construction is different. Russians, Ukrainians, Bulgarians, will do this, but no Italians or French.

I once had occasion to look at a letter in the hands of a police officer searching for the ‘Chinese’ person who wrote it. It required only a few seconds to know the writer was not Chinese but a Caucasian, and not a very smart one. The writer clearly wanted to leave the impression of being Chinese but, in his assumption that Chinese would make grammar and other mistakes in English, and having no knowledge of languages or cultures, had no idea what kind of mistakes they might make. The best he could do was to imitate the kind of broken English that a sorely uneducated English person might make.

The reason I mention this is that one person commenting on this website, pretending to be Chinese, makes precisely this mistake, believing Chinese would make some grammatical errors, but clearly having no knowledge of the kinds of errors they might make. He does his best by inserting occasional and very obvious mistakes common to uneducated English Caucasians while in other posts manifesting an excellent command of English. The errors are actually glaring and laughable because, while Chinese will indeed make grammatical errors, they would not be of that nature.

I’m a Canadian, eh?

Negative questions are another identification point, such as “You’re not going to the party, are you?”. “Yes.” Well, yes what? “Yes, I’m not going.” Think of the expression, “I’m a Canadian, eh?” The last word has no use and carries no meaning. It’s just there. With the negative questions, most people read the first part “You’re not going to the party” as a statement, the remaining words merely useless emphasis, and thus they respond in the affirmative, meaning “Correct. I agree with what you said.” Since very few languages have this negative construction, they can be useful in identifying the speaker.

Mrs. Schrödinger’s Ferrari

There are a great many other national characteristics that affect both behavior and language. Germans are engineers, cool, precise, no nonsense, formal and reserved, high respect for quality. My desk can be next to that of a German woman for five years and I will still refer to her as ‘Mrs. Schrödinger’. The familiarity of a first name is for family and the closest of friends. And the cat.

Only the Germans could build a Mercedes or BMW; extreme engineering, generally faultless quality and reliability. With my Mercedes, I can go downstairs every morning for 25 years and I know my car will start when I turn the key. On the other hand, only the Italians could design and build a Ferrari or Lamborghini; breathtakingly beautiful, sinfully sexy, and stupidly fast. And, with my Ferrari, I go downstairs every morning and have no idea what will happen when I push the button. Similarly, only the French could design and build a 4CV, and only the Americans could make an AMC Gremlin. This is much more than nothing; these innate cultural characteristics affect the most minor portions of behavior as well as the way different ethnicities speak and write.

Hasbara and Friends

There also exist some curiosities about Jews, most noticeable in the apologists of events or when covering up crimes. In my mind, I seem to separate them into two categories. Many Jewish writers produce articles and books which are exemplary in terms of accuracy, caution, lack of exaggeration and overstatement, revealing even of substantial felonies but at the same time non-judgmental and non-provocative, dispassionate, quintessentially human, characteristics I envy. A good example is Ron Unz’ article on Chinese Melamine and American Vioxx. If you haven’t read it, you should.[2]https://www.unz.com/runz/chinese-melamine-and-americ...rison/ But the apologists, the historical revisionists, the Jewish Misinformation Committee, Hasbara, (and I have no way of knowing how large a group this is), lie with a consistency that qualifies as a template. The approach is the same, the manner of creating facts from invisible threads and weaving these together to form false conclusions, the universal tendency to blame the victim, the uncanny ability to introduce irrelevancies and sow confusion, the veiled use of shame and fear to push others off their positions. These tend to be so uniform that when they occur it is often possible to almost instantly identify the ethnicity of the author.

Believe as if you were on fire from within

There is also something interesting about passion as expressed in articles or reader comments. The passion of Americans exhibited in these pages stems primarily if not exclusively from ideology. Many of the more fiery articles and comments are from the primitive instincts and emotions (typical of the Right-Wing brain) in areas touching politics, religion, racism. On these topics, reader comments are passionate Cro-Magnon attacks as if responding to mortal danger. It may be true that, in the case of these people, any challenge to their positions does in a sense represent an existential threat, one to be repelled with an excess of verbal firepower. For non-Americans (or non-Neanderthals generally), passion is a positive reflection of a deep and abiding concern or conviction for some topic while for typical Americans passion in a positive sense mostly reflects a powerful desire for more bombing.

Following from this (and from much more I haven’t covered here), it can be surprisingly easy to identify the ethnic backgrounds of some people or at least to limit the range of potential nationality and ethnicity. And it is usually quite easy to identify and separate real Chinese from the pretenders.

Notes

[1] https://www.unz.com/lromanoff/a-few-historical-frauds/

[2] https://www.unz.com/runz/chinese-melamine-and-american-vioxx-a-comparison/

 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: American Media, China, Ethnicity, Jews 
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  1. I assumed the Chinese LARPers were just that.

    Also worth noting: Very few Chinamen are booting up a groggy, buggy VPN to post Unz Review comments about the impending collapse of America in English. They have their own internet for that. Any missives here from behind the great firewall are likely coming from expats like yours truly.

    • Replies: @Rahan
    , @yakushimaru
  2. Chris Moore says: • Website

    Thus, a typical Chinese female pretending to be an American girl would probably do it badly, and an American female pretending to be native Chinese would have no idea how to behave and would likely fool no one. In this same context, a Frenchman pretending to be a German cannot fool an Italian for very long. The national characteristics of peoples are powerfully affected by their culture and religion, with traits emanating directly from the psyche and not easily imitated. The fundamentals are simply too different.

    And yet a Zionist pretending to be an American is pretty easy to pull off… but the “tell” is always their contempt for the Constitution, the “white” founding stock, and the principles that the nation was built upon, in favor of their own “chosen-vanguard” race or ideological identity and/or their support for international Zionism or Marxism and its totalitarian agenda.

    The Marxist-Zionist can only conceal what it is for so long. But it’s also able to hide itself behind millions of ignorant, confused or schizophrenic Golem useful idiots, which makes it a tough nut to crack.

    Acting instinctively to save himself, Kyle Rittenhouse cut through all the confusion and delivered a love letter straight into the heart of ZOG’s minions.

    • Replies: @Dr.C. Fhandrich
  3. Pheasant says:

    ‘The U.S is the only country in the world where a full 75 percent of the population is of below average intelligence’

    How embarrasing…

    • Replies: @karel
  4. Pheasant says:

    ‘Usually by force’

    Whites prefer to be open about conflicts rather than dissumulating as orientals do.

    Chinese people may seem more enlightened than Whites but just wait til they stick the knife between your shoulder blades.

    Not picking on the Chinese it is the same for all eastern peoples.

    • Disagree: Iris
  5. Pheasant says:

    ‘But no Chinese have such an attitude.’

    Really?

    Because the Chinese have a shame culture just like the middle east does and shame cultures are almost always zero-sum games.

    I like your articles generally but here you are talking out of your hat.

  6. Patta says:

    Hei man no that is totalt wrong because I know it and you not, cannot apply anthropology to forums, we are only a selection of madmans. And who shout louder usually wins! Believe me because I’m Chinese, make best noodles in the world.

  7. Ko says:

    Wow, what a racist you are Larry.

  8. Larry, I have the impression that you are not only factually wrong but morally wrong, accusing Christianity when it stands for mercy and forgiveness, when it’s Judaism that stands for judging others, or, as they call it, justice.

    It’s easy to judge Christianity as represented by self-styled Christians like Pompeo, rather than observant Christians, easy but wrong. Pompeo is not a Christian.

  9. ‘The U.S is the only country in the world where a full 75 percent of the population is of below average intelligence’

    Lake Wobegone makes up for the rest.

    My desk can be next to that of a German woman for five years and I will still refer to her as ‘Mrs. Schrödinger’. The familiarity of a first name is for family and the closest of friends. And the cat.

    Not entirely true. As a native English speaker, you can offer the “du” pretty much across the board in terms of social station, sex, and age by telling a German they can call you by your first name, and more often than not they will tell you to call them by theirs. It’s a total violation of their culture that many willingly bend for you, especially if you are an American. However, the French are still somewhat chauvinistically formal, even more than the Germans in these matters, n’est-ce pas ?

    I think your list at comment 550 needed a better setup, but I can’t disagree with your point.

    好不好

  10. JasonT says:
    @Ann Nonny Mouse

    Exactly. The term “Christianity” has been co-opted by those who do not act as Christians.

  11. SysATI says:

    It’s not just the grammar of the structure of phrases…

    Some words and therefore concepts do exist in certain languages and not at all in others.

    One nice example is the turkish word “gurbet” which is the sick feeling you get in your guts when you’re far away from your country. In english it is “to be homesick” or “nostalgic”.

    But believe me “to be homesick” doesn’t even begin to explain what gurbet means.

    People have to leave their homeland for a long time before starting to feel such a pain. I guess Turks were warriors and spent most of their lives on conquests, away from home and that’s the reason that word exists in the language. None of the other european languages I know have an equivalent word.

    So it is simply impossible to an american/french/german/whatever to begin to imagine what that words means…

    I don’t know if there is an equivalent in another language, but I would guess that if there is, it is also a nation of warriors or travelers…

  12. Jim Given says:

    I’m not sure your comments about the Chinese are entirely correct. I recall Lin Yutang, in his book, “The Importance of Living,” presenting a list of traits that Chinese share with Americans. He included “rudeness” in his list. I believe that many Chinese find the rudeness so common in American big cities to be natural, and eagerly join in. Chinese clerks and shopkeepers are often rude, in my experience. Waiters in Chinese restaurants (in America) are often rude also, especially younger ones. (But I suspect these are offspring pressed into service in their parents’ restaurant, who would plainly prefer to be hanging out down at the mall.)

  13. Thomasina says:

    Blacks and Jews already hate Whites, but now the Chinese hate Whites too? Christian Whites are inferior to the modest Chinese?

    “Canadians and Americans particularly, in spite of their “melting pots” of peoples and cultures, generally display little to no understanding of other cultures and tend to interpret differences through ideological lenses and their lack of a culture…”

    Lack of a culture? Oh, we DID have a culture, right up until about 1965. That’s when a massive number of immigrants started to flood in, which ended up changing our culture. You’ve been listening to the academics, the people being paid by the vested interests who want to see the practice continue. How many riots have the Westerners had over this? I’m pretty sure I know how the Chinese would have handled it in their country – there’d be a few elite hanging from lamp posts.

    And I’ve seen how the Chinese react when their property in China goes down in value 10 or 20%. They riot. How many Americans do this?

    I’ve seen the insane reaction of a group of Chinese when they applied for a television licence, but didn’t get their way. Unjustified accusations of racism were immediately launched at the panel.

    I’ve personally had my car kicked by a Chinese man, and when I went to get out of my car, I was violently pushed against my open car door. He and his wife had been walking side-by-side on the road (even though there was a sidewalk), and as I slowly came around the bend in the road I went “beep beep” with my horn just to warn them that I was coming up behind them. He apparently felt he lost “face”, so he kicked my car. Chinese don’t like losing face (feeling ashamed for something they’ve done) and can become very aggressive when this happens. I couldn’t believe it.

    This is just a small example, I know, and I hope you don’t find me rude because I disagree with you, but I do not find the Chinese to be modest or meek at all. In fact, I find them to be very aggressive. In business dealings, you had better have a signed contract. If they are caught doing something they shouldn’t be doing, all of a sudden they don’t speak English. And then if nobody is looking, they’ll just continue on with the practice.

    As far as being corrupt, I would put the Chinese right behind the Jews, and not far behind at that!

    I could go on and on. I think it is you who thinks in black and white, Larry. The Chinese are no better or no worse; just different.

  14. Charles Dickens got paid a penny a page, and so he filled huge tranches of some of his novels with “fill.” Yup. Fill.

    • Replies: @Thomasina
    , @karel
  15. Thomasina says:
    @obwandiyag

    “Charles Dickens got paid a penny a page, and so he filled huge tranches of some of his novels with “fill.” Yup. Fill.”

    But what good fill!

  16. This is especially true of Americans of low intellect but, to be fair, the US is the only country in the world where a full 75% of the population is below average in intelligence.

    I never imagined the percentage would be this bad. Who did the study? No wonder the US is in the sad state it is in.

    Thank you, Mr. Romanoff, for the article and observations. I wish other columnists would write something similar. Maybe it would have some effect on curtailing this distasteful practice. Maybe not.

    I have been visiting this site for quite awhile now. Is it just me or have the insulting remarks and name-calling gotten progressively worse over time? I know there are all kinds of commenters, some with agendas, but it is still truly annoying.

    There was a comment in another article here that unz.com clears remarks that would not be allowed on other web-sites, due to the increasing censorship on specific topics. Guess then we have to take the good with the bad, don’t we?

    • Replies: @botazefa
  17. This may reveal me to be among the 75%, but… isn’t it impossible to be more than 50% below average by definition?

    • Replies: @Iris
    , @Kratoklastes
  18. If the Chinese culture does not shame people then why do they have social credit scores and even alerts on their phone when they are approaching someone with a delinquent bill? That is even more shaming than is done by Americans, big time! They are also prohibited from using public transportation with low social credit scores. A Chinese exchange student in America insisted on walking everywhere because her social credit score would be lowered if she did not walk so many steps a day. Not that I oppose walking, but that I oppose such monitoring! It really creeps me out! I had read this several years ago by one of the Tylers on Zero Hedge. Neither of the Tylers are American, so it can not be chalked up to American prejudices or American ignorance towards Chinese.

  19. Patta says:

    Dear mr. Romanoff
    your bad opinion about Americans or other native English speakers, stemming from the analysis of comments, may be biased on the worse by the following effect:

    The sample of native Englis speakers is picked quite random; even with the heavy ignorance you allege, most of them can read and write, and may end up in this or other outlets.

    The foreginers that read and comment articles in English language are cherry-picked, curious individuals that go searching for informations in a foreign language. Hence their (our) comments will in general more acknowledged and respectful of different ideas.

    How many Americans read and comment articles in Russian, Chinese or even simply Spanish? Very few indeed; but I guess that if we read those comments, they will paint a much different profile of the “average” American.

  20. I like this article. There is a problem i totally don’t care about.

    Somebody wants to be a Chinese in a comment section? Why not? Let him do.
    There is so much stupidity in the world, this little extra did not count

    BTW: My problem is much harder. I prefer to pretend i am a Penguin on an Antarctic ice floe.
    But i never found a co-commenter that trusted me. 😉

  21. BuelahMan says:

    I’m trying to understand why Ron Unz thinks this author is worthy of real estate.

    • Troll: Kali
    • Replies: @Begemot
    , @RoatanBill
    , @Saggy
  22. It is a refreshing change to find such a well thought out article here. Outgrowing the toxic heritage of patriarchal monotheism is such a major element of the growing pains our culture is suffering through, and with good reason. Christianity is a spiritual Big Mac: it satisfies your hunger but does not nourish you. It impoverishes you by sating your instinctual yearning for transcendence with a value system that is so rigidly judgmental and dualistic that it forms a well nigh impenetrable barrier to true self-awareness and serenity. Plus, as the Red Queen said, it demands you believe six impossible things before breakfast.

    Christianity was the best that men could devise within the limitations of ignorance, magical thinking, and superstition of the ancient cultures that spawned it. Today Christian beliefs are shallow and unsatisfactory anachronisms. Jesus is not a great moral teacher. He merely makes arbitrary assertions. He never deigns to advance arguments for their validity, unlike the great philosophers of the classical tradition, but threatens hell fire as punishment for disregarding them or heavenly rewards for unquestioning obedience. In fact a moral system that is based on reward and punishment is not morality: it is merely self-interest. Moreover, Jesus’ supposedly original teachings are adaptations or paraphrases of contemporary Jewish thought, cobbled together for what he thought were “the end times” presaging the imminent return of Yahweh.

    The Christian system of belief fails to comprehend the true expansiveness of human nature, and is simply wrong in its understanding of the natural world and its workings. We were not placed on a hostile planet ruled by invisible spirits, at the whim of a supernatural sky-being which can be manipulated by magical thoughts or rituals, and we cannot retain our individual consciousness after we die.

    Because these distorted beliefs (which they hold to be the only correct ones) form the basis of how Christians perceive reality and respond to it, Christianity’s demand for conformity produces very serious problems for the rest of us, who seek to incorporate the intervening centuries of human progress into our belief and value systems.

    • Replies: @Chris Moore
  23. KlcTan says:

    A prominent Hong Kong pundit and anti-China activist named Kong Tsung-gan has become a go-to source for Western media. An investigation by The Grayzone confirms Kong as a fake identity employed by an American teacher who’s a ubiquitous figure at local protests.

    Go to Grayzone to find out.

  24. Iris says:
    @Sollipsist

    There is nothing stupid in your question.

    Intelligence, as do any other “natural” parameters, tend to be distributed in a symmetrical “Bell Curve” or Gaussian, or Normal Distribution.

    The curve is centered around the average value of the parameter, in our case the (arbitrary) 100 IQ value.

    The standard deviation (defined as the square root of the variable’s variance) is a calculated positive quantity by which one measures the dispersion of values on either sides of the curve’s average.

    The value of the standard deviation SD is also a “natural” parameter, that makes a bell curve either “sharp” around its average, or more “flat” and covering a larger range of values.

    Most IQ studies agree on a SD=15 value. So the likelihood of being below IQ=50 can be calculated, with average =100 and SD=15 ( see online tool below), and returns a value of 0.0004, meaning that only 0.04% of the population may have an IQ below 50, which is indeed insignificant.
    http://onlinestatbook.com/2/calculators/normal_dist.html

    • Thanks: Kali
  25. Most impostors and whites blogging from china are pepople with british last names, the idiot chinese should know by now the head of the western snake are people of british descent cut off contact with these snakes then only will there be peace, deny visas into china all british last named people there should be zero tolerance even for tourists.

    • Replies: @Thomasina
  26. Anonymous[305] • Disclaimer says:

    Many of the more fiery articles and comments are from the primitive instincts and emotions (typical of the Right-Wing brain) in areas touching politics, religion, racism. On these topics, reader comments are passionate Cro-Magnon attacks as if responding to mortal danger.

    They are in mortal danger. Self-preservation is probably one of those “primitive” impulses we should keep and anger is one of the most useful emotions for humans and animals alike.

    You need to pop that “non-primitive” bubble you inhabit or at least stop preaching behind that thin, delusional membrane.

    • Agree: Thomasina
    • Replies: @Kali
  27. Rahan says:
    @Supply and Demand

    Very few Chinamen are booting up a groggy, buggy VPN to post Unz Review comments about the impending collapse of America

    You have to remember that:
    a) not all of the foreign internets are banned from China, just certain chunks (porn) and certain specific players (Google, Youtube, Facebook, NYT, etc).

    b) different societies have different criteria of what to censor. China’s communists are not western liberal leftists, and although may form some forms of tactical alliances with them, the values are mostly opposite.

    From China one would need a VPN for the New York Times or for Youtube, but not for Unz.com or for Gab. Those were fine last time I checked. There are places on the web that list the current forbidden lists in China in English. Unz is never there. The Daily Stormer is never there. CNN and Fox News are also quite available.

    To summarize:
    1) China’s borders are open, not closed Soviet style
    2) Chinese people can own property and dollars, unlike in the USSR
    3) George Orwell and Ian Fleming and Ayn Rand are translated and published there
    4) You can watch whatever film you like and listen to whatever music you like
    5) Only porn and “outright enemy media” are blocked on the web.

    Believing the corporate right’s disinformation how China is a mix of North Korea and the USSR, is on par with believing the corporate left’s disinformation how Russia is a Christian Fascist Fourth Reich.

    Doesn’t mean China and Russia are the pinnacle of humanity. Means the corporate left and right are full of it is all.

    • Replies: @Supply and Demand
  28. Chris Moore says: • Website
    @Observator

    The Christian system of belief fails to comprehend the true expansiveness of human nature, and is simply wrong in its understanding of the natural world and its workings. We were not placed on a hostile planet ruled by invisible spirits, at the whim of a supernatural sky-being which can be manipulated by magical thoughts or rituals, and we cannot retain our individual consciousness after we die.

    But Christianity pointed the way out of that Jewish superstition.

    Think of The Who’s I’m Free:

    But you’ve been told many times before, Messiah’s pointed to the door, But no one had the guts to leave the temple… I’m free, and freedom tastes of reality.

    Moses pointed to Jesus, Jesus pointed to the West. Jewish money changers have hoodwinked the “rationalists” and materialists of the West and are gradually circling the world back to their superstitions ways, where their temple priests ruling from Jerusalem are the ultimate power.

    And they’ve demonstrated how primitive and whore-like these Western rationalists are along the way; primitive and whore like because they didn’t deal with the Hebrew primitives as Moses did, or tried to do.

    So true Judeo-Christian fundamentals (not Jew-worshiping Zionism) are important. And true Judeo-Christian fundamentals are “anti-Semitic.” Moses was “anti-Semitic.” Jesus was “anti-Semitic.” The West was “anti-Semitic.”

    When the West dropped its “anti-Semitism,” all progress ceased, and the world is reverting back to primitive superstition, led by the Jewish primitives.

  29. botazefa says:
    @Three of Swords

    There was a comment in another article here that unz.com clears remarks that would not be allowed on other web-sites, due to the increasing censorship on specific topics. Guess then we have to take the good with the bad, don’t we?

    I don’t see an alternative. Hopefully your good example will have an impact. Hopefully people will have the discipline to ignore trollers and toxic commenters. And implement the ‘ignore’ feature liberally.

  30. @Rahan

    I’m in China (Dalian, Liaoning Province) at the moment and would be happy to confirm that Unz Review is only accessible through a VPN.

    • Thanks: Rahan
    • Replies: @Erebus
    , @Larry Romanoff
  31. Begemot says:
    @BuelahMan

    And yet, this author is worthy of your time and attention. Curious.

  32. Thomasina says:
    @australianbrainsize1325snicker

    And in the western countries the Chinese have been the head of the eastern snake. Their Jew-like pursuit of wealth has led to money laundering, rampant speculation, and the destruction of many western cities. They have not been a plus.

  33. karel says:
    @Pheasant

    My guess is more like 90% but you would have to take the average IQ value from a Chinese survey.

  34. karel says:
    @obwandiyag

    What fillings do you use to get some pennies?

  35. @BuelahMan

    To answer your question, it’s because he can write and he generally makes a lot of sense.

    • Agree: Kali
  36. @Ann Nonny Mouse

    I think he is partly correct. The Puritans, who some would argue are not really Christians, came from the perspective that all were inherently wicked, and only their religious view could redeem them.
    On the other hand, the Quakers saw all were inherently good, but succumbed to temptation.
    In the big scheme of things, the Puritans seem to have won out.
    I have never considered any “born again Christian” or “Christian Zionist” to be a Christian, so you’ll get no argument from me about observant Christians vs Pompeo.

  37. @Sollipsist

    It depends on which average is being used (more generally it also depends on the degree of skew of the distribution, but IQ distributions have zero excess skewness by construction).

    If group A has an IQ distribution with a lower average than group B, then the proportion of group A that is below group B’s average will be more than 50%.

    Note though that Mr. Romanoff didn’t say that 75% of USans had an IQ lower than the average; he sid that 75% of USans were less intelligent than the average. Perhaps he had a more nuanced definition of ‘intelligence’.

    As an example: in the OECD’s PIAAC studies, the median score for US adults is the worst of all the Anglophone countries; in both literacy and numeracy, the average US adult scores below the bottom cutoff for the median PIAAC band. Focusing on numeracy: the median US adult score for numeracy (253) is barely above the 25th percentile score for Finnish people (251) and is 15 points below the Australian median (268).

    In the OECD PISA tests (focused on younger people), the US scores 18 points below the OECD average for Mathematics, but somehow scores above the median for ‘Science’.

    I admit I have a strong bias in favour of numeracy as a key indicator of raw cognitive grunt: for a start, you can’t finagle the test or the results. You can’t emote your way to a top-decile grade in Mathematics.

    The US has the lowest proportion of ‘high performers’ in PISA Mathematics – 1.6%, which is roughly half the level of other Anglophone countries, and is less than ⅔ of the OECD average proportion of ‘high performers’ (2.4%). Worse, it’s ⅒ of the proportion of the (biased) Chinese results (“biased” because they only include BSJZ and ignore rural China).

    Face it: the Yank educational central planners have successfully enstupidated their population.

    It doesn’t help that a bunch of Yanks have a cognitive version of Toxoplasma Gondii (the protozoa that makes mice become attracted to cat piss): the mind-virus of flag worship and reflexive cult-level nationalism. (Other forms of religious impulse are just as bad, and just as prevalent).

    • Replies: @Chinaman
  38. Chinaman says:

    Dear Larry

    I am truly honoured that someone would think it is worthwhile to devote a 2600 word article to exposing me (or my persona here, Chinaman). I think this is the only occasion on Unz.com that a commenter have garner such attention and I honestly appreciate the opportunity to interact with you- someone who almost triggered WW3 by revealing the the TRUE origins of the (Fort Detrick) coronavirus – You deserve a Nobel peace prize for your bravery and for speaking truth to power, to evil. Every Chinese is in debt to you for exonerating them from this unbearable crime against humanity. Please continue the good work and regardless of whether you are associated with the CCP, please continue with the “戰狼 wolf warrior” diplomacy.

    It is really unfortunate that we got off on the wrong foot here and I also know that there is nothing I can do or say here which would convince you that I am indeed Chinese and not masquerading as one. To be clear, I am a Chinese who have grown up on the ex-British colony of Hong Kong and have lived in the West for many years. I think that much will suffice as the explanation for the various aberrant behaviour that you have noted. None of which you have observed in mainlanders. As any observer who have been following the events in HK (Should I say the comprador revolt?) will conclude:

    Hongkongers are pretty fucked up.

    In any case, it seems that I have pass the Turing test of being White, or being a conniving Jew. It give me no pleasure in saying that I am more successful at masquerading as White than as I am, a Chinese. The worst form of colonialism is that of the mind and of culture and it seems that it have left an indelible vestige on me. May be it is true that I have brought shame to my people by inviting such vitriol and it might be better for me to “save face” for them by admitting that I am a Jew masquerading as Chinese.

    On the other hand, may be I am just being myself, in all my perfections and imperfections. My typos and carelessness compounded by Apple’s egregious autocorrect algorithms when typing on an IPad.

    You are right that cars reflect the national character. A Ferrari will give you drama and emotions that no Mercedes can deliver but even amongst Ferraris, a puny V8 California is not the same 2004 V10 screamer that Schumacher drove. There are 1.4 billion Chinese. That’s a lot of us and no matter how you or others would like to fit us in little square boxes with well defined labels. There will be the occasional nail that sticks out. In fact, if you look close enough, you will find that each of us are as human and as diverse as the other few billion individuals on earth. Being Chinese is an inalienable part of my identity and on a website like this, I think it is important that I state my identity as I tussle with 2 digit IQ White nationalists and resident psychopaths here. Sorry for any confusion I have caused.

    If you were ever to come by HK, please look me up. ( please provide me with a way to contact you) It will be my pleasure to buy you a drink.

    Yours sincerely
    Chinaman

  39. Chinaman says:
    @Kratoklastes

    Worse, it’s ⅒ of the proportion of the (biased) Chinese results (“biased” because they only include BSJZ and ignore rural China).

    I wouldn’t call it a bias. I believe there are 100 million people living within 300km of Shanghai. That’s UK + Australia.

    If you were to look at UK’s IQ, would NOT taking into account Australian’s IQ – whose genotype would contain higher proportions of deleterious genes due to adverse “convict” selection and mixing- be considered a bias?

    Zhejiang, which sits on the ancient kingdom of Wu, have to a different population than say Northen China. I believe Zhenjiang’s IQ is around 115 ( as you might be able to discern from PISA). Guangzhou, which is genetically closer to Vietnamese, is lower. I think is intellectually sloppy to assume that all Han Chinese have homogeneous IQs, just as it is wrong to assume White American IQ is representative of average American IQ.

  40. Chinaman says:
    @Chinaman

    Dear Mr Unz

    I would really appreciate the golden border around my previous reply to Mr Romanoff, if only to let he and others to read it.

    Thank you.

  41. Erebus says:
    @Supply and Demand

    I’m in Guangdong, and I’ve never had to use a VPN to access UR. I often do use one either because I’m already on it, or simply because it’s normally much faster than waiting for Cloudflare’s annoying “inspection” of my browser. Cloudflare’s redirect is supposed to take 5 sec, but it’s not unusual for it to take 20 sec or more, or sometimes to just hang altogether.

    I don’t have any Western social media accounts so I don’t miss my FB, Messenger, etc but [a] the connection is generally much faster thru a VPN, and [b] I often do want to read “enemy media” simply to track and assess the latest nonsense.

    • Agree: Larry Romanoff
    • Thanks: Rahan
  42. @Thomasina

    so ethnicity has slaughtered more people and raped and killed women and children, dont compare animals to humans ,

  43. @Supply and Demand

    I’m sorry, but this is an outright lie. Unz.com is available in China and has always been. No VPN, no nothing required.

    • Thanks: Rahan
    • Replies: @Rahan
  44. Rahan says:
    @Larry Romanoff

    Perhaps in different parts of China the Internet control can be looser or stricter?

    Or maybe there are generic structural hiccups (for example a website loading easily only in certain parts of the day), and this poster decided, due to such hiccups, that Unz.com is off limits, without checking if he was jumping to conclusions?

  45. Alfa158 says:

    “This is especially true of Americans of low intellect but, to be fair, the US is the only country in the world where a full 75% of the population is below average in intelligence. Another kind of American exceptionalism.“
    A point I had never thought of before, explains a lot. I was wondering if Brazil has close to the same situation. I can’t think of any other countries that presently might have the same population composition where both the low intelligence groups and high intelligence groups are each a significant portion of the country. The Northern European countries are heading that way so some of us will see them join the 75% club in the next decades.

    “Only the Germans could build a Mercedes or BMW; extreme engineering, generally faultless quality and reliability. With my Mercedes, I can go downstairs every morning for 25 years and I know my car will start when I turn the key.”
    Well actually the Japanese do it just as well, the Koreans are getting there, and even American cars are improving. We Italians are a special case and I like to think of it as part of our quirky charm. When I was a kid I owned a FIAT sports car and it proved the old saying that keeping an Italian car running was like building a sand castle with the tide coming in, but the car was so charming you couldn’t stay mad at it. It also benefited from comparison at that time to British sports cars that were even worse. Despite my pseudonym , I would never buy something like an Alfa as a daily driver.

  46. The top selling vehicle in the USA for 35 years has been the Ford F150. Your choice of the AMC Gremlin as typical of American manufacturing is silly. Before we were betrayed by the current crop of aliens who occupy the financial high ground, we made some pretty good stuff–not all of it was great by any means, but enough to get by pretty well.

  47. d dan says:
    @Chinaman

    “It is really unfortunate that we got off on the wrong foot here …”

    Oh boy, what a mess. Larry Romanoff is a very knowledgeable person, and he is obviously a friend of the Chinese people. I hope you could sort out the misunderstanding. There are many important issues and discussions that still need both your fine contributions in future. Good luck to both.

    • Thanks: Chinaman
  48. Kali says:
    @Anonymous

    Mortal danger from writings?
    Self preservation by name-calling over the internet?

    Seriously?

    You need to pop that “non-primitive” bubble you inhabit or at least stop preaching behind that thin, delusional membrane.

    The man is holding up a mirror for you. He is not the threat you face, that threat lies much closer to home.

  49. @Chinaman

    You are one of the very best commenters on this website, no doubt about that. Thank you for your excellent contributions, and please continue your high-grade trolling of all the low-IQ morons here. It’s fun to watch.

    Mr. Romanoff is a bit hit-or-miss for me. Some of his articles are very good, others (like this one) become overly loopy and self-indulgent. Still, he’s more interesting than 95% of the other writers at UNZ.

    • Replies: @Chinaman
  50. Chinaman says:
    @Ghan-buri-Ghan

    Thanks, man. Very kind of you to lavish such praise. A bit hesitant on how to respond. If I am too humble, then I am definitely masquerading as a Chinese since no Chinese are that obsequious. If I do a victory lap, then that could only mean I am a Jew since only they are that egotistical.

    I am just here to rant and troll on morons. Hard to find a higher concentration of American psychos and redneck anywhere else on the internet. Glad you enjoyed it. Let’s tag- team them next time.

    I should say that I take personal responsibility for my vulgarities and indiscretions here and it should not reflect on my countryman. I am the worst of all Chinaman and do not represent them.

    It is just me.

    • Agree: Ghan-buri-Ghan
  51. vot tak says:

    This role playing is a guardianista specialty. They pretend to be someone else as part of their role in the zpc psywar. This applies both with regard to ethnicity and politics. These are cowardly, extremist propagandists that have absolutely zero moral grounding. They will push anything, as long as it wont rebound on them personally.

    Their home base for personal bs: justthetalk.com.

    For political/geopolitical topics: offguardian.org.

  52. Smith says:

    It’s these kind of whites that really need to stay out of Asia.

    This Larry guy sounds like a headcase to me.

  53. @Chinaman

    Actually, the intellectual climate, if I may call it so, used to be better.
    With comment sections drying up everywhere else, strange characters appear on these pages.

    Keep up the good work.

  54. @Chinaman

    I think this is the only occasion on Unz.com that a commenter have garner such attention

    it seems that it have left

    Spot the errors? Maybe it is suchlike that gave LR the wrong idea … or the right idea?

  55. @Ann Nonny Mouse

    My impression, when I read that statement, was that Larry had never set foot in an Orthodox church, because not judging one’s brother is really a big thing in orthodoxy; and there’s a very powerful lent-time prayer when we ask for the strength not to judge, repeated a good dozen times with inclinations. My guess is that buddhism and religious (i.e. basically buddhist) confucianism are all about personal salvation, much like Eastern orthodoxy. And, just as they are comparatively weak on the missionary spirit, especially compared with protestant sects, they are somewhat deeper in spiritual commitment.

    • Replies: @showmethereal
  56. @Chris Moore

    Excellent comments. It amazed me, how, despite the intense indoctrination and B.S. directed at young white Americans like Kyle to hate themselves, he non-the less, defended himself like a career soldier,, or trained cop.

  57. Saggy says:
    @BuelahMan

    The cynical view is that Unz seeds the website with crackpots like Romanoff to discredit the site.

  58. @Ann Nonny Mouse

    Everything Yeshua (westerners call Him Jesus) was from the Hebrew/Aramaic scriptures.. His point was He was correcting false interpretations… But yeah I don’t see many “fruits of the Spirit” coming out of Mike Pompeo

  59. @Jean-Marie L

    Confucianism is more of a philosophy than a religion

    • Replies: @Jean-Marie L.
  60. @showmethereal

    Confucius lived in the 6th century BC, like Lǎozǐ. The earliest form of Buddhism came to China under the Hàn Dynasty, in the 2nd century AD. It was a religious form of Buddhism (mahayana), with a doctrine of salvation, and this doctrine was readily adopted into Confucianism and Taoism, which, being only philosophies, albeit with a moral (Confucianism) and metaphysical (Taoism) component, had dwindled down to a very thin following by that time.

    • Replies: @showmethereal
  61. @Jean-Marie L.

    True and all three exist today still… Though Confucianism has reverted back to a philosopy. That is one of the ways “socialism with Chinese characteristics” is carried out. The ruling government party melds Confucianism with Marxism now. Even a state owned airline melds Taoism thought in its name “OTT airlines”. But while Buddhism is promoted as Chinese culture (and many folk beliefs) – you are not “supposed” to be a party member and participate in religion.

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