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Saigon, 2018-2

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“Tổ Quốc Trên Hết” [“Nation Above All”] was a slogan of the defunct and much maligned Republic of South Vietnam, while the Socialist North rallied their populace with “Chống Mỹ Cứu Nước” [“Fight the Americans, Save the Nation”]. During the war, both Vietnamese sides stressed their nationalist credentials while discrediting their opponent as a foreign puppet. The common Vietnamese soldier, then, didn’t fight and die for capitalism, communism, democracy, internationalism, universal brotherhood, America, Russia or China, but only for Vietnam, for only nationalism could justify so much sacrifice, pain and endurance.

Two miles from me is St. Francis Xavier Church. In Vietnam, there are Catholic churches that combine Western and Eastern architectural elements, with Phát Diệm Cathedral, completed in 1891, the most striking example. Though St. Francis Xavier is quite modest in size, it’s very charming and elegant, with a Chinese pavilion in its courtyard sheltering the Virgin Mary. The red, buttony cross on its ornate gate is flanked by two white, upturned carps, while inside, the main crucifix, with an ivory-white Jesus, is framed by two contrapuntal couplets, in Chinese.

On November 2st, 1963, President Ngo Dinh Diem and his brother, Ngo Dinh Nhu, were captured at St. Francis Xavier Church, where they had fled to escape a coup. Tied up and dumped inside an armored personnel carrier, both were then shot.

Since the Americans had propped up Diem, it was they who had to give the go ahead to depose, if not kill, the man, and though Diem is often caricatured as just an American puppet, he was clearly not just that, for otherwise, there would have been no reason to wipe him out.

The very fact that he was killed by the American deep state means he wasn’t serving it very faithfully. Likewise, John F. Kennedy was also assassinated three weeks later, and though that rub out is even murkier, to the point of farce, its lessons are also abundantly clear.

If you’re an American citizen, the state doesn’t owe you any reasonable explanation, about anything, and if you’re a politician within the American orbit, it’s best that you toe the line and ask no inconvenient questions. Carter, Clinton, Bush father and son, Obama, Trump, Sanders, Hillary or whoever, they understand perfectly well the diagram of magic bullets dancing in a shattered skull, so none will let slip one heretical statement about the USS Liberty, say, or 9/11.

In Saigon in 2016, Obama visited Jade Emperor Pagoda. Built by the Chinese in 1909, it’s considered old by local standards, but Saigon is a pretty new city. Founded in 1698, it’s a decade younger than Philadelphia. Near me on Nguyen Trai Street, there’s a handful of Chinese temples from the 19th century, and the other day, I found myself ogling at one, again, as I trudged by in the heat and dark. If this was any other East Asian city, however, these modest structures wouldn’t even be mentioned in a guidebook.

Renamed Ho Chi Minh City after April 30th, 1975, this city is still universally called Saigon in daily conversations, as well as on countless shop signs, and not just here, but across the country. In Hanoi, for example, you’d find stores advertising “Saigon fashion,” and restaurants serving dishes in the “Saigon style.” Now as ever, a native son is still a “người Sài Gòn.” Finally, you can’t erase by a governmental decree a name that’s immortalized by all those songs, novels, stories and poems.

I’m bringing this up because a couple of righteous nitwits have chastised me for not knowing the name of my native city, with one John Lawrence Ré commenting, “Calling it Saigon is for revisionists still living in the illusion of american exceptionalism”! Only an American exceptionalist revisionist with the deepest illusions about himself, country and history can barf up such a load of unintended irony. It is hopeless.

War against the Americans over, the Vietnamese communists promptly fought against communist Cambodia, then China, so there goes international communist solidarity, not that it ever existed, then the Soviet Union collapsed. With communism discredited for everyone but Western bourgeoisie posers, Vietnamese Communists have resorted to the old standby, nationalism, for their legitimacy. Nation above all.

Across Vietnam, then, you’ll find nationalist murals and posters exhorting the people to defend the nation, as in “PARACEL ISLANDS AND SPRATLY ISLANDS BELONG TO VIETNAM,” “WE CHILDREN LOOK TOWARD OUR NATION’S SEA AND ISLANDS” and “FIRMLY PROTECT THE OWNERSHIP OF VIETNAMESE SEA AND ISLANDS,” etc. There’s even a kids’ coloring book called “Sea Islands My Nation,” with a boy sailor standing on a beach, holding an AK-47, with a lighthouse behind him.

In the West, nationalism has become a dirty word to the educated, progressive class, who routinely equate it with fascism. They also see national borders as somehow obsolete and oppressive, but what’s ignored is that each man is profoundly defined and marked, with practically each of his word and action, by his national heritage. Having lived as an adult in five countries, and traveled to dozens more, I have never met anyone, no matter how cosmopolitan, who isn’t essentially one nationality, with only a handful tolerably passing as a second. The nation, then, is the totality of who you are, and it’s where and how you are properly seen and understood.

The most common Vietnamese word for nation is actually “water,” as in I was born in this water and I will defend my water to the death. What water are you from? Shaped by a unique history and language, every nation sees the world differently, so only the most naive or educated can even pretend we’re all the same.

Philadelphia’s Italian Market may be one of the funkiest American neighborhoods, but it’s still not Saigon, not that it should be. Each day, I become more reintegrated to my native city, so instead of bullshitting in Friendly Lounge, with the Phillies in the background, I found myself, like tonight, eating two duck balluts on a sidewalk, then wandering through clogged streets and darkened alleys to reach another eatery, where I had some pretty good beef, bò lúc lắc, plus two Tiger beers, for just $4.27. As with most Vietnamese joints, there was no clear boundary between business and street, so intinerant food vendors approached my table, and the owner’s kids ran all over, with the alley as their playground. Surrounding me were office and factory workers, eating, drinking and talking, with no canned noise to interrupt them. As always, the main pleasure was mingling.

Foreigners may sneer that the Vietnamese aesthetics seems to range from slovenly casualness to high kitsch, but judging by how your average Vietnamese is dressed, to the way he decorates his home or business, visual elegance or beauty is clearly not that important here. If you want that, fly to Japan. In Vietnam, a man is content if he has a plastic chair to sit on, with some tasty morsels in front of him, and people to converse with or simply see. So what if there’s garbage under the table, and the wall he’s leaning on is dirty. He’ll chatter away, laugh.

ORDER IT NOW

At a park near me, a woman decided to open a noodle shop, so she set up a few tables not just in front of her house, but across the alley, in the park itself, and no one thinks anything of it, not even the cops who regularly lounge in the same park, but that’s Vietnam for you. Borders are routinely smudged here.

Squatting on the ground, a pudding vendor chastised me for carrying my baby nephew wrong, “You’re going to make him bow legged!” In an alley, a stranger blurted, “What a cute baby! I’ve been married for ten years but I can’t conceive. You don’t know how much I suffer, brother.” Instant familiarity is common here, and it’s built into the language, for everyone is your older or younger brother, older or younger sister, greater or lesser uncle, or greater or lesser aunt, etc.

Although all languages were designed to establish degrees of kinship, some stress these bonds more than others, and Americans prefer, simply, the egalitarian “you” and “I.”

A month ago, I hung out with a Vietnamese-American friend who’s a professor at a California university. Though H. came to the US as a child, she never adopted an Anglo first name. Plus, H. speaks Vietnamese reasonably well, visits Vietnam often and has built her entire academic career on Vietnam. Despite all this, H. does not consider Vietnam to be her nation, “because this place is entirely owned by men,” an oversimplistic assertion, I thought, and told her so. Tellingly, H. also doesn’t consider the US to be her country. In her mid 50’s, H. is divorced, so she’s not only nationless, but without anyone to come home to. Living in Los Angeles, H. spends much time sitting in a car, staring at other people’s tail ends. Though she would protest, H. is entirely shaped by America, and is quintessentially, anomically American. If H. was more Vietnamese, she would know that her fate is bound up with her family, community and nation.

Linh Dinh’s latest book is Postcards from the End of America. He maintains a regularly updated photo blog.

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Vietnam 
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  1. TheJester says:

    Linh Dinh,

    Thank you for your insights. You are always spot on on the issues of the nation and one’s identity … the one we present to the world. We apparently wear it on our faces, in our clothes, and in our body language.

    Once I was existing a 747 from business class. The stewardess at the exit wished everyone an individual “goodbye” in a broad smattering of languages … first German, then French, then English (with an American accent … although she was German), etc. I’m confident she did not get one of us wrong. It’s that obvious, even within a crowd of people with different European identities.

    • Replies: @Anon
  2. sondjata says:

    “A month ago, I hung out with a Vietnamese-American friend who’s a professor at a California university. Though H. came to the US as a child, she never adopted an Anglo first name. Plus, H. speaks Vietnamese reasonably well, visits Vietnam often and has built her entire academic career on Vietnam. Despite all this, H. does not consider Vietnam to be her nation, “because this place is entirely owned by men,” an oversimplistic assertion, I thought, and told her so. Tellingly, H. also doesn’t consider the US to be her country. In her mid 50’s, H. is divorced, so she’s not only nationless, but without anyone to come home to.”

    Very powerful statement. I guarantee that she is full of regret but to proud to say.

  3. LindaJ says:

    Hi, Linh. It pains me to say so, but I’m an American (North of course) and I know it. May I rot in hell! (It’s okay. I don’t believe in Hell.) Thanks for your writing. Linda

    • Replies: @Old Jew
  4. ‘…Despite all this, H. does not consider Vietnam to be her nation, “because this place is entirely owned by men,”…’

    The sheer nihilism of this attitude just struck me. After all, so much of human culture and socialization has to do with making it possible for men and women to get along in some reasonably harmonious manner.

    Then spoiled children like this come along and throw it all out because it doesn’t meet their (recently invented and rather artificial) ethical expectations. Do they think something better is going to magically replace it all when it’s gone?

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
  5. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    US and Philippines.

    It seems the bloodiest US wars were all in Asia.

    In Philippines, with Japan, with Korea/China, with Vietnam.

    Millions dead.

    Will 21st century be worse?

    • Agree: Agent76
  6. Very similar in Thailand where people prefer to share food sitting on a mat on the floor to sitting at a table. No-one knocks at the door but just walks in, and if the family is eating, then whoever it might be is encouraged to join the family and eat. People share spoons to serve the food and their fingers to eat. It is so much more intimate and civilised, although as a westerner it takes bit of getting used to.
    Similar also is the right to set up stalls at the side of the road to sell home-made food, or fruit and vegetables from people’s gardens.
    Driving home the other day my wife had a ‘phone call and asked me to stop the car. She walked across the road and broke a big leaf from a banana plant.
    “Don’t you need to ask?”
    “For what?” Tong is cooking fish and needs a banana leaf.”
    “What about the owner?”
    “Never mind. It’s ok. Don’t worry. He won’t mind.”

    • Replies: @Joe Aproso
  7. When read Linh’s articles, I automatically think how my liberal toolbox would “improve” Vietnam. Public Banking, public investment in schooling and healthcare, science and so forth.

    The “do gooding” urge dies hard in us liberals.

  8. Linh Dinh, your writing has become more enjoyable, from my perspective at least, since you returned to Vietnam.

  9. More simplistic words from another career CIA agent. North, south, divide, conquer and more fake news. Keep posting!

  10. Anon[158] • Disclaimer says:
    @TheJester

    Thank you for your comment.

    Well said. Spot on!

  11. @Si1ver1ock

    We really need to find a cure for busybody-ism. It will be the death of mankind.

    • Replies: @jacques sheete
  12. Though H. came to the US as a child, she never adopted an Anglo first name

    It’s not Anglo first names, it’s Jewish first names. Some people think that by adopting these strange names when coming to this country, some even abandon their ancestors’ faiths and convert to Christianity, they may get accepted into the mainstream by the natives while in fact they will never be.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  13. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    Give credit where it’s due. Communism was a bad economic system, but by stressing the importance of the Worker, it staved off the worst of capitalist degeneracy. Now, Vietnam and China may eventually get to where the West is yet, but both have communism to thank for serving as a bulwark against the West whose culture is now pure degeneracy. Look at Japan and South Korea. Total demented whore-nations of the globo-homo West.

    And look how Eastern Europe is saner than Western Europe. Communism wasn’t all bad.

  14. This is phase one. In about a year, we’ll get to phase two.

    Linh Dinh will get bored and return to America the Incredible.

  15. MBlanc46 says:
    @Colin Wright

    The expectations may be artificial and recently invented. But the hostility is deep and almost certainly ancient. The expectations are merely the cover story.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  16. @MBlanc46

    ‘The expectations may be artificial and recently invented. But the hostility is deep and almost certainly ancient…’

    Is it? Living up here with the white peasantry, I’m starting to wonder. It’s definitely a bit late in the day for me to discover this, but some of the girls are awfully nice.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
  17. Da Wei says:

    Linh Dinh,

    Nice work.

    Your piece portrays co-existing ideas and images in 2 countries: acculturation with religion; fashionable pretense and tradition; isolation and community. There’s a lot implied here to spin the mind, e.g. deep state assassinations; the Viet Nam war and implicitly the deception of the Gulf of Tonkein Resolution; USS Liberty; sheepish submission posing as brazen political leadership, all betrayal.

    Then, there’s the inevitability of individual identity and on this matter Popeye is Everyman: “Eye yam what eye yam an’ that’s all what eye yam.” Your final image is a haunting one of H enclosed in in her own little bubble in a sea of LA traffic, without intimacy or even community, having realized the American dream. Hell, Linh, you’ve got a novel here.

  18. “Despite all this, H. does not consider Vietnam to be her nation, “because this place is entirely owned by men,” an oversimplistic assertion, I thought, and told her so. “

    Sounds like she’s caught the (((western))) disease of feminism and at 50, divorced and alone, is paying the price for it. I have a Korean colleague like that. She’s still reasonably attractive but learned strident feminism as a graduate student in the US in the nineties and is now alone and childless as she approaches fifty. She told me recently that she now has three cats. In Korea that could’ve been three kids and a much more fulfilling life.

    You’ve done the right thing by abandoning the West Linh.

    • Replies: @Miro23
  19. I didn’t know that Linh Dinh has decided to (permanently) go back to his native Vietnam and to “become what he is.” Congratulations!

    • Replies: @Truth
    , @DB Cooper
  20. Truth says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    LMAO!

    I thought I was the only one who noticed.

    Linh was all multicultural and white-friendly and concerned with all the downtrodden Caucasians when he lived in Philly, the second he dropped his bags on Vietnamese soil he turned into Al SharpDinh.

  21. DB Cooper says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Ron Unz should invite more Linh Dinh type people to write here. People who can look at things from a foreign (independent) perspective and who don’t regurgitate the MSM echo chamber nonsense.

    • Replies: @Carroll Price
  22. Please change “Western bourgeoisie posers” to “Western bourgeois poseurs“.

    This is correct English usage.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    , @daniel le mouche
  23. AaronB says:

    The uncontrolled chaos of these Asian cities is the exuberance of life itself – not seeking to suppress or control nature, life explodes in all its colorful variety, and even dirt and grime becomes part of the larger beauty.

    On the opposite pole lies the American suburb, where everything is shiny, clean, controlled, suppressed, organized – and utterly dead, so that one despairs and seeks relief in opiods, without quite understanding the strange emptiness eating out one a heart.

    It is the difference between being connected to nature and utterly cut off from nature.

    • Replies: @Miro23
    , @jilles dykstra
  24. Saigon at 5pm on a Friday is a wonder to behold – it is a case study in order emerging from (apparent) chaos, and is also a testament to the willingness of humans to cooperate. I watched a bunch of about a thousand people on mopeds give way to a woman in her 80s… they had the light, but she had already started crossing when it changed… they waited.

    Contrast that with a pedestrian crossing in Sydney two weeks earlier, where The Lovely‘s father (in his 80s, using a walking frame) was knocked over twice on the same cross walk by cunts too ‘busy’ to pay attention to where they were going.

    The first time we took a taxi from Tan Son Nhat to the Vissai Saigon, I was certain that someone was going to die (not us; the tens of thousands of people on mopeds and motorcycles). We’ve been back every year since then – even though our pampered round-eye digestive systems were pole-axed (by giardiasis; it took The Lovely almost a year to get over it).

    And there are still 100 million bomblets in the Vietnamese countryside, that kill about 100 people a year – dropped by the US in the 70s. And of course the ongoing tragedy from US use of chemical weapons from Agent Orange (which was known to be an endocrine disruptor at the time).

    If I was Vietnamese I would hate the US with an absolute passion – much the same as I would if I was an Arab or Palestinian – but it seems that they have a stoic (not Stoic) pragmatic view of what went down.

    China – not so much.

  25. republic says:

    LD writes best as an outsider, as a foreigner,
    Making observations on places and peoples which were unknown to him.
    His writings on his native country are
    Much less interesting, apart from the obvious fact of his being
    a returned émigré from the Vietnamese diaspora

    His observations of the underclass in the United States were very sharp, highly readable,like a de Tocqueville.

    His literary talents lie in his life in the US studying a subclass of poor, odd and highly eccentric characters.

  26. Arn says:

    Linh, before I go any further, please clarify; was it two Tiger beers for $4,27, or was it that price for each, namely $8,54 ?
    Respectfully

    • Replies: @Linh Dinh
  27. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @Arn

    Hi Arn,

    I had beef cubes with onion, bell pepper and potato, plus two Tiger beers, for $4.27 altogether.

    When I got sick two weeks ago, I went to a doctor for the first time in 18 years. (The last time was also in Vietnam.) He figured out what was wrong and gave me three days’ worth of medicines, and charged me $5.15.

    Last night, my dinner of rice with pork stuffed tofu in a tomato sauce, plus a bowl of bitter melon soup, cost 64 cents.

    In a moment, I’ll hit my morning coffee spot and have two cups, plus a small glass of fresh squeeze orange juice, for $1.50 altogether. The owner is a lovely lady with a daughter who works in a factory, and a semi retarded son who does nothing but sits there all day to drink coffee, banter with his friends and eat noodle soups delivered to him.

    Linh

    • Replies: @Biff
  28. Dumbo says:

    He figured out what was wrong and gave me three days’ worth of medicines, and charged me $5.15.

    Wow. Well, cheap food I suppose you still can find somewhere in the US, but cheap doctors?! Fuggedaboutit.

  29. Dumbo says:
    @Eustace Tilley (not)

    This is correct English usage.

    I think you’re right, but strangely enough, those are not English but imported French words.

    I wonder if Lihn speaks any French? With previous French colonization of Vietnam and all that.

  30. Biff says:
    @Linh Dinh

    When ever I relate costs of goods and services in U.S. dollars I get chided by my wife(Thailand) “Stop thinking like that!” She keeps reminding me of how much the locals earn. 330 Baht(min. wage) per day to about 820 Baht(average) per day, on up. $1.00 = 32 Baht
    I do realize you have an American audience here, and it makes sense for you to do that, but if I may ask what is the average wage in Vietnam? $1.00 = 23,328 Dong

    • Replies: @Linh Dinh
  31. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @Biff

    Hi Biff,

    Recently, I profiled a domestic servant who makes $345 a month, and she doesn’t have to spend any money on food or rent. A factory worker makes between $216 to $345 a month, but his monthly rent should only be $43 or less, often much less, depending on how many roommates he’s willing to deal with.

    Tonight, I again paid just 64 cents for dinner, but it’s at a kind of place no foreigner would enter. Regular workers eat at these joints that tend to charge 86 cents for a filling plate of rice with one meat dish, plus a bowl of soup, and the iced tea is free. They can also buy a bánh mì [Vietnamese hoagie] for just 43 cents. If they’re really broke, they can cook up an 11 cent packet of instant noodles at home.

    Linh

    • Replies: @Arn
    , @Anatoly Karlin
  32. republic says:

    Of course a returned émigré like LD from the Vietnamese diaspora would think that a doctor’s visit
    Costing $5.15 would be cheap, but the only correct way to determine the true cost is
    Finding the cost of living as expressed in earning power.

    Purchasing power in Vietnam is low if one was to use data from sources like the Big Mac index
    or the UBS site (Swiss bank)

    If an ordinary worker in Vietnam makes $150/month and works a 6 day week that would mean
    They would work around 192 hours a month, so a visit to a doctor costing $5.15 would equal
    To about 6 hours of work. So not really cheap by local standards.

    LD (called a sojourner in Vietnamese) has a heart that is a Vietnamese nationalist , but still thinks
    Like an White expat from the US

    https://www.ubs.com/microsites/prices-earnings/en/

  33. Arn says:
    @Linh Dinh

    Thank you Linh! Your texts are are always a pleasure, mixed with pain, as in the ”Postcards…”. Short definition of art.
    Nationality and identity, as you describe it, is forbidden in some places, but nevertheless, fundamental. And in that region, I’ve come to ponder the ”Throne and the Altar”.

    Prices are always related to income. Below you give an example, were rent, $43, is between 10-15% of an income of 225-345 . But what space, square meters, and standard, do you get by that?
    Eating, clothing, healthcare, transportation, takes it’s toll. Hos much is left?
    Where I live, you get 65-70 sqmeters, for about $750-800. Heating included. Refrigirator, stove, bathtub, brandy new toilet, sink. Electricity exclusive, though. $260-440/year.
    Let’s say the income is $1800, after tax, which is around 30%. So gross is appr $2500.
    A lunch is $10-12. Cheapest beer, on draught, is $3:30.

    With best
    And cheers
    Arn

    • Replies: @Linh Dinh
  34. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @Arn

    Hi Arn,

    Here is a photo of some factory workers’ apartments. You can see the entrances to units 17 and 18. As you can see, they’re tiny and, by American standards, rather squalid looking.

    Online, I just found a 236 square foot room that can be had for just $38 a month, and it looks pretty nice, actually, and it’s right in my neighborhood, which is five miles from downtown Saigon. Posted just nine hours ago, it will probably be gone by the end of the day.

    Beer is cheap in Vietnam because the government doesn’t tax it much, unlike, say, in Muslim majority Malaysia. Since Vietnamese love beer so much, it’s wise to keep it affordable. A few years ago, there were talks of having a cut off time for beer consumption, which is a very bad idea, and not that enforceable, so it’s good that nothing came of it. Proponents, however, cite the fights and traffic accidents that come from over drinking.

    Linh

    • Replies: @Linh Dinh
  35. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @Linh Dinh

    P.S. The $38 room comes with free utilities, wifi and access to a washing machine.

  36. MBlanc46 says:
    @Colin Wright

    Perhaps the women are different where you are. The hostility that I’ve seen in the women that I’ve been observing for more than fifty years looks as if it goes pretty deep.

  37. Washo says:

    Thank you Linh. I enjoyed your writing about life in Philadelphia but I am enjoying more your writing about Vietnam. I have visited twice and found it fascinating and you answer many questions I wanted to ask.

  38. Anonymous[119] • Disclaimer says:

    Instant familiarity is common here

    Perceptive observations. The bit about the lady setting up a noodle restaurant extending across the street was also intriguing. But as someone who has been to several other third world countries, these traits are not unique to Vietnam. Something about tradition-driven societies seems to engender feelings of instant bonding and familiarity, even between locals and visitors. That is not so in Western societies. As you rightly observe, people will offer unsolicited advice, all with the best of intentions. In the West, feelings of solitude and detachment for migrants are commonplace and they rarely come to appreciate individualism and placing such high premium on “personal space”.

  39. @Linh Dinh

    Why I keep telling people who make most of their money online to downshift to cheaper places. Any real or (more often) fictional downgrade in “civilization” is more than compensated by moving up a few rungs on the socio-economic ladder just by virtue of the geoarbitrage.

    @ Biff,

    Vietnamese monthly wage seems to be around 5,000,000 dong. https://tradingeconomics.com/vietnam/wages

    That’s about $200. Which, based on these prices, seems decently livable, even for Vietnamese (though ofc buying tradable goods will be a slog). This would make Vietnam about as well off now as the poorest European countries such as the Ukraine or Moldova, which is not all bad considering Vietnam was hardcore Third World as late as 1990.

  40. Miro23 says:
    @Johnny Smoggins

    You’ve done the right thing by abandoning the West Linh.

    The trouble with Liberal multicultural places is that they are attractive for elites and intellectuals. For instance pre-WW1 Vienna with its coffee houses, arts movements, avant-garde theatres, new political ideas, etc. It was genuinely vibrant, but the vibrancy was generated by its collapsing structure.

    The German minority (that provided stability), and that had previously built and dominated the Empire, had been displaced by Jews. The media and finance were in Jewish hands and the majority (of different ethnic groups) were blocked out and denied power in the gridlocked Viennese parliament.

    The Poles, Czechs, Hungarians etc seriously wanted independence while Hitler was determined to remove the Jews and resurrect ethnic German dominance (over Austria-Hungary and the ethnic groups comprising it – covering a large part of Central and Eastern Europe).

    Do you choose boring ethnocentric nationalism or vibrant unstable multiculturalism?

    National majorities seem to choose the former, while their liberal elites seem to choose the latter.

    A good source is “Hitler’s Vienna: A Dictator’s Apprenticeship” by Brigitte Hamann

    https://www.amazon.com/Hitlers-Vienna-Dictators-Apprenticeship-2000-11-09/dp/B012HU3200

  41. iffen says:

    they understand perfectly well the diagram of magic bullets dancing in a shattered skull, so none will let slip one heretical statement about the USS Liberty, say, or 9/11.

    Does your contract with R. Unz stipulate that each article must contain at least one bizzarro craplet like this?

  42. Miro23 says:
    @AaronB

    It is the difference between being connected to nature and utterly cut off from nature.

    I very much agree with this, but it’s not just human nature, it’s actual physical nature such as plants, trees, animals and natural habitats. These have suffered greatly from human depredation over the last 50 years.

    It’s not outside the bounds of possibility for government to make a pact with every citizen to improve their own natural habitat in some way – which of course could range from a large farm to a window box , depending on what they owned. It would be a story of planting, mulching, encouraging wildlife etc. Once everyone was engaged in this I’m 100% sure that the country in question would be a better place.

    • Replies: @AaronB
  43. @The Anti-Gnostic

    We really need to find a cure for busybody-ism.

    We do, but not necessarily for this reason.:

    It will be the death of mankind.

    It’s enough that it’s long been a scourge of the species.

  44. @Anon

    Communism wasn’t all bad.

    It wasn’t monolithic either. And the international banker supported version was not only the worst iteration but the ascendent one and it still exists and dominates US and Europe despite the fact that it was variously supported and at others fought by certain elements of the money bag crowd depending on whatever happened to be expedient at the time. The Communism you seem to be commenting on was a tool of certain cunning capitalists, and it was pretty bad as in horrendous.

    I could not at that time know, as I did later, how men of wealth use the communist movement to bend workers to their will. So I quite willingly adopted the clichés about secrecy being necessary because of the brutality and savagery of the working-class enemies. I soon learned that the members exposed to the public were not the important Communists.

    -Bella Dodd, School of Darkness, Ch 6

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  45. @Kratoklastes

    And there are still 100 million bomblets in the Vietnamese countryside, that kill about 100 people a year – dropped by the US in the 70s. And of course the ongoing tragedy from US use of chemical weapons from Agent Orange (which was known to be an endocrine disruptor at the time).

    Thanks for mentioning that, which is some sick sh!t, no? For that alone I’ll forever loathe the politicians of the “nation” of my birth.

  46. The common Vietnamese soldier, then, didn’t fight and die for capitalism, communism, democracy, internationalism, universal brotherhood, America, Russia or China, but only for Vietnam, for only nationalism could justify so much sacrifice, pain and endurance.

    The book
    Paul Bonnecarrère, ´Par le sang versé, La Legion étrangère en Indochine’ , Paris, 1968, 2006 is about the Foreign Legion in Indochina, Vietnam, many Germans fought there, joined the Legion, to escape Eisenhower’s and De Gaulle’s POW death camps.
    The book describes how a POW by theVietcong was brought into a political lecture course by Ho Tsji Minh.
    What intrigued me was the deep hatred of Ho for the French, I wondered, what did the French do ?
    The historical novel
    Anthony Grey, ‘Saigon, Een grootse roman over Vietnam in de periode 1925 – 1975′, Amsterdam 1987 solved the problem, treatment of Vietnamese by the French comparable to transatlantic slavery until the abolition.
    Hope there is an english translation.
    The common Vietnamese did fight, often suicidally, for their nation, yes, but to get rid of a racist brutal occupier.
    In comparison, Orwell’s Burmese Days, Colonel Blimp leading a Kindergarten.

    • Replies: @Biff
  47. Eusebius says:

    As good an article on the meaning of nationalism as I’ve ever seen.

  48. @AaronB

    There is no chaos, it is controlled.
    Around 1986 I dined with a Dutch friend, who knew the Middle East quite well, in the Asian part of Istanbul, outside, on a square.
    I had no idea to what small restaurant our table belonged.
    But waiters came, took our orders, brought food, how many courses I forgot, the weird thing for me: different waiters all the time.
    It was very pleasant to eat there, everything went smoothly.
    My Dutch friend explained to me that each small restaurants had its own specialties, and that after all guests had gone, the restaurants knew exact exactly how to divide what had been paid.

    At the same trip I visited the medieval suq of Aleppo, delight to visit, also an apparent chaos.
    But in reality no chaos again.
    Alas, bringing democracy to Syria has destroyed the suq.

    Wonder if anyone here ever visited Danzig, it looks as if there still is an old city.
    Only after having been there I discovered that anything was post WWII, in WWII the whole medieval Danzig had been destroyed.
    ‘Liberate us from the liberators’.

    • Replies: @AaronB
  49. Death to Ho Chi Minh City!

    Death to Saigon!

    Long live Prey Nokor!

  50. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @iffen

    “I’m on my way out as well. I’m just trying to keep the door from hitting me in the ass.”

    Oops.

  51. S says:

    Kudos to you Linh Dinh. A very nice, insightful, and well written article.

    If H. was more Vietnamese, she would know that her fate was bound up with her family, community, and nation.

    Yes, and don’t let them ever take that away from you!

  52. @Eustace Tilley (not)

    Both are correct, you nitpicking ninny.

  53. Biff says:
    @jilles dykstra

    What intrigued me was the deep hatred of Ho for the French, I wondered, what did the French do ?

    For one, the French tortured the Vietnamese en mass for decades, and then performed medical experiments on their brain dead bodies. That’ll piss ya off!

    http://www.vietnam-guide.com/hanoi/hanoi-maison-centrale.htm

  54. @iffen

    That’s a nice little phrase, but doesn’t apply here. What Linh says is just scratching the surface.

  55. The Zionists control almost all governments of the world via their control of the countries central banks ie as in the privately owned FED which is a wholly owned creation of the Zionist banking cabal and this control is absolute and extends into every area of our lives, and paraphrasing Nathan Rothschild, ie I care not what puppet is place upon the throne of England, the man who controls the money supply controls the British empire and I control the British money supply !

    This Zionist control here in America was shown clearly in the case of the Israeli attack on the U.S. Liberty on June 8, 1967 where 34 Americans were killed and 174 wounded and not a thing was done to Israel for this killing of Americans. Another case there Zionist control was show was in the Zionist attack on the WTC where 3000 Americans were killed in an attack by Zionist Israel and the Zionist controlled deep state and Israel got away with it and every thinking American knows that Israel and the Zionist controlled deep state did it.

    As was shown by these two examples America is totally under the control of Satanic Zionists who are going to destroy America for their false god satan and their goal of a Zionist NWO.

    The enemy is not at the gates, the enemy is within the U.S. government and our society and the name of this enemy is Zionism and is going to destroy America.

  56. @iffen

    Does your contract with R. Unz stipulate that each article must contain at least one bizzarro (sic) craplet like this?

    Your comments routinely make you a contender for Bizarro Crapleteer Grande, so you getting jealous er sumpin?

  57. Anonymous[385] • Disclaimer says:

    How is a politician ‘right wing’ if he is ‘for open borders’?

    Liars
    Cucks

  58. @jacques sheete

    Communism, the theory, was and is very bad
    As the USSR demonstrated in the late nineties of the 20th century, just a capitalistic commercial system with profit motive is able to produce, and offer for sale, at the right moments, those consumer goods consumers want.

  59. H’s story is the story that is quickly becoming that of main stream America. Liberalism, AKA communism, progressivism, feminism, Satanism has sucked the life force out a once great nation.

  60. If H. was more Vietnamese, she would know that her fate is bound up with her family, community and nation.

    Amen

  61. AaronB says:
    @Miro23

    That would be fantastic, and I believe this kind if return to nature will happen sooner or later as the technocratic culture looses its dominant grip.

    I don’t think the technocratic culture will disappear, but it will exist more in enclaves and alternative lifestyles will spring up.

    • Replies: @Miro23
  62. AaronB says:
    @jilles dykstra

    Right, it is only apparent chaos. It is actually a complex order but one that cooperates with and works with nature rather than suppresses it, sanitizes it, and imposes our will on it – like an American suburb – rendering it lifeless.

    Its such a more satisfying environment.

  63. Soon as I read the title of this article by Linh, “Nation Above All,” I expected something reflective and great.

    Having been on N.E. Pennsylvania roads with Linh several times, the first time he visited my Taylor Borough apartment, I recognized commonality we shared.

    Linh Dinh knew that the vital need to live in a country, city, town, village was an authentic community as a whole. Intensely good hearted, thoughtful, and worldly wise, Linh saw essential human advantage in folks seeing everyone as their neighbors, family, uncles/aunts, grandparents, teachers, and yes… even local cops, bartenders, a large quantity “weed” pusher/ex-Con, and bookies.

    Consequently, I see Linh’s “Nation Above All” as the best article written-to-date on the SICK state of affairs & conditions (opposite to the above paragraph’s ideals!) that were sutured upon the world by the zombie American-Israeli Empire.

    Given yesterday’s typical divisive ZUSA midterm election outcome, fyi, I am very sorry to report on the joy of an ambitious short-order cook with whom I met earlier this morning at Scranton Dunkin’ Donuts.

    As the world moves closer to war with Iran & possible Doomsday, the cook was overjoyed by Senator Bob Casey’s victory over GOP Congressman Lou Barletta because now he had hopes to maintain his unaffordable family health care plan in aftermath of the Trumpian demolition of Obama’s scary A.C.A.!

    Don’t know zip about the quality & cost for health care in Vietnam, but I figure people here at U.R. noted Linh Dinh’s impressive cost & result for health care “service” in Vietnam.

    Thank you, Linh!

  64. denk says:

    During the Dien Bien fu battle, when the French were staring at an imminent defeat, the murikkans graciously offered their ‘allies’ three A bombs.

    Luckily, the French still had the presence of mind to reject that deadly ‘gift’ , which might help to obliterate the VN forces and rewrite history…..
    thus conferring France the dubious honor as the second nation to use the bomb…. and provoking the perennial hatred of the VietNamese/

    • Replies: @Thim
  65. On November 2st, 1963, President Ngo Dinh Diem and his brother, Ngo Dinh Nhu, were captured at St. Francis Xavier Church, where they had fled to escape a coup. Tied up and dumped inside an armored personnel carrier, both were then shot.

    As near as I can tell, every single thing the CIA has ever done has been stupid and evil.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  66. Tell “H” to give me a call… she needn’t be lonely!

  67. “The nation, then, is the totality of who you are, and it’s where and how you are properly seen and understood.”
    I think a fisherman from the USA has more in common with a fisherman from Vietnam than with a bank clerk from New York.

    • Agree: ChuckOrloski
  68. Agent76 says:

    Mar 11, 2016 All America’s Wars Begin with False Flags (and WWIII Will Too)

    This D.C. think tank blatantly admitted all of America’s wars have traditionally begun with false flag events, and they know they will need another one to get the war with Iran started that they’ve been working on for so long.

  69. @DB Cooper

    John Derbyshire, llana Mercer, the Saker, & Anatoly Karlin are pretty good substitutes.

  70. @Anon

    Capitalism didn’t make the United States an undesirable place to live. Prior to the Jewish-financed Cultural Revolution of the 60s and 70s (including forced racial integration) followed by today’s materialism and mindless consumerism, the United States was a pleasant place in which to live and raise a family when sensible white people could still afford to have more than 1 or 2 children.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter, Da Wei
  71. Hey Carrol Price!

    As you might know, Linh Dinh’s book “Postcards from the end of America” chronicled the end!

  72. Dan Hayes says:
    @John Gruskos

    John Gruskos:

    Ho Chi Minh’s comment about the US authorized/inspired assassinations of the Diem Brothers: “How can the Americans be so stupid.”

    BTW, American Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge was probably most responsible for these ignominious deeds.

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  73. Thim says:

    They cannot possibly be serious about the Spratleys. Nationalism should at least try to be sane.

  74. Thim says:
    @denk

    Never heard of that offer. It does not seem like one Eisenhower would have made. Any references on the alleged offer of 3 atomic bombs to the French in Vietnam?

    • Replies: @denk
  75. Yo Linh,

    Fyi, please look at local Foxnews article, posted below, and see how Scranton High School students assaulted Scranton cops.

    https://fox56.com/news/local/several-scranton-high-school-students-arrested-for-assaulting-officers

    Scranton people logically figure that their greatest problem is the astronomical school district debt. But there’s another side to the diminished In God We Trust “coin.”

    The unionized Scranton school teachers annually get paddled for their school’s underachieving SAT scores, but…, but the teachers can never dare to explain, write in public, the dangerous student behavioral issues that must be cast beneath-the-rug, for fear of ‘Lil Myron Castro’s fucked up and headstrong parents & their filing slander lawsuits against the broken school district.

    In addition, no local newspaperman/Talking Head ever dares interviews either conscientious school teachers or even (Front Line) elementary/intermediate bus drivers in order to help pissed off Scranton “taxpayers” comprehend the dark side of the utopian “No Child Left Behind” mentality.

    Like you wrote, “End of America,” and regrettably for me, it’s become Zio-approved policy, “Paddle Scranton P.D. officers!”

    Sincerely regret the topic departure, Linh. Thank you, & one day I hope to live and read an article on the state of Vietnam’s elementary & high school education system.

    Uh, one more thing. Is Saigon High School District hiring experienced CDL bus drivers?

  76. @Stevelancs

    Although a lot of things about our present western culture have deteriorated from what they were, I still prefer our Western respect for space and property, plus our cleaner way of eating food. You are entitled to the ways of Thailand with its lack of formality and it’s ladyboys and everything else. Not for me.

    • Replies: @Biff
    , @Biff
  77. Biff says:
    @Joe Aproso

    I still prefer our Western respect for space and property,

    Law enforcement seize more property from citizens than burglars.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/11/23/cops-took-more-stuff-from-people-than-burglars-did-last-year/?utm_term=.5920836fd4ae

  78. Biff says:
    @Joe Aproso

    plus our cleaner way of eating food.

    There’s a cleaner way of “eating” food? How does that work? Do it in the shower?

    • Replies: @ploni almoni
  79. denk says:
    @Thim

    Conclusion…
    All things considered, its highly plausible that murikkans offered A bombs to the French.

    I concur with the above view.

    uncle sham used it on the jps, they seriously contemplated nuking China during the K war.

    AFAIC, what’s not to believe ?

    https://thebulletin.org/2016/02/we-might-give-them-a-few-did-the-us-offer-to-drop-atom-bombs-at-dien-bien-phu/

    • Replies: @jilles dykstra
  80. @denk

    Agent Orange was bad enough, it failed.
    One cannot win a war with a people determined to drive out the occupier, unless one destroys the people completely.
    Alistair Horne, ‘A savage war of peace, Algeria 1954-1962’, 1972, 2002, New York
    Ward Churchill, ‘A Little Matter of Genocide, Holocaust and Denial in the Americas, 1492 to the Present’, San Francisco 1997
    Ronald Wright, ‘Stolen Continents, Conquest and Resistance in the Americas’, 1992, London
    Vine Deloria, jr, ‘Red Earth, White Lies, Native Americans and the Myth of Scientific Fact’, 1995, New York
    Charles C. Mann, Ancient Americans, Rewriting the History of the New World’, 2005, London, ( 1491: New Revelations of the Americas before Columbus, 2005, New York)
    Paul Kane, ‘Wanderings of an artist among the Indians of America’, 1859, 1996, New York

    • Replies: @denk
  81. @Dan Hayes

    De Gaulle: the only USA solution to a problem is force

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  82. @jilles dykstra

    USA citizens are “forced” into having no say as to whatever wars their
    “elected” rulers want to indulge.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  83. @jilles dykstra

    Hey J.D.!

    Assume Nationalist Charles De Gaulle knew the “force” upholding the ambitious Zionist politics of leaders Churchill and FDR?

    Please refer to the updated report (below) on the “force” that really drives US elections & misgovernment, below?

    https://www.presstv.com/Detail/2018/11/08/579396/Money-In-US-Politics

    Thank you.

  84. Yo Linh,

    Recalling your teaching job at Leipzig University and subsequent informative articles written after journeys to European cities, below & fyr is Brother Nathanael’s Real Jew News video, “Hate cops are coming” to Germany.

    http://www.realjewnews.com/?p=1323

    Ever since I first watched Brother Nathanael years ago and to date, I can not help but grin at his monastic garb and satiric oratory style, but oh man, I always listen closely and learn from what he daringly conveys.

    Wish you & Linky well! Thank you.

  85. As s homage to knowledgeable “balance,” & given your time to do so, please refer to video below, Linh?

  86. Anon[438] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    In the West, nationalism has become a dirty word to the educated, progressive class, who routinely equate it with fascism. They also see national borders as somehow obsolete and oppressive…

    Both nationalism and imperialism are natural political forces. We see this in the animal world too. Organisms are invasive and defensive. They seek to expand and conquer but also to defend and preserve. Castles are defensive. Cavalries are offensive. Power naturally tries to grow outward. Opposing power tries to push back against invasion. There is no single force or law in history. There are opposing forces, and history is like a pendulum.

    Even though nationalism combats imperialism, they also serve each other. When a nation grows strong and powerful from nationalism, it has a tendency to move into imperialist mode. Also, imperialism may clear the way for nationalism. The removal of the Old Ways by Western Imperialism led to rise of modern nationalism in much of the world. Chinese nationalism owed to Western Imperialism’s weakening of the old order. Or, nationalism turns out to be the last remaining core of a dying empire. When the Ottoman Empire collapsed, Turks went into nationalist mode with the Turkic core. Imperialism, as success or failure, works like a forest fire that kills the dominant trees that hog all the sunlight. Thus, new tree may grow from the ground. If not for Western Imperialism’s clearing og the Old Way, men like Mao, Gandhi, Sukarno, and Ho chi Minh wouldn’t have been possible. Most likely, Asia today would be like what it was in 1800. So, imperialism is both oppressive and liberating. It is foreign oppression, but, by destroying the Old Indigenous Power, it makes way for the rise of new power among the indigenes.

    Also, imperialism uses nationalism against other imperialisms. USSR encouraged Vietnamese nationalism against US empire. US encouraged Polish nationalism against Soviet empire. As empires clash for supremacy or at least hegemony, they often find nationalisms to be useful against the enemy empire. Lawrence encouraged Arab nationalism against the Ottomans. French empire aided the American colonies against British Empire.

    Empire may spawn rebel nationalism in its midst. America began as a colony of the British Empire but demanded national independence. But in time, as it grew and grew, it too turned into an empire.
    Nationalism is essentially a conservative force. Imperialism is essentially a liberal force. Both make nature and the human world what they are.

    Jewish Power is now most awesome, and it favors nationalism in Israel(though with a bit of imperialism against Palestinians and neighboring Arab nations) and imperialism(with US as proxy) around the world. Since Might and Money can only go so far, Jews needed a missionary faith to win over the world(or its elites) Morally. Such faith used to be Christianity, but Jews killed it and replaced it with Homomania, an utterly crazy stuff, but it won over so many elites because homos cater to the vanity of the elites.

  87. denk says:
    @jilles dykstra

    War crimes in Nam….

    Exhibit A.

    “IT WAS out of control,” Rion Causey, a former Tiger Force medic, told Toledo Blade reporters. “I still wonder how some people can sleep after 30 years.” Between May and November 1967, an elite platoon of the 101st Airborne division of the U.S. Army, known as Tiger Force, moved across the Central Highlands of South Vietnam. They left behind a path of death and destruction.

    In their eight-month investigation, Blade reporters Michael Sallah and Mitch Weiss reviewed thousands of classified Army documents, National Archive records and radio logs, and interviewed more than 100 former Tiger Force soldiers and Vietnamese civilians. They found not only that Tiger Force was responsible for horrifying war crimes against the Vietnamese people, but that the Army and U.S. government did nothing to stop them.

    The gory details….

    http://socialistworker.org/2003-2/476/476_05_WarCrimes.php

    P.S.
    Tip of an iceberg.
    They’r scrubbing the internet clean.
    There used to be tons of results searching for
    war crimes in Nam and elsewhere, now there’s none !

  88. MacNucc11 says:
    @Si1ver1ock

    Answer; Banking, schooling, healthcare, and science. Question. Name four things destroyed by government.

  89. @Biff

    It is called washing the hands with soap which is why there are now no Cholera epidemics in Europe while these still exist in the Third World.

    • Replies: @Biff
  90. Miro23 says:
    @AaronB

    That would be fantastic, and I believe this kind if return to nature will happen sooner or later as the technocratic culture loses its dominant grip.

    I don’t think the technocratic culture will disappear, but it will exist more in enclaves and alternative lifestyles will spring up.

    My general line is that almost all lifestyles can be improved by a greater commitment to the natural world. It’s not either/or ( I’ve not got anything against technocratic culture) – it’s just spending a few hours outdoors in a non-ideological way helping improve the natural habitat on your own property and letting the plants/animals get on with it. Really (initially) more of a routine, but the emotional rewards can be quite special.

    • Agree: AaronB
  91. Biff says:
    @ploni almoni

    The only cholera epidemics occur where coalitions have bombed water supplies.

  92. jdoyle says:

    maybe if a few more americans will overlook how yellow skined, hygenic deficint, crowded, boisterous Asian nations have defended their national borders to preseve their ethon-culure, and take the borders issue to heart then this would not appear as a regluar issue on cnn, etc. (“the american people have overwhelmingly supported secured borders!”…)

    A while ago, the chinese communist party invaded Vietnam and had their char-shu handed to them, for example…

    https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2015/05/01/402572349/ask-the-vietnamese-about-war-and-they-think-china-not-the-u-s

    • Replies: @denk
  93. @Kratoklastes

    I’ve been to Saigon three times as a result of leaving it too late to use frequent flyer points and wanting, for example, to get to London economically to see a family member in a play without busting the bank balance. By now I have done the trip up the Mekong to visit the Viet Cong’s amazing tunnel system and somehow get my large Western body crawling through it. I find it hard to believe there are still anything like 100 million bomblets in the Vietnamese countryside when they have long had a big and cheap enough labour force to use metal detectors snd hand trowels to get rid of them.

    • Replies: @daniel le mouche
  94. denk says:
    @jdoyle

    Why do you expect me to waste time clicking on a npr link ?

    Besides, how does it exonerate the kind of shit murikkans did to the VN and remain unrepentant ???

    The widespread employment of the defoliant and herbicide Agent Orange (AO) by the U.S. military during its barbarous war against the peoples of Vietnam should by all accounts be considered one of the greatest war crimes of the twentieth century. The mass ecocidal-herbicidal campaign to utilize dioxin-containing AO against the tropical environment of Vietnam, begun in 1961 by the liberal-imperialist Kennedy administration, greatly helped facilitate the murder of between 2 and 5 million Vietnamese that was prosecuted by U.S. forces in their war.

    https://dissidentvoice.org/2012/04/scorched-earth-legacies-of-chemical-warfare-in-vietnam/

  95. @Wizard of Oz

    ‘ I find it hard to believe there are still anything like 100 million bomblets in the Vietnamese countryside when they have long had a big and cheap enough labour force to use metal detectors snd hand trowels to get rid of them.’

    Amen, Mr. Wizard. Could it be tourism?

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  96. @denk

    ‘waste time clicking on a npr link ?’

    Just a wee point, that’s AN npr link. Also, many murrkins ARE indeed repentent, there’s no use generalizing so.

    • Replies: @denk
  97. @daniel le mouche

    I’m not sure what you mean unless you fancy that they would like to cull tourists who get off the beaten track.

    • Replies: @daniel le mouche
  98. denk says:
    @daniel le mouche

    Sorry ,
    I dont mean to tar all yanks with the same blush.

    Im talking about murikkans like quartermaster, JOhan Ricke here,

    These characters dont seem to learn from all the past murikkan misadventures.
    They still reckon fukus, the most wanted outlaw, has any business posing as sheriff.

    They still figure its their gawd given prerogative to decide who’s the right man to rule China, Russia , NK, Venezuela……even when their own country is mis-ruled by a cabal of mafiaso.

    These two are the ugly murikkan personified., unfortunately, there’r a lot more where they come from.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  99. @Wizard of Oz

    No, I just meant it’s something many tourists are curious about, like the tunnels.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  100. @daniel le mouche

    Yeah, after one has had one’s dish of fried cicadas I suppose a kind of archaeological dig for bomblets might be suggested. After all the climate has made it impossible to say “these are tombs of the early Midianites before the Moses massacre: we may find some bones of children he had chopped up here”. No, I’m not trespassing into our resident antisemites’ territory…. Just wondering now: if I were a good Bible Christian would I know whether Moses had descendants with his Midianite wife and who they were? Hey! It’s fun – look up the half Midianite son Gershom and his Danite apostate priest son Jonathan…. You can see how important to me precision on matters to do with wars and slaughter are in any era :-)

    • Replies: @daniel le mouche
  101. @Si1ver1ock

    I was a liberal when I left college and at the bottom of US society the “do-gooding” urge does little good at all.

    Also, Vietnam and other Asian countries might have infrastructural or bureaucratic problems but not the sheer criminal violence and gangsterism that US cities have.

    Believe, the Vietnamese are better off than working-class Polish-Americans who find themselves unable to leave Flint or whites in Phoenix near a barrio.

  102. @denk

    I don’t know that anyone including Taiwan wanted Mao to run China. And in any event he would have probably run Taiwan if the US at that time had not been able to blockade him.

    So it was not too long ago that Taiwan (And possibly still the Philippines) are occasionally grateful for US playing the cop.

    “Fuck da police…” until you need them.

  103. @denk

    China and Vietnam have been fighting for 1000 years, haven’t they?

  104. @ChuckOrloski

    This is why the Pentagon no longer attempts to instate a draft. The military is entirely volunteer.

  105. @GWashington

    Why don’t blacks or Hispanics rush right out and adopt Anglo-Saxon names.

    Actually, you could always tell the difference between an assimilated Italian-American and an “ethnic” one this way. The ethnic Italian would have a name like Nino or Ricardo.

    • Replies: @Them Guys
  106. Them Guys says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    Yep, like how Nino becomes, Louie da Thumper when he gets a new job with the “family”.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  107. @Them Guys

    As a general rule, whites you meet in the suburbs will have an Anglo-Saxon first name. Regardless of their background. In the cities, and at lower income levels, they’ll have ethnic names.

  108. @Wizard of Oz

    Hi Wiz,
    I see only all out war all around me at all times, and full blown slaughter every waking second. For this is how I see our great Society. But if you’re a Jew you don’t give a shit, if you’re some dingbat or a negroid or an airy butt stabber you are by definition never wrong or in the wrong, and the only problems you see are Donald Trump and white men in general. I do remember a time, say twenty years ago, when the odd person would be interested in the thinker’s ideas and feelings, before the greatest lunatic idiocy in human history began.

  109. Anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @daniel le mouche

    Wow! You should think of going back to brevity. That sort of stuff could get you locked up for your own protection.

    • Replies: @daniel le mouche
  110. @daniel le mouche

    “Twenty years ago”

    That is what makes my own experience relevant, in my opinion. I left in 1999 and the idiocy seemed to begin with the election of George Bush.

    The US was a normal place in the nineties. Political correctness had emerged and a Democrat was in office but things did not get completely off the rails until Bush was elected.

    I honestly don’t know why.

  111. @daniel le mouche

    And if you are white…why do you give a shit if the gays get AIDS “chasing the bug” or the blacks continue to smoke crack and stumble around their internal third worlds in poverty?

    I live overseas, have given my life’s work to foreign employers who never taxed me and because Americans who earn under $80,000 a year are tax exempt, why, I don’t give a shit.

    See, I never paid for black teens who got pregnant. It is impossible to “cock-block” them and impossible to prevent Anally Inflicted Death Sentences.

    If a white man goes overseas, he does not care a whit about any of these things.

    And more and more white men are just throwing in the towel and fleeing to Asia or wherever the problems of blacks and gays will never matter to them.

    The number of American males moving overseas has never been higher. Wait until Gen X reaches retirement in 10-20 years. You’ll see millions just moving to some dirt-cheap country to forget about all the things that deep-down, white men do not care about.

    White flight, for example, demonstrates how white people actually feel. They just want to get away from it the way you step around a pile of dogshit on the sidewalk.

  112. @Anonymous

    I thought my comment was fairly brief, but I agree with your conclusion. That said, I do almost wistfully look at a local prison sometimes when I pass it of late, as ‘outside’ is so relentlessly vile.

  113. @Jeff Stryker

    ‘The US was a normal place in the nineties. ‘

    I think they amped everything up with their rap garbage, starting with Snoop Doggy Dogg. Few may remember now how shocking he was at the time (19 m.f.’in 93). I’ve seen a video about a conspiracy in around 1991, a top secret meeting in Hollywood from which if anyone peeped a word they’d be bumped. It may well have been Dick Gregory, speaking of MJ and Prince killings, I can’t remember. But things got insane rather quickly. Between 1995 and 98 people of a sudden became covered in tattoos, it was all pre Bush. Who’s Pres means nothing at all, it’s a total charade.

    ‘White flight, for example, demonstrates how white people actually feel. ‘

    It’s no good to generalize too much, though I agree that most white men just want to be left alone. This is not, however, reality. There is ethnic strife in our multi ethnic so-called societies. We’ve seen nothing yet compared to what our kids will see, then their kids, with Africa as if by miracle being transplanted to Europe and all once-white countries. Who’s going to kick them out? Has anyone seen that French rap video with an African goon gratuitously murdering a white guy? It’s all so grim, but we’ve only just seen the beginning of it. All white cultures will be completely annihilated, their histories and traditions erased. All will be black and Jew worship, to a black soundtrack–it already is.

  114. Anonymous[259] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    That is what makes my own experience relevant, in my opinion. I left in 1999 and the idiocy seemed to begin with the election of George Bush.

    I’d agree with that. America seemed to have plateaued in the Clinton era and the decadence was already seeping in but it didn’t start noticeable until Dubya took over. Big Nig continued the trend, and Orange Monkey is either a genius pretending to be a fool or a fool pretending to be a genius. I genuinely have no idea which.

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