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Destroyed Jewish tank in Mleeta, Lebanon, 2020

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Every village has its idiot, but in Sidon, they’re all idiots, Ali informed me as we drove, again, through this gorgeous and mellow city. And they’re cowards too, Ali added, chuckling. “They do not like to fight.”

“Maybe they’re like that because this city is so beautiful.” I wanted to say soft, but when speaking to someone with only basic English, you must constantly pare down your vocabulary, and stay away from colloquialism and slang.

“I love Lebanon more than myself,” Ali declared. “If no war, Lebanon is so beautiful. Lebanon is the only country with mountain next to sea. We have everything here, snow, beach, everything.” Ali nodded towards the hazy mountains on this overly bright day. It is remarkable. In half an hour, you can drive from banana groves to evergreen forests. Many have skied in the morning, then swam in the ocean in the afternoon. “We have everything but a government!” We laughed.

As we passed a woman in blue jeans and long-sleeved black top, Ali smiled and honked. Her face stayed passive. “Do you know her?” I asked.

“No, no, she’s a bad girl.”

“A prostitute?”

“Yes.” The young lady did arch her back to accentuate her big butts.

“Lebanese?”

“No, Syrian. Maybe Palestinian.”

When I remarked that American streetwalkers tend to not be so beautiful, Ali said, “The most beautiful prostitutes are in bars. You go there, see her. If you pay $100, you can have her for seven hours.”

“So you know!” I slapped Ali on the shoulder.

“I know, but I don’t go.”

There’s a large Palestinian refugee camp in Sidon. A semi-autonomous community, it has its own schools, clinics and even police. Although its inhabitants are free to come and go, outsiders aren’t allowed in.

Fleeing Jewish mayhem and carnage, Palestinians, Iraqis and Syrians have all fled to Lebanon, and before that, there was a flood of Armenians escaping genocide by the Turks.

Even with its constant turmoil and a shaky economy, Lebanon has also attracted eager immigrants from all over. There are 175 Vietnamese here, working mostly as maids, and many thousands more from the Philippines, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Ethiopia and Senegal, etc.

Traveling up to two hours, Filipinas flock to English-language masses at Beirut’s Saint Francis, and nearby are Pinoy restaurants and groceries. I plan on checking out Le Hanoi, Beirut’s only Vietnamese restaurant, if it’s still cooking after Covid and Beirutshima. It was only 1/3 mile away from that monstrous blast.

*

Meet Christine, a 42-year-old Filipina who’s been in Lebanon for six years. “I love Lebanon, sir. This country give me everything. That’s why I always say, ‘Alhamdulillah! Alhamdulillah!’” Praise to God! Used to calling people sir or madame, Christine extends to me that courtesy. Barely literate even at home, she has managed to learn enough English and Arabic to get by. On some Sundays, she goes to a church in Maghdoucheh.

“Do you understand the sermon?”

“Some, sir, and I can sing.”

“In Arabic?”

“Yes, sir. People look at me. Whoaa!” Christine widens her eyes. “I don’t care, sir,” she laughs. “I sing.”

Going to church, Christine snared a local boyfriend, so she’s also grateful about that. Alhamdulillah! Her husband was a drunk, brute and serial skirt chaser, but after two near-death experiences, he’s become more sober and responsible. Each month, Christine sends money to support their three kids.

Every two years, Christine goes home, a trip that takes two full days. Landing in Manila, she still has to take a 20-hour bus trip to her village on a mountain.

“Look at my daughter, sir.” She shows me her phone.

“How old is she?”

“Twenty-two, sir. She in school.”

“Studying what?”

“Nursing. She almost finish. She tell me, ‘Mama, I want to study more,’ so I say, ‘Don’t worry, I send you money.’ If she want to be a doctor, I send her money.”

“That’s great.”

Arriving in Lebanon, Christine had but a tiny and ridiculous-looking blue suitcase. She had never opened a fridge. She ate so much her first month, she always felt ill. Homesick, she also cried constantly.

“I have three sister in Lebanon, sir. I had four, but she married a nigger.” Struggling to find the right word, Christine’s dark face looks very confused. “A negro, sir, a nigger…”

“She married a black man?”

“Yes, sir. He half black. They in Hawaii now.”

“Wow! But you still have three sisters here?”

“Yes, sir. One sister in Lebanon 27 year!”

“That’s incredible. Do you see them often?”

“Sometime, sir. They live far.”

Darker than all her siblings, Christine was least loved, so haunted by this handicap, perhaps, she tells me she has Spanish blood, and not just a drop or two, but loads of it. “Look at my eye, sir.”

*

In Al-Quala’a, I’m being housed and fed by the blogger, Taxi. Through her, I was also introduced to the legendary journalist, Ali Ballout, now retired. Though not in great health, Ballout can’t wean himself from world events, so he spends nearly every waking hour fixated on televised news or discussion shows from various countries, with only an occasional break to watch goofy, escapist movies, in Arabic, English or French.

On his living room wall, there are framed photos of Ballout with George Habash, Shafiq al-Hout, King Hussein of Jordan, Yasser Arafat, Zhou Enlai, Kim Il-sung, Muammar Gaddafi and Saddam Hussein, etc. In his TV room, there’s one of Ballout leaving prison, looking dapper in a casual suit and holding a cigar, though still in handcuffs.

Ballout was jailed three times, the first in 1973 for reporting a secret meeting between Golda Meir and King Hussein. A year later, Ballout got locked up again for publishing a letter from Saudi King Faysal to Lyndon B. Johnson.

In this region, Ballout had unmatched access to powerful figures and sources of information. He served as a backchannel between Damascus and Baghdad, as well as Baghdad and Washington. Ballout knew Saddam Hussein for over 30 years.

ORDER IT NOW

After Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990, Ballout went to Baghdad with a message from the Americans. If Saddam would declare his intention to withdraw within five days, the US would force Kuwait to reimburse Iraq for the stolen oil, plus lease Bubiyan Island to Iraq for 20 years.

As a fellow Arab, Ballout told the Iraqis they should snag this deal, “We’re faced with two choices. We can withdraw and fulfil some of the conditions on our own terms, or they will smash our bones.” Proud and deluded, Saddam ignored Ballout’s counsel.

Preparing to topple Saddam in 2003, the Americans asked Ballout about Saddam’s inner circle. Since Saddam’s totally isolated, a coup would be preferable to an invasion, Ballout said, thus sparing Iraq from destruction. Since this was a key Israeli objective, however, Washington went ahead and smashed that society. Mission accomplished.

On his couch, Ballout reflected, “I liked Saddam. Before he went mad, he accomplished a lot. He could rule his country, but not control his family. Also, the Americans put a lot of pressure on him for nine years.”

Just before he was lynched, Saddam shouted, “Long live free Arab Palestine!” Although Saddam massacred plenty of Shiites, even they admire his sane and rousing last words.

On one of my visits, the TV announced Robert Fisk had just died. “He was a very good friend,” Ballout sighed. “Now, I’ll have to erase his name from my phone.”

*

In 1982, Fisk witnessed the immediate aftermath of the Jewish-sanctioned and abetted Christian militia’s massacre of Palestinians in the Chatila Refugee Camp. Wading into this horror, Fisk leaves the most clear-eyed and damning account:

It was the flies that told us. There were millions of them, their hum almost as eloquent as the smell. Big as bluebottles, they covered us, unaware at first of the difference between the living and the dead. If we stood still, writing in our notebooks, they would settle like an army—legions of them—on the white surface of our notebooks, hands, arms, faces, always congregating around our eyes and mouths, moving from body to body, from the many dead to the few living, from corpse to reporter, their small green bodies panting with excitement as they found new flesh upon which to settle and feast.

[…]

There had been massacres before in Lebanon, but rarely on this scale and never overlooked by a regular, supposedly disciplined army.

[…]

There were babies – blackened babies because they had been slaughtered more than 24 hours earlier and their small bodies were already in a state of decomposition—tossed into rubbish heaps alongside discarded US army ration tins, Israeli army medical equipment and empty bottles of whisky.

[…]

The whole embankment of muck shifted and vibrated with my weight in a dreadful, springy way and, when I looked down again, I saw that the sand was only a light covering over more limbs and faces. A large stone turned out to be a stomach. I could see a man’s head, a woman’s naked breast, the feet of a child. I was walking on dozens of corpses which were moving beneath my feet.

[…]

How could I explain to them that the terrorists had left, that the terrorists had worn Israeli uniforms, that the terrorists had been sent into Chatila by Israeli officers, that the victims of the terrorists were not Israelis but Palestinians and Lebanese?

Jews chased Palestinians into Lebanon, then stoked the tension of this refugee crisis to have them exterminated. With variations, it’s in their playbook.

With groveling Uncle Sam behind them, Jews have illegally dropped cluster, nail and phosphorous bombs on Lebanon.

*

Already in 1948, Jews invaded Lebanon to slaughter up to 58 unarmed men from a village, Hula. This was not a battle, just innocent people being killed, unprovoked. For this crime, only one Jewish soldier, Shmuel Lahis, was court-martialed, but his seven-year sentence was quickly reduced to one, before Lahis was entirely pardoned. Absolved, Lahis would become the Director General of the Jewish Agency for Israel, the largest Jewish non-profit in the world. A butcher of goys became the face of Jewish charity.

Since then, many more Lebanese have been killed by Jews, so the country is filled with memorials that also serve as inspiration and challenge for continued resistance. At the entrance to Al Quala’a, for example, there are ten portraits of local Hezbollah fighters who died fighting Jews. Two were smooth-faced teenagers. Driving by, Ali mumbled, “My brother died in 1987.”

“He was with Hezbollah?”

“Yes.”

“How old was he?”

“Twenty-two.”

Memorials are hung on utility poles, store fronts and private balconies. Though dead young men stare back at you everywhere, they’re less visible in congested, urban neighborhoods, with so many other signs to crowd them out.

Above Sweet Bites in Al Quala’a, there’s a banner of a silhouetted warrior being pierced by a dozen arrows and a lance. It’s Husayn ibn Ali, Mohammad’s grandson. With just 70 warriors, Husayn fought to the death in 680 against an army of thousands. Within sight of this image is one honoring Musa al-Sadr, an important Shiite leader who’s widely believed to have been killed by Gaddafi in 1978. In Bourj el-Barajneh, a Shiite suburb of Beirut, I saw a portrait of General Qasem Soleimani on a soft drink cooler. Whether martyred yesterday or centuries ago, righteous, brave and selfless men inspire people here.

Warring against Jewish invaders in the 1980’s, many Hezbollah fighters dug their own grave and slept in it, to show they weren’t afraid to die. Just as with Jesus, a transcending, redeeming death is celebrated and honored. (Seeing an image of Mary holding Jesus in a butcher’s shop, I simply assumed he was Christian. Taxi, “No, he’s Muslim.” Unlike Jews, Muslims revere Mary and Jesus.)

On Lebanese television, time is always coupled with “Jerusalem,” as in, “Join us tonight for our special program, at 6, Jerusalem time,” and Israel is nearly always referred to as “Occupied Palestine.” Not by choice, Lebanese have been at war, off and on, ever since the Jewish state was founded. They won’t regain normalcy until that genocidal abomination disappears. What a warped nightmare!

Going home, millions of Palestinians can rediscover their truer selves, and so will you.

Linh Dinh’s latest book is Postcards from the End of America. He maintains a regularly updated photo blog.

 
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  1. Thank you for your articulate insightful witness, Linh Dinh. It is beyond price. And not for sale. Which is — some ways — the same thing. But really, sir, I must protest, the plural of goy is goyim.

    • Replies: @dimples
  2. Charles says:

    You should tell Christine not to worry – most everyone’s first inclination is to use “the N-word”; it’s most often the best descriptor.

  3. Talha says:

    Thank for this article…what a change of emotions from the beginning to the end. I had not come across that account of the Chatilla massacre by Mr. Fisk before. He shall be missed.

    Peace.

    • Agree: Notsofast
    • Replies: @chris
  4. Thank you, Linh Dinh! Your eloquent exposure of the abomination of IsraHell among nations is righteous and fair. May your voice and prayer be heard.

    • Agree: Old and Grumpy
  5. anon[712] • Disclaimer says:

    Excellent piece as usual, it’s like being there. Linh Dinh has the talent for writing.

  6. “Lebanon is the only country with mountain next to sea.”

    How about Syria, Israel, Egypt, Cyprus, Turkey, Greece, Albania, Montenegro, Croatia, Italy, France, Spain, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Sudan, Eritrea, Djibouti, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Oman, and Iran? And those are just the ones in the general neighborhood. Vietnam and the United States also qualify, of course. Why quote something that stupid? To demonstrate the fine quality of a Moslem education?

  7. dimples says:
    @J. Alfred Powell

    Goys works for me. What’s wrong with it? We are speaking English here not Hebrew. The Hebrew or Yiddish don’t ask me word for what I assume is the ‘Non-Jew’ has been appropriated into English. Normal English rules for plural can apply to it if the result appears to be linguistic English enough. Why speak like a Heeb when you can speak English? Only if you are an Old Testament scholar perhaps or marry an Israeli chick or you have business with Jews who prefer to speak Hebrew etc.

    • Agree: Alfred
  8. Alfred says:

    I guess it takes a Vietnamese of a certain age to understand the Palestinians and Lebanese.

  9. Alfred says:
    @Ray Caruso

    Syria, Israel, Egypt, Cyprus, Turkey, Greece, Albania, Montenegro, Croatia, Italy, France, Spain, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Sudan, Eritrea, Djibouti, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Oman, and Iran

    I never knew that all these countries had ski slopes a short distance from a warm sea. Thank you for the information. 🙂

    The straight distance from Mzaar Ski Resort and the Mediterranean is 40km (25 miles)

    Google Map of Mzaar Ski Resort and Mediterranean

    • Thanks: Notsofast, Hiram of Tyre
    • Replies: @frankie p
  10. Thanks. Great piece! At least you won’t be hounded by Jews over there, Linh. Must be a relief.

  11. @Ray Caruso

    “Mountain” is not synonymous with “ski slope”; “sea” is not synonymous with “warm sea”. If you think they are, you’re just not very bright.

  12. I don’t know if Ali’s estimation of that streetwalking woman’s profession is correct since many Arab men have this habit of referring to all women out alone and in western clothes as “whores”.

    • Replies: @GeeBee
  13. frankie p says:
    @Alfred

    Mzaar Ski Resort is situated between the elevations of 1,850 and 2,465 m. Pretty good altitude for a mere 25 miles from the sea.

    • Agree: Hiram of Tyre
  14. Great article of an unbiased nature by a free and courageous Linh Dinh.

    Many of those who are familiar with Lebanon can see that this country is a lost paradise that was sacrificed at the altar of hell known as Israel. This country that featured one of the five most vibrant economies in the world in the early sixties, a model economy that inspired among others Singapore, became an economic basket case after the debilitating civil war that was triggered by the armed Palestinian struggle from within Lebanon against the usurpers of Palestinian land. What a pity that a truly multicultural society with a mosaic of cultures has disintegrated into social and economic chaos courtesy of the offspring of Western Imperialism, the ‘ only democracy’ in the Middle East, ‘ the country for Jews only, Israel.

    • Thanks: Alfred, Hiram of Tyre
    • Replies: @Alfred
  15. If Jews are killing Lebanese then what is stopping the Lebanese from killing Jews? If tête-à-tête does not work then go for tit for tat… they understand the concept of an eye for an eye… it’s in their holy book!

    • Replies: @Notsofast
  16. anon[102] • Disclaimer says:

    Linh Dinh, you are the only author on unz.com whose writings do not betray a hidden sponsor or a desire to deceive with words. An authentic point of view that is so rare these days. This marks you as a rare free song bird in a planet of trained parrots.

  17. @Ray Caruso

    Seriously, you want to dispute a phrase by a local taxi driver.
    As I understand it, you can travel the entire length of the country in less than an hour, and from the coast to the ski resorts, in less than half an hour. So that makes it indeed unique among these other larger countries that you list. Perhaps you should pay more attention to Linh’s words than to his driver, and give the taxi driver some slack.

    • Replies: @Ray Caruso
  18. Sirius says:

    @Linh

    Up until 100 years ago, Lebanon was Syria, part of the Ottoman provinces of Syria, and was regarded as such for at least 2-3 thousand years (so was Palestine by the way–check Herodotus if you don’t believe it). The term Lebanon used to refer only to the Mount Lebanon, which is a fraction of today’s Lebanon.

    It was the French who in their infinite wisdom decided to create the state of Lebanon (originally called “Grand-Liban”) when they occupied northern Syria in 1920. It was divide and rule, and a way to create states that would be dependent on France. (The British did the same with southern Syria or Palestine, but that’s another story with the complexity of Zionism).

    It’s probably why Lebanon has that “missing” government till today and a century of misrule. I would need to write volumes to address sectarianism.

    Incidentally, you can look up any newspaper reports prior to 1920 and constantly see references to Beirut, Syria, or Beirut as the most important port of Syria, etc.

    Is someone like Ali aware of that, when he looks over at a Syrian or Palestinian woman and presumably regards her as foreign, or somehow non-Lebanese? Or when he thinks of Lebanon as the most beautiful country? Would he be aware that his aborted, divided and occupied homeland is likely the cause of all this misfortune?

    I’m genuinely curious about that. I also wonder if you’re aware of that history. It’s nearly completely unknown in Western countries, as if it were some kind of carefully hidden secret.

  19. Whenever I come to Unz, I always check Linh’s slot to see if something new and delicious has been served up for us. It’s like a feast for the soul in a world of spiritual starvation. Once again, Linh does not disappoint. And best of all, Unz places it in the prominence it deserves.

    Another deeply satisfying repast for those who crave justice, fairness and truth as their preferred moral sustenance. And some of the finest travelogues I have ever had the pleasure of reading.

    A heartfelt, “Thank you!”, to add from the list of those you nourish on so many levels, Linh.

    • Agree: Notsofast, Sirius, Druid
  20. TKK says:

    Women forced to sell their a** because of knuckle dragging Muslims with their barbarian, criminal ideas about honor and purity- what a knee slapper!!! Just hilarious. The fun never stops for women in Muslim countries.

    Linh talks about women like most people would a snow leopard. That they are strange, exotic, unattainable creatures.

    The young lady did arch her back to accentuate her big butts.

    Lihn might find many kindred spirits in the Incel community.

    • Replies: @HeebHunter
    , @frankie p
    , @Druid
  21. @Ray Caruso

    How aggressive. If only this energy can be harnessed to stop the extermination of your race, lol

  22. Realist says:

    Why would any American give a shit about Lebanon at a time like this?

  23. Notsofast says:
    @God's Fool

    Israel will always respond by bombing until there is a ten to one kill ratio in their favor. After they achieve this ratio a cease fire will be agreed to. No one ever calls out their disproportional response.

  24. It’s not difficult to understand the Middle East. The Middle East is one big, festering, 8000-year-old race war.

  25. @Sirius

    “It was the French who in their infinite wisdom decided to create the state of Lebanon (originally called “Grand-Liban”) when they occupied northern Syria in 1920. It was divide and rule, and a way to create states that would be dependent on France. (The British did the same with southern Syria or Palestine, but that’s another story with the complexity of Zionism).”

    Ah, the lovely Sykes-Picot Agreement. The French in league again with Perfidious Albion. Amazing how soon the locals can be mind-scrubbed by a little ‘divide et impera’, eh?

    And now America. The (shit)show must go on!

    Just don’t ask, “Cui bono?” or you’ll be quickly de-platformed. And in the end, it’s all about money/fame/power with most people, anyway.

    But not with Linh and many others here on Unz, thankfully. At least we have that. But they need our support. (Looks like I’ll have to speak with the family “CFO”, i.e., the wife, and see about making a donation to Linh. Put one’s money where one’s mouth is, and all that. I’m sure she’ll agree. She’s a keeper.)

  26. Jiminy says:

    Levison Wood, the English explorer whose latest tv series includes trekking through Lebanon, had quite a hairy moment there as they crossed a mountain range to get to the ocean on the other side. Once they left the tree line, the snow got heavier until visibility was down to less than a metre. Then suddenly all cleared and beyond could be seen the ocean.
    Lebanon appears to be quite a nice place to visit, only spoiled by the Jews want of killing everyone there.

  27. Alfred says:
    @Joe Levantine

    When I was a teenager at a boarding school in England, one of my friends was a Palestinian (Greek Orthodox) who lived in Lebanon. His father, Yousef Beidas owned the biggest private bank of Lebanon at that time. His customers were the elites of the Gulf. His bank had immense properties including the Casino du Liban and the Port of Marseilles I believe.

    In a twinkle of an eye, the father had to disappear and the bank went bust. Essentially, from what I understand, there was an engineered run on the bank by many parties – including the USSR. When Intra Bank went to the central bank to swap assets for liquidity, the central bank refused to provide liquidity. Any bank, no matter how conservatively and well-run, collapses in such a scenario.

    In retrospect, it is obvious that Beidas made a lot of enemies as he was a “foreigner” and extremely successful. Even the Jewpedia says that he was called “The Genius from Jerusalem”

    Countries like Kuwait kept large sums with the bank – much to the irritation of the Americans, British and Swiss. The UAE did not exist at the time.

    Some time later, the father was arrested in Switzerland. He had a Brazilian passport. His rented car was badly parked. A Swiss policeman asked for his papers. When he saw that this gentleman was Brazilian, the policeman tried to speak to him in Portuguese. Such bad luck. He was in custody for a while. He died from cancer in Switzerland – possibly poisoned like Yasser Arafat.

    My friend had a huge apartment on Grosvenor Square, London, near the US embassy. He had a Mini Cooper S. He had fun driving me around London. He drove like a maniac. There was relatively little traffic and no cameras at the time.

    I believe my friend is still in Lebanon. I have not been in touch with him for many years. Our paths diverged.

    Many believe that the collapse of Intra Bank was a prelude to the civil war and all subsequent mayhem. 🙁

    • Thanks: chris, Hiram of Tyre
  28. Taxi a woman! I had no idea. Thanks for this information, Linh Dinh.

  29. @Sirius

    ‘s someone like Ali aware of that, when he looks over at a Syrian or Palestinian woman and presumably regards her as foreign, or somehow non-Lebanese? Or when he thinks of Lebanon as the most beautiful country? Would he be aware that his aborted, divided and occupied homeland is likely the cause of all this misfortune?’

    Demonstrating that a nation has recent and even artificial origins is not the same thing as demonstrating it doesn’t exist. The Lebanese think Lebanon exists; therefore, it does. That’s where nations exist; now, and inside people’s heads.

    • Agree: Talha
    • Replies: @Sirius
    , @Bombercommand
  30. @Ray Caruso

    “Lebanon is the only country with mountain next to sea.”

    How about Syria, Israel, Egypt, Cyprus, Turkey, Greece, Albania, Montenegro, Croatia, Italy, France, Spain, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Sudan, Eritrea, Djibouti, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Oman, and Iran? And those are just the ones in the general neighborhood. Vietnam and the United States also qualify, of course. Why quote something that stupid? To demonstrate the fine quality of a Moslem education?

    Lol, is that the only thing you picked up from this article you bloody cretin?

    The list of countries on this planet with both mountains and access to the sea is indeed long. Hell, you might as well have included Canada, the UK and Japan while you were at it.

    To understand the reporting of Ali’s statement — which only a bloody cretin you like (my apologies for reiterating such observation) would associate to a “Moslem eduction” — one has to travel to Lebanon. Like you, Ali, unlikely traveled anywhere and so he does not know any better. What’s your excuse, bloody cretin?

    • Replies: @Ray Caruso
  31. Anonymous[243] • Disclaimer says:

    Try this:

    “Maybe because the country is beautiful.”

    “her butts”? Who’s the one with English problems?

    Mountains and beaches? You mean like Los Angeles?

  32. @Dave from Oz

    It’s not difficult to understand the Middle East. The Middle East is one big, festering, 8000-year-old race war.

    That’s the story of the world it seems. And to think Europe might have broken free of this phenomenon if it wasn’t for the mass importation of alien peoples!

    • Replies: @Talha
  33. chris says:
    @Talha

    I hope Mr Fisk died of natural causes and that he wasn’t cleared out of the way like the Afghan guerilla leader, Massoud who was murdered on 9/9/2001, before the main show was about to start.

    Otherwise, another fantastic article, Linh!

    • Replies: @Talha
  34. Dumbo says:

    “I have three sister in Lebanon, sir. I had four, but she married a nigger.”

    LOL. Well, it’s not a consolation, but it happens in the best families… 😀

  35. Talha says:
    @chris

    Yes, I think he did, he was getting pretty old in age and his body had been through quite a bit of use. He was of that old-school war-reporter generation, those guys were tough as nails.

    Peace.

    • Agree: chris
  36. The author presumably an atheist equates Israel and its inhabitants with the Devil, a theology of sorts. An examination of the history of the sayet of Syria under the Turks, the Turks defeat in WW I, the Zionist colonization of Palestine, the rise of Arab nationalism, etc. would conclude that the struggles for primacy in that area were conducted by mortals acting for their self-interest. To ascribe uniquely to the jews of Israel evil incarnate is unconvincing to this reader. It would be interesting to learn where and how the author acquired his passionate hatred.

  37. Talha says:
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    I remember Gore Vidal once stated:
    “History is nothing more than the bloody record of the migration of tribes.”

    And to think Europe might have broken free of this phenomenon if it wasn’t for the mass importation of alien peoples!

    Most certainly the case with regards to any wars related to the Middle East or originating from there.

    But I think you’d agree that a cursory study of European history (even within living memory) shows Europeans certainly need no outside reason to initiate bloody continent-wide wars. In the last couple slug-fests, they were running out of warm bodies so quickly that they were importing in soldiers from all over the Middle East and even Africa to help kill each other:

    Peace.

    • Replies: @Ugetit
  38. chris says:
    @Dave from Oz

    But that’s not true! There are Christian communities in Syria and Lybia and the whole ME since the earliest Christian times. Also Jewish communities existed in the different countries until they were thrown out in response to the Palestinian expulsions of 48 and 67.

    Other than that, I don’t think they were more belligernt than their Christian counterparts in Europe. But it may be easier to just repeat old tropes than to actually look into it.

  39. Sirius says:
    @Colin Wright

    That wasn’t really my point. And my question concerns how well people are educated about their own history and sense of identity.

    One point which I didn’t get into in my original post is that Lebanon will never truly be a viable country. It’s truncated, severed from its deeper region of historic Syria. Lebanon will always be dependent on outsiders, as will most of her neighbors. It was set up that way. Can it ever be corrected? I don’t know.

    The fact that historic Syria wasn’t allowed to grow organically back in 1920, when it declared its independence, should never be forgotten. It is the underlying reason why there has been a century of suffering and misrule and a conflict that looks eternal.

    That British-French-Zionist collaboration wrecked our modern world, in my humble opinion. Can that even be corrected? Again, I don’t know. One can hope.

    It is a multi-layered conflict that ultimately threatens the peace of the entire world, but that’s a much bigger topic. But that’s precisely why it’s so important to reflect on it.

  40. @Alfred

    Indeed, the downfall of Baidas was a tragedy brought about by jealousy from establishment figures and the fact that a naturalised Palestinian had many deputies on his payroll. Baidas was a genius of the banking world and a man of vision but also a gambler whose ambition knew no bounds. He overstretched his finances in some illiquid investments and when he sought help from the Central Bank, all his enemies jumped at the opportunity to expose the skeletons in his closet that any person of his success would inevitably have. The bank was restructured and all small to medium depositors were reimbursed by the government which was at the time a very fiscally conservative one running balanced budgets with zero debt. Big depositors ended up shareholders in the new restructured bank under the name of Bank Al Mashreq.

    As for Intra Bank being a catalyst for the civil war, I very much doubt the theory. One article by Lance Morrow during the 1982 Israeli invasion of Lebanon, compared Lebanon to the beautiful son of an Arab woman who fearing the evil eye would put a scar on her son’s face. Lebanon at the time was very much envied and feared by his Arab neighbours not because of its military power but more because of its democratic system of governance with an elected parliament and a presidency with term limits and an independent judiciary and a liberal life style that was very favourable to Western influence. The end of Lebanon started with the Black September in Jordan when King Hussein massacred thousands of Palestinian fighters pushing the PLO into Syria and Syria’s Assad pushing them into Lebanon in a deliberate attempt to destabilise Lebanon which had a system of governance based on a delicate sectarian balance. While Moslems were favourable to the Palestinian fighters’s intrusion, Christians were hostile and suspicious. This schism within Lebanese society rendered the Lebanese army totally ineffective at controlling the Palestinians who started acting as a state within a state and making incursions into Israeli territory under the legal protection of the Cairo agreement which Egyptian President Nasser imposed on Lebanon in 1969 with the Lebanese unable to resist this escalation with Israel to avoid civil unrest between Muslims and Christians. The rest is history.

    Though one interesting fact to mention is that for many decades before Israel’s military involvement in Lebanon, the joke within the Israeli army was that when they would decide to occupy Lebanon, they would send the military music band. Lebanon ended up the only Middle Eastern country which Israel left after many years of occupation without any preconditions.

    • Thanks: Alfred
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    , @Alfred
  41. @Colin Wright

    You need to study history. When the Ottoman Empire surrendered, two Mandates were created to be administrated by The League of Nations: The Mandate of Syria and The Mandate of Mesopotamia. These two Mandates were, by international law, to attain independance at the earliest possible date as the sovereign nations of Syria and Iraq. All this corresponded with the wishes of the inhabitants therein. Only Iraq attained independance with its sovereign territory intact. The Mandate of Syria was first, illegally, severed into a northern sector under France, and a southern sector under The United Kingdom, then these two illegal SubMandates were further severed. The UK severed its zone into the illegal SubMandates of TransJordan and Palestine. France got real fancy, with several shuffles at one point the French northern sector was severed into five entities, but the French settled on two illegal SubMandates of Lebanon and Syria(plus the illegal severing of Syria’s Hatay Province gifting it to Turkey). As a further kink, the UK severed The Golan from its illegal SubMandate of Palestine and gifted it to the French northern sector, the probable origin of the dirty jooos notion that The Golan belongs to the zionist entity as the jooo(mistakenly) believes that England had the right to gift the illegal SubMandate of Palestine to the jooo. Ask yourself why the Mandate of Mesopotamia achieves independence intact but the Mandate of Syria was illegally severed into four entities. Remember it was the Syrians who made the deal with Lawrence to aide the Allies against the Ottomans on the condition the Allies supported Syrian independance. Lawrence of Arabia should correctly be called Lawrence of Syria, he knew the truth and was likely murdered for it. Syria(comprising present day Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, and Jordan) is a nation as ancient as Egypt, actually older. When the Ottomans first conquered the area, Historical Syria(AKA Greater Syria) was administered as the Ayalet of Syria, later the Ottomans did some severing to maintain control. It is easily seen, and proven by history, that Historical Syria is the only legitimate political entity and that the numerous severings, particularly the post WWI severing, are illegal, against the wishes of the inhabitants, and done not only to neutralize the political power and desire for sovereignty of the citizens of Historical Syria, but to hand over, quite illegally, a large chunk of Syria’s territory to a pseudo-people with a bogus religion who most closely resemble a Masonic Order of Bedbugs(their women are particularly unattractive with hideous faces and bushes a mile wide the joooish male’s obsession with the Shiksa is entirely understandable).

    • Thanks: Alfred, Druid
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  42. @Bombercommand

    ‘You need to study history. When the Ottoman Empire surrendered…’

    None of this addresses anything I said.

    • LOL: Bombercommand
  43. @Joe Levantine

    ‘…Though one interesting fact to mention is that for many decades before Israel’s military involvement in Lebanon, the joke within the Israeli army was that when they would decide to occupy Lebanon, they would send the military music band…’

    That is amusing. Do you have a solid source, though?

    …if you do, it would be useful to have it.

    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  44. @Anonymouse

    ‘The author presumably an atheist equates Israel and its inhabitants with the Devil, a theology of sorts. An examination of the history of the sayet of Syria under the Turks, the Turks defeat in WW I, the Zionist colonization of Palestine, the rise of Arab nationalism, etc. would conclude that the struggles for primacy in that area were conducted by mortals acting for their self-interest. To ascribe uniquely to the jews of Israel evil incarnate is unconvincing to this reader. It would be interesting to learn where and how the author acquired his passionate hatred.’

    This sounds a lot like the usual Zionist Plan B. When all else fails, claim Israel has been justified by Darwinian principles of natural selection.

    When it comes to Israel, that argument, while perhaps intrinsically valid, has been tainted by association.

    In any case, I’m fine with pulling the plug and letting Israel sink or swim on its own merits. I’m confident of the outcome.

    • Replies: @Anonymouse
    , @Anonymouse
  45. Alfred says:
    @Joe Levantine

    Beidas was a genius of the banking world and a man of vision but also a gambler whose ambition knew no bounds

    His son, Ghassan, was also a gambler. I would wonder into the Playboy Club on Park Lane very occasionally in the afternoon and would see him playing blackjack. His apartment was a short walk away. He was incredibly shy. When I had two girls he would refuse to help me out. No wingman.

    I liked to go there sometimes because the location was great, the girls were pretty and the self-service table was heaped with delicacies. It cost £1 and you could more or less eat as much as you liked. The cocktails were more expensive than the meal. I almost never gambled.

    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  46. anon[306] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sirius

    Beneath politics lies ethnicity, beneath that geography and beneath that geology. But of course the fractiousness of the peoples dwelling within a thousand kilometers or so of the Dead Sea Rift, the nexus of Africa and Eurasia, is all Whitey’s fault.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  47. Akouo says:

    Really enjoy your writing, many thanks.

  48. Emslander says:

    When I was a young man in the United States Foreign Service, I had the option of going to Beirut. It was tempting, but I had a wife and two babies, so I turned it down. I have some regrets.

  49. @Sirius

    While what you state about Lebanon’s history is true, I would bring to the attention of the reader that the geography that was prevalent before the French mandate was the result of the Ottoman takeover of the Levant after the defeat of the Mamluks. The geography of region has been constantly shifting from the dawn to the death of successive empires that ruled this part of the world and the fact that many parts of current day Lebanon belonged to Syria up to 1918 is irrelevant to those Lebanese who would rather be part of current day Lebanon. During the reign of Emir Fakhr al Din between the 16th and 17th century, the Druze Emir expanded the boundaries of Mount Lebanon beyond the geography of today reaching south into Palestine, only to be defeated by the Ottomans which put an end to this first attempt at ‘ Greater Lebanon’.

    Though it is true that the Lebanese have failed to agree on a definite identity and dodged the issue when Lebanon took its independence in 1943 by declaring the motto ‘no West and no East’ which in itself does not constitute an identity.

    The reason Lebanon has a dysfunctional government is that the system is too centralised and should move into a federation of many states or cantons or should in the least be highly decentralised. This would allow each sect to preserve its culture, traditions and ethnic orientation while united under a limited central government that takes care of sovereign ministries like defence, foreign affairs, law, finance and internal affairs.

    Lebanese geography, just like the geography of the whole Middle East is an artificial setup that was tailored to the needs of the colonial powers of the United Kingdom and France, two countries whose frontiers metamorphosed over centuries keeping so far the unity of their components.

  50. @Colin Wright

    By Way of Deception, by Victor Ostrovsky, also confirmed on more than one occasion by the head of Hizbollah Mr. Hassan Nasrullah.

    • Thanks: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  51. @Alfred

    £1 for a meal! And at the Play Boy Club. God bless the good old days. I guess inflation is as much of a party spoiler as Covid19. Thanks for this trip down memory lane 😉

    • Thanks: Alfred
  52. Wielgus says:

    That Mleeta museum is fascinating. I have been there twice. It is also possible to peer at occupied Palestine from there.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
  53. @Colin Wright

    After writing my comment, later I remembered how the author had wallowed in what may be called atrocity porn imagining writhing or dead bodies in the mud. Ariel Sharon who was complicit in permitting a Christian militia to enter a Palestinian camp where they murdered approximately 2000 Palestinians. His malfeasance shocked and horrified everyone including the Israeli public. An official Israeli inquiry found that he bore “personal responsibility” for the Sabra and Shatila massacre. Unfortunately the author gets his jollies from atrocity porn images dancing in his head.Again, is it known what in the author’s personal history led him to his great hatred of jews? Perhaps a jewish girl turned him down.

  54. @Colin Wright

    >In any case, I’m fine with pulling the plug and letting Israel sink or swim on its own merits. I’m confident of the outcome.

    So am I.

    • Agree: Commentator Mike, AaronB
  55. @Joe Levantine

    Bought ‘By Way of Deception.’

  56. @anon

    ‘… But of course the fractiousness of the peoples dwelling within a thousand kilometers or so of the Dead Sea Rift, the nexus of Africa and Eurasia, is all Whitey’s fault.’

    In the case of Lebanon, we — or rather, Israel — certainly build upon our opportunities.

    Sabra and Chatila offers a perfect microcosm. The shooters were Lebanese Christians — but the Jews armed them, disarmed the Palestinians, and then ushered the killers into the camp and literally provided the lighting. We set the stage, and Israel wrote the script. You can blame the actors — but it’s questionable if the play would have happened at all if we hadn’t lent a hand.

    • Agree: Joe Levantine, Alfred
    • Replies: @anon
  57. Thim says:

    Sorry about the flip’s sister. What a disaster for that family.

  58. Wielgus says:
    @Wielgus

    Actually more accurately the Khiam prison that was run by the Zionist collaborators and is located a short distance from the border.
    The Mleeta museum has notebooks and diaries with Hebrew writing inside, probably belonging to IDF members who met with some misfortune.

  59. saggy says:

    until that genocidal abomination disappears

    Lest anyone accuse you of exxageration – Deuteronomy 20:16-17

    16However, in the cities of the nations that the LORD your God is giving you as an inheritance, you must not leave alive anything that breathes.17For you must devote them to complete destruction—the Hittites, Amorites, Canaanites, Perizzites, Hivites, and Jebusites—as the LORD your God has commanded you,

  60. Free Occupied Palestine…

    and…

    All will be well…

    [not a call to shed any blood, only a call for justice to be executed – yes, a very Machiavellian wording ].

  61. @TKK

    Lol, we have one pissed off little KIKE here, folks.

    • Replies: @obvious
  62. @Anonymouse

    Oh shut the fuck up you little kike worm. How mand terrorists were appointed office in your swamp of a goverment?

    You insects are bound to hell, so whatever though. Enjoy the boiling pots of human shit.

  63. frankie p says:
    @TKK

    Sure wish Ron Unz would add a “Hasbara Troll” button.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  64. @Anonymouse

    ‘…His malfeasance shocked and horrified everyone including the Israeli public…’

    Not super-shocked.

    They subsequently elected him prime minister.

  65. @frankie p

    ‘Sure wish Ron Unz would add a “Hasbara Troll” button.’

    Redundant. ‘Hasbara’ would suffice.

  66. @Dave from Oz

    ‘It’s not difficult to understand the Middle East. The Middle East is one big, festering, 8000-year-old race war.’

    Bullshit. Take your Zionist tripe and shove it.

  67. anon[244] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    They would have their constant clannish fractures with or without us, just as we would have our periodic, earthshaking, White-on-White, universalist-on-clannish wars, with or without them. About the only new wrinkle since Frankish times is the logarithmic growth of Ashkenazi power over the last two centuries. This affects both the West and Middle-East tremendously, but now promises to be far more catastrophic for us.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  68. Anon[174] • Disclaimer says:

    So many nice things Lebanon has done like the marine barracks bombing murdering 250 Americans. Buy what does that matter when 56 Lebanese were killed by Israel in 1948 as you write.
    . A very balanced piece ( of Shiite propaganda).

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  69. AaronB says:
    @Anonymouse

    The death of religion in the West hasnt actually ended the human need for religion, and people just end up getting creepier and weirder religions.

    Apocalyptic antisemitism satisfies some peoples need for a religion. It has its inhuman devils. Ones own failures and pains can be attributed to some evil force.

    Apocalyptic antisemitism is a myth that has seized on some peoples minds. We don’t get to control the myths that seize us. They rise up from below and take over our minds, they satisfy a need, and seem to offer a compelling explanation of our suffering.

    Thankfully, apocalyptic antisemitism is a fringe religion and a minority myth. It had its heyday in the mid 20th century and has lost its ability to animate large numbers of people. It did enough damage then, but myths fade away and continue to linger only on the fringe. Paganism is no longer mainstream, either. It served its purpose.

    It has had a rebirth in the Muslim world, but it is fading there too, and will soon be the religion of white nationalists and Islamists – and random crazy failed Vietnamese ex-poets, and random fringe people in general like Ron 🙂

    I say if a broken man like Lin Dinh can take the edge off his suffering just a bit by believing Jews are inhuman devils responsible for his anhedonia, let him have it. Its harmless in todays day and age.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    , @gay troll
  70. @AaronB

    And just in case you haven’t lost your lunch…

    Heere’s Aaron!

  71. @anon

    ‘…About the only new wrinkle since Frankish times is the logarithmic growth of Ashkenazi power over the last two centuries…’

    It is interesting. I have some exhaustive, monumentally tedious, ‘let’s count every tree’ history of the Thirty Years War — eight hundred pages.

    Reading it should be a penalty for the more serious class of misdemeanors, but it is certainly a worthy effort.

    Jews are referred to exactly twice — both times in passing. Once upon a time, they simply didn’t matter.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
  72. @Sirius

    @Linh

    Up until 100 years ago, Lebanon was Syria, part of the Ottoman provinces of Syria, and was regarded as such for at least 2-3 thousand years (so was Palestine by the way–check Herodotus if you don’t believe it). The term Lebanon used to refer only to the Mount Lebanon, which is a fraction of today’s Lebanon.

    It was the French who in their infinite wisdom decided to create the state of Lebanon (originally called “Grand-Liban”) when they occupied northern Syria in 1920. It was divide and rule, and a way to create states that would be dependent on France. (The British did the same with southern Syria or Palestine, but that’s another story with the complexity of Zionism).

    It’s probably why Lebanon has that “missing” government till today and a century of misrule. I would need to write volumes to address sectarianism.

    Incidentally, you can look up any newspaper reports prior to 1920 and constantly see references to Beirut, Syria, or Beirut as the most important port of Syria, etc.

    Is someone like Ali aware of that, when he looks over at a Syrian or Palestinian woman and presumably regards her as foreign, or somehow non-Lebanese? Or when he thinks of Lebanon as the most beautiful country? Would he be aware that his aborted, divided and occupied homeland is likely the cause of all this misfortune?

    I’m genuinely curious about that. I also wonder if you’re aware of that history. It’s nearly completely unknown in Western countries, as if it were some kind of carefully hidden secret.

    Your reduction of Lebanon, its history and people as merely a part of ancient/modern Syria is a result of, what appears to be, honest historical ignorance. Additionally, nothing you wrote, on the ancient part and/or on the early 1900s-onward era, is either “completely unknown” or “some kind of carefully hidden secret”. A quick search online will return what you essentially laid out. On a side note, if you’re ever interested in unknown, hidden/secret history, you should look into Canaan/Phoenicia and how its colonial, usurious, banking, seafaring merchant class and their ties to some of today’s Jewish ruling classes.

    To clarify and understand the matter of Syria better, I invite you to refer to the link below. The confusion is a result of etymology and varying designation (geography, size, politics) under different people of different eras. As the reference states Syria “never alluded to a uniform or constant well-deigned geographic or political entity, but remained labile through the centuries until the emergence of present day Syria.”

    “The Origins of Syrian Nationhood”
    Part 1 – “The name of Syria in ancient and modern usage”
    (Shortened link from Google Books): https://bit.ly/358Rx6m

    One on hand, the etymology. While debated for a long while; most seem to agree that it does come from the ancient Greeks; who after coming in contact with the Assyrian Empire in the 8th century BCE, named the land Syria and the people of the land Assyrians. The inhabitants of the land however (the Canaanites-Phoenicians for instance and others) did not call the land Syria nor themselves as Assyrian. The Greek designation is confusing since they also clearly distinguished between the different people of the land (Phoenicians, Syrians, Judeans, Arabs, etc).

    On the other equally perplexing hand, the boundaries. The same ancient Greeks named the whole region as Syria but also applied the name to refer to Assyria alone, Aram and the Arameans and even a part of Persia (Coele-Syria known to the Persians as Ebernari). To make matters worse – and this contradicts the part of your comment where you wrote that Beirut/Lebanon were part of Syria for thousands of years – the ancient Greeks always and clearly distinguished geographical Phoenicia from Syria. The examples are many: Hecataeus (circa 500 BCE) clearly distinguished Phoenicia from Syria, so did Ctesias (circa 390 BCE), the Periplus of Pseudo-Scylax (circa 350 BCE), etc. The Romans also identified/designated Phoenicia separatly even subdividing (prima, secunda, maritima, libanesis). Lastly, Phoenicia continues appearing in historical records, as distinct geographical location, up until the 3rd or 4th century AD.

    As far as Lebanon goes and to the best of my knowledge, the name first appeared in the Epic of Gilamesh – albeit, yes, in reference to its cedar tree forests. The Romans did include it as part of Phoenicia under Phoenicia Libanesis (likely due to proximity and the cedar tree commodity used by the Phoenicians) – and so, it could explain why Greater Lebanon included Mount Lebanon and the coastal cities. Personally, I think it would have made more sense to name present-day Lebanon as Phoenician than Lebanon. The aforementioned link covers the early 1900s-onward era as well.

    • Thanks: Joe Levantine
    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
    , @Alfred
    , @Sirius
  73. Wielgus says:
    @Colin Wright

    C.V. Wedgwood’s massive tome?

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  74. @Hiram of Tyre

    Thanks for the meticulous details and the historic references.

    One late great Lebanese scholar, brought up to me the theory that the name Phoenicia derives from the Greek word Phoenix, adding that it was Homer who referred to the trading people of the East Mediterranean as Phoenicians in a derogatory way, as the Greeks were unhappy about the competition in shipping and trading throughout the Aegean Sea and the rest of the Mediterranean basin from those newcomers from the Eastern Mediterranean. Homer considered those new competitors to have sprung from nowhere as the Greeks traced their origins to the Eastern Arabian Gulf where they had mastered the maritime routes of the Indian sea until they heard about the other sea to the west and started accordingly to colonise the Easter Mediterranean while decimating in the process the greatest natural resource of Mount Lebanon which is the cedar tree for the sake of their shipbuilding industry. Here, the scholar based his theory on differentiating between the people of the Lebanese coast and those who dwelled in the mountainous side of Mount Lebanon who relied for their survival on agriculture and hunting as opposed to the mercantilist ways of the trader class of the coast. He backed his theory by looking into the culinary ways of those two components of Mount Lebanon’s demography noting that the coastal people had fish as a staple diet whereas the mountain dwellers almost never used fish in their diet. Also, the scholar thought that the people of the different city states of the Lebanese coast never referred to themselves as Phoenicians but rather associated themselves as citizens of Tyre, Sidon, Beirut and Byblos.

    I would appreciate your take on this theory.

  75. Alfred says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    I think it would have made more sense to name present-day Lebanon as Phoenician than Lebanon

    The Phoenicians have been around as a distinct people for an awfully long time. The Ancient Egyptians got their wood for building boats and so on from them.

    According to Herodotus, the Phoenicians managed to circumnavigate Africa in a voyage in c. 600 BCE sponsored by the Egyptian pharaoh Necho. Starting from the Red Sea, they sailed westwards in a journey that took three years. The sailors of Phoenicia’s most successful colony Carthage were said to have sailed to ancient Britain in an expedition led by Himilco in c. 450 BCE. Another famous Carthaginian voyage, this time by Hanno in c. 425 BCE, reached the Atlantic coast of Africa as far down as modern Cameroon or Gabon. The voyage, whose purpose was to found new colonies and find new sources of valuable commodities (especially gold), is recorded on a stele from the temple of Baal Hammon at Carthage. In the tale, Hanno describes meeting savage tribes, volcanoes, and exotic animals such as gorillas.

    The Phoenicians – Master Mariners

    • Thanks: Ugetit
    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  76. Ugetit says:

    …that they were importing in soldiers from all over the Middle East and even Africa to help kill each other:

    Thanks for that.

    However, I’d like to add that the Allied “Christians” tapped their colonies even beyond the Middle East (such as India), to fight their demonic wars against their White Christian neighbors to appease the moneyed atheists with globalist pretensions.

    Those things were called “world” wars for a reason.

    The following quote is from a book that’s well worth a read, starting with Chapter 22,

    “When the French colonial (Negro) troops under his (General Eisenhower’s) command entered the German city of Stuttgart, ‘they herded German women into the subways and raped
    some 2,000 of them.” “Even a PM reporter, ‘reluctantly confirmed the story in its major details.’”
    Peace Action, July, 1945

    – Benton L. Bradberry, The Myth of German Villainy, Chap 22

    file:///C:/Users/jeff/Downloads/The%20Myth%20of%20German%20Villainy.pdf

    The Soviet hordes were famous for doing that and worse, as well. But ya know, “dat Hitler.”

    • Replies: @Thumbhead Forney
  77. Ugetit says:
    @Talha

    My post, #80, was in reply to Talha as is this,

    CHAPTER XXIV

    Cannon Fodder from the Colonies

    An enormous flood of humanity, equal in numbers to the French and British armies of 1914 (2,300,000 men in the month of October 1914) was about to pour out onto all the battlefields of the Allies, from Africa, from Asia, and from Oceania. The gleam of their countenances, yellow, copper, black, would be reflected on all the seas of the world. Not even included in these droves were the considerable armies raised in Canada, in Australia, in South Africa, etc., often with the descendants of conquered French, Irish forced laborers, and dispossessed Boers.

    – Leon Degrelle, Hitler: Born At Versailles, Ch 24

    https://archive.org/details/BornAtVersailles/page/n237/mode/2up?q=Africa+

    • Thanks: Talha
  78. Sirius says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    I’m actually replying to all of you who responded to my points about historic Syria.

    This whole discussion about Phoenicia is beside the point. To argue that Phoenicia is the predecessor to a Lebanese state or heritage is almost as ridiculous as arguing that Zionist myth of a 2000 year claim to Palestine. I stress almost! It’s not the same because modern Lebanese are likely descendants of those same Phoenicians (unlike the usurpers of Palestine today), but so are the modern Syrians (yes, that divided up one) and so are the modern Palestinians. What makes you think “Lebanese” have a sole claim on that heritage?

    Anyway, it wasn’t my intention to get that far into ancient history, but obviously some are focusing on that.

    True, Syria was named by the Greeks. The Semitic name is Aram. It is why Aramaic and Syriac are basically different names for the same language or dialects. But so what?

    The point is “Lebanon” – Grand-Liban – was created in 1920 by French foreign officials. They drew the entire border sitting in some Paris office. Nothing can change that fact. And their point was to create mini-states that they could control. They tried to further divide Syria into 5 more states* but it didn’t work, largely because no one in the rest of Syria was as loyal to the French or as susceptible to manipulation as the Maronite Christians for whom Lebanon was created to rule over. The French played the sectarian card like no other.

    These were the seeds of destruction of natural Syria, of its organic growth from 1920 and again, this seemingly eternal conflict. It went alongside and supported the Zionist project too, as it divided everyone into weaker and smaller entities. Zionism was obviously far worse because its goal was downright genocidal: eliminate the entire indigenous population all together of as big a territory as possible. They’re still working on that one.

    *I would add that many modern Zionists/neocons have resurrected those same proposals dividing the current smaller Syria into 5 or 6 pieces, playing on Kurdish or sectarian sentiments.

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  79. gay troll says:
    @AaronB

    apocalyptic antisemitism is a fringe religion and a minority myth. It had its heyday in the mid 20th century and has lost its ability to animate large numbers of people.

    Disagree. “Apocalyptic antisemitism” is a perfect euphemism for Christianity. The Gospels depict Jesus Christ as a person surrounded by evil Jews. Jesus himself calls his Jewish contemporaries evil. He then predicts the violent destruction of Jerusalem, portraying it as divine judgment against the sinful Jews. The biggest problem with JC’s criticism of the Jews is its hypocrisy; the Gospels would have us believe that Jesus has the authority to condemn the Jews because he is their King; they would have us believe that he fulfills Jewish scriptures only to reject their most basic premises. Gospel Christianity is schizoid, simultaneously denying and affirming Jewish beliefs. This is because although JC genuinely wants to destroy the Jewish people, he wants to keep their scriptures, their treasures, and their “promised” land for Rome. Thus the Gospels transform the universal wisdom of love into an imperial weapon that perpetuates the Torah. A more horrible blasphemy cannot be conceived.

    • Replies: @AaronB
  80. @Alfred

    Thank you for sharing your anecdote on the Beidas family. Fascinating to say the least.

    I don’t know if the fall of Intra-Bank was in part a prelude to the civil war but it most certainly is a point worth looking into. On this matter, I once came across information stating that the civil war was waged to destroy Lebanon and shift the power to the Gulf. I don’t remember the details and/or if it is accurate but if so, it would be in line with that theory.

    To the best of my knowledge, the civil war was instigated to split Lebanon between Israel (Zionists have wanted its south up to the Litani river since the early 1900s) and Syria (to make up for the stole Golan Heights and make up for demographics) — all under Kissinger’s policies. The fact that Lebanon was an economic/financial strength, developing, etc was surely another contributing factor (in a detrimental way for Lebanon) since those who created the Zionist state always wanted others destroyed (which is again in line with the theory you alluded to).

    • Thanks: Alfred
  81. anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:

    Lebanon was once rather famous for having the sexiest women in the Arab world. When I was about 8 years old (1969) I remember Miss Lebanons competing very well in the Miss World swimsuit competition.

    And then I noticed things like Lebanon Civil War, the Israeli invasion, the Slaughter of Palestinians in a PLO administered refugee camp by Arab Christian Falangists and the Israeli Defense Minister Sharon saying “why were they blaming Israeli Jews for this slaughter that was carried out by Gentile Goyim?”

    As an Anglo White American, I have notices that French Colonialism left behind a lot of a really good looking, well dressed, sexy local gals and great food.

    Ya can’t beat French Vietnamese cuisine.

    What the F#*$& did we Americans bring when Reagan and French and Italians put our troops in to Lebanon in the 1980s before we completely cut and ran after Islamic terrorists slaughtered so many of our troops in a terrorist attack.

    I think we brought White Castle fast food burgers. Great!

    It seems like our kinsmen the Russians are the only White Indo European people that have any clue about how to go in and stay with Arabs. The Russians and secular Arabs in Syria seem to have won the Civil War there.

    I hope there are beauty contests of Lebanese and Syrian and Russian women competing in Syria – perhaps in the Classical Greek archeology sites in Palmyra Syria.

    Another reason I can tell the idiot Christian Zionists morons that they and Bush I, Bush II, Zionist Neo Conservatives were complete F#*&$ #idiots in our interventions in Iraq, Libya, Syria?

    Why not just support good looking women?

    When the alternatives are:

    Ruth Bader Ginzberg
    Elena Kagan
    Hillary
    Madeline Albright
    Donna Shalalah (Lesbian and Lebanese – Lesbanese)
    Rachel Madcow Maddow

    A huge % of these God awful American Libs, Leftists, Neo Conservatives, ZIonists are ethnic Jews – but not all. But they are all ugly, hateful women.

    No wonder we have so many Gay people in the USA.

    • Agree: Alfred
  82. AaronB says:
    @gay troll

    Christianity was influenced by Zoroastrianism and became a dualistic religion where Satan is the enemy of God. In Judaism, there is no Devil. Satan is merely the Accuser, an angel who serves God by bringing the case for the prosecution against you when you die. He’s just doing his job. In Judaism, also, God created good and evil – evil is not a seperate principle opposed to God – and there is an ultimate realm beyond good and evil, like there is in Buddhism and Christian mysticism.

    That being said, Judaism was also influenced by Zoroastrianism, but to a far lesser extent. It forms the core of Christianity.

    The Zoroastrian element in Christianity is what led to apocalyptic antisemitism, as well as to Nazism, Communism, and Woke ideology. Linh Dinh doesn’t know it, but he’s basically a Zoroastrian dualist, as is Ron Unz.

    Zoroastrian dualism is probably the great heresy among religious and metaphysical systems. It is divisive, whereas the best metaphysics is integrative. It makes war on one aspect of reality, whereas non dualism seeks to integrate all aspects of reality.

    It would not be going too far to say that Zoroastrian metaphysics has led to most of mankinds ideological conflicts, wars, and massacres – those conflicts that go beyond merely local attempts to gain resources.

    You are right that Christianity is divided – it is Zoroastrian, Greek, and Jewish, and the tension has never been resolved. The Jewish element based on Jesus’s life and sayings tends to flow into Christian mysticism, the Zoroastrian element into wars of religion, inquisition, and their modern ideological successors, and the Greek element into abstract thinking.

    The only element that is really problematic is Zoroastrian. Ironically, the modern Church has moved away from this element – and various secular ideologies have inherited it, from Woke ideology to its counterpart on the right, the apocalyptic antisemitism of Lin Dinh and Ron Unz.

    Modern Islamism has also to some extent developed the Zoroastrian strand within itself – forgotten are the beautiful sayings of Rumi about a reqlm beyond good and evil, and the ridiculous Dajjal mythology is developed.

    • Troll: Druid
  83. @Ugetit

    The Germans raped about as much in the Soviet Union as the Soviet army did in Germany, only they killed about 10 million Russian and Ukrainian civilians while they did it, compared to 2-ish million civilians dead in Germany.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    , @Alfred
    , @Ugetit
  84. @AaronB

    ‘Christianity was influenced by Zoroastrianism and became a dualistic religion where Satan is the enemy of God…’

    You don’t know what you’re talking about — not that that ever slows you down much.

  85. @Thumbhead Forney

    ‘The Germans raped about as much in the Soviet Union as the Soviet army did in Germany…’

    What are your sources for that?

    • Replies: @Talha
  86. @Wielgus

    ‘C.V. Wedgwood’s massive tome?’

    No. Peter H. Wilson.

    As I recall, Wilson more or less demolishes everyone else’s paradigm for the war — but never creates one of his own. That may be justified from the point of view of historical accuracy. Maybe there wasn’t an overarching explanation for the war. At the same time, it makes for difficult reading. The results could be summarized as a description of a forest — individual tree by individual tree.

    • Replies: @anon
  87. Druid says:
    @TKK

    As usual, TKK is on his hate Muslims rant. There must be at least one. What a creep!

  88. Talha says:
    @Colin Wright

    I’d be interested too, since this is the first time I’m hearing about this regarding the Germans in Soviet territory. I’m sure they did some raping, but was the scale the same as what the Soviet army did in Germany? I’m mean, it’s in the realm of possibility, but nevertheless it would be nice to have an academic or reliable source for the information.

    Peace.

    • Agree: Ugetit
    • Replies: @Ron Unz
  89. Ron Unz says:
    @Talha

    I’d be interested too, since this is the first time I’m hearing about this regarding the Germans in Soviet territory. I’m sure they did some raping, but was the scale the same as what the Soviet army did in Germany?

    I’m also *extremely* skeptical of those claims, which I’ve never heard anywhere else.

    Everyone knows that at Nuremberg, the Nazis were accused of all the most totally ridiculous and absurd war crimes, with the Soviet prosecutor even accusing the Nazis of being responsible for the Katyn Forest Massacre, when everyone knew perfectly well the Soviets themselves had done it.
    But as far as I know, the Germans were never accused of mass rapes.

    So if they weren’t accused at Nuremberg, I’d say there’s a 99+% chance it never happened…

    • Replies: @Talha
    , @Wielgus
    , @Antiwar7
    , @Ugetit
  90. Talha says:
    @Ron Unz

    So if they weren’t accused at Nuremberg, I’d say there’s a 99+% chance it never happened…

    That’s a pretty good counter point; difficult to argue against that one.

    Peace.

  91. @Sirius

    I’m actually replying to all of you who responded to my points about historic Syria.

    This whole discussion about Phoenicia is beside the point. To argue that Phoenicia is the predecessor to a Lebanese state or heritage is almost as ridiculous as arguing that Zionist myth of a 2000 year claim to Palestine. I stress almost! It’s not the same because modern Lebanese are likely descendants of those same Phoenicians (unlike the usurpers of Palestine today), but so are the modern Syrians (yes, that divided up one) and so are the modern Palestinians. What makes you think “Lebanese” have a sole claim on that heritage?

    I initially thought your historical information might have been incomplete but I am now realizing that you simply are not interested in facts. Phoenicia is and cannot be besides the point when you wrote “Up until 100 years ago, Lebanon was Syria, part of the Ottoman provinces of Syria, and was regarded as such for at least 2-3 thousand years (so was Palestine by the way–check Herodotus if you don’t believe it).” A specific geography called Phoenicia (with a people known as Phoenicians) has existed and was clearly distinguished from Syria and Syrians for thousands of years. Since you seemed ignorant of it, I presented you with an academic reference to amend correction to your erroneous argument.

    Do you realize how much you contradict yourself? I ask because you say that today’s Lebanon has nothing to do with ancient Phoenicia but also say that modern Lebanese are likely descendants of the ancient Phoenicians and admit Phoenician heritage with today’s Lebanese. The issue here is that you are stuck on semantics – if today’s Lebanon was named Phoenicia (which as I said should have been), you would not — and could not — waste my and your time with such silliness.

    I never claimed, said or insinuated that today’s Lebanese should have sole claim to Phoenician heritage. I am well aware that some Syrians and the Palestinians do as well. The fact that I did not bring it up does not mean otherwise. Looking back, I should have.

    Anyway, it wasn’t my intention to get that far into ancient history, but obviously some are focusing on that.

    Yet you wrote, and I am reiterating: “Up until 100 years ago, Lebanon was Syria, part of the Ottoman provinces of Syria, and was regarded as such for at least 2-3 thousand years (so was Palestine by the way–check Herodotus if you don’t believe it).”

    True, Syria was named by the Greeks. The Semitic name is Aram. It is why Aramaic and Syriac are basically different names for the same language or dialects. But so what?

    You tell me “so what?” Who wrote or ask you about Aramaic/Syriac?

    The point is “Lebanon” – Grand-Liban – was created in 1920 by French foreign officials. They drew the entire border sitting in some Paris office. Nothing can change that fact. And their point was to create mini-states that they could control. They tried to further divide Syria into 5 more states* but it didn’t work, largely because no one in the rest of Syria was as loyal to the French or as susceptible to manipulation as the Maronite Christians for whom Lebanon was created to rule over. The French played the sectarian card like no other.
    These were the seeds of destruction of natural Syria, of its organic growth from 1920 and again, this seemingly eternal conflict. It went alongside and supported the Zionist project too, as it divided everyone into weaker and smaller entities. Zionism was obviously far worse because its goal was downright genocidal: eliminate the entire indigenous population all together of as big a territory as possible. They’re still working on that one.
    *I would add that many modern Zionists/neocons have resurrected those same proposals dividing the current smaller Syria into 5 or 6 pieces, playing on Kurdish or sectarian sentiments.

    No, that is not your point. Your point is that today’s Syria should go back to the size of ancient Syria (which varied in geography, size and politics). Just read your own comments.

    Nation states and borders are modern concepts. Virtually all countries today were designed by Western, Imperial entities. Iraq’s modern borders for ignorance were drawn over a heavy diner by Churchill. He had apparently eaten and drunk so much while tracing the lines that Iraq’s boundaries were known as “Churchill’s hiccup”.

    And yes, the borders of today’s Lebanon were traced in Paris to suit French imperial desires. Never said otherwise. Today’s Syria is no exception; outsiders designed its borders and then have played with it.

    • Replies: @Sirius
  92. @Alfred

    The Phoenicians have indeed been around for a long time. Mainstream information however only lays out a portion of their history from today’s Lebanon onward. Academic references show that they were in other places before. In that sense, it only confirms that they have been in existence for an even longer time.

    In relation to the map you presented, it is also believed they reached the American continent by mistake and after being lost at sea around the Western African continent. The Canary current (the same used by Columbus to reach the Americas) would have taken them to the Americas. Inscriptions on stones were found in Brazil and other places.

    • Replies: @Alfred
    , @Ugetit
  93. @Joe Levantine

    Most welcome Joe; always nice discussing with you.

    Based on the information I read so far, that theory is plausible. Phoinix/Phoinikes (Phoenicia/Phoenician) does come from the ancient Greeks — who seem to have translated it from the Egyptian Fenikh (date palm tree) but I never came across information depicting it in a derogatory way. That is not to say it’s not possible, I just don’t know of it. There are other etymology possibilities.

    Ancient historical records do mention that the Phoenicians entered (or came from) the Erytrean Sea area. Moving north after an earthquake. It would help to know if the Lebanese scholar mentionedtiming. When would the Phoenicians have arrived? You mentioned Homer (some say he lived in the 8th and others 12th century BCE). I am leaning to the 12th as it may be in reference to the destruction of the Eastern Mediterranean region (all and everyone were destroyed by the Phoenician cities) which allowed the Phoenicians to expand West and dominate the basin for another thousand years.

    I would elaborate more but since it may be long, I would first prefer to narrow it down first around the theory you reported.

    • Thanks: Joe Levantine
    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  94. Alfred says:
    @Thumbhead Forney

    The Germans raped about as much in the Soviet Union …

    I don’t know about that.

    But I do know that the grandmother of my Russian ex-wife worked as a cleaner for German officers in occupied Russia – close to Saint Petersburg (Leningrad). Her husband was a soldier and disappeared very early in the conflict. She had a small boy – the father of my ex-wife. This little boy constantly swore at the Germans in Russian – and was admonished by his mother. They survived.

    The little boy is now an old man and he receives the special pension for all Russians who survived the German occupation.

    Of course, this snippet does not disprove the thesis of Thumbhead. But it suggests that the Germans soldiers were a heck of a lot more civilised than the American soldiers of today.

    • Thanks: Joe Levantine
  95. Alfred says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    Inscriptions on stones were found in Brazil and other places.

    I never heard of that. Thank you. 🙂

    Let’s not forget that the Phoenicians had settlements around the Mediterranean. Carthage was a Phoenician settlement. They took on Rome. No mean feat.

    Phoenicians – Carthage and Hannibal

    • Agree: Hiram of Tyre
  96. Sirius says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    I think you’re still misunderstanding me. You modified what I said to fit your argument.

    So I wrote: “Up until 100 years ago, Lebanon was Syria, part of the Ottoman provinces of Syria, and was regarded as such for at least 2-3 thousand years (so was Palestine by the way–check Herodotus if you don’t believe it).”

    Now maybe that was a mistake to mention the thousands of years ago part, because there’s always going to be that guy who’s going to take you back to ancient history. Not that I mind, it’s quite fascinating and I do appreciate the discussion anyway, but it kind of gets one sidetracked.

    My point there was that 100 years ago wasn’t a historic aberration. As recently as 1920, that very coast of Lebanon was still considered Syria. I said it had been that way for thousands of years to show it wasn’t an exception, not to go and argue about Phoenicia and what happened 2-3 thousand years ago. You refocused the discussion to ancient history when I just mentioned it in passing.

    You said ‘You tell me “so what?” Who wrote or ask you about Aramaic/Syriac?’

    Well, who said anything about Phoenicia in the first place? You did. Now you may like to consider Phoenicia something uniquely distinguished from Syria historically, but I could go back into ancient history and show that Phoenicia was also considered at various times as coastal Syria by ancient Greeks. It was never my intention to get into that. Phoenicia was a very fluid term anyway without any real boundaries at all and covered most of the pre-1920 Syria coast not just modern Lebanon’s. Phoenician was also used to refer to a famous North African, Hannibal (hence “Punic” Wars – translation: Phoenician Wars), but again, another subject entirely.

    Maybe it wasn’t your point, but many Lebanese nationalists do use the Phoenicia argument as some kind of legitimation for their Lebanese identity and claim it exclusively for themselves, so perhaps I unconsciously and inadvertently included you in that group.

    You said: “Your point is that today’s Syria should go back to the size of ancient Syria”.

    I didn’t say “ancient”. You did. It’s only a century ago we’re talking about, not a big amount of time in the annals of history. “Ancient” delegitimizes the idea somehow. I said “historic” and “natural”.

    Permit me to make my own points. It’s not just to be dismissed as to “go back”. It’s to understand and hopefully reverse the damage of the last 100 years. It’s for the people of the area to refuse to live in these enforced mini-states created by their colonial occupiers (just as the Germans refused to accept their partition from WW2 for example, but again that’s another big topic).

    Moreover, it’s to create a viable polity that can resist being torn down every generation or so.

    To tie it all back to the original article (to which I’m very grateful to read, by the way), it’s also for someone like Ali to acknowledge that the woman he referred to disapprovingly as a “bad” one (and characterized as a Syrian or a Palestinian) is actually a person of his own cultural/national group, not some foreigner.

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  97. @AaronB

    Why are Zoastrians now a small ethnically Iranian minority in India who are economically successful?

    How has Evangelical Christianity helped the Bible Belt? The Irish-Catholics like Biden have political influence and managed to succeed but the US rural areas where Evangelical Christianity flourish are poorer, have more meth/opoid abuse, higher teen pregnancy, more rural poverty, third world infrastructure.

    [MORE]

    If more Americans were religious you might bring down teen pregnancy from promiscuity, single mothers, absent fathers, drug abuse, alcoholism etc but would this really generate cash? Would the US oligarchy care?

    US liberals have culturally taken over but the oligarchy has not introduced any social democratic programs that make NW Europe somewhat more bearable for the poor than the US and reduce the number of families sleeping in cars or in tents compared to America?

    How can middle-class Americans be religious when they can go from a house to a tent on a sidewalk in a single health crisis or a new boss who dislikes them? Why isn’t this the case in Europe.

    Come to think of it Aaron, answer me this, Northwest Europeans are more openly atheist than Americans and yet white Americans suffer from far more inequality and lack of living standard. Despite Americans being more religious than average Northwest European.

    Let me break it down into questions that need answering.

    1. Why are so many white Americans living at a lower living standard than atheistic Northwest Europeans when Americans are more religious?
    2. Why do Northwest Europeans seem more humane and socially conscious than Americans to the poor even though they are less religious-even atheist?
    3. Why do the Evangelical areas of the US-the rural ones-have so many social problems while agnostic Jews or Catholics on the East Coast do not. Teen pregnancy, unemployment, sexual abuse, domestic violence, familial dysfunction, massive meth and heroin addiction, adopting whigger behavior, lack of education are all bigger problems in the so-called Bible Belt or rural areas with whites-and I am talking about whites-than in urban areas with the Catholic whites or Jews.
    4. I’m not Jewish and not here to defend Jews but since they are purportedly so wicked why do they have lower rates of property crime, teen pregnancy, drug addiction or involvement in meth trafficking, street prostitution, alcoholism, petty crime than poorer rural whites? The commonplace wickedness of the molested daughter, the meth addict who robs his mother or siblings for his next fix, the teenage girl who gets involved in prostitution because she is already a heroin addict at age 17, the chronic assault merchant who beats people up in bars when he is not in prison, the wife beaters who finally end up shooting their spouse-all the horrors of the trailer park or the country lane-don’t exist to nearly the same levels among urban or suburban Jews. Or for that matter, Jews.
    5. Is this a result of education? Is it merely that urban Jews and other whites are usually better educated than exurban or rural whites?

    Now let’s move on to the Middle East.

    1. Why are Norway and Dubai able to use oil profits to reinvest in a higher standard of living-a nanny state-for all citizens while oil-rich states like Texas have some of the worst poverty?
    2. Is this because they nationalize oil while the oligarchs of the US oil industry tell Leatherface living in stark hillbilly poverty out in Texas bush country that if we cut more taxes maybe this will create a job for him and his white underclass relatives?
    3. In that case, why do poor US whites believe it. Why don’t US whites want the same oil windfall as the Middle East or Norway in oil rich states like Texas?
    4. If US capitalist democracy is what the ME needs than why do countries like Dubai, Bahrain and Qatar have less poverty, drug abuse, poor infrastructure, lack of education, teen prostitution/pregnancy, gang violence, riots and protests than the US?

    Do my questions make sense?

    What is the answer?

  98. Wielgus says:
    @Ron Unz

    The German army organised brothels for its troops (sometimes synagogues were used for this) and some of the “staff” were young women kidnapped off the street in occupied Poland or the USSR. However the charge was not pursued at Nuremberg, perhaps because it might have entailed banning the German army. In fact rape was not prosecuted at Nuremberg at all in relation to anyone. Nor did the “comfort women” issue arise in war crimes trials in Japan – there seems to have been a certain shying away from the issue, probably something to do with a strait-laced attitude to sexual matters – this was after all a time when Lady Chatterley’s Lover was banned, at least in unexpurgated form.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  99. @Sirius

    You brought up “2-3 thousands years”, “Herodotus”, etc in relation to Syria.
    I amended correction and backed it with a reference.
    You continue with the same exact drivel.

    The bloody Greeks called the land Syria and the people living on it Assyrian after coming in contact with the Assyrian Empire — all while calling the different people of the land by their different names. Had the bloody Greeks come in contact with the Persian empire instead, they would have likely called the land Persia and the people Persian. That’s my (only) point.

    Before the bloody Greeks, there was no Phoenicia/Phoenicians. The people in question referred to themselves as Sidonian, Tyrians, Sons of Byblos, etc. The land was known as Canaan, which never was one monolithic entity but a confederation of city-states.

    The fact that the Punic wars is also known as the Phoenician is simply due to the fact that Punic is the Latin form of Phoenician. Didn’t think this, either, required clarification.

    I understand your point with Ali, the taxi driver, how the Phoenician “heritage” is used by some Lebanese to justify ancestry, etc and how it has lead to division. I agree. But I doubt the Phoenician past even crosses Ali’s mind. The matter isn’t also how you may think it is – most Lebanese aren’t too preoccupied with the Phoenician past. They consider themselves Lebanese and that’s it. I’ll reiterate that I think today’s Lebanon should have been name Phoenicia (or Canaan).

    • Agree: Joe Levantine
    • Replies: @Sirius
  100. Antiwar7 says:
    @Ron Unz

    I knew someone who lived in German-occupied southeastern Europe during WW II. He said someone complained to a German officer about a German soldier raping or bothering some woman. The officer told the soldier to stand at attention, and then executed him on the spot. I know this is only one data point, but it’s a powerful one.

    Compare that nowadays to the British government, with their Overseas Operations Bill to grant themselves immunity for war crimes, or the US “Hague Invasion Act.”

    • Replies: @Wielgus
  101. @anonymous

    “ What the F#*$& did we Americans bring when Reagan and French and Italians put our troops in to Lebanon in the 1980s before we completely cut and ran after Islamic terrorists slaughtered so many of our troops in a terrorist attack.”

    The bombing of the American and French Barracks in 1983 was blamed on Islamic terrorists. But who were those terrorists and who financed them?

    Western intelligence by and large points the finger of blame on Hizbollah. Yet how many Westerners realise that the beginnings of Hizbollah were meant to be a dividing factor within the Shia community in Lebanon after it was monopolised by the Amal Movement that was established by the cleric Moussa Al Sadr with the leadership passing to Nabih Berri after the liquidation of Al Sadr by Gaddafi.

    Once the Maronites refused to go along the Israeli plan for the partition of Lebanon right after the Isreali occupation of Lebanon in 1982, Moshe Arens, the Defence Minister of Israel who succeeded Ariel Sharon after the Sabra and Shatila massacres, attempted to woo the Shia community by proclaiming that the presidency in Lebanon should belong to the Shias courtesy of their numerical advantage over other Lebanese sects. The response from the Shia spiritual leader Mohamed Mehdi Shamsul Deen was an unequivocal ‘shove it.’ A few weeks after these events, an Islamic party named Hizbollah appeared and bit by bit the Amal Movement and Hizbollah came into loggerheads causing the deaths of hundreds of Shia fighters. At that time Sobhi al Tofaily was the leader of the Hizbollah movement and he was knowingly or unknowingly acting as Israel’s stooge. Israel never accepted the American Marine presence in Lebanon, since for Israel, Lebanon, Syria and Egypt are part of the Isreali sphere of influence and its future living space. So when Western intelligence accuse Hizbollah of the bombing of the American and French contingents, that crucial detail is never mentioned.

    When the Iranians saw what was happening on the Lebanese ground, they set about organising a coup against Al Tofaily and replaced him with the vehemently anti Zionist Abbas Al Mousawi and from there on Hizbollah became a thorn in Israel’s side. Al Mousawi was subsequently assassinated by the Israelis in 1992 and he was succeeded by the incumbent Hassan Nasrullah.

    So just like 9/11, the massacre of more than two hundred forty American Marines and fifty eight French legionnaires have Israeli fingerprints all over. For 9/11, one of the most detailed books about that shameful event is The Trigger by David Icke.

    • Agree: Hiram of Tyre
  102. @Hiram of Tyre

    Unfortunately I did not request any information about the timing; it would have been quite useful. If you could elaborate about the event of the 12th century BC, was it a natural disaster?

    It has been researched and scientifically proven that the areas of the Levant and Egypt suffered a prolonged drought between the 12th and the 11th century BC. Egyptologists, managed to translate a hieroglyphic template that spoke of Egyptians cannibalising their babies and the Egyptian king promising to transfer to the gods large areas of his realm in return for rain. Scientific studies of the earth layers related to that era showed a large accumulation of sediments in the bottom of many lakes that can only be explained by dust bowls due to severe drought.

  103. Wielgus says:
    @Antiwar7

    Most death sentences for rape in the German armed forces were commuted to service in a punishment unit or some outfit like Dirlewanger’s notorious brigade.
    Alexander Dallin in German Rule In Russia (first published 1957) mentioned a case of a German soldier being prevented from raping a woman in Ukraine on the grounds that the victim was classified as an ethnic German. Presumably if she had just been Ukrainian, it would have been OK.

    • Replies: @Ugetit
  104. @anonymous

    • Just don’t call a Christian Lebanese, Arab. They don’t like it. I know, I am one of them, lol. The very “Arabic” we speak is barely Arabic:

    Introduction:

    Lebanese is the native language of the people of Lebanon. In addition to daily conversations, Lebanese is used in an extensive body of popular poetry, play production, popular music, television shows, and much more. Due to the huge media production in Lebanese, the language became instrumental in understanding the rest of the languages and dialects spoken in Palestine, and parts of Syria and Jordan.

    The Lebanese Language belongs to the West and Central Semitic family of languages that includes Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew, and Arabic. Other forms of this spoken language include the Palestinian dialects, the Coastal and Central Syrian Dialects and some dialects of Jordanian to a lesser extent. The Lebanese language is an amalgamation of various languages that passed over Lebanon. It is a result of centuries of cumulative linguistic assimilation, thus is the state of every living language today.

    Historical Development:

    The oldest recorded spoken language in Lebanon was Phoenician, originally called the Canaanite language. The Phoenician language was spoken in Lebanon for an unidentified period of time. It is a branch of the West Semitic family of languages. Some linguists refer to it as an ancient form of Aramaic.

    The Hebrew and the Syro-Aramaic are closely related to the Phoenician that some linguists consider them dialects of the same tongue. The current Lebanese language still maintains some of the sentence structure of the Phoenician, and much (albeit transformed) vocabulary from the Phoenician. When the Aramaic language became the Lingua Franca of the whole of the Middle East, it naturally assimilated into the spoken dialect of the Phoenician language.

    Being a close relative to the Phoenician language, the effects of the Aramaic were somewhat minimal in transforming the spoken dialect. Aramaic started to lose grounds to the Syriac language [Also Syro-Aramiac] beginning the 2nd Century A.D. onward. Aramaic, as well as Canaanite is a part of the West Semitic group of languages that includes also the Hebrew and Arabic. In contrast, Syriac is part of the Eastern Semitic development of Aramaic. Syriac is often referred to as Eastern Aramaic in simple terms. Syriac became the official language in the region of the whole Middle East until around 900 AD. The Syriac dominated the language of Lebanon, and contaminated much of its speech. Changes in alphabet and pronunciation included dropping the “P” in favor of the “F”, and introducing new sounds like the “Ḱ”.

    Around the eighth and the ninth century, and with the advent of the Islamic conquests, the Arabic language was introduced as the language of the institutions in the whole region instead of Syriac. Arabic language infiltrated the language of Lebanon, added to its lexicon, and modified parts of its speech. Since the Arabic language itself was developed from Aramaic, it was easy to adapt much of the vocabulary from Arabic, especially since 40% of the Arabic vocabulary is of Aramaic origin. However, the people of Lebanon kept most of their grammar structure as is. Around 1100-1200, people in Lebanon were speaking several dialects of Aramaic especially in the mountains and North Lebanon, while some Arabic dialects were introduced in some coastal cities. Eventually, the people of Lebanon blended their Aramaic with Arabic which gave what some refer to as Neo-Aramaic, Arabo-Canaanite, or West Levantine languages. It was at that time that Lebanon, (within it’s modern borders) began to develop a regional language of its own distinction.

    From the 17th to 20th centuries, some of the Turkish language vocabulary was incorporated into Lebanese. The shaping of Lebanese language continued until the present where some French and English were introduced. As all living languages emerge, they can take two paths. One path will be its continuous use and development, and the other will be its death. The Lebanese chose the path to develop and sustain their language until reaching the modern Lebanese spoken today.

    One common mistake is confusing the Lebanese language as a dialect of Arabic. The Lebanese language has developed throughout the ages alongside the Arabic language, and it cannot be understood just as a branch of Arabic. Lebanese shares a lot with Arabic, but its grammar and Lexicon differ greatly from the Arabic language. Lebanese Language and Arabic Language share roots and are offshoots of the original Semitic Language. The best comparison example for how close, yet different, Lebanese is from Arabic today, is by comparing the Spanish and Italian languages.

    In conclusion, the Lebanese language is a very distinctive and unique language that is spoken by millions of Lebanese in Lebanon and the world. The people of Lebanon have been updating their language until this very day, enriching it with vocabulary while preserving most of its ancient grammar. The Lebanese Language Institute’s main goal is to preserve this rich linguistic heritage, and develop its framework.

    http://www.lebaneselanguage.org/language/history/

    • That invented kind, the “Israelis”, remember and forget at will. Sharon is forgetting that his soldiers lit up the sky with flares to let the Phalanges locate those to be massacred. Interestingly enough, the founder of the Phalange, Pierre Gemayel, loved Hitler and modeled his party on Hiterl’s Youth. If anyone if telling me Israel did not know that. But that too, Jews, use the Hitler card when it’s convenient.

    • On the barracks bombing, and according to Victor Ostrosky (former Mossad, “By Way of Deception”), Israel had foreknowledge of it but did not notice the US military.

    • Christian Zionists, Neocons and the likes of Bush fucking the MidEast up appears to be related to the Puritans of Britain who themselves were linked to Oliver Cromwell who allowed the Jews back to Britain. If A=B and B=C then A=C. Meyssan happened to have written an article on the subject today:

    https://www.voltairenet.org/article211579.html

    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
    , @Taxi
  105. Ugetit says:
    @Thumbhead Forney

    The Germans raped about as much in the Soviet Union as the Soviet army did in Germany, only they killed about 10 million Russian and Ukrainian civilians while they did it, compared to 2-ish million civilians dead in Germany.

    Either provide credible sources or I call B.S.

    • Agree: utu
  106. Ugetit says:
    @Ron Unz

    I’m also *extremely* skeptical of those claims, which I’ve never heard anywhere else.

    Not only have such claims never been made, let alone credibly, but the opposite, that the Germans were highly disciplined and therefore unlikely to engage in such behavior to any real degree, is what one consistently reads.

    • Replies: @utu
  107. Ugetit says:
    @Wielgus

    Enough of your unsubstantiated claims. Either get with the program and provide evidence or your claims are prurient and scurrilous rumors at best.

    Who do you people think you are and what makes you think you can get away with obviously ridiculous fabrications?

  108. @Hiram of Tyre

    Thanks for this detailed history of the Lebanese language. With your permission, I would like to archive this valuable post.

    • Replies: @Sirius
    , @Hiram of Tyre
  109. anon[216] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    My paradigm for the HYW is the same one I have for every almost major White-on-White war over the last 1500 years: expansive, originally Anglo-Frankish, universalism versus residual clannishness. IMO, HBDChick makes a persuasive case that Protestantism arose mainly in the still-clannish fringes of the Germanic world: places like Saxony, Bohemia, Moravia and Switzerland. Further, she implies this was a direct result of clannish rebellion against centralized Catholic power, itself originally set up as a non-breeding counterweight to aristocracy, which tends to inbreed (even more importantly, the Church tightly controlled that inbreeding tendency).

    Of course Luther himself was very concerned with the Jews, so I wouldn’t say they were of no importance in the Reformation and counter-R, but of far less importance than they have been since the seeds of J Emancipation were sewn in the late Enlightenment.

    • Replies: @utu
  110. Sirius says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    Drivel, eh? Can’t you at least be polite?

    I answered you about the ancient history and said I probably shouldn’t have brought it up. Maybe you should learn to read more carefully.

    I highlighted my point, in boldface type, in case you wouldn’t see it, and you ignored it anyway. It seems nothing I say will make you address this problem of non-viable, difficult to defend states.

    Read “Tribes with Flags” by Charles Glass. Or read John McHugo’s “Syria, the last 100 years” to bring you up to speed on what I’ve been trying to explain. You’ll get a better idea about mini-states and your irredentism, and the historical tragedy of the last 100 years.

    Call it whatever you want, your mini-state will always be a dependency. It was designed that way.

  111. Sirius says:
    @Joe Levantine

    I’m sure he’ll love you for it. Just be aware that you’ll be archiving a Lebanese nationalist ideology-based fiction.

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  112. @Joe Levantine

    Thanks for this detailed history of the Lebanese language. With your permission, I would like to archive this valuable post.

    Most welcome and by all means, please do as I myself only quoted the website I linked to. I believe it’s valuable information.

    p.s. Will get back to you on your comment (no.106).

  113. @Sirius

    Drivel, eh? Can’t you at least be polite?

    I answered you about the ancient history and said I probably shouldn’t have brought it up. Maybe you should learn to read more carefully.

    I highlighted my point, in boldface type, in case you wouldn’t see it, and you ignored it anyway. It seems nothing I say will make you address this problem of non-viable, difficult to defend states.

    Read “Tribes with Flags” by Charles Glass. Or read John McHugo’s “Syria, the last 100 years” to bring you up to speed on what I’ve been trying to explain. You’ll get a better idea about mini-states and your irredentism, and the historical tragedy of the last 100 years.

    Call it whatever you want, your mini-state will always be a dependency. It was designed that way.

    Drivel was for lack of better words, not to be impolite.

    I don’t think I did anything wrong in amending historical correction (backed by a solid and verified reference). Somehow, it seems to have offended you.

    “your mini-state will always be a dependency.”– I take seem back, it definitely offended you; when it should not have. On that note, how your big-state doing nowadays?

  114. @Sirius

    I’m sure he’ll love you for it. Just be aware that you’ll be archiving a Lebanese nationalist ideology-based fiction.

    I don’t know why you’re so irked. The content Joe wishes to archive isn’t mine – I quoted it myself.

    After reducing modern Lebanon and ancient Phoenicia’s history, you are now going after the evolution of the modern Lebanese language and its connection to the ancient (Canaanite) Phoenician language.

    But yes, everyone’s nationalism today is based on a fiction but the Syrians. At least make a little effort at covering up your superiority complex (which as you have evidenced, always comes with reducing/belittling others).

  115. Ugetit says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    Inscriptions on stones were found in Brazil and other places.

    Most interesting, especially if true, and I wish it were. Unfortunately it probably isn’t.:

    https://patagoniamonsters.blogspot.com/2011/03/phoenician-inscriptions-from-paraiba.html

    Also, regarding possible fabrications,”Wielgus” quotes Alexander Dallin. If anyone is tempted to believe what that one wrote, I invite him to do a search for the name. Also check out David Dallin, his father. Doing so will likely cure one’s gullibility.

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  116. @Ugetit

    The Paraiba inscription is the most popular. Some scholars believed it to be real and others, a forgery. If the latter, I never understood who and why would anyone forge such inscription in the late 1800s. One would have to know the Canaanite/Phoenician alphabet in the first place and then have a motive. It’s not like the inscription was boasting or glorifying; it was a mere homage by lost seamen on a new land. That said, I wonder if Columbus the same new land(s) from a former Phoenician port and through the same Canary current was coincidental.

    I don’t connect the dots @Wielgus and his reference to Alexander/David Dallin; could you elaborate?

    • Replies: @Ugetit
  117. @Wielgus

    ‘The German army organised brothels for its troops (sometimes synagogues were used for this) and some of the “staff” were young women kidnapped off the street in occupied Poland or the USSR. However the charge was not pursued at Nuremberg, perhaps because it might have entailed banning the German army. In fact rape was not prosecuted at Nuremberg at all in relation to anyone. Nor did the “comfort women” issue arise in war crimes trials in Japan – there seems to have been a certain shying away from the issue, probably something to do with a strait-laced attitude to sexual matters – this was after all a time when Lady Chatterley’s Lover was banned, at least in unexpurgated form.’

    That sounds plausible, but it is light years away from what the Red Army did — particularly in East Prussia and Silesia.

    The Soviets consciously encouraged Red Army soldiers to engage in wholesale rape in order to clear the German civilian population from territories they wanted to render free of Germans. The bestiality was almost unspeakable.

    I remember being struck by something while reading Peter Clark’s The Death of East Prussia. In the territory allotted to them, the Poles were ordinarily brutal — but perhaps no worse than the Germans had been to them. The Russians were a whole order of magnitude worse than that.

    It was one of the most horrific crimes in history. Morally, the primary difference between it and the Holocaust seems to me to be that in the cast of the latter, the perpetrators have been made to endlessly express remorse and accept collective guilt. Nothing like that has happened in the case of the former.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
  118. Taxi says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    Funny but I’ve been in Lebanon for ten years now and all I hear is Arabic spoken, with dialect variations in north, south, east, west and central-coastal.

    Your link appears to be bogus, providing NO INFORMATION as to who exactly put it together: names, credentials etc. are missing from the site. How do you explain this non-academic bullshit?! Do you go around believing masked people soon as they open their mouths just because you’re suffering from some form of nationalistic self-loathing?

    You can knock yourself out talking shit about how you don’t speak Arabic and how you’re not an Arab – music to israel’s ears, I’m sure – but the fact is that you ARE a modern Arab and you DO speak Arabic.

    Facts on the ground, or ‘facts in the mouth’ is what I am going by here and the fact is that just because the Lebanese Arab dialect contains smatterings of Turkish, Syriac, Aramaic and a sprinkling of French does not de-Arabize the Arabic language that’s spoken in the Lebanon.

    Just ask yourself who exactly is served by this psyop link you provide? Who in the region is hellbent on destroying its culture, its language, its history and people? Yeah I don’t need to provide you with the answer – you know damn well whom I’m talking about.

    There is no such thing as a ‘Lebanese language’.

    • Replies: @Talha
    , @Hiram of Tyre
  119. Talha says:
    @Taxi

    just because the Lebanese Arab dialect contains smatterings of Turkish, Syriac, Aramaic and a sprinkling of French does not de-Arabize the Arabic language that’s spoken in the Lebanon.

    I get what you are saying, Every region of the Arab-speaking world has its own colloquial form which is influenced by its local pre-Arab history, for instance you get really pure Arabic among the Yemenis and you get Berber-influenced Arabic in parts of North Africa, closer to Persia and you get more Persian loan words. My Egyptian brother in law can recognize where someone is from just by how they speak Arabic. And he says that he has the toughest time speaking with Moroccans.

    There is no such thing as a ‘Lebanese language’.

    Whether that counts as just Lebanese Arabic or its own Lebanese language is beyond my pay grade. I guess this is the kind of thing linguistics professors hash out over tea and biscuits.

    Peace.

    • Agree: Hiram of Tyre
    • Replies: @Taxi
  120. I’m reminded of a girl I knew from Moldova. Well, the Russians grabbed Moldova from Romania in 1940 and spent fifty years assuring the inhabitants of Moldova that they weren’t Romanians. There was even a Romanian-Moldovan dictionary — as if the two were separate languages.

    She said it was the most ridiculous thing. ‘Romanian: cat. Moldovan: cat.’ Etc.

    Now, get a Highland Scot going in full spate, and I’ll have a hard time making out what he’s saying, but he’s speaking English. Nae doot.

    Of course the Lebanese speak Arabic. Sure as Netanyahu’s from Poland.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
    , @Commentator Mike
  121. Wielgus says:
    @Colin Wright

    Depends what source you read – Norman Davies and Roger Moorhouse in Microcosm which is about Silesia and especially its capital, Breslau/Wroclaw has the Red Army brutalising Germans to make them leave and then Poles arriving to take it up a further notch, as Silesia was to go to Poland and they had even more stake in driving out the Germans because they planned to move there themselves. Neither Davies not Moorhouse are pro-USSR and Davies is, if anything, a little too pro-Polish in his historical judgments.

  122. Wielgus says:
    @Colin Wright

    I am not convinced by claims that Serbs, Croats, Bosnians and Montenegrins speak different languages, but since the break-up of Yugoslavia that is the standard claim that is made.
    In the mid-1990s I noticed Langenscheidt had brought out a dictionary of “Bosnian”-English. A glance through it suggested to me that the Slavic language in question was basically Croatian, or alternatively Serbian using the Roman alphabet. Call me old-fashioned but I still think in terms of Serbo-Croat.
    In the case of Moldovan/Moldavian, this was written in a Cyrillic script in Soviet times to make it seem more different from Romanian, although Romanian had in the past also used Cyrillic, most Romanians being Orthodox Christians.
    A curiosity of my Russian department library at university was a Moldavian translation of Winnie the Pooh in Cyrillic script, published in the late 1940s or early 1950s. The book was entitled Vini-Pu.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  123. Taxi says:
    @Talha

    Not only do Lebanese people speak Arabic, but the official Lebanese government language is Arabic too.

    You would think that if there really is such a thing as a ‘Lebanese language’, the government of Lebanon as well as its Christian presidency would be using it, right?

    On this point, Hiram of Tyre is disseminating misinformation that is ‘clung to’ by a minority of Leb Christians who are known as the Al-kata’eb’: a fascist phalanges party. You know, the Leb party that is pathologically treasonous: having colluded with tel aviv during the brutal israeli invasion of Lebanon that killed some 23.000 Lebanese civilians during the summer of 1982 alone – the very same party that also committed the infamous mass-massacre at Sabra and Shatilla at the prompting of Ariel Sharon, the Kata’eb’s bff and humanity’s number one enemy at the time.

    Mindful here that Syrian and Palestinian Christians whose enclaves are a mere hop away from Leb Christians do not suffer from the same self-loathing and actually embrace their Arabness with warmth. Only the fascist, islamophobe christians of Lebanon are in denial of their Arab origins. One day they tell us they are ‘modern Phoenicians’, the next they tell us they’re ‘French!’ STFU the lotta them already and for fuck’s sake stop taking the frigging shekels to say this unfounded and divisive lie!

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  124. @Colin Wright

    No more ridiculous than all these post-Yugoslav languages that evolved from Serbocroatian more recently.

  125. Anon[220] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymouse

    To ascribe uniquely to the jews of Israel evil incarnate is unconvincing to this reader

    You write like a fag.

  126. @Taxi

    Funny but I’ve been in Lebanon for ten years now and all I hear is Arabic spoken, with dialect variations in north, south, east, west and central-coastal.

    Your link appears to be bogus, providing NO INFORMATION as to who exactly put it together: names, credentials etc. are missing from the site. How do you explain this non-academic bullshit?! Do you go around believing masked people soon as they open their mouths just because you’re suffering from some form of nationalistic self-loathing?

    You can knock yourself out talking shit about how you don’t speak Arabic and how you’re not an Arab – music to israel’s ears, I’m sure – but the fact is that you ARE a modern Arab and you DO speak Arabic.

    Facts on the ground, or ‘facts in the mouth’ is what I am going by here and the fact is that just because the Lebanese Arab dialect contains smatterings of Turkish, Syriac, Aramaic and a sprinkling of French does not de-Arabize the Arabic language that’s spoken in the Lebanon.

    Just ask yourself who exactly is served by this psyop link you provide? Who in the region is hellbent on destroying its culture, its language, its history and people? Yeah I don’t need to provide you with the answer – you know damn well whom I’m talking about.

    There is no such thing as a ‘Lebanese language’.

    The language spoken in Lebanon is indeed known as Arabic. My point was to highlight its development and influences from other indigenous languages (namely Canaanite, Aramaic, etc) and how it is today different from other Arabic. I can’t even understand the Arabic spoken in Morroco, Algeria, Turnisia and to a similar extent the one from Saudi Arabia, Yemen, etc.

    I agree that the page in question is not, and should have been backed, with sources but it doesn’t make it bogus. I came across the content through various references; will I will dig since they are in books mostly and some other internet bookmarks in an older computer.

    Zionist/Israeli psyop? Division surely benefits them and in light of how the Kataeb Party was aligned with Israel, I understand where you come from but for me, and many other Christian Lebanese who despise the likes of Kataeb, it’s about history and heritage.

    As far as suggesting that I suffer from “nationalistic self-loathing’ self-loathing, I think you should learn to be respectful. There is nothing wrong in being proud of my land’s history and heritage.

    Likewise, knock yourself out and say I am Nigerian and speak Samoan. I am Lebanese and speak Lebanese Arabic. Arabic was spoken in Turkey for a long time, did that make of them Arabs?

  127. @Taxi

    Not only do Lebanese people speak Arabic, but the official Lebanese government language is Arabic too.

    You would think that if there really is such a thing as a ‘Lebanese language’, the government of Lebanon as well as its Christian presidency would be using it, right?

    On this point, Hiram of Tyre is disseminating misinformation that is ‘clung to’ by a minority of Leb Christians who are known as the Al-kata’eb’: a fascist phalanges party. You know, the Leb party that is pathologically treasonous: having colluded with tel aviv during the brutal israeli invasion of Lebanon that killed some 23.000 Lebanese civilians during the summer of 1982 alone – the very same party that also committed the infamous mass-massacre at Sabra and Shatilla at the prompting of Ariel Sharon, the Kata’eb’s bff and humanity’s number one enemy at the time.

    Mindful here that Syrian and Palestinian Christians whose enclaves are a mere hop away from Leb Christians do not suffer from the same self-loathing and actually embrace their Arabness with warmth. Only the fascist, islamophobe christians of Lebanon are in denial of their Arab origins. One day they tell us they are ‘modern Phoenicians’, the next they tell us they’re ‘French!’ STFU the lotta them already and for fuck’s sake stop taking the frigging shekels to say this unfounded and divisive lie!

    You’re either demented or spend too much time with (Muslim) Lebanese, Syrians and Palestinians in barns.

    The fact that I am proud of my land’ history and heritage does not, in any shape or form, associate me with the vile phalanges party. I despise them more than I do the vile Zionist State. If you think that all Christian Lebanese in and outside Lebanon are fascist, then you clearly don’t know much. What you are suggesting is that we forget our past and embrace Islam; to that, I politely tell you to F off.

    • Replies: @Taxi
  128. republic says:
    @Sirius

    Many people think that Charles Glass faked his kidnapping

  129. Taxi says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    If you think that all Christian Lebanese in and outside Lebanon are fascist, then you clearly don’t know much. What you are suggesting is that we forget our past and embrace Islam; to that, I politely tell you to F off.

    Oooh so triggered over shit I never said or even implied. What a fucking asshole snowflake you are. Go back and read my post again and look for my “minority of Christians” in reference to the phalanges.

    I cornered your bullshit and you wanna distract from this by falsely accusing me of shitting on ALL Christian Lebanese AND denying you your “past” AND wanting to turn you into a muslim to boot? LOL! Well, your knee-jerk indignation as weapon of distraction is not gonna work buddy-buds. You can hate on them phalanges all you like but you certainly share a commonality with them in denying your Arabhood. And all your silly islamophobia, xenophobia and Arabphoic hissyfit aside, you did not address or actually cogently rebut my salient point because, well, it’s un-rebuttable because it is both fact and common sense.

    Furthermore, and I do think you should be sitting down for this one in case of dangerous swooning: Phoenicians WERE Arabs too. We know this from the works of one of the greatest Lebanese poets of the 20th century, Mr. Said Akl, a Christian himself, who like you had rejected his Arabhood, preferring instead to be labeled a ‘Phoenician’, and who then academically researched the origins of the Phoenicians himself and concluded, with honest dignity, (unlike you!), that indeed before arriving to the eastern Mediterranean, the Phoenicians were an Arab tribe hailing from the deserts of Arabia.

    Now either rebut the great Mr. Akl’s conclusion without stupid histrionics, or fuck off yourself. I have just proved you wrong on two major points and they are as follows: contrary to what you say, there is no such thing as a “Lebanese language”; AND, the ancient Phoenicians were a pagan Arab tribe who colonized a chunk of the eastern Mediterranean coast, now known as the Lebanon.

    Fine by me if you want to deny your Arabhood, but for fuck’s sake don’t go around presenting your personal delusions as facts to people who are curious and attentive but don’t know better.

    And btw, I can run circles around you with my knowledge of Lebanon. After all, I learned it all from the “barn”, right? Self-hating Leb fucker! I know your fucking type only too well. And fortunately for Lebanon, your type is but a minority.

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  130. utu says:
    @Ugetit

    “Germans were highly disciplined ” – No question about it. Official American record shows that American soldiers committed 3,500 rapes in France and German records claim that Americans committed 190,000 rapes in Germany. Red Army committed 2-3 millions of rapes in Germany but they also raped women in liberated countries like Poland, Czechoslovakia and Hungary.

    The issue of rape was never raised in countries occupied by Germany. Though I am willing to consider that in Russia where the war was particularly savage rapes have occurred.

    During Warsaw Uprising in 1944 there were claims that both Oskar Dirlewanger unit (of criminals) and Kaminski unit (of Russians, Belarusians and Ukrainians) committed many rapes.

    • Replies: @Ugetit
  131. utu says:
    @anon

    https://www.unz.com/article/jews-in-the-cathedral-a-response-to-curtis-yarvin/#comment-4236229
    Jews were very much on the minds of Christian reformers like Jan Hus and Martin Luther. They both were very concerned about the salvation of Jews and having them converted to Christianity.

  132. @Joe Levantine

    My reference to 1200 BCE is about the invasion and the destruction of the entire Eastern Mediterranean region by the Sea People. While of monumental historical importance (considered by many as the collapse of the known world); that phase is barely spoken of and when so, reduced to an attack on Egypt by the (mysterious) Sea People. A crucial, known but somehow omitted fact in the mainstream narrative is that “in the midst of a cataclysm which destroyed almost every city in the eastern Mediterranean area—the Phoenician cities remained untouched.” — as Sanford Holst writes in his academic paper “Sea Peoples and the Phoenicians: A Critical Turning Point in History” [1]. Holst explains that the Phoenicians’ competitors and enemies (the Aegeans, Ugarit in the north, Egypt who wouldn’t protect Phoenician city-states, the Hittites on land, etc) were all crushed in the process. To contrast, the initially Phoenician held Arward which was captured by the Hittites was returned to the Phoenicians. Egypt did fight the Sea People back and won but it was weakened to a point of not return to their former glory and began their decline. Most importantly, the invasion/destruction of the Sea People allowed the Phoenicians who were confined East by the Aegean lanes to expand West and dominate the entirety of the basin for (at least) another thousand year .

    The theory of the late Lebanese scholar you presented corroborates the Greeks/Aegeans’ frustration but I am not sure it is accurate to say that the Phoenicians where new comers or that came out of not where — unless the Phoenicians were the Sea People (which is a theory some have proposed and support). I personally don’t think so. Neither does Holst who explains that the Phoenicians were in the Levant much longer than 1200 BCE. It would be more accurate to say the they flourished immensely more after circa 1200 BCE.

    Homer’s statement that the Phoenicians came from the Arabian Peninsula is I think a good start and one that is, and more or less, accurate. Herodotus, based if I recall right on Egyptian records, stated that the Phoenicians came from or entered from the Erythrean Sea. There are theories that the Phoenicians originally came from Western coast of India (Indus Valley Civilization, aka Harappan). A theory, I think referred also by Herodotus (could be someone else, will need to cross check), is that a non-Semitic maritime people (advanced in astronomy, the navigation of the sea, commerce, etc) had civilized Mesopotamia and other parts of the Middle East (namely the coasts of the Persian, Arabian peninsulas and what we call today the “Horn of Africa”). They would have ruled over the Semitic pastoral people. Here again, that corroborates the late Lebanese scholar’s theory. Interestingly enough, maritime insurance (accredited to the Phoenicians) was also practiced the that Harappan people. The most high goddess of semitic pantheons (Ishtar, Isis, Astarte, etc) is also said to have its origins in the much older Indic Shatki. Another theory is that the Phoenicians descended from the Panis who, like the Phoenicians, were faithless, masters of the sea and commerce, intelligent, builders/engineers, extremely cunning etc. Some scholars in India believe that it’s the other way other: that the Panis are descendants of the Phoenicians. Either way, I think that their entry from the Erythrean Sea is indicative that they were not indigenous of the Levant. Others have indicated that the Phoenicians came from Pun (or Punt) and called themselves Punoi (or Poeni) – Pun or Punt here equates to “other side of the Arabian Peninsula” as in today’s Somalia. Wherever they originally came from, I think it is safe to say they moved north from in or around the Persian and/or Arabian Peninsula. The theory of their origin in India, to me, makes sense. Western orientalists and historians centering the beginning and/or cradle of civilization only in and around Mesopotamia and the Middle East is either a result of not knowing better and/or favoring the Biblical narrative.

    As far as the etymology goes, the proposition are many: man, purple, red, date, (date) palm tree, merchant, etc. I don’t think the Greeks invented the names Phoenicia/Phoenician but merely translated it from existing names. If the Phoenicians did in fact come from or enter the south (Persian/Arabian Peninsula), what where they called there? Theories on that hover around the Egyptian word Fenkhu/Fenkhi. And if they originally came from India, what were they called there?

    All in all many theories. What I find intriguing is their continuity; either biological or spiritual. After Tyre, they continued to thrive in Carthage. It can be argued that they ceased to exist then but many Carthaginians and Phoenicians adopted Judaism after Carthage. Venice, ruled by Jews, operated exactly like the Phoenicians did. Those Jews, along with the ones north lead to the creation of the British Empire. All of them lead the slave-trade, monopolies of maritime routes, commerce, banking, loved financing wars, etc.

    __________

    [1] http://www.phoenician.org/sea_peoples.htm

    • Thanks: Joe Levantine
    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  133. @Sirius

    “ Call it whatever you want, your mini-state will always be a dependency. It was designed that way.”

    Volume versus quality; which side are you on? There are huge dysfunctional states all over the world. The USA is one such state that going down the tubes courtesy of an oppressive and corrupt federal government. The state of dependency in Lebanon can be traced to the multicultural set up that failed to metamorphose into true national unity. The solution for Lebanon is decentralisation where different entities would compete over better governance and quality services to the citizens. Alas, Arab nationalism is the big hurdle to overcome. Arab nationalism, a creation of the British intelligence service that dates back to WWI with Lawrence of Arabia as its main protagonist, is the main reason that Lebanon went into the abyss. When Syria was bedevilled by military coups right after independence, Lebanon was led by an elite of lawyers who built on the French constitution to promote a state based on the rule of law and a separation of the three branches of government. The civil war was a direct result of the conflict between Arab nationalism supported by one side of the population against those who proclaimed a Lebanese identity that was labelled by the Arab intelligentsia as isolationist.

    As far as my preferences go, I would rather see Lebanon emulate Switzerland or Singapore than follow the failed experience of the artificial European Union which will soon settle into its twilight zone.

    • Agree: Hiram of Tyre
    • Replies: @Sirius
  134. @Taxi

    Did you any any chance write “triggered”? Darling, did you read the emotional meltdown you’ve had in your past comments? Pick your uterus off the floor already.

    Cornered my bullshit you say. How? The linguistic part of the origins of the Arabic spoken in Lebanon is verifiable. The ancient Phoenicians being Arabs is one of the many, debated, theories proposed over the course of the past decades. Akl adhered to one (incomplete) debated theory. The ancient Phoenicians (or whatever they were called) have always lived by the coast and could not have been in the desert. You might also update yourself on genetics studies done in Lebanon.

    When Ray Caruso (comment no.7) wrote “To demonstrate the fine quality of a Moslem education?”, I taught that Ray was Islamophobic (he might be, besides the point). I realize he was spot on: you’re an Islamic pig.

    In spite of your emotionally-guided psychosis, I can care less if one is Sunni (even if those are the worst), Shia, Druze, Orthodox, Maronite and what not in Lebanon – to me, and that is how I was raised, were are all Lebanese. A degraded, butt-hurt Vietnamese camping in Lebanon who is in dire need of anti-depressants will not contradict that.

    On an ending note, is “circling” Lebanon with your knowledge a Freudian slip? I ask because it seems reminiscent of the shape of an anus. You know like the (male) ones you have acquainted yourself in barns over the past ten years.

    • Replies: @Taxi
  135. @Hiram of Tyre

    From the diverse theories that you present I can draw the conclusion that history is and will always be a dynamic science that requires constant updating based on newly discovered facts and revision of established theories.

    “ It can be argued that they ceased to exist then but many Carthaginians and Phoenicians adopted Judaism after Carthage. Venice, ruled by Jews, operated exactly like the Phoenicians did. Those Jews, along with the ones north lead to the creation of the British Empire. All of them lead the slave-trade, monopolies of maritime routes, commerce, banking, loved financing wars, etc.“

    If we compare what industries the Jews control today, we can see that trade and marketing are two prominent activities along with finance based on usury. I would lean towards the idea that trading and marketing were adopted from the Phoenicians whereas finance based on usury was a legacy of Mesopotamia that the Jews managed to build upon and improve into the banking industry and the financialization of the economy. Control of the maritime routes is essential for trading which in turn is a contributor to human welfare. Usury based finance on the other hand is the root cause of most of the ills of society. I truly hope that the Phoenicians did not have a role in usury based finance.

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  136. @Joe Levantine

    It’s definitely evolving. I wish I could have provided you with a more concrete answer. I am no scholar and can only share what I know (which is far from complete). Contradicting theories and/or records from former competitors/enemies is mostly what’s available on the Phoenicians. The Anglo-Saxon ruling class of the 19th century purposely erasing the Phoenician (and Egyptian) influence in the formation the Western world has not made things easy. I may have shared Bernal’s Ancient vs Aryan model on this matter in the past:

    http://www.historyofmacedonia.org/AncientMacedonia/greekmyth.html

    The concepts of money, banking, interests/usury is fact a Mesopotamian concept. Economist Michael Hudson spent a decade researching the archeology of money concluded that. It was however the Phoenicians (and Assyrians on land) who spread it West. Phoenicians were the central bankers of their time; and so definitely involved in usurious banking/practices.

    https://michael-hudson.com/1992/03/did-the-phoenicians-introduce-the-idea-of-interest-to-greece-and-italy-and-if-so-when/

    Jews never came from one particular place, all were converts. H.G. Wells stated in his “Outline of History” that “The main part of Jewry never was in Judea and had never come out of Judea.” The Carthaginian ruling class becoming Jewish and continuing their usurious practices isn’t too far fetched.

    • Thanks: Joe Levantine
  137. Can someone explain Lebanon’s extremely low national IQ? 82. On some charts below Papua New Guinea, Uganda, Nigeria etc. I mean, the few Lebs I’ve met (mainly Christians) don’t seen stupid. What is going on?

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
    , @republic
  138. Ugetit says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    I don’t connect the dots @Wielgus and his reference to Alexander/David Dallin; could you elaborate?

    Sure.

    There is really no connection except that both deal with the subject of fabrications. As for motives, they vary from pranks to profits, but who really knows in any given case? I’ve recently become aware that fake histories are much more common than I had heretofore realized. Apparently the old timers had plenty of time and a lot of talent to amuse themselves. The more recent bogus histories seem to involve profit and power, apparently the main motives for the holohoax, 9/11, and COVID narratives.

    Mainly, I was just trying to conserve my comments since UR doesn’t like too many it seems. Anyway, sorry for the confusion.

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  139. Ugetit says:
    @utu

    Red Army committed 2-3 millions of rapes in Germany but they also raped women in liberated countries like Poland, Czechoslovakia and Hungary.

    True for sure.

    Some of the descriptions are so bestially nauseating that I have neither the desire nor the capacity to finish them.

    Here’s one example of the horrific mutilation-torture-rape-murder atrocities German women were forced to endure at the hands of the “morally superior” Allies,

    [MORE]

    Suddenly I heard loud screams, and immediately two Red Army soldiers brought in five girls. The commissar ordered them to undress. When they refused out of modesty, he ordered me to do it to them, and for all of us to follow him.

    We crossed the yard to the former works kitchen, which had been completely cleared out except for a few tables on the window side. It was terribly cold, and the poor girls shivered. In the large, tiled room some Russians were waiting for us, making remarks that must have been very obscene, judging from how everything they said drew gales of laughter.

    The Commissar told me to watch and learn how to turn the Master Race into whimpering bits of misery. Now two Poles came in, dressed only in trousers, and the girls cried out at their sight. They quickly grabbed the first of the girls, and bent her backwards over the edge of the table until her joints cracked. I was close to passing out as one of them took his knife and, before the very eyes of the other girls, cut of her right breast. He paused for a moment, then cut of the other side. I have never-heard anyone scream as desperately as that girl. After this operation he drove his knife into her abdomen several times, which again was accompanied by the cheers of the Russians.

    The next girl cried for mercy, but in vain, it even seemed that the gruesome deed was done particularly slowly because she was especially pretty. The other three had collapsed, they cried for their mothers and begged for a quick death, but the same fate awaited them as well. The last of them was still almost a child, with barely developed breasts. They literally tore the flesh of her ribs until the white bones showed.

    Another five girls were brought in. They had been carefully chosen this time. All of them were well-developed and pretty. When they saw the bodies of their predecessors they began to cry and scream. Weakly, they tried desperately to defend themselves, but it did them no good as the Poles grew ever more cruel.

    They sliced the body of one of them open lengthwise and poured in a can of machine oil, which they tried to light. A Russian shot one of the other girls in the genitals before they cut of her breasts.

    Loud howls of approval began when someone brought a saw from a tool chest. This was used to tear of the breasts of the other girls, which soon caused the floor to be awash in blood. The Russians were in a blood frenzy…

    -Benton L. Bradberry, The Myth of German Villainy, Chap 22, quoting from Hans Koppe’s book “In Their Terror All Were Alike.

    Suddenly I heard loud screams, and immediately two Red Army soldiers brought in five girls. The commissar ordered them to undress. When they refused out of modesty, he ordered me to do it to them, and for all of us to follow him.

    We crossed the yard to the former works kitchen, which had been completely cleared out except for a few tables on the window side. It was terribly cold, and the poor girls shivered. In the large, tiled room some Russians were waiting for us, making remarks that must have been very obscene, judging from how everything they said drew gales of laughter. The Commissar told me to watch and learn how to turn the Master Race into whimpering bits of misery. Now two Poles came in, dressed only in trousers, and the girls cried out at their sight. They quickly grabbed the first of the girls, and bent her backwards over the edge of the table until her joints cracked. I was close to passing out as one of them took his knife and, before the very eyes of the other girls, cut of her right breast. He paused for a moment, then cut of the other side. I have never-heard anyone scream as desperately as that girl. After this operation he drove his knife into her abdomen several times, which again was accompanied by the cheers of the Russians.

    The next girl cried for mercy, but in vain, it even seemed that the gruesome deed was done particularly slowly because she was especially pretty. The other three had collapsed, they cried for their mothers and begged for a quick death, but the same fate awaited them as well. The last of them was still almost a child, with barely developed breasts. They literally tore the flesh of her ribs until the white bones showed. Another five girls were brought in. They had been carefully chosen this time. All of them were well-developed and pretty. When they saw the bodies of their predecessors they began to cry and scream. Weakly, they tried desperately to defend themselves, but it did them no good as the Poles grew ever more cruel.

    They sliced the body of one of them open lengthwise and poured in a can of machine oil, which they tried to light. A Russian shot one of the other girls in the genitals before they cut of her breasts.

    Loud howls of approval began when someone brought a saw from a tool chest. This was used to tear of the breasts of the other girls, which soon caused the floor to be awash in blood. The Russians were in a blood frenzy…

    -Benton L. Bradberry, The Myth of German Villainy, Chap 22, quoting from Hans Koppe’s book “In Their Terror All Were Alike.

    file:///C:/Users/jeff/Downloads/The%20Myth%20of%20German%20Villainy.pdf

    • Replies: @utu
  140. utu says:
    @Ugetit

    But rapes by German side were happening.

    The Finnish SS-VOLUNTEERS AND ATROCITIES
    https://arkisto.fi/uploads/Julkaisut/sarjajulkaisut/SS-VOLUNTEERS_verkkoon.pdf

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  141. @Ugetit

    No worries; thanks for clarifying. Unz does have an automated filter that prevents posting or hitting any of the agree/disagree/troll/etc buttons too quickly.

    I understand motives in lies like 9/11, Covid, the Holocaust, etc – but forging a Canaanite/Phoenician inscription on a stone in Brazil in the late 1800s? Who does it benefit? Anyway, there are other solid indications in and around Brazil as well as Australia – all equally suppressed.

    We could look at it otherwise: who does it benefit to hide the truth in calling it a forgery? The Anglo-Saxon ruling class couldn’t accept the Afro-Asiatic influence in the formation of the western world went on systematically erasing the Phoenicians and Egyptians – see Ancient vs Aryan models:

    Ancient:

    Bernal suggests an explanation of ancient Greek development in terms of what he calls “the ancient model.” Classical, Hellenistic, and later, pagan Greeks from the fifth century B.C. to the fifth century A.D. believed their ancestors had been civilized by Egyptian and Phoenician colonization and the later influence of Greek study in Egypt. Up to the eighteenth century A.D., Egypt was seen as the fount of all “Gentile” philosophy and learning, including that of the Greeks, and it was believed that the Greeks had managed to preserve only a part of this wisdom. Bernal suggests that the sense of loss that this created, and the quest to recover the lost wisdom, were major motives in the development of science in the seventeenth century.

    Bernal argues that the ancient model was accepted by historians from antiquity till the nineteenth century, and was rejected then only for anti-Semitic and racist reasons. He sees the Egyptian and Phoenician influence on ancient Greeks as beginning in the first half of the second millennium B.C. He concludes that Greek civilization is the result of the cultural mixtures created by these colonizations and later borrowings from across the eastern Mediterranean. These borrowings from Egypt and the Levant occurred in the second millennium B.C. or in the thousand years from 2100 to 1100 B.C., which Bernal suggests is the period during which Greek culture was formed! “The Ancient Greeks, though proud of themselves and their recent accomplishments, did not see their political institutions, science, philosophy or religion as original. Instead they derived them – through the early colonization and later study by Greeks abroad – from the east in general and Egypt in particular.”

    Aryan:

    The Aryan model, an alternative theory about the development of the ancient Greeks, first appeared in the first half of the nineteenth century. It denied any influence of Egyptian settlements and expressed doubt about a role for the Phoenicians. An extreme version of this model was propounded during the height of anti-Semitism in Europe in the 1890s, and then in the 1920s and 1930s; this particular explanation denied even the Phoenician cultural influence.” According to the Aryan model, there had been an invasion from the north, an invasion not described by ancient writers, which had overcome the existing pre-Hellenic culture. Greek civilization was seen as the result of the mixture of the Indo-European speaking Hellenes and the older peoples over whom they ruled.

    http://www.historyofmacedonia.org/AncientMacedonia/greekmyth.html

    That could be a, the, reason.

    • Replies: @Ugetit
  142. Talha says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    This doesn’t seem to make sense. All of the surrounding Muslim majority countries in that region have a better average than Lebanon. The major difference between them and Lebanon is that it has a much more significant Christian population.

    Peace.

  143. Taxi says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    LOL you’re a hilarious wimp pimping out your islmophobia, xenophobia and fascism as high-class whoring – oh and now I must add uterus-phobia and misogyny to your list of limp idiocy. Thank you for your prickless thrust but I’m afraid it didn’t quite compensate for your pseudo bullshit of an argument. Someone drops a handful of poetic f-bombs at you and you call that “psychosis”? LOL you really are a fucking milksop snowflake with snot running over lip.

    I repeat: you are an Arab and there is no such thing as a Lebanese language. You’ve miserably failed to disprove both these points. Wagging your mousey groin around does not a man make you; and failing to remain focused on the argument does not make you an Einstein either. Whoever “raised” you is the one in need of “antidepressants” for the gruesome, vacuous snobbery you pathologically suffer from.

    You can throw mud and thorns at me till the cows come home, “darling”, and it won’t touch or move me, but I will here draw the line on your hostility to pigs! I love pigs with all my heart. I love them for their cuteness and for their IQ level that’s certainly higher than yours. You are a pretentious and despicable religio-tribalist and a nauseating hypocrite. You ARE the very definition of what’s wrong with Lebanon. No, you DON’T love your country – you only love your own botoxed ass.

    I bet you’re one of those vain Lebanese who looks like a million dollars but not a single dime in their pocket. An arrogant Lebanese who thinks a dunce hat is a Fedora.

    Now go comb your hair or something, sissy motherfucker! If it were not for the courage and smarts of Leb muslims, you’d be a crusty sex-slave in some tel viv brothel by now.

  144. @Talha

    Then it’s the Christians, lol. I was pulling a leg anyway.

    The real reason is inequality and the economy – in Lebanon, it’s blatant. The guy behind the (only) conducted study so far (if I am not mistaken), Richard Lynn, mentioned it:

    Lynn argues that difference in national income are correlated with differences in the average national intellectual quotient (IQ). They further argue that difference in average national IQs constitute one important factor, but not the only one, contributing to differences in national wealth and rate of economic growth.

    All public schools in Lebanon bloody suck. Most can’t afford private.

  145. Taxi says:
    @Talha

    Actually it does make sense considering the illogical statement comes from an envious islamopobe.

  146. @Taxi

    Well good morning to you too sweetie. Though may prefer As-salamu alaykum. Reading your continued emotional meltdown, I take it the barn was empty last night.

    No, psychosis is what and how you write. Just read your comments. You need psychiatric help. You are not sane and I mean this with the best of intentions.

    Feel free to repeat at will, you’re only imposing your ignorance and projections of fascism. You just don’t realize that it is you who could not disprove anything. Screaming things left and right all while vomiting endless ad hominem isn’t how inteligent people debate.

    Your assumptions about me are, though very amusing, not worth dignifying. I know you know that that kind of Lebanese isn’t remotely knowledgeable enough these matters and/or that he/she had better things to do (like looking fabulous for instance) than wasting time in commenting on sites like this one.

    Have yourself some Lebanese breakfast of champions now and enjoy your day..

    • LOL: Ugetit
  147. @Wielgus

    ‘am not convinced by claims that Serbs, Croats, Bosnians and Montenegrins speak different languages, but since the break-up of Yugoslavia that is the standard claim that is made.
    In the mid-1990s I noticed Langenscheidt had brought out a dictionary of “Bosnian”-English. A glance through it suggested to me that the Slavic language in question was basically Croatian, or alternatively Serbian using the Roman alphabet. Call me old-fashioned but I still think in terms of Serbo-Croat.’

    As it happens, my mother worked in the acquisitions department of the University of California Library, where she dealt with perusing books printed in Yugoslavia and deciding what to purchase.

    She was quite sure Croatian and Serbian were the same language — the primary distinction being the alphabet each used. Inasmuch as it was her specialty, I always took her word for it.

    • Agree: Wielgus
  148. @utu

    In World War 2 the biggest number of rapes was perpetuated by the Japanese in Asia. Simply because Europe and UK and America had strictures imposed against it, while Japan did not.

    If you watch television, once in a great while you will see a bunch of elderly Dutch, Chinese, Korean and Southeast Asian women trying to legislate compensation from the Japanese government for forcing them to work in Imperial whorehouses.

    They even had Japanese doctors staffed to inspect the women monthly for STD’s.

    A few 90 year old comfort women sometimes appear on television to legislate some sort of compensation.

  149. @Taxi

    Taxi, are you the one who posts articles on UR under the same name? If you are, I would be shaken by your aggressive and insulting comments to Hiram of Tyre, for the articles I have read under the name of taxi prove a high degree of intelligence and originality that negates this style of writing that befits people who are driven by hatred or those acting as ideological drones. You may well disagree with Hiram of Tyre in a collegial way but reverting to such brazen insults destroys the value of this valuable site that is the antidote to the anti democratic ‘anti’ social media that are run by Mark Zuckerberg, Jack Dorsey, Sundar Pichai and their ilk. Anyone is free to have his proper opinions or ideology as long as that person is not engaging in blatant fabrications like the ones the Zionists are known for. Hiram of Tyre has expressed opinions by and large supported by research; it does not mean that you have to accept his ideas, but I find your attacks totally unwarranted.

    • Thanks: Hiram of Tyre
    • Replies: @Taxi
    , @Hiram of Tyre
  150. @Talha

    “ All of the surrounding Muslim majority countries in that region have a better average than Lebanon. The major difference between them and Lebanon is that it has a much more significant Christian population.”

    Better average in what? When you speak of a Muslim majority countries, please take into account that many of those countries have natural resources that far exceed that of the scenic but awfully poor Lebanese territory. To be able to judge the success of the Lebanese, you have to put under scrutiny the achievements of the Lebanese diaspora who by the acknowledgement of most Arabs I came in contact with, were the most significant of all the Levantine area. Lebanon suffered immensely from the meddling of competing Moslem/ Arab states into his internal affairs and going back to the only relative time of stability in Lebanon during the sixties and the early seventies, Lebanon was considered the jewel of the Middle East until he was utterly destroyed by the cancerous consequences of Israel’s creation and Arab states meddling that played on the delicate sectarian balance. And here when I speak of the Lebanese diaspora, I speak of Lebanese of all sects though it is a proven fact that the Christians were the first to immigrate due to reasons that I will not be able to cover in this post.

    The only relevant fact I would like to emphasise is that the space of freedom in Lebanon compared to autocratic rules throughout the Arab world can be surely traced to the receptivity of the Christians to the Western intellectual influence.

    • Agree: Hiram of Tyre
    • Replies: @Taxi
    , @Taxi
    , @Talha
  151. QUESTION

    Since the Middle Eastern IQ is so low, why do oil-rich countries like Dubai and Bahrain and Abu Dhabi have better infrastructure, free education, free healthcare, higher overall living standard than oil-rich regions of the US.

    Part of this is the stupidity of pure capitalism in places like Texas whereas Norway and Dubai have Nationalized oil industries.

    However, the people who support the GOP listen to the state government tell them “let us cut taxes and maybe the oil companies will give you a job”.

    So then you have a bunch of poor people in oil rich places like Houston or New Orleans.

    So who has the lower IQ?

    Can someone here tell me that?

  152. Taxi says:
    @Joe Levantine

    Thank you Joe. Yes, it is I, Taxi, same writer you point out. People who’ve been reading me for a long time know that I’m happy to roll up my sleeve and dive into the mud pit when dealing with assholes. I do not do PC with stokers of hate and misinformers. It doesn’t bother me one bit what people think of me, whether they stop reading my “high degree of intelligence and originality” articles once they see me dropping f-bomb comments at deserving assholes. Make of this what you will. And I’ll remind you here that Shakespeare too dropped many an equivalent of f-bombs in his lifetime too.

    I’ve actually enjoyed reading many of Hiram’s comments but I found his lies about the Lebanese language full of covert and overt incitement to religious civil war in his own country that also happens to be my current country of residence. No, I was not going to let something this serious and consequential pass. In my book, denying a language is literally like cutting off the tongue of a nation. Never mind that Hiram’s assertion is completely untrue, his very statement about the Lebanese language is often repeated by a minority of Lebanese agents of chaos and war: a divisive and insidious statement intended to divide up the Lebanon. It’s a local nuance that your good self is probably not aware of, but Hiram sure knows all about it yet he disseminates it with gusto. I, a stranger in Lebanon am active against the ongoing attempts at manufacturing civil war in the Lebanon, while Hiram, a Lebanese national himself is stoking it. What an upside world we live in. And when this ‘language’ lie of his was exposed by me, his ego just could not deal and he wigged out like a drunken banshee instead of engaging his wit and wisdom with me. He claims to embrace all Lebanese yet he consistently makes derogatory and uncalled for remarks about muslims and Palestinians and Syrians, giving himself some lahdeedah air over them. What’s that about except for hypocrisy and overt prejudice and sniveling snobbery? Never mind his open misogyny and condescending tone towards me just because I am a female. His initial response to me was not to engage me in a debate about the Lebanese language, but to go straight for my uterus lol! I mean really, Joe, you expect me to sit back and let some pretentious, noxious wimp deal me an injustice when I’m trying to literally stop a civil war from erupting? I’m sure if I were your sister, you would want me to stand up to a stupid bully who’s jonzing for war, no?

    Notable in your comment that you do not yourself critique Hiram’s despicable discourse and tone with me. Why is that? You think my f-words are more offensive than Hiram’s blatant exhibition of islamophobia, xenophobia, misinformation, incitement to civil war, and misogyny? Really now! Where’s your scales of justice here? (No answer required, my question is rhetorical).

    I advise all pompous fuckers not to mess with me. I am skilled at writing intelligently and acrobatically in all genres: I am sweet with the sweet, reasonable with the reasonable, and I am most certainly tough with nutheads and shitheads. Newbies to my writings soon learn this – after they get over my shock-n-awe, that is.

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
    , @Sirius
  153. Taxi says:
    @Joe Levantine

    Joe,

    Lebanon suffered immensely from the meddling of competing Moslem/ Arab states

    Try this for real size: Lebanon’s problems, nay, the whole of the Levant’s regression began with the immoral, unjust and forced establishment of the klepto-terrorist jewish state of israel.

    Maybe I shouldn’t be surprised by your whataboutery.

    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  154. Taxi says:
    @Joe Levantine

    Oh dear me, dear Joe:

    The only relevant fact I would like to emphasise is that the space of freedom in Lebanon compared to autocratic rules throughout the Arab world can be surely traced to the receptivity of the Christians to the Western intellectual influence.

    What a sly, ignorant and islmophobic comment. LOL! You’ve obviously been spending too much time listening to ‘supremacist christian’ Hiram. Have you even met a single Leb muslim intellectual? A Druze one? An atheist Leb intellectual? You certainly haven’t! And this is a loss for you, my dear. And you see ‘western civilization’ as being loftier than the eastern one? Wow! If not for your brain being pickled in a western-supremacy mindset, you’d understand that intellectual ability has zero to do with one’s religion. And I’ll remind you here that muslim Arabs have already had their renaissance period – arrested by western intervention and racist imperialism. I’ll also remind you that Persians too have had their moment in the sun. I urge you here to look further than Hiram’s nose for accurate information on the middle east.

    I can tell you from personal experience, I’ve met about as many christian idiots as I have muslim ones. And I’ve also met muslims who are equally as smart as christians ones too.

    I have also met many christians in Lebanon who despise the western culture and mindset. They see the west as back-stabbing terrorist barbarian looters and thieves, hellbent on destroying their beloved, cultured and peaceful Levantean lifestyle. And they’re correct! Just look around! It is the West that has incessantly weakened and endangered the christians of the middle east. It is the West who unleashed the talmudic head-chopping wahabis in their midst. And it is the muslim Lebanese (Hezbollah) who saved them from the deranged wahabis.

    Perspective here, please, perspective!

  155. Talha says:
    @Joe Levantine

    Better average in what?

    Average IQ. I think the original response Hiram gave was not an adequate explanation for the data given the IQ averages in the surrounding countries. His subsequent response makes more sense.

    Peace.

  156. @Joe Levantine

    Thank you Joe for your good words and sane point of view.

  157. @Taxi

    I don’t know where to start…

    Never mind his open misogyny and condescending tone towards me just because I am a female.

    What?! I am so confused. When I searched “Lindh Dinh” online, I came across a Wikipedia page that said:

    Linh Dinh (Vietnamese Đinh Linh, born 1963, Saigon, Vietnam) is a Vietnamese-American poet, fiction writer, translator, and photographer. He was a 1993 Pew Fellow. He writes a column for The Unz Review.

    It says He. That is a male. The same goes for the image on that page and other places online for “Lindh Dinh” — the same male.

    Does this look like a male to you or anyone? I don’t know, maybe it is. Today’s world is so messed up with binary gender, no gender, custom gender and what not that… only “God” knows. Either way and regardless; when I wrote to pick your uterus off the floor, I 1) most certainly did not know you were anything but a male and 2) it was to poke at your anger/rage. Had I know you were a female (I am honestly still confused), I would have never used the uterus comment. I am married (to a female) and have a daughter myself. I equally would not have written the “barn” satire; which too was to poke at your anger.

    To address the rest. I did not lie. I initially wrote that Christian Lebanese don’t like to be called Arab, that I am one of them and that the Arabic we speak is barely Arabic. It’s not a lie. It’s an OPINION. You disagreed with it and said I spoke “shit”. Nonetheless, in my first reply to you, I further explain my point in the same polite way. @Talha equally shared his opinion on the language spoken in Lebanon and you attacked him/her (to “STFU”, to “stop taking shekels”, that those who say the language is called Lebanese are part of the Phalanges party). I found your allusion to the Phalanges offensive (I truly despise them) and called you demented for it and threw the “barn” comment as a result of it. It is then that you went ballistic. At that point, I said to myself this person is only worth poking at and not to reason with. The more I poked, the crazier you went. It was amusing.

    If you believed I was wrong, you should have presented your facts. Instead, you did the very same: present your opinion and called it contradictory facts all while making all sorts of unfounded derogatory assumptions about me. Your argument on the Lebanese language page was resumed to: bullshit, an Israeli/Zionist psyop, etc. Same on Phoenician history, Akl’s adherence to one debated theory.

    For what it’s worth, I believe in unity. I have defended Islam, Muslims, Palestinians and Syrians when need be (maybe even too much). I do mean it when I write that I see no difference between a Muslim or Christian Lebanese but I also cherish the Phoenician past of Lebanon.

    I did not understand why you were so offensive and disrespectful towards me. It’s only after reading some of your other comments that I realized that’s how you are: you attack anyone you disagree (even slightly) with in the most disrespectful way. The fact that you write well does not make your argument more right nor does it excuse your nasty behavior.

    • Replies: @Talha
  158. @Talha

    Average IQ. I think the original response Hiram gave was not an adequate explanation for the data given the IQ averages in the surrounding countries. His subsequent response makes more sense.

    Peace.

    It was to poke at Lindh. It worked.

  159. @Taxi

    Agree. But under the pretence of fighting Zionism, many Arab states wreaked havoc on Lebanon, a country that lacked the advantage of the police state that all Arab rulers hunker behind.

  160. @Taxi

    What a sly, ignorant and islmophobic comment. LOL! You’ve obviously been spending too much time listening to ‘supremacist christian’ Hiram. Have you even met a single Leb muslim intellectual? A Druze one? An atheist Leb intellectual? You certainly haven’t! And this is a loss for you, my dear. And you see ‘western civilization’ as being loftier than the eastern one? Wow! If not for your brain being pickled in a western-supremacy mindset, you’d understand that intellectual ability has zero to do with one’s religion. And I’ll remind you here that muslim Arabs have already had their renaissance period – arrested by western intervention and racist imperialism. I’ll also remind you that Persians too have had their moment in the sun. I urge you here to look further than Hiram’s nose for accurate information on the middle east.

    I can tell you from personal experience, I’ve met about as many christian idiots as I have muslim ones. And I’ve also met muslims who are equally as smart as christians ones too.

    I have also met many christians in Lebanon who despise the western culture and mindset. They see the west as back-stabbing terrorist barbarian looters and thieves, hellbent on destroying their beloved, cultured and peaceful Levantean lifestyle. And they’re correct! Just look around! It is the West that has incessantly weakened and endangered the christians of the middle east. It is the West who unleashed the talmudic head-chopping wahabis in their midst. And it is the muslim Lebanese (Hezbollah) who saved them from the deranged wahabis.

    Perspective here, please, perspective!

    I too don’t agree with the quoted part of Joe’s comment but it does not make of him a sly, ignorant or islamophobic person. To me, I see Joe’s perspective and point of view as the result of Western education; one that has reduced/erased the East to favor the West. Reality is that there would be no West without the East.

    Otherwise, you continue writing non-sensical and emotionally driven assumptions about me. As I wrote to you in an earlier comment, I have defended Muslims and Islam when need be. More than enough to be called all sorts of derogatory names.

    “supremacist christian’ Hiram” — Not one bit. I consider all monotheistic religions equally dumb. You should know that I know what you know (past civilization’s advancements, Islamic Golden Age/Rennaissance, Western interruption of the region’s development, etc).

    And yes, there are as many dumb Christians than there are Muslims. In my opinion, religion (regardless which one) is a contributing detrimental factor in the development of a nation. The Brits have always known that and have used it at will, especially in the Middle East. Had it not been for them, the region would be mostly secular and immensely prosperous.

    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  161. @Taxi

    I could not contest any concept that you state here.

    I just thought I should mention that the person who exerted the highest influence on me and my perspective of life is none other than my personal friend, the late scholar Farid Salman, a Druze intellectual that I cherished like a father. Also, one of my favourite speakers was the late Hassan Fadlallah. And as of today, having shut my ears to the political noise in Lebanon, the only Lebanese leader I still can get myself to listen to is Hassan Nasrallah courtesy of the ideological rejection of Zionism, despite the fact that when it comes to internal politics, I lump the whole Lebanese Political establishment together as a bunch of incompetent and corrupt lot that contributed to bringing Lebanon to its knees more than the genocidal and expansionary policies of the Israelis. The only two ‘Christian’ friends to whom I confide wholeheartedly are one graduate in philosophy and the other the son of a great poet who wrote nine books of poetry in the local dialect; we all pretty much agree about the crooked ways of the West. But I have always drawn the line between the people of a country and its ruling elites. Thus, while I exalt the achievements of Victor Hugo, Alphonce De Lamartine and Voltaire, I never stood for any of France’s imperial policies in the Levant or around the world.

    My comment about what I perceive as the positive influence of the West in Lebanon is intimately linked to the historic fact that all sects in Lebanon were sponsored by different foreign powers starting with the nineteenth century. All Christian missionary schools catered to different Christian sects when most Sunnis in Lebanon looked for Istanbul for their education. Tsarist Russia did not spread among Greek Orthodox the principles of liberty or revolution against tyranny for they lacked such an experience. Yet exposing the Orthodox to the writings of Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky sure enhanced in Lebanese intellectuals the capacity to look at life from a different perspective. The French Revolution was taught to us and to our ancestors as a landmark in the human march of freedom, a tale that I have contested on many occasions on this site. Yet, most of the Lebanese lawyers who took a career in politics were very much influenced by the French legal system that was brought to Lebanon by the University of Saint Joseph. The list of Western ‘positive’ influence can fill out many pages but I have to concede that the political motive behind most Western initiatives in Lebanon was meant for political and imperial reasons.

    You mention the Persians as people to admire, and I say with pride that I have befriended many Iranians whose culture and historic achievements I learned to admire.

    Taxi, you have a great potential as a writer and a great mastery of the English language that puts an amateur intellectual like myself on the defensive and your style exposes you as a person who cares for justice and truth, two disappearing virtues that are worth living and dying for. Though, you have jumped to many conclusions about myself on the basis of a sentence that I wrote. Your championing the noble causes should not prevent you from exercising some degree of restraint when it comes to judging people. After all, it looks like we have more in common than what sets us apart. I should note with regret the inflammatory exchanges between you and Hiram, for I believe that a dispassionate dialogue could be in the interest of most followers of this site in general and the Lebanese people specifically.

    All said, I look forward to engaging with you in a face to face dialogue the same way that I look forward to do the same with Hiram.

    • Replies: @Taxi
    , @Ugetit
  162. @Hiram of Tyre

    “ To me, I see Joe’s perspective and point of view as the result of Western education; one that has reduced/erased the East to favor the West.“

    Hiram, you have opened my eyes to many achievements of the Eastern culture in previous dialogues but you realise that I have always considered what the West considers as the cradle of Western civilisation, Greece, to have borrowed most of what the Greeks mastered from the Eastern Mediterranean, Egypt and India. However, I would be much obliged to have a list that compares the martyrs of freedom in the West to those of the East. It is true that the history of Europe is splattered with the blood of revolutionary martyrs for the cause of freedom starting with Magna Carta, but my education did not expose me to their counterparts in the East. Here I should mention the names of those who impressed me the most from the West, even though they have not died on the battlefield: Martin Luther, Mikhail Bakunin, Thomas Jefferson. Here you notice that I have not included the names of most of the tyrants of the English, French and Russian revolutions.

    The only true fighter for human justice from the East, the way I see it, is Imam Ali who had he succeeded in his bid to become a Caliph, he would have changed the face of Islam into a religion of justice and equity in practice as well as in theory. If you could enlighten me about the great minds that spoke or died for freedom in the East in a practical or philosophical way, aside from Jesus Christ whom we consider to be part of the holy trinity, I would be much obliged.

    • Replies: @Talha
    , @Hiram of Tyre
  163. Talha says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    I believe “Taxi” and “Mr. Dinh” are two different people. Mr. Dinh stated in his article:
    “In Al-Quala’a, I’m being housed and fed by the blogger, Taxi. Through her, I was also introduced to the legendary journalist, Ali Ballout, now retired.”

    Peace.

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  164. Ugetit says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    Thanks, very interesting stuff.

    • Agree: Hiram of Tyre
  165. Taxi says:
    @Joe Levantine

    The fabric of your tone is disarming. Humble, and charming. Thank you for sharing of yourself. And I apologize for my earlier assumptions of you. You have my respect and appreciation.

    • Thanks: Joe Levantine
  166. Ugetit says:
    @Joe Levantine

    I’m jealous. You guys are all interesting as can be. Wish I knew something of your world.

    From Taxis comment, it’s apparent I’d fit right in with some since I agree with this, for sure.

    I have also met many christians in Lebanon who despise the western culture and mindset. They see the west as back-stabbing terrorist barbarian looters and thieves, hellbent on destroying their beloved, cultured and peaceful Levantean lifestyle. And they’re correct! Just look around! It is the West that has incessantly weakened and endangered the christians of the middle east. It is the West who unleashed the talmudic head-chopping wahabis in their midst. And it is the muslim Lebanese (Hezbollah) who saved them from the deranged wahabis.

    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  167. Talha says:
    @Joe Levantine

    The only true fighter for human justice from the East, the way I see it, is Imam Ali who had he succeeded in his bid to become a Caliph

    Just as a bit of historical correction here…Ali ibn Abi Talib (ra) was the caliph – he was the 4th caliph. The issue is that he was killed off by the extremist Khawarij before he was able to unify the governates of Egypt and Syira under his leadership.

    After him, the people chose his son Hassan (ra) as leader, but he abdicated his position saying that he did not want to shed the blood of fellow Muslims in a civil war.

    Peace.

    • Thanks: Joe Levantine
    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  168. Sirius says:
    @Taxi

    You said: “You think my f-words are more offensive than Hiram’s blatant exhibition of islamophobia, xenophobia, misinformation, incitement to civil war, and misogyny? Really now! Where’s your scales of justice here?”

    You’re absolutely right.

    He revealed himself as a bigot and a provocateur, and accused me of saying things I never said either. I chose to stop replying as he kept taking the discussion in another direction, or creating straw men, and the tone was getting increasingly insulting. Anyway my point was made.

    That “Lebanese” language nonsense really proved the pseudo history he was peddling and I’m glad someone called him on it.

    If he’s really Lebanese I hope it’s a very, very small minority opinion, because those attitudes can bring back the civil war days. As you more or less said, it only serves Zionist interests of fracturing peoples.

    • Thanks: Taxi
    • Troll: Hiram of Tyre
    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  169. @Joe Levantine

    Please don’t get me wrong when I wrote “Reality is that there would be no West without the East.” I meant to highlight the fact that Westerners today are ignorant of the Eastern contribution in the development of the “Western” world. Funny thing is that Greece never considered itself “Western” until that ruling class imposed it as so.

    I most certainly agree that there were as many martyrs of freedom, and I would add advancement, in the West. Though I would not included Luther (a heretic picked up by the Jewish ruling class of Venice to created Lutheranism and weaken the Church; matter of another debate).

    There are many examples of past Near Eastern great minds. Harun al-Rashid is a prime example. His humanist endeavor, cultural/scientific/economic exchange with Charlemagne essentially saved Europe from its centuries-long decline (following the fall of the Roman Empire). That exchange also revived the roots of ancient Greece.

    • Thanks: Joe Levantine
    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  170. @Talha

    I believe “Taxi” and “Mr. Dinh” are two different people. Mr. Dinh stated in his article:
    “In Al-Quala’a, I’m being housed and fed by the blogger, Taxi. Through her, I was also introduced to the legendary journalist, Ali Ballout, now retired.”

    Peace.

    Yes.

    Up until earlier today; I thought Lindh Dink posted under @Taxi.

    • Replies: @Commentator Mike
  171. @Sirius

    You said: “You think my f-words are more offensive than Hiram’s blatant exhibition of islamophobia, xenophobia, misinformation, incitement to civil war, and misogyny? Really now! Where’s your scales of justice here?”

    You’re absolutely right.

    He revealed himself as a bigot and a provocateur, and accused me of saying things I never said either. I chose to stop replying as he kept taking the discussion in another direction, or creating straw men, and the tone was getting increasingly insulting. Anyway my point was made.

    That “Lebanese” language nonsense really proved the pseudo history he was peddling and I’m glad someone called him on it.

    If he’s really Lebanese I hope it’s a very, very small minority opinion, because those attitudes can bring back the civil war days. As you more or less said, it only serves Zionist interests of fracturing peoples.

    How was I a bigot, a provocateur or insulting? Calling your inability to address my contradictory and factual argument a “drivel” – really? Grow/man up already and learn to take a pinch.

    You claim I accused you saying things you never did. Where and what? Show me. If I did, it shouldn’t be a problem to you to point out on this page.

    The bottom line is that you made an incorrect statement about ancient history (which has had repercussion to date; the early 1900s) and I corrected you with a verified reference. Not only did you not bother reading that reference, you chose to dwell on more recent history because you could not contradict the facts I presented.

    And look at you play the victim and blame the Zionists alone when Syria gang-raped Lebanon for nearly 30 years. Apparently the al-Assad were called al-Wahhish originally. Wahhish is said to mean “wild” – supposedly because the they were courageous. I say it’s because they are animals. Regardless; Syria deserves what happened to it. If only it could rebuilt fast enough so the Syrian garbage in Lebanon can go back home hastily.

    • Replies: @Talha
    , @Sirius
  172. Talha says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    Apparently the al-Assad were called al-Wahhish originally. Wahhish is said to mean “wild” – supposedly because the they were courageous.

    Interesting. That’s what Lebanese called Hafez al-Assad? Was this common among the people of Lebanon or just specific sectors?

    I know in Egypt, which I am more familiar with, “wahhish” means more along the lines of “wicked” or “immoral”. Not necessarily “wild”, maybe that’s just a regional difference.

    Peace.

    • Thanks: Hiram of Tyre
    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  173. @Talha

    Actually, we don’t call him by that name. I am not even sure it’s widely known that their family name was originally different.

    In Lebanon, Wahhish is interpreted in the sense of “beast” or “monster”.

    • Replies: @Talha
  174. Sirius says:
    @Joe Levantine

    You made a lot of points in your post but I’ll try to answer you.

    “Volume versus quality; which side are you on?”

    Well, I mentioned historic Syria before. That’s not a huge size we’re talking about. Lebanon was designed by the French as a Maronite Christian-dominated state originally (even the Greek Orthodox were not sympathetic to the idea) and the Mount Lebanon area was expanded to maximize the area the Maronites could dominate. It ultimately failed because it took in too many Muslims who didn’t care to be dominated. Sectarianism is the enemy here in my view, not Arab identity versus European identity.

    So I wasn’t referring to such a huge union with countries like Egypt or Morocco or those in the Arabian peninsula, but one with its natural extension and vice-versa, the country right next door, Syria, with which it used to be part of in the first place.

    Take Germany: it is essentially a German union and today a federal republic. Up until 1870 Germany was a diverse collection of states and mini-states united by the Prussian state. The mini-states were constantly manipulated by outside powers until Bismarck put a stop to that. Germany was broken up again in 1945 (in 4 parts that became 2) and united a second time in 1990 with superpower approval. Interestingly the British and French leaderships opposed it (another fascinating topic if we were to go off on a tangent). Of course no comparison is perfect or even close to perfect but historic Syria shares some key qualities with Germany, one of which is that is sits at a crossroads that is constantly being pushed from outside forces.

    You mentioned Syrian military coups. Syria, a democracy in the 1940s, was disrupted by the failures in Palestine and then by US and British meddling that sponsored those military coups. Inter-Arab meddling didn’t help either but they were minor powers at the time. There was a lot of outrage at the disaster in Palestine in 1948-49 and that helped delegitimize the civilian government and paved the way for military coup leaders, who of course made matters worse. But it doesn’t mean Syria itself is not a good idea. The circumstances were extremely difficult.

    Basically I’m saying there is an intermediate solution to the grander Arab vision and the tiny Lebanese one, which to me is the natural one of historic Syria. The fragmentation was wrong then (1920) and is wrong now. Butrus al-Bustani was right.

    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  175. @Hiram of Tyre

    I believe this Taxi has her own website but it’s not posted next to her name. I suppose it would have helped if you had been able to look it up so as to avoid this confusion of identity.

    • Agree: Hiram of Tyre
  176. Talha says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    Whoa – I just looked this up; I had no clue this was a real thing. Apparently one of their ancestors did change the name from al-Wahish to al-Assad. Crazy!

    Peace.

    • Agree: Hiram of Tyre
    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  177. @Sirius

    What you propose is very much in line with the thinking of Antoun Saade , a great man who was martyred by the Lebanese establishment in cahoots with the Western intelligence and, of course, Israeli intelligence. As far as I am concerned, I view the Levant as an entity that is fit to unify under the banner of secularism and democracy buttressed by a strong level of decentralisation but not the pretended one of the Ba’ath party, for its type of secularism was muddied by brutal dictatorship. Though I see such a union as a dream, for experience tells me that the initiative for such a lofty ideal should come from the Sunni majority of the Levant, and the recent events in Syria disproves the idea that most Sunnis are ready for such a cataclysmic change where religious affiliation is subdued to a national identity. Nor do I think the Maronites are willing to embark on such an adventure.

    The predicament of Syria can only be partially blamed on the tragedy of Palestine, for the fact of the matter is that the Arabisation of Syria after the Islamic invasion changed the character of this ‘ land in the middle’ to a such an extent that the passing of power from ruler to ruler has been ever since an eternal bloody affair. Germany managed to unite under the near dictatorial leadership of Bismarck who stated his famous words” the question of the day will not solved by meetings and discussions but by iron and blood”; true to his word, he built the German union on the back of three successful wars against the neighbouring states of Denmark, Austria and France, thus boosting the enthusiasm of the different German states for unification. Unfortunately, no such prospect for the Levant exists. Maybe with time the opportunity will come. But until then, I think the best triumph for the people of the Levant is to keep Israeli expansion at bay while building a robust economy and increasing the level of freedom for the population. Here also the record of Syria, Iraq and Lebanon is hardly promising.

    • Agree: Sirius
    • Replies: @Sirius
  178. @Talha

    According to my old Syrian teacher in the 70’s, he attributed the name change to a Christian religious cleric, a bishop who made a speech at the Assad residence stating “ I am not at the Wahish home, I am at the lion’s lair”.

    • Thanks: Hiram of Tyre
    • Replies: @Talha
  179. Sirius says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    Okay, you’re baiting me and I guess I have to respond.

    You corrected me on my ancient history? How? I have no argument with you on Phoenicia, only that Phoenicia was part of Syria even then. And you were wrong on Assyria by the way. It included Mesopotamia as well and sometimes was only Mesopotomia depending on which era one chooses. I repeatedly said it was not my intention to discuss ancient history and only mentioned it in passing just to prove that Syria was that larger region even thousands of years ago, not only in the modern era leading up to 1920.

    Here’s a historic map from 1865 that refers to the year 70:

    /Users/max3/Desktop/800px-1865_Spruner_Map_Israel_or_Palestine_post_70_AD.jpg

    Syria-Phoenicia and Syria-Palaestina are shown clearly on the map. Point taken? (I’m not sure the map will materialize-anyway it’s on Wikipedia).

    You’re not a bigot? So referring to some Syrian unfortunates in Lebanon as human garbage is not bigoted? And they deserve what they got? Where’s your sense of decency? Saying that the average Lebanese IQ is lower because of Muslims is not bigoted? You’re oozing all this hate and you don’t see it.

    And what’s this nonsense about Syria’s intervention in Lebanon?

    I have no interest in defending that intervention, but you should remember, if you’re really a Christian Lebanese, the Syrian army went in to save your leadership’s collective asses from a total victory by the Lebanese left/mostly Muslim/Palestinian coalition, which was about to win the civil war in 1975-1976.

    The intervention, which was officially supported by the US government, was supposedly to prevent an Israeli invasion, which ended up taking place later anyway. It was also on official invitation from the Christian Lebanese President Camille Chamoun, so take it up with one of his descendants.

    Furthermore, that intervention spurred huge dissent in Syria which arguably cost Assad much of his legitimacy and led to the insurgency which took place in the next few years culminating in a near civil war in Syria itself in 1981-82.

    So why all this hate?

    • Replies: @Sirius
    , @Hiram of Tyre
  180. @Ugetit

    I think that Dr. Johnson said ‘ it is a bloody wicked world’. This is our world in the Middle East until further notice. Most people in this troubled part of the world have learnt to go along with their lives without much thinking while others got galvanised by the tragedy to try to make sense of it. This region that is at the centre of three continents with important oil fields is doomed to suffer for many decades to come until one of two things happen: 1-a solution to the Palestinian problem with Israel Palestine a country for all Jews and Palestinians, 2- an end to the Western hegemony. Meanwhile there is not much to envy us about.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    , @Ugetit
  181. Talha says:
    @Joe Levantine

    Interesting. Thanks! You learn something new every day.

    Peace.

  182. Sirius says:
    @Sirius

    Correction: it was President Franjieh, not Chamoun. Lebanese politics can get very confusing.

  183. @Sirius

    You corrected me on my ancient history? How?

    Are you serious or trolling? I told how several times already. I’ll say it once last time:

    In the opening statement of your comment (no.19), you wrote:

    Up until 100 years ago, Lebanon was Syria, part of the Ottoman provinces of Syria, and was regarded as such for at least 2-3 thousand years (so was Palestine by the way–check Herodotus if you don’t believe it). The term Lebanon used to refer only to the Mount Lebanon, which is a fraction of today’s Lebanon.

    To which I responded:

    To clarify and understand the matter of Syria better, I invite you to refer to the link below. The confusion is a result of etymology and varying designation (geography, size, politics) under different people of different eras. As the reference states Syria “never alluded to a uniform or constant well-deigned geographic or political entity, but remained labile through the centuries until the emergence of present day Syria.”

    “The Origins of Syrian Nationhood”
    Part 1 – “The name of Syria in ancient and modern usage”
    (Shortened link from Google Books): https://bit.ly/358Rx6m

    Ill add here that the very name Lebanon comes from the Canaanite-Phoenician lbn anyway; meaning white. Likely after the snowy tip of the mount.

    I have no argument with you on Phoenicia, only that Phoenicia was part of Syria even then.

    You just bloody confirmed my point: that you did not bother reading the short verified, and academic, reference I presented you. Had you taken 60 seconds of your day, you would realize that you were wrong then and still are wrong now.

    And you were wrong on Assyria by the way. It included Mesopotamia as well and sometimes was only Mesopotomia depending on which era one chooses.

    You can’t make this up. I said that very same thing to you in an earlier comment.

    I repeatedly said it was not my intention to discuss ancient history and only mentioned it in passing just to prove that Syria was that larger region even thousands of years ago, not only in the modern era leading up to 1920.

    /Users/max3/Desktop/800px-1865_Spruner_Map_Israel_or_Palestine_post_70_AD.jpg

    Syria-Phoenicia and Syria-Palaestina are shown clearly on the map. Point taken? (I’m not sure the map will materialize-anyway it’s on Wikipedia).

    Syria-Phoenicia and Syria-Palaestina are shown clearly on the map. Point taken? (I’m not sure the map will materialize-anyway it’s on Wikipedia).

    The the Xth time, I know it was never your intention. I merely amended a honest correction for the sake of clarify and historical accuracy. Mea culpa, remain misinformed and/or ignorant.

    The map does not open but I have likely seen it before. Not sure how it contradicts anything I presented to you this far when the Greeks and everyone else clearly distinguished Phoenicia from the rest of the land/region and the Phoenicians from the rest of the people. Futermore, Phoenicia is also identified on some of the oldest maps I have seen of the region.

    You’re not a bigot? So referring to some Syrian unfortunates in Lebanon as human garbage is not bigoted? And they deserve what they got? Where’s your sense of decency? Saying that the average Lebanese IQ is lower because of Muslims is not bigoted? You’re oozing all this hate and you don’t see it.

    You wrote I was a bigot before I wrote anything about Syrian refugees in Lebanon. Don’t twist things.

    Yes, Syria got what it deserved. If you were Lebanese and lived under 30 years of Syrian oppressive regime, you would concur. Anyone who opposed their presence, ways, etc disappeared. Check points after check points where Syrian soldiers stole foods, good, etc. Home owners kicked out of their houses. It was an occupation no different than others.

    The IQ-Muslims related comment was to pull whom I believed to be Linh Dink (in reality @Taxi)’s leg. Nothing to do with you. Next time, and seeing how so many are sensitive here, I’ll add emojis and/or will clarify that it’s humor.

    And what’s this nonsense about Syria’s intervention in Lebanon?

    Nonsense? I am going to skip this part. You’re either utterly, honestly ignorant or dishonestly stupid.

    I have no interest in defending that intervention, but you should remember, if you’re really a Christian Lebanese, the Syrian army went in to save your leadership’s collective asses from a total victory by the Lebanese left/mostly Muslim/Palestinian coalition, which was about to win the civil war in 1975-1976.

    Where do you read me say that you defended that intervention? I only wrote that you should also consider it and not just the Zionist one.

    Yes I am really a Christian Lebanese and I have the answer to my previous question: you are utterly but honestly ignorant. The whole Syrian Army (sent by none other than the bloody, evil USA) to save Lebanon and its Christians is poppycock. You adherence to such mainstream and forced fed narrative speaks volume of your knowledge on this matter. The end goal was to split Lebanon between Israel and Syria under Kissinger’s policies – up to the Litani river to Israel whose Zionists have salivated at Lebanon’s fresh natural water supply since the early 1900s and the rest to Syria to make uo for the stolen Golan Heights. No friends in geopolitics, only interests.

    The intervention, which was officially supported by the US government, was supposedly to prevent an Israeli invasion, which ended up taking place later anyway. It was also on official invitation from the Christian Lebanese President Camille Chamoun, so take it up with one of his descendants.

    Idib.

    Furthermore, that intervention spurred huge dissent in Syria which arguably cost Assad much of his legitimacy and led to the insurgency which took place in the next few years culminating in a near civil war in Syria itself in 1981-82.

    Again, nothing but the regurgitation of the Anglo-American mainstream poppycock narrative. Once the US was done using Assad, they backed the Muslim Brotherhood in Syria to remove him. Assad butchered the Brotherhood (not complains there) and called it a day. Nothing to do with an indigenous uprising. You should know that the Muslim Brotherhood is a British intelligence creation serving Anglo(-American) interests in Muslim nations.

    So why all this hate?

    See it as you wish. It’s not hatred on my end.

    • Replies: @Sirius
  184. republic says:
    @TelfoedJohn

    I have been to Lebanon many times and found them to be very smart.lots of very wealthy expats living all over world,for example the Mexican,Carlos Slim,who is from Lebanon

  185. @Joe Levantine

    ‘1-a solution to the Palestinian problem with Israel Palestine a country for all Jews and Palestinians…’

    ? Why do all Jews need to live there? Most don’t even want to — and they certainly didn’t come from there.

    Should all Christians live there?

    On my view, it’s kind of self-evident who should live in Palestine. (Hint: who should live in Norway?)

    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  186. @Talha

    Yes I do realise that he was legally the right caliph, but unfortunately he accepted the arbitration of Abou Moussa Al Ahaari, most probably to spare Muslim blood even though he could have conquered the Umayyad army. His selflessness cost him the caliphate and his life. This a great leader and a philosopher that could have imposed a kinder gentler face of Islam free from the shenanigans of power play.

  187. Ugetit says:
    @Joe Levantine

    Meanwhile there is not much to envy us about.

    I’m “envious” about your (I mean this collectively) knowledge and insights of the languages and history of the area. Even the highly knowledgeable (and respectable) Talha seems fascinated by the comments you guys make and that’s saying a lot.

    The US is occupied territory as well, though not yet anything near the nightmares the folks in the neighborhoods of the Eastern Mediterranean have experienced. Not much to envy us about either and I’d like nothing more than to pull a Linh Dinh and “didi” but that’s not realistic.

    Meanwhile thanks to you, Hiram, Sirius, et al for posting.

    • Thanks: Joe Levantine, Sirius
  188. Sirius says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    I can see that you like to modify the facts to fit into your theories, like you did in proposing the idea of a “Lebanese language” and with the more recent history of Lebanon (like the phoney partition theory).

    I can only imagine that you must be a Phalangist or pro-Phalangist, or even more extreme than they. I’m not sure on their current ideas lately but I would hope they abandoned the extreme ultranationalist/sectarian stuff they used to propound. Unlike you, I view what happened to Lebanon in its civil war as a tragedy, whereas you gleefully look on with schadenfreude to the Syrian war. If that’s not hatred I don’t what is. It’s a shame.

    On another note, if you would like people to spend more attention to your theories, you might consider showing a little respect. Not everyone who disagrees with you is stupid or ignorant or a troll, far from it.

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  189. @Sirius

    Earlier, you wrote that I accused you of saying things you never did. I asked you to show me where but for obvious reasons (that you are a liar); you did not answer. You now continue with that mendacious approach in rephrasing it as “I can see that you like to modify the facts to fit into your theories”. Also, notice how you did not (because you cannot) even dare touching the historical amendment I brought forth.

    This was about me correcting a small and honest correction on a statement you made about ancient history. Nothing less, nothing more. You are not intellectual fit to comprehend it and have shown, twice now, to be a coward who finds refuge behind straw man arguments (that I accused you of saying you didn’t, that I twist facts) – all while accusing me of using straw man. Pathetic.

    Feel free to call as whatever you want. Phalange, pro-Phalange, etc. I can bloody care less but please spare me your crocodile tears about Lebanon. And yes, Syria deserves what happened to it.

    The fact that you are ignorant of the partition plan of Lebanon does not make it a my theories. But, and I am reiterating myself, the fact that you so docilely swelled the Anglo-American-Zionist mainstream narrative speaks volume of your IQ level (pun intended since it’s being discussed here).

    I am not here for people to pay attention to me nor are they “my” theories. I was always respectful towards you. If you can’t take the word “drivel”, I don’t know what to say. Maybe to man up? Neither did I call you stupid. I wrote in asking that you are either honestly ignorant (which happens to everyone) or dishonestly stupid to suggest that Syria, with the backing to the US, was to sent save Lebanon. I concluded you were ignorant of the facts.

    • Replies: @Taxi
  190. Taxi says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    And yes, Syria deserves what happened to it.

    Classic hasbara.

    Good to know your jewy self supports the massacres of Syrian Christians at the hands of the terrorist headchoppers. Bravo motherfucker, bravo lol!

    • Agree: Pat Kittle, Iris
    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
    , @Sirius
  191. @Taxi

    I don’t know what suits you and your foul mouth better; pirate or truck driver. I am guessing something in between.

    the massacres of Syrian Christians at the hands of the terrorist headchoppers

    That’s a valid point. Nonetheless, it doesn’t mean I support that.

    My opinion on Syria deserving what happened to it was first and foremost in response to @Sirius’ cherry picking and ignorance. And secondly to what we, Lebanese, lived under Syria for nearly 30 years. Simply put, it was a brutal occupation where thousands of Lebanese were kidnapped, tortured and killed in Syrian prisons.

    But sure; “classic hasbara”. Easy for you to talk when you did not live it or come from outside and think to know it all.

    • Replies: @Taxi
  192. @Colin Wright

    In theory, I agree with you, but in practice this is the only solution left since there is hardly any Palestinian land for a two state solution. Please take into account that Israel has served to many jews as a transit station to all kind if destinations in the world especially the United States. IMHO, this solution is a non starter for most Israelis for two reasons:
    1- fear of Palestinian demographic growth that could overtake the Jewish population
    2-the Likud coalition that is still dreaming of a greater.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  193. Sirius says:
    @Taxi

    And not to forget all the other Syrians, one of whom came to mind and I think appropriate to mention: a true hero, Khaled al-Asaad, the Syrian archaeologist who was beheaded by the criminal ISIS gang for refusing to help them loot and destroy antiquities.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-33984006

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khaled_al-Asaad

    Al-Asaad spoke fluent Aramaic and contributed much to the study of ancient history and specifically Palmyra/Tadmor.

    @Linh Dinh, if you’re following: it would be nice if you could get a chance to cross the Syrian border and give us glimpses of life over there, although it’s understandably difficult. You’re contributions are quite valuable.

    • Agree: Taxi
    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  194. @Sirius

    Since when do the likes of ISIS know or care about archeology? It was their Anglo-American-Zionist patrons who gave the order to destroy the historical past. Let’s remember what George Orwell (who for the record was part of that evil gang), said:

    “Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past.”

  195. @Joe Levantine

    ‘In theory, I agree with you, but in practice this is the only solution left since there is hardly any Palestinian land for a two state solution…’

    I disagree. Pull the plug on Israel and the place will be gone within ten years.

    Not with a bang, but with a whimper. Just make sure the Jews are free to emigrate to the United States.

    We did the crime, we can pay the fine.

    There’s nothing impractical about this. Assuming we can stand up to Israel at all, we can yank her off our tit. Do that, and the battle’s won. So why talk about some compromise? If we can impose the compromise, we can impose a complete solution.

    • Agree: Joe Levantine
    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  196. @Wielgus

    ‘…Neither Davies not Moorhouse are pro-USSR and Davies is, if anything, a little too pro-Polish in his historical judgments.’

    Speaking of which…

    Can you recommend any books covering the German occupation of Poland in 1939-45?

    Okay…so three million Polish gentiles died — but what happened?

    The only book I read turned out to be all about demonstrating that Polish gentiles were really very nice to the Jews — which may or may not have been the case, but wasn’t really what I wanted to find out about.

    So…anything on Poland in World War Two that is reasonably judicious in its judgements and doesn’t get obsessed about Jews yet again? I mean, of course the Holocaust was the sole significant event in world history — but what about what German and Polish gentiles were getting up to in between killing or saving the Jews as the case may have been?

    • Replies: @Wielgus
    , @utu
  197. @Wielgus

    ‘Depends what source you read – Norman Davies and Roger Moorhouse in Microcosm which is about Silesia and especially its capital, Breslau/Wroclaw has the Red Army brutalising Germans to make them leave and then Poles arriving to take it up a further notch, as Silesia was to go to Poland and they had even more stake in driving out the Germans because they planned to move there themselves…’

    That all sounds perfectly valid, but another source which I found perhaps more convincing than more literary works was Karl Friedrich Gauss, Silesian Inferno: War Crimes of the Red Army on its March into Silesia in 1945. A Collection of Documents.

    It’s largely annotated refugee testimonies. Very illuminating, if horrifying. It’s something to be aware of whenever one learns that someone came ‘from Silesia’ in some way.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
  198. Taxi says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    A genocidal maniac is offended by a swearword? LOL what a prissy israeli you are. And you think you’re better than a “truck driver”? WTF lol! Keep putting your stinkfoot in stinkmouth and enjoy the weather in tel aviv while you can.

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
    , @Jimmy Gee
  199. @Taxi

    Shalom Taxi,

    “genocidal maniac” – Oy vey Izmir. Sure, why not.

    Far from offended, fire swearwords at will and continue making a fool of yourself. I just can’t process you’re a female. But anyway, mazel tov.

    Nothing wrong with truck drivers; they’re an essential part of the industry. My reference, which I know you understood, was about your foul mouth.

    “prissy israeli “, “tel aviv” – Anyone who differs from your view, even slightly and/or understandably, is an Israeli, a Zionist, from Israel, etc. Funny how you kept on calling me fascist when you were only projecting. Fascism is exactly what you do: my way or die.

    Kol tuv.

    • Replies: @Taxi
  200. Wielgus says:
    @Colin Wright

    There was a book issued by the Polish exile government in London during WW2 with the title “The Nazi (or German) New Order In Poland”. I am not sure of the exact title now. A relative owned it. It was quite horrifying reading but largely concentrated on the fate of non-Jewish Poles although the Nazi treatment of Polish Jews was mentioned – it was not discussed as extensively as you would typically get today. Although propagandist the book used a lot of German sources and indeed it was possibly difficult to find others in wartime conditions, but the Third Reich hardly bothered to conceal the nature of its rule. Pictures of Poles hanged in the street as reprisals after a partisan shooting of a German policeman or soldier – that kind of thing. Or a German woman who had her head shaved and was made to wear an insulting placard because she “had relations with a Pole”.
    There are other books out there but they tend to be in Polish.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  201. Wielgus says:
    @Colin Wright

    In a town in Germany I once lived on a street called “Schlesienstrasse” (“Silesia Street”). Sometimes the name was old, but in more newly-built places the street name was given after lobbying by Silesian refugees.

  202. Jimmy Gee says:
    @Taxi

    Taxi, you’re a breath of fresh air. Spirited, moral, clear-thinking. I’ve read Linh Dinh’s wonderful pieces for some time now — I can certainly see why he’d have such an amazing friend. Maybe someone should be transcribing the conversation between the two of you while he’s visiting? Anyway, all the best from the west coast of Canada.

    • Agree: Iris
    • Thanks: Taxi
  203. HalconHigh says: • Website

    Wild Child
    Full of Grace
    Savior of the
    Human Race

  204. Sirius says:
    @Joe Levantine

    I gave some further thought about what you posted.

    About Antun Saadeh it occurred to me, is there any evidence that Israeli intelligence colluded in his death? I don’t doubt it, as I think Zionist leaders would have considered his ideology a danger, a unifying force for the region, that he regarded Palestine as part of his homeland too, and that such unifiers are always considered threats by them. They much prefer and encourage fragmentation. But I couldn’t find any sources. Maybe the archives are still secret or unresearched.

    Saadeh was betrayed by the first Syrian coup leader to disrupt democracy, Col. Husni al-Zaim, who overthrew the elected government of Syria in 1949, and unfortunately was funded and supported by the US government. Zaim proceeded to actually withdraw Syrian forces in the small sliver of Palestine they saved from Zionist occupation which resulted in a neutral zone that the Israelis used to provoke later Syrian governments (and ultimately occupied in 1967). That deal indicates a motive for collusion with the Israeli leadership.

    Zaim was himself overthrown a few months later and executed for treason, just an indication of the instability caused by coups and countercoups. It’s a turbulent history to say the least.

    About Saadeh’s form of Syrianism he regarded Syria as including a bigger area than what was the traditional one, the region that in the 1920s-30s became Syria, Lebanon, Palestine and Transjordan: it includes Iraq, Kuwait and some neighboring areas as well. I haven’t done much study as to why, other than I believe he had a theory of geographical unity within specific geographical limits: Taurus mountains to the north, eastern Mediterranean and Sinai to the west, Zagros mountains to the east and Arabian desert to the south.

    It is fascinating stuff because ultimately it’s about what makes a nation and what identifies a people. I will study it further.

    • Replies: @Taxi
    , @Joe Levantine
  205. Taxi says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    Oh I know EXACTLY who you are motherfucker! I’m an expert sniffer of jewy Controlled Opposition Writers and agents and YOU ARE MOST CERTAINLY NOT LEBANESE! Everything about you, including your avatar name is jewy – EVERYTHING! My question to you is: why did you move from the UK to occupied Palestine and how many shekels do you get paid for attending and graduating from Hasbara University? And, can I, please, pretty please, take a course there too? LOL!

    I strongly advise you to quit writing under ‘Hiram of Tyre’ and start a new fake account under the name of ‘Pharisee Phucker’. So much more apt and better suited to your fake EVERYTHING!

    You think that just because you can cite some Leb history and current affairs (courtesy of your hasbara degree) you can pass for a Leb? LOL! I am a famed hunter of evil Controlled Opposition Writers (COWs), and you motherfucking bullshitting COW are now in my unforgiving crosshairs.

    The only truth of yourself you’ve offered is that you are NOT an Arab and indeed speak no Arabic either. Of course you don’t LOL! Busted your ass!

    And for fuck’s sake stop giving yourself away by over-commenting, and, by incessantly EXPLAINING what you really meant in your last comment – you do this with EVERYBODY! And while you’re at it, disguise your English roots better by not consistently using British idioms and perfect British English. I’m helping your talmudic ass out here for your next fake disguise and I expect an earnest ‘thank you’ and some filthy shekels for it lol!

    From here on, expect me to ignore the content of ALL your comments and respond to you with my ugly verbal ak-47 at every misstep you make, whether the comment is directed at me or not. I intent to bury you in the sewers where you belong.

    Miserable-genocidal-sisterfucking-klepto-ponce jew!

    p.s. my asshole is prettier than your ugly, lying mouth.

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
    , @mcohen
  206. Taxi says:
    @Sirius

    You’re certainly onto something with this:

    … I believe he had a theory of geographical unity within specific geographical limits: Taurus mountains to the north, eastern Mediterranean and Sinai to the west, Zagros mountains to the east and Arabian desert to the south.

    Mindful here too that Kuwait is historically part of Iraq; and Lebanon, Palestine and Transjordan are historically part of Greater Syria, therefore, the unification would be conceptually more organic than artificial.

    • Thanks: Sirius
  207. @Hiram of Tyre

    “ Though I would not included Luther (a heretic picked up by the Jewish ruling class of Venice to created Lutheranism and weaken the Church; matter of another debate).”

    I have my doubts that Luther sought the support of the Jews, though I would not rule out a Jewish attempt to make use of the the reformation to weaken the church. Michael Hoffman, a great Catholic scholar labelled as an anti Semite by the Jews explains in his book “ The Occult Renaissance Church of Rome” how it was Rome’s intransigence and refusal to debate Luther that led to the schism. One important and proven factor of Luther’s extreme dislike of the Jews was a booklet that he personally wrote where he advises his followers to avoid any dealing or contact or dialogue with the Jews and were he accused the Jews of self worship. I will try to dig the title of this book from the internet but I doubt that google did not yet dump it the memory hole.

  208. @Wielgus

    ‘There are other books out there but they tend to be in Polish…’

    There must be something in English. Ought to be, anyway.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
  209. Wielgus says:
    @Colin Wright

    There should be, but maybe the urge to translate from Polish to English (for example) is more likely to attract money and sponsorship if the Jewish angle is played up.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  210. @Colin Wright

    Let us face it. Israel is part and parcel of the Western capitalist imperialist system as much as central banking and the BIS are, and when the system implodes, Israel will implode with it. How far away is the day of reckoning? I think not too far away considering all that is happening in the world’s economy in general and the US economy in particular.

  211. @Joe Levantine

    I think the book is : The Jews and Their Lies by Martin Luther

  212. utu says:
    @Colin Wright

    “So…anything on Poland in World War Two that is reasonably judicious in its judgements and doesn’t get obsessed about Jews yet again? “

    Poles are the 2nd rate victims of the Nazis.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massacre_of_Lwów_professors
    “After World War II the leadership of the Soviet Union made attempts to diminish the Polish cultural and historic legacy of Lwów. Crimes committed east of the Curzon line could not be prosecuted by Polish courts. Information on the atrocities that took place in Lwów was restricted. In 1960, Helena Krukowska, the widow of Włodzimierz Krukowski, launched an appeal to a court in Hamburg. After five years the West German court closed the judicial proceedings. A West German public prosecutor claimed the people responsible for the crime were already dead, however Hans Krueger, commander of the Gestapo unit supervising the massacres in Lwów in 1941, was being held in a Hamburg prison, having been sentenced to life imprisonment for the mass murder of Polish Jews of the Stanisławów Ghetto committed several weeks after his unit was transferred from Lwów. As a result, nobody has ever been held responsible for the killings of the academics.”

  213. @Sirius

    Unfortunately, I do not have a solid source implicating Israeli intelligence in the death of Saade. Though let us remember that the so called heroes of independence in Lebanon were nothing more than English intelligence collaborators, but not agents in the generic sense of the word. Michel Shiha was a banker with proven relations to Britain and so was Camille Shamoon. It was General Spears who issued his instructions to the leaders of Lebanon to rebel against the French mandate, specifically to Bishara Al Khoury the President, to leave Lebanon without the French military cover in anticipation of what was about to happen in Palestine. When the Nakba struck in 1948, Lebanon’s army of around three thousand strong and lightly armed was no match to the well equipped and highly trained Zionist fighters. Thus the Lebanese army was unable to protect the Palestinian refugees in their proper land and Lebanon had to absorb the Palestinian refugees without any real possibility to have them integrated within the Lebanese society courtesy of its sectarian structure. When the Syrian Nationalist coup of 1949 failed, Syria’s Zaim betrayed Saade and handed him over to the Lebanese authorities who under the directions of then Prime Minister Riad El Solh, issued an order to execute Saade without a proper trial. Here the question to ponder is : cui bono. There is no doubt in my mind that El Solh either acted knowingly or unknowingly as Britain’s useful stooge. El Solh was later assassinated in Jordan supposedly by a Syrian Nationalist but intriguingly enough not too far away from a British Barrack. Saade’s ideology was antithetical to the emergence of Israel and for the Lebanese leaders to act at the instructions of British intelligence is tantamount to acting on Israel’s behalf.

  214. @Wielgus

    ‘There should be, but maybe the urge to translate from Polish to English (for example) is more likely to attract money and sponsorship if the Jewish angle is played up.’

    It’s exasperating, actually. You can walk into your average public library, and there will be perhaps five hundred volumes devoted to the Second World War and related topics in general. A good hundred of those will dwell on what happened to five million Jews.

    Thanks to Iris Chang, there may be one volume in that library on what happened to a few of the ten to twenty million Chinese that died. The fate of a good many of the military portion of the thirty million or so gentile inhabitants of the Soviet Uni0n who died will be discussed — it’ll come up in accounts of the combat. We won’t get much on civilian deaths on either side of the front, though. Nor does anyone pay much attention to the three million Russian P.O.W.’s who died.

    Etc, etc. Two-three million German gentile civilians, two-three million gentile Poles, then there are Serbs, Greeks, ‘traitor peoples’ in the Soviet Union, etc. — generally mentioned only in passing, or in wildly tendentious accounts. The fate of the Volksdeutsch of the East, for example, should merit a text at least as careful and comprehensive as Raul Hilberg’s survey of the annihilation of European Jewry. As it is, it’s only fleeting snapshots, so to speak: a mention of women and children penned and awaiting shipment to the East to serve as slave labor, for example. I mentioned the Poles — but they all could use at least a fraction of the attention obsessively devoted to the circumcised among the victims.

    We need some kind of numerus clausus here. Each additional volume on the precious five million needs to be matched with at least one volume focusing on deaths among the not-so-important fifty million.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    , @Wielgus
  215. @Taxi

    HAHAHAHA !!!

    That was an epic post. Truly epic, thank you for the laugh.

    I am equally thanking you for complimenting my English. It means a lot coming from someone who writes so well in English; especially that English is my third language – Lebanese Arabic and French (in no particular order) being the first two. A quick note: the usage of bloody is to avoid using the much less pleasant fucking – nothing to do with being British.

    “expert sniffer”, “famed hunter” — Tap your own shoulder all you want, you’re not any different than those (invented) Israelis and Jews you despise. They shout “You’re all Arabs!” and so do you. They shout “There is no Palestinians!”, you scream “There is no Lebanese language!”. Israelis have imposed the narrative that Palestine was empty, waiting for Jews to come back. You indirectly allude to a similar nonsense: that everyone in the Middle East today descent from Arabs – logically implying that the entirety of the region was once empty. Luckily, we have genetic studies showing that you are wrong – the region is a mixture of ancient people (who were not all Arabs.) To contrast with similarities, the only difference between you and Israelis is that they don’t sugar coat their vile character – they came from outside, killed, stole and proclaim to be righteous. You, like most Muslims (Sunnis at least (which I think you’re one)), pretend to be tolerant of others. I wrote “Sunnis at least” because I am sure you know of the Iranian Mullah’s plan to create a Shia crescent in the Middle East (with Lebanon part of it). In case you didn’t know, or prefer to ignore it, the MI6/CIA backed those Mullahs to remove the Shah.

    If I may rewind once more — and yes, I may have a tendency to be explicit (I do it unconsciously (it’s in my purist/analytical nature) and not maliciously) — this whole thing started with me giving my own and personal view/opinion: that Christians in Lebanon don’t like to be called Arabs (I’ll add here: because an Arab is usual Muslim) and that the Lebanese language is hardly Arabic (my intention was to highlight its origin and development). At the end of the day, it was a personal view/opinion. The fact that you went ballistic about it (to a point where your anus prolapsed (pun intended since you brought up your asshole)), only confirms what I wrote earlier: that Muslims (Sunnis at least and for the most part) are not tolerant. Identifying as a Christian Lebanese (and less as an Arab) proud of the ancient Phoenician history/heritage does not make of that person a racist, a pro-Israeli/Zionist/Jew and even less an anti-Arab and/or Muslim. With an ever diminishing Christian population in the Middle East, the Christian Lebanese’ wish to not be identified as Arab should be understood, if not tolerated.

    Today’s Turks spoke Arabic for a long time, why are they not called Arabs today? If today’s Lebanese revived and spoke Canaanite/Phoenician (or even Aramaic), would they not be Arabs anymore but Caananites/Phoenicians (or Aramaens)? What about if Farsi or Greek or Latin was still spoken in Lebanon – would it make of us Persian, Greeks or Romans/Italians? Don’t impose your Islamic fascism and learn to be tolerant.

    Not sure what to make of my my avatar being Jewish but I can only suspect that your emotions, once again, took the worst (or is it the better?) of you. Hiram of Tyre was a Phoenician King. If you’re allusion is in reference to his said alliance with the mythical King Solomon, you should know that it’s just that: a myth. No Abraham/Saul/Solomon/David ever existed. No invasion of Canaan, mass killing of Canaanites, the establishment of kingdoms, etc ever happened. We know this today thanks for forensic archeology. Whoever wrote the Old Testament, made up all those lies to make up for the insignificance and validate their myths. And what a better way than associating a mythical king to a real, historical one.

    On an ending note and while I didn’t ask about the beauty of your anus but I bet that most of the men in a 10 kms radius of where you live will agree. Is your avatar, Taxi, in homage to it? Hop on, hop off.

    • Replies: @Taxi
  216. @Colin Wright

    Thinking about it this way makes me realize that the promotion of the Holocaust as a blanket bar to criticism of Jewish behavior is accomplished not just positively, but negatively, so to speak.

    We are not only told repetitively about Jewish suffering both as a warning that we must never, never allow ourselves to feel critical of Jewish behavior again. That suffering is further emphasized by minimizing all other accounts of suffering. It is as if we have an orphanage, and we keep hearing all about what happened to one of the orphans. We hear little to nothing of what happened to the other hundred children in the orphanage.

    As a result, we emerge with the idea that we must be especially nice to that one orphan. The other hundred? We’re barely aware they had a hard time as well. They merit no more than ordinary consideration.

    • Replies: @utu
  217. @Joe Levantine

    Hi Joe. I don’t think to have insinuated that Luther sought the support of Jews. What I meant when I wrote that he was picked up by the Jewish ruling class of Venice is that he was used (knowingly or not, I am not sure) by the Jews in question to weaken the Church in creating a Christian denomination. Pope Leo X had publicly denounced the University of Padua as the center of Lutheranism (which he called a German disease). Your reference to his book “Jews and their Lies” is a valid argument but I am not sure if Luther knew the true identify of the Venetian ruling class – who pretended to be Christian. They used to say they’re Venetian first and then Christian.

    The different branches of Christianity (Protestantism (1517), Lutheranism (1517), Calvisnim (1519), etc) emerging after the War of the League of Cambrai (1516) were not random but by (Venetian) design. All part of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation to weaken the Church. The creation of Jesuit Order in 1514 was not any different. The war of Cambrai is of particular historical importance – it opposed the Papal States and most of Europe who made it their missing to destroy the cancerous Venice. Unfortunately, the Venetian ruling class managed to survive (after a diplomatic deal with the Pope), packed and moved north where they continued their usurious and warmongering ways. There, they established the Banks of Amsterdam, England and others (all based on Venice’s Banco di Rialto), colonials enterprises that led to the creation of the British Empire. All this was done through alliances with northern nobilities (many of whom were also crypto-Jews).

    • Thanks: Joe Levantine
    • Replies: @Joe Levantine
  218. Taxi says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    I didn’t bother reading past the second line because I don’t read cunt.

    Now go scratch your anus for my response in ‘the Lebanese language’.

    Genocidal jew shitbag!

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
    , @Iris
  219. @Taxi

    Bonjour Taxi,

    Who are you kidding; I know you read the entirety of my comment.

    Anyway; if you’re a female at all, it’s too bad you’re such a trashy one.

    Don’t take life too seriously, nobody gets out alive.

    Keep well.

  220. utu says:
    @Colin Wright

    International Martyrology Olympiad is a zero sum game. Jews won all possible medals.

  221. Wielgus says:
    @Colin Wright

    In a London public library I used, Iris Chang’s book was literally the only book on Japanese behaviour in China. A few books along was a fairly grim account of Japanese treatment of British Empire, US and Dutch POWs and civilian detainees. The same smallish library had at least 15 books dealing with the Holocaust – in whole or in part.
    I can read German, Russian and Polish and sometimes pick up more information and a wider range of perspectives that way, but the Anglophone world is cut off from a lot of information about history – perhaps deliberately.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  222. sb says:

    I guess everyone has their own view as to whether the Germans or the Soviets behaved the worse in WW2
    I’ll throw in my two-penneth worth : my late father was a POW of the Germans ( captured at Crete )
    His POW camp had one section for British Commonwealth POWs -where treatment was basically Geneva Convention – and also a Soviet section – which my father described as a death camp

    Yes I realise that the Soviets reciprocated in kind . But , as every child knows, the basic rule of claiming to be in the right , is , “they started it ”

    • Agree: Wielgus
    • Replies: @Wielgus
    , @Colin Wright
  223. Wielgus says:
    @sb

    Yes, especially in 1941 huge numbers of the Soviet POWs taken were left to starve to death. Conditions improved somewhat later, but getting out of one of these places was a major reason for Red Army POWs to sign up with Vlasov or some Osttruppen formation, rather than any particular desire to fight for Hitler or against Stalin.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  224. Iris says:
    @Taxi

    my response in ‘the Lebanese language’.

    Just small random additions to your perfectly correct statement about the “Lebanese language” being of course entirely Arabic.

    Lebanon, although a small country in population, is an important powerhouse in the Arabic cultural and linguistic world.

    – Before the destruction of Iraq by the Zionist-controlled USA, a common saying was that “Any Arabic-language book would have most probably been written in Egypt, printed in Lebanon, and read in Iraq“.

    – Lebanon’s TV channels and their information shows in Arabic are watched throughout the Arab world.

    – To date, Lebanon is the 3rd producer of Arabic-language TV dramas, watched by 300 odd millions of Arabic speakers throughout the world (after Egypt and Syria), arguably people of a lower education level than those interested in current affairs.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Lebanese_television_series

    – Lebanon’s film industry is prominent in the translation to Arabic of TV series from other origins, Turkish and Brazilian in particular. That is because, among all versions of spoken Arabic, Lebanon’s Arabic accent and idioms are considered beautiful, pleasant to the ear and the easiest to understand by other Arabs, as the closest to classical Arabic.

    Each spoken Arabic language in its respective country or region indeed present specific idioms, turn of phrases and pronunciations. But ultimately, they are all based solely on classical Arabic, and the evidence is that, after a familiarisation of only a few days, any Arabic-speaker gets to understand other Arabs. The only exception ate the everyday-language spoken in Somalia, Sudan and Djibouti, who possibly borrow more from native African vernacular.

    On an another note, thanks ever so much for your remarkably intelligent articles and principled political positions. It is an honour and a privilege reading you. God bless.

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  225. @Iris

    Don’t impose your Islamic fascism.

    Lebanese Arabic is not entirely Arabic.

    From Wikipedia:

    Lebanese Arabic (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ لُبْنَانِيّ‎, romanized: ʿarabiyy lubnāniyy, Lebanese: ʿarabe libnēne), or simply Lebanese (Arabic: لُبْنَانِيّ‎, romanized: lubnāniyy, Lebanese: libnēne), is a variety of North Levantine Arabic, indigenous to and spoken primarily in Lebanon, with significant linguistic influences borrowed from other Middle Eastern and European languages and is in some ways unique from other varieties of Arabic. Due to multilingualism and pervasive diglossia among Lebanese people (a majority of the Lebanese people are bilingual or trilingual), it is not uncommon for Lebanese people to code-switch between or mix Lebanese Arabic, English, and French in their daily speech.

    Lebanese Arabic is believed to be a descendant of the Arabic dialects introduced to the Levant in the 7th century CE, which gradually supplanted various indigenous Northwest Semitic languages to become the regional lingua franca. As a result of this prolonged process of language shift, Lebanese Arabic possesses a significant Aramaic substratum, along with later non-Semitic adstrate influences from Ottoman Turkish, English, and French. As a variety of Levantine Arabic, Lebanese Arabic is most closely related to Syrian Arabic and shares many innovations with Palestinian and Jordanian Arabic. However some modern researchers have opposed the idea of descendance from Peninsular Arabic dialects, such as Ahmad Al-Jallad and others.[3] These hold that the vernaculars languages went through a parallel evolution.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lebanese_Arabic

    Arabic is not Arabic. If it was, a Lebanese and say, a Moroccan or Yemeni, would have no trouble communicating when it’s virtually impossible.

    • LOL: Iris
    • Replies: @Iris
    , @Taxi
  226. @Hiram of Tyre

    Thanks for this historic overview of the role of Jews at creating divisions within the realm of the Catholic Church.

    The papal pronunciations of Pope Francis provide the icing on the cake of the deviation of the Catholic Church from the true spirit of Christianity. The Vatican Bank is the most flagrant in your face endorsement of usury which Michael Hoffman’s book ‘Usury in Christendom’ elaborately exposes, a must read. The sexual child abuses that is whittling away the moral authority of the church is a natural outgrowth of the sin of upholding usury.

    • Thanks: Hiram of Tyre
    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  227. Iris says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    Don’t impose your Islamic fascism

    “Islamic fascism” is an extremely revealing choice of phrase.

    It is the number 1 political “concept” currently being spinned by prominent French Zionists and their National-Zionist party under construction. Straight from Hasbara Central in Tel-Aviv.

    You bring it to yourself; don’t be surprised people call you names.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  228. Check out this hellhole… worth a visit? It includes a bar run by kids.

    https://yomadic.com/stolipinovo-gypsy-ghetto/

  229. @Wielgus

    ‘In a London public library I used, Iris Chang’s book was literally the only book on Japanese behaviour in China. A few books along was a fairly grim account of Japanese treatment of British Empire, US and Dutch POWs and civilian detainees. The same smallish library had at least 15 books dealing with the Holocaust – in whole or in part.
    I can read German, Russian and Polish and sometimes pick up more information and a wider range of perspectives that way, but the Anglophone world is cut off from a lot of information about history – perhaps deliberately.’

    It does seem deliberate. In spite of the fact that he is one of the more important writers of the last sixty years and English is one of the more important languages on the planet, Solzhenitsyn’s Two Hundred Years Together is still not available in English in an authorized translation. Now, if English were, say, Maltese, I could see the delay, but…

    From what I’ve been able to gather from various more or less suspect and fragmentary translations, it’s really a relatively balanced work; ‘yes, the Jews did this to us — but let’s not kid ourselves: we did it to ourselves as well.’

    I’d like to read it. After all, I’ve read much of the rest of Solzhenitsyn’s ouvre. But apparently, I mustn’t — it’s not developmentally appropriate for Americans or something.

    I can read Lolita, or William Burroughs, or the Marquis de Sade, or even Mein Kampf — but it wouldn’t do for me to read critical remarks about Jews from a Nobel-prize winning author. Nope, that can’t be permitted.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
  230. @Wielgus

    ‘Yes, especially in 1941 huge numbers of the Soviet POWs taken were left to starve to death. Conditions improved somewhat later, but getting out of one of these places was a major reason for Red Army POWs to sign up with Vlasov or some Osttruppen formation, rather than any particular desire to fight for Hitler or against Stalin.’

    This is one reason I get irritated when the Righteous manage to track down some ancient Ukrainian fossil who was first a POW and then a guard at a concentration camp.

    What do you think his choices were? If he is to be judged, the jury should consist exclusively of those who were in a similar situation at some point.

    • Agree: Wielgus
    • Replies: @Wielgus
  231. @sb

    ‘I guess everyone has their own view as to whether the Germans or the Soviets behaved the worse in WW2’

    It’s difficult to avoid — but I think it’s basically a mistake to make it into a competition.

    It also does nothing to justify crimes against innocents merely because you associate them with the perpetrators of some crime. That actually was a justification employed by the Germans in the Holocaust.

    In Ordinary Men, when the commander of Order Police Battalion 501 is relaying the order to kill all the Jews in Jozefow to his men, he explains that ‘they’ (the Jews) have orchestrated the bombing of the wives and children of the men back in Germany. Therefore, they are going punish ‘them’ (the Jews) here in Poland.

    • Agree: Wielgus
  232. @Iris

    Neither me nor this has anything to do with what’s going on in France and don’t you know it. The revelation here is that you are unable to think for yourself and resort to emulating the trashy woman’s (if she’s a female at all) remarks. Would a Zionist (me apparently) defend Muslims, Islam, the Islamic Golden Age, etc – just read my past comments; you have taken part of them yourself.

    No, I don’t bring it to myself. What’s happening is a bunch of intolerant Sunnis ganging up. They can’t accept anyone who is not Arab and/or Muslim and/or a different view/opinion. I only shared my view/point and was attacked for it. Read the thread again. All you Sunnis do in doing so is to reinforce and confirm my point: that you are intolerant of others. Besides, I know many Shia Lebanese who also don’t like to be called/referred to as Arabs – are they also Zionists?

    No wonder Zionists have led Sunnis from the tip of their nose for decades.

  233. Wielgus says:
    @Colin Wright

    Solzhenitsyn was useful during the Cold War but not all his writings were. Reading between the lines of something like Lenin In Zürich, Solzhenitsyn found the Bolsheviks and their Menshevik rivals un-Russian, and his portrayal of Parvus slips into something like anti-Semitic caricature, but it is all still somewhat hinted at rather than stated blatantly. My guess is that Two Hundred Years Together is a little too rich for some people’s blood, so there is no proper English translation.
    Sanitised portrayals of cultural heroes are not limited to Solzhenitsyn. George Orwell hated Stalinism but reading his journalism suggests he hated Roman Catholicism almost as much, and in Homage To Catalonia he is quite blasé and even approving about Catholic churches in Spain being vandalised and destroyed. This is not censored but commentators never draw attention to it – but why not?

  234. Wielgus says:
    @Colin Wright

    In the graphic novel Maus, Vladek Spiegelman is hardly some resistance hero – he survives in Auschwitz and probably eats better than average for an inmate by giving English lessons to a brutal Polish Kapo who has decided the Reich might not win the war and English might be useful to know. Later he is given a whole sausage by an SS man whose torn boot he fixes (actually he doesn’t but in return for giving him some bread he gets a specialist cobbler to fix the boot for him). Like Vladek, I suspect a lot of these guards were doing what they needed to do to survive, like millions of others in Europe at the time.

  235. @Talha

    Sorry Talha for missing the point about the IQ. All I can say is that the 45 years of unrest, economic decline and corruption combined with a laxness in the previous rigours of the educational system that consumed up to 4% of the GDP back then, have caused a massive brain drain in Lebanon that could very well have contributed to a collective lower IQ compared to the one that existed before the civil war. As a footnote, I add that up until 1975 the rate of success in the Baccalaureate was about 34% and some of those who flunked would go to Egypt to earn a degree in Tawhiddiah or Tawjeehiah.

    The militia leaders have been in charge since the early eighties. When the rabble seizes power, decline is across the board.

    • Agree: Hiram of Tyre
  236. obvious says:
    @HeebHunter

    LOL we have one fat ugly toad here, folks… another slob destined for the crank. Another full of “we” and desperately trying to “join”. In real life I’d knock you down in front of everyone and all your little friends would slither away. Thank GOD ALMIGHTY FOR THE JEWS

  237. @Joe Levantine

    Thanks for this historic overview of the role of Jews at creating divisions within the realm of the Catholic Church.

    The papal pronunciations of Pope Francis provide the icing on the cake of the deviation of the Catholic Church from the true spirit of Christianity. The Vatican Bank is the most flagrant in your face endorsement of usury which Michael Hoffman’s book ‘Usury in Christendom’ elaborately exposes, a must read. The sexual child abuses that is whittling away the moral authority of the church is a natural outgrowth of the sin of upholding usury.

    Your depiction of Pope Francis as the icing on the cake cannot be more appropriate. His cover-up of the sexual scandal involving Cardinal McCarrick was nauseating. The matter was exposed by Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano; who wrote a letter to President Trump on the Establishment [1].

    I didn’t know about Hoffman’s book; thank you for sharing. Just looked it out and it’s interesting to see its cover to be the same as Michael Hudson’s “…and forgive them their debt.” [2] Money/debt is a center theme of the Bible but seldom spoken of. As Hudson states, “the Bible is preoccupied with debt, not sin.”

    —–

    [1] https://stpeterschulte.com/news/bulletin/2390-letter-carlo-maria-vigano/file

    [2] https://michael-hudson.com/2018/08/and-forgive-them-their-debts/

    • Thanks: Joe Levantine
  238. Taxi says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    What a hilarious lying cunt you are, little jew. Keep up the cut and paste from dubious sources while pretending you’re Lebanese. Nothing says ‘I’m a jew” more than your insidious lying jew face.

    And somewhere you claim that you even know shias who reject their Arabhood? LOL that surely takes the ultimate kosher biscuit of all time! Man you are so freaking EXPOSED! Long live the jewy clown COWs and their mountain of lies lol!

    My question is: do you keep your kippah on while pretending to be Lebanese? Might as well wear a dead kipper on your head you stinking liar!

    Now go collect your shekels from from that putrid fuzz of a place otherwise known as Netanhays’s asshole.

    p.s. I only read what you write to others – I skip right over your shitting shits addressed to me – but of course, you being a fantastically typical narcissist jew finds this hard to believe lol!

    p.p.s. And I note with satisfying amusement how ALL your detailed passages on history have been cut and pasted from reference books. LOL typical jew stealing and claiming it as his own. EVERYTHING you do and say is oh so very typically jewy. Funniest of all is your admissions of love towards humanity while simultaneously vocally supporting the genocide of gentiles who pose a threat to israel. You are one hilarious English jew hiding behind your crooked little pinky.

    • Thanks: Bill Jones
    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  239. @Taxi

    I see I got under your skin; deep. Hehe (that’s my Jewish laugh).

    Anyway; I’ll skip your continued psychotic emotional meltdown to address one point:

    And I note with satisfying amusement how ALL your detailed passages on history have been cut and pasted from reference books. LOL typical jew stealing and claiming it as his own.

    Care to show me what I stole? I always use quotation marks and cite sources at the bottom of my comments — unless the author/reference about the matter/topic being discussed was previously brought up with the commentator.

  240. mcohen says:
    @Taxi

    I agree.i will take your asshole over his mouth anytime.

    I remember you from mondoweiss.That was 10 years ago.Annie Robbins and Co.Great stuff.The comments section was really good and then suddenly it changed.Closed down.

    Always wondered what happened.

    Regards mcohen

    • Replies: @Taxi
    , @Hiram of Tyre
  241. Taxi says:
    @mcohen

    Hiya mcohen. Sure I remember you too from back in the day. Hope you’re keeping well and good. And you ask whatever happened to Mondoweiss? LOL isn’t it obvious? The lib jews and their covert love of censorship, that’s what happened.

    • Replies: @anon
  242. @mcohen

    i will take your asshole over his mouth anytime.

    Awkward wouldn’t begin to describe this but anyway; you might want to get in line. As I wrote to Taxi in an earlier comment:

    On an ending note and while I didn’t ask about the beauty of your anus but I bet that most of the men in a 10 kms radius of where you live will agree. Is your avatar, Taxi, in homage to it? Hop on, hop off.

    You also might want to check if Taxi is a woman at all. She squeals “misogyny” but also keeps on using the “cunt” word. Something does not add up. In my opinion, she has only pretended to be a woman online to further dilute her identity. And yes, I realize that the author of this article addressed Taxi as “her” but it could have just been a simple request/favor. Nothing really too far fetched there. All in all, just a word of caution in case you expected some female derrière.

    • Replies: @mcohen
  243. mcohen says:
    @Hiram of Tyre

    Hiram

    Does it matter anyway who and what taxi is?not really.I made up a saying

    “When you stand for nothing,you fall for anything.”

  244. anon[218] • Disclaimer says:
    @Taxi

    a poem for mondoweiss olden days and that includes you Mr obama

    I would like to cry in your beer
    We fighted the good fought
    But it is quite clear
    All has come to nought

    The road was paved with good intention
    Flags held high
    But someone forgot to mention
    It was pie in the sky

    No amount of sauce
    Will make it easier to swallow
    But I know that’s because
    Winning is not for all dear fellow

    Better to be a loser
    Accept it with pride
    No use being a bawler
    Just enjoy the ride

    mcohen 2020

  245. AReply says:
    @anonymous

    Why just hate Jews when there are so many others?

    It’s a wonderfully USA libertarian turn to consolidate a reckoning of vast diaspora into “but the local chicks were hot and who can hate cuisine. And btw I hate gays”

    Reminds me of the NOLA saucier who almost gets mauled by a tiger in Apocalypse Now complaining about how the Navy kitchen took hundreds of pounds of beautiful prime rib and boiled it “grey”.

    Was Ray Kroc jewish? Oh sry that was McDougs. [Insert photo of Trump hosting WH banquet table featuring hundreds of stale burgers lit by camdelabra. Lol!]

    Yes corp America hates culture. All that complexity and nuance stands in the way of efficiency and profits

  246. TJM says: • Website

    Another excellent story by Linh Dinh. The banners celebrating the dead heroes were interesting. Imagine trying to put up your own banner in the USA. You’d be forced to take it down. The billboard companies will not tolerate competition.

  247. @Hiram of Tyre

    Moslems are low-IQ, inbred, violent apes. A genuine Moslem education consists of memorizing the Koran, and literally nothing else. That’s how a Moslem named after one of Mohammed’s equally illiterate minions could think Lebanon is the only country with mountains in proximity to the sea. That Moslem’s ignorance, regardless of his métier, is pitiable. It contains no hidden insight that one would gain through “travel to Lebanon”. That statement of yours—illogical, unexplainable, and full of impotent fury—is typical of Moslems. In fact, it’s the only kind of argument your ilk can come up with.

    • Replies: @Hiram of Tyre
  248. @RealAmerican

    Linh Dinh chose to quote that driver, so I was paying attention to his words. Odd that you didn’t get that. The question is why would Linh Dinh chose to quote that. Linh Dinh seems much too smart to agree with the assertion that Lebanon is the sole country with mountains in proximity to the sea, so he must have wanted to demonstrate an extreme example of ignorant provincialism.

    By the way, the quote in question does not mention skiing or swimming, only mountains and sea, which are not the same. However, Lebanon is certainly not unique in offering the opportunity to visit a third-rate ski resort and take a cold dip in the sea on the same day.

  249. @Ray Caruso

    Your issue with Muslims is clearly personal and so, I won’t dwell on that part. Even less so that I am not Muslim. Besides and if I were you, I would take a moment, pick my prolapsed anus off the floor and read my comments before even thinking to write about “fury”.

    That said; you are a cretin. I was right when I first wrote it on November 8th and I am still right sixteen days later. My point was that the taxi driver’s statement (that Lebanon is the only country…) is likely a result of him not knowing better – perhaps for never having left Lebanon. And/or, and I would add now, for being madly in love with Lebanon.

    You, on the other hand, when you wrote…

    How about Syria, Israel, Egypt, Cyprus, Turkey, Greece, Albania, Montenegro, Croatia, Italy, France, Spain, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Sudan, Eritrea, Djibouti, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Oman, and Iran? And those are just the ones in the general neighborhood. Vietnam and the United States also qualify, of course. Why quote something that stupid? To demonstrate the fine quality of a Moslem education?

    …only made a testimony of your intellectual inability to understand the colloquial aspect of the conversation between Lindh and the taxi driver, attested of your gross ignorance of Lebanon’s unique natural attributes and above all, look like a complete fool venting out fumes about Muslims/Islam. Don’t forget that the cultural/scientific/economic alliance/exchange between Harun al-Rashid (a past Muslim Caliph) and Charlemagne save Europe from its centuries-long decline following the fall of the Roman Empire. Without the East, there would be no West; cretin.

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