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Escape from America: Australia, Costa Rica, Colombia, Latvia, Spain and, Now, France
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Jack near Preixan, France

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At 80-years-old, you’ve done and seen quite a lot, but you didn’t exactly have an auspicious beginning. You couldn’t even graduate from high school. What happened?

I was expelled! I wasn’t much of a student anyway. I signed up for welding class and woodworking class, so I didn’t have to do any work, but in welding class, the instructor was a friggin drill sergeant from the Korean War! This son of a bitch was always ordering me around, “Do this,” “Do that.” If he didn’t like what I was doing, he’d say, “You, get on the floor, do twenty pushups!”

Right in class?

There weren’t desks or anything, but yeah. I had to get this asshole, so after school, I went back to the shop. There was no one in there, except me, so I welded a bunch of tools onto the welding table! My parents got a call. He knew immediately it was me.

So now what?

I joined the navy, on my 17th birthday. I wanted to see the world. My parents had to sign for me. We were living in Bellevue, Washington. Back then, it only had about 10,000 people. So I flew to San Diego. I had never been on an airplane.

When you enlisted, you had to take a bunch of tests. They had to see what your aptitude was, whether you were a dishwasher, or swab the deck, or being an electrician or machinist. I took these tests and scored very high on them, so it made me eligible for a lot of technical programs. I went to submarine school for about three months, had psychological training there. You had to go through a 100-foot-tall escape tank, to simulate an escape from a submarine. None of that stuff bothered me. I graduated easily.

So where did you go?

My first submarine was a diesel submarine. It had completed patrols in the Pacific in World War II, successfully. It had sunk some Japanese ships, that kind of shit. It had about 70 enlisted men, and 10 officers.

On a submarine, everything was pretty loose. You can have long hair, you don’t need to shave, you don’t need to shine your shoes or any of that shit.

It was pretty cool. This was amazing stuff, I thought. Nobody was at war, 1957, so I had joined an adventure program.

They sent us to Pearl Harbor, but it was only to refuel and add supplies. Not much fresh vegetables. Lots of frozen stuff, frozen meats. The vegetables, they stacked them in the showers, so we wouldn’t be able to use the showers for a few weeks.

I got into a little trouble in Hawaii, because we were only there for a couple days. They only let us out for one night, to get drunk, chase women.

I climbed onto the roof of this nightclub place that had an open-air dance floor. I took these coconuts off this tree, and I was throwing them down onto the dance floor. Just crazy shit.

They didn’t really do anything to me. They just said, “OK, don’t do that shit any more.”

Were you drunk?

I might have been. I hardly drank anything, to speak of. When I was 16 or 15, I may have had a beer that whole time. I smoked, but I didn’t drink.

This was amazing, Linh, for an 18-year-old kid, to experience this, traveling across the Pacific. We ended up having to go through a hurricane on the surface. We were taking 45-degree pitch, and 65-degree rolls, and my job was helmsman, trying to steer this thing.

Cruising at night on the surface, my job was to look out at night, it was very peaceful.

In Hawaii, I bought ten cartons of cigarettes. I smoked Lucky Strike. They were a dollar a carton! I got paid $75 a month. Plus, we got another $30 hazardous duty pay, for being on a submarine. I really didn’t understand why. I didn’t see any hazard.

Seventy days later, we pulled into Yokosuka, Japan. Seventy days.

In Hawaii, we had seven or eight civilians come onboard, which was very unusual. Who are these guys? It ended up they were CIA. Our mission was to spy on a Russian naval base, right off the Russian naval base, submerged, and tap into their undersea cables, to monitor all their communication.

We were laying on the bottom, dead quiet, no engine running. No fans running, just dead quiet, hiding, and listening. There was a Russian destroyer that came out. You could hear their active sonar, looking for us. Apparently, they had an alarm that we were there, or some indication that we were right there.

We were just sitting on the bottom, in about 200 feet of water, not very deep. They started dropping depth charges. You know what those are? They’re big canisters they rolled off the destroyer, to try to kill submarines.

There’s your hazard pay!

Yeah, but we survived. So we were pinned down, and the air was getting low. The air was getting very screwed up. On the bunks, back in the crew’s quarters, we had carbon monoxide absorbent powder. The problem was we couldn’t turn on the air valves. There was no noise allowed. It was a little bit tense.

I remember going into the control room. That’s where they had the periscope and all that shit. I went up to the officer, and I said, “Hey lieutenant, you don’t mind if I smoke a cigarette?”

You couldn’t breathe and you wanted to smoke a cigarette?!

I figured I might as well have one more, if I was going to die soon. The officer said, “No, no , no, go ahead,” so I took out my Zippo and my Lucky, but the lighter wouldn’t light! He just laughed at me. There wasn’t enough oxygen to light the lighter.

So we weren’t caught by the Russians. We escaped, finally. They gave up after a while. Going deeper, we slowly crept out of there.

Eventually, we got back to Yokosuka, where the submarine was put onto a dry dock to be repaired. The hull of the submarine was damaged from the depth charges. It caved in from the compression of the explosions underwater.

It took six weeks to repair the submarine, so we had six weeks of rock and rolling! Can you imagine an 18-year-old kid, going into… Women everywhere, bars, 18-years old! Woo! Rock and roll!

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Here’s a funny one. Halfway through, the chief of the boat, Jenkins, said we’re going to have a ship’s party. He said, “Everything in there is paid for! Everything.” Anyway, the ship’s party was in a brothel! It was at a fuckin’ brothel, with free pussy for everybody!

Jenkins was like a father to the other enlisted men. Besides organizing group activities for the crew, he also lent money to you if you were broke, and you paid him back on payday.

Did any man refuse to go to the party?

Oh no, no, no, we all went. What do you mean?

There might have been guys who were super religious, who didn’t think it was right.

No, no, no. They’re submarine sailors. What do you think?

It’s interesting, we had black guys on there too. Two or three black guys. At the time, black guys could join the navy, but they could only be stewards to the officers. You know, servants. Same with the Filipinos. They could join the navy, but they couldn’t be an electrician, torpedo man or anything. They had to work as stewards, as servants for the officers. It was pure racist crap.

It’s interesting, Linh, but where I grew up, during my entire existence, up to that point, I don’t think I had seen a black person, in person. Maybe on TV, you know. Like most things, I didn’t give it any thought.

One of the black guys became my best friend. We’d go get some women together, and stuff like that, and drinks.

He ended up with a girlfriend, after about two weeks there. I found a girl that I semi fell in love with, at 18. I stayed at her place most nights, that I could.

Then we went to Hong Kong. As a young, 18-year-old kid, and knowing very little, it was really amazing, the shit I went through, and discovered.

I got a little mouse tattooed on my shoulder. It was midnight or 1 O’clock, and we were just wandering around, half drunk, and we stumbled onto this this tattoo shop. There was a woman in there getting a tattoo on her thigh. She was a British Army woman, and pretty neat looking. She was sitting there with her legs spread, getting a tattoo on the inside of her thigh, so we said, “Woo, got to see what’s going here!” The guy said, “You’re not supposed to come in unless you’re getting a tattoo,” so I said, “Sign me up!”

He charged me five Hong Kong dollars, which at the time was worth 17 cents.

So how long were you in the navy?

Ten years! I signed up again. It was the very beginning of the navy nuclear powered submarine program, so I applied for it. I had to take the equivalent of a two-year university engineering test, and I was accepted. For some reasons, I have this ability to pass tests, even when I don’t know what I’m talking about.

Near the end, though, I got very disenchanted. I couldn’t wait to get out. I was growing up. On our submarine, the nuclear missiles were programmed to hit different Russian cities, I found out. They were ready to kill millions of people.

I had been in the navy for 8 ½ years. Most of my other friends had gotten married. They had a pretty good deal, I thought, a wife making food for them and all that shit. They lived in a house, while I lived in a barrack.

So what did you do after the navy?

In 1965, I bought a brand-new Jaguar XKE. I had started road racing. In 1966, I married Betty. She was going to the University of Connecticut, majoring in English. Betty worked at the racetrack, as a volunteer. I met her there.

The next year, I got out of the navy and bought a one-bedroom house. I applied to the University of Connecticut, so we were both students, and I was making this $85 a month house payment.

I was a self-taught car mechanic, so I got a job at this foreign car repair shop.

What were you studying?

I wanted to study… My intention was… I wanted to get a degree in philosophy.

Philosophy?!

The thing about me, Linh, I have never, ever had any desire to be rich, or to make a lot of money. My intention in life, from a very early age, was to have the lowest stress life I could figure out for myself. As long as I had a roof over my head, as long as I had enough food to eat, I don’t really care what kind of clothes, or anything like that.

They wouldn’t let me into the liberal arts department, though, because I didn’t have a foreign language, but there was a way around it. I could take philosophy classes while enrolled in the business school, so I did that.

The idea of a college degree, in my view, was just to learn about the world around us, what’s going on, what it’s all about. It’s just a quest for knowledge, and not for the purpose to make money. It’s to obtain knowledge, you know.

In the navy… I had never read books in my life, but in the navy, because I was at sea for so long, I started reading books. I read historical novels, non-fiction books, because on a nuclear submarine, they had an extensive library. I just spent all my spare time reading.

As a student, I had such a desire to learn, to just absorb everything. I was in a maximum kind of mode. I wanted to know everything, what’s going on, so I could function, you know, and that continued my whole life. I’d travel to a place to find out what was there.

So how long did your marriage to Betty last?

Till 1979.

Wow! So you were married to her for a long time.

Yeah. I mean, I never disliked her. I liked her, but I wasn’t really in love with her, you know. There’s a difference.

Why did you marry her if you didn’t feel that strongly about her?

It was a thing to do at the time. All your friends are getting married…

I guess she fell in love with you, huh?

I don’t know. She had the same view of me as I did of her. We’re friends. I won’t hurt you, or anything like that.

We never had kids. Betty made it clear she didn’t want any.

On the other hand, I want more now. I’ve matured to the point where, you know, I want somebody to love.

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Betty became mentally ill. She was manic depressive, in an extreme way, so I took her, I did some research, to the Yale University Hospital. They were supposed to have this advanced treatment for severe manic depressives. They kept her there for a week, put her on this lithium hydroxide treatment.

It’s supposed to balance her brain, but once you’re on this lithium program, you’re on it for life, basically. You can never get off, because it replaces the missing chemical in your brain.

Anyway, that was her deal. What I noticed, particularly, was how her personality changed, on this lithium. She wasn’t mean or anything, but just distant all the time. So it just accelerated the demise of our relationship.

So I got divorced in 1979. I gave her everything. I gave her the house. I mean, it wasn’t much, but I didn’t want to do anything that damaged her, or anything like that. I wanted her to survive.

Was Betty upset when you got divorced?

It was very weird. Not upset, not too much. I came back to see her a few times, to make sure she was alright. She eventually met some guy, married him. I was in touch with Betty until, probably, eight or nine years ago? Ten years ago?

That’s pretty good. That’s unusual.

I did care about her. I cared about her well being, you know, if she was going to be alright. It’s just, I wanted a woman to fall in love with. It’s hard to come by.

So let’s talk about your second marriage.

In 1979, I left for Charlotte. I had five thousand dollars to my name, and my race car.

I had friends down there, whom I had met through racing. A guy hired me to maintain his two race cars, and to act as his crew chief during races, and for that, he paid me $1,500 a month, so I was OK.

I went to Atlanta to see an old navy friend, and he said, “I just got a contract to search for the Atocha. It’s a Spanish galleon that sank in 1733, with lots of gold. You want to come with me?” I said, “Sign me up! Let’s go!”

I wasn’t actually paid, only fed, with the promise of a small percentage of whatever we could find. It was like looking for a needle in a haystack. I spent about seven months doing that. At the end, I had a hundred dollars to my name.

Finally, I got tired of it, so I went back to Charlotte, and that’s where I met my second wife, Gail.

There, I got a job from a friend, got paid. I went to a bar and met this woman, and we ended up going to bed, that night. Her name was Gail, and she was the assistant buyer at Sears, in Charlotte. She was 25-years-old. I was 40.

We had a relationship. One day, I said, “Gail, will you marry me?”

She just laughed at me. She said, “I’m not going to marry somebody who’s just kinda wandering around, who’s semi-homeless!” She said, “If you get a normal job, I’ll marry you.”

That was the last thing I ever wanted to do in my life, but she talked me into it. There was an ad in the Charlotte newspaper, for a roofing company. They were looking for an account executive, to represent the company in the entire Southeast. The compensation was more than I ever made, company car, expense account, all that shit.

How the hell can I get this job? So I made up a resume. Obviously, I can’t tell the truth.

I did, in fact, have a degree from the University of Connecticut. I graduated with honor, in business, right? I had, in fact, started small businesses. One, I imported leather furniture from Brazil. When I got tired of that, I opened a foreign auto part store, selling parts for Jaguar, MG, Austin-Healey and stuff like that.

I was also racing during this time. In 1975, I bought a Lotus Super 7. It was basically a race car. Because of my engineering background, and knowledge I had picked up in the navy, I could heavily modify a car to make it run a lot faster, so in 1976, I started winning races.

Jack, Jack, let’s get back to you applying for this job!

I’m sorry, I got way off track!

OK, so you embellished your resume, but you did have business experiences.

Yeah, in a way, but I didn’t do it seriously. My passion was racing cars, and making enough money to do that.

OK, the new wife. 1983, we got married, and I had this job with this roofing company. It was kinda fun, because I didn’t do hardly anything. I had a very new company car, they paid my expenses and I could travel anywhere I wanted. I really didn’t care about the job, yet I had a natural ability to do it anyway.

After I worked there for about one year, their competitor approached me. I said, “What’s the deal?” They offered it to me. I said OK, but I wanted to take the Northeast. After I did that for about five months, their national sales manager, he either died or something, but somehow, I was appointed the national sales manager of this company!

We had moved to Connecticut. Gail had become the divisional vice president at this department store. Then we moved to Cleveland, Birmingham, then back to Connecticut, because Gail kept getting hustled, I mean recruited, by all these companies.

So we were living in Greenwich, Connecticut, and you know what that’s all about, right? It’s like Palm Beach and Beverly Hills. It’s where all the hedge fund managers live, from New York. The Wall Street scammers.

It’s 2001. By then, I was so sick of Gail, but I hadn’t left, because in 1988, we had a daughter. By the way, I quit my job in 1990 to take care of my new daughter, my baby girl, and I started another business, a shipping business in Cleveland, and I started importing race cars from England.

In Connecticut, Gail got recruited by this high-powered Australian company, to be their CEO. They flew us down there, first class, then they wined and dined us. It was an offer we couldn’t refuse, so we moved to Brisbane.

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For myself, I was doing real estate, buying and fixing houses, but in 1995, you could trade stocks, equities and commodities on the internet, so I taught myself how to do that, to make money. By 1995, I could do it anywhere. It didn’t matter where I was. I could make money.

Gail was bringing in money like there’s no tomorrow. Just to give you an idea, she had a car allowance of a hundred thousand dollars a year, and she was on a list of either a hundred or 50 most powerful women in the world!

The downside is, she’s a complete fuckin’ psychopath, but most people are, to get into powerful positions, alright? She was a complete fuckin’ psychopath, man, and I didn’t want to have anything to do with her. She was such bad news. The only reason I stayed that long was because of my daughter. I had to take care of her. I didn’t feel I could leave.

My second daughter, Lena, is adopted. At a carwash in Pittsburgh, I saw a flyer that said, “INTERESTED IN ADOPTING A POLISH BABY?” It was just a hand-written note. When I got home, I called up that number, and it was a woman a couple towns over. It was a Polish woman, and she was single handedly trying to get as many Polish children out of these orphanages as possible. Her goal, more or less, was to save all these children.

It’s not that easy. Because of nationalism, the Polish government only wants Polish families to adopt these children, not foreigners. Poland only releases children from these horrible orphanages that are in terrible conditions. They only release a child if there’s something drastically wrong with them. Don’t go in there expecting a healthy child. It’s pretty crazy, and there are so many of them.

With Lena, both of her eyes were pointing to the middle, and she was way stunted in growth. She was chronically ill, with several things wrong with her. I didn’t know what all they were. To see her, it’s her eyes and her size. Right now, she’s 25-years-old, and she’s 4-foot-10, you know? Her eyes are OK now, got her eyes fixed.

The way the system works, you have to spend six weeks over there, to get to know the child. I picked Lena myself. I stayed in Szczecin. The orphanage was about 10 kilometers away, in Stargard. I’d see Lena and spend the day with her. At first, I couldn’t leave the orphanage. I’d go into the big room, where all the children were running like mice. There were 20 or 30 of them. I’d see Lena, pick her up and carry her, and all the other children would put their hands up. Please take me too! It tears your heart apart.

After six weeks, there’s a trial. They actually call it a trial. You go into a court room, with a jury, which are peers, from the community there, and you have to present your case of why you want to adopt this child.

Even after we were allowed to adopt Lena, we had to wait three more months, so I had to come back to Poland. I took the train from Warsaw to Szczecin. I was really touched when I came to pick her up. You’d think she wouldn’t remember. Lena was only a year and a half. She was in a crib there. Lena looked up and said, “Tata! Tata!”

So I got her out of the orphanage. I put her in my coat, it was December. We went to the airport. It was an open-air airport. There were no tourists or anything. There was a commercial prop plane that was supposed to show up and take us to Warsaw. We were there for about twelve hours, waiting for this prop plane, and it was December! Anyway, I had little Lena inside my coat. It was zipped up. She was like a papoose!

So you did this alone? Your wife was not there with you?

No, Gail was there. She had to be there, for the trial. They had to question both parents, you see.

It’s interesting that Gail went along with the adoption. She couldn’t have been too bad. She didn’t object to it.

She viewed it as some kind of prestige, it’s hard to explain. A psychopath like that, they just do weird shit. Normal people would never do some of the things she was doing. I saw how she reacted. She had a sister, right? Her older sister died at 56-years-old, of cancer, a horrible death of cancer. Gail never went to visit her sister, before she died. It wasn’t that complicated. She never bothered. It’s crazy.

When her mother was dying, she didn’t go see her either. She didn’t die suddenly, she was in the hospital. Gail never bothered to go.

Shortly after I met her, her father had a sudden heart attack and died, so I went to the funeral. I wasn’t married to her yet, but I went with her. There wasn’t a tear in her eyes.

So you got a divorce from Gail, and it was particularly nasty…

She tried to destroy me financially, but I got away. She withdrew a substantial amount from my bank account, which was a felony, but I didn’t press charges. I just wanted to get the hell away from her.

I found out, for sure, that the divorce was final during a 14-hour flight back to the US. The plane had a phone that cost like $10 a minute. I called this woman lawyer of mine, “Did you get the result yet?” “Yeah,” she said, “you’re free.” So I got a scotch whiskey after that, sat down and smiled.

Now, your wandering years really began.

Even before I got divorced, I went to Fiji, with this girlfriend from Australia, to this really remote island. The only power there was this one generator, in the middle of the island. Every night before dinner, they’d sit and drink this, ah, narcotic kind of drink.

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I went to Bangkok, and places like that. Then I moved back to the US, near Seattle. Then I took two or three trips to the Ukraine, to Kiev. I had a girlfriend in Kiev I kept for quite a while. We went to Turkey together.

It was fun, I enjoyed doing it, but I knew it didn’t have a future, in terms of love.

Then I shifted to South America. I spent some time in Costa Rica. It’s kind of like Bangkok, San Jose, Costa Rica, so I lost interest. Then I got onto this Colombia kick, you know, so I went to Bogota. I was there for quite a while.

Finally, I met this woman. She kinda made sense. She seemed smart and pretty educated. I was trying to feel out if this was somebody I could fall in love with. Finally, the answer was no, so I decided to move on.

I knew it wasn’t the right one. I didn’t have too many years left to get this process moving. Then I went to Barranquilla, on the Caribbean side of Colombia. I spent a long time there. I went to Cartagena, Santa Marta, but I was based in Baranquilla. Then I met a really, really super nice woman there.

She was a beautician. She was genuine, I think. She wasn’t a gold digger. I’m very good at figuring that out. I understand what’s going on, and it has gotten me out of trouble.

This lasted probably six, seven, eight months, which was long for me. I kept testing the idea if this was going to work, if this was the right one, if this was going to be my wife.

I was actually, seriously looking for a woman who would fall in love with me, and I would fall in love with her, deeply and completely, for the rest of our lives, together, and actually, you know, it worked! When I met Olga in Latvia.

Part of it is the Russian traits. Different people have different traits. You can see it run through their culture. You have a few Russians that aren’t so good, but you have a bunch that are very good.

Russian women, they’re extremely loyal. Once they’ve committed to you, they mean it. Olga would fight to the death for me. She would, physically, and I’m not exaggerating.

She loves me without reservation, without this, without that. I’m the same for her. I’m so fortunate, I feel like I’ve won the lottery. It’s like night and day for me, those other marriages.

It’s very difficult to find, but with Olga, love happens like flipping a switch.

When I met her in Latvia, we went to dinner that night. We talked about things. She’s an English teacher as a second language. I talked about a recent book I was reading, and she said, “Oh, I just finished reading that same book!” It wasn’t that common. It was by Marquez.

Which one?

One Hundred Years of Solitude. She’s read most of his books. Love in the Time of Cholera… We started to talk about books, and things like that, and about family.

How old were you then, and how old was Olga?

I was 66, and she was 42.

At first, we’d spend six months in Latvia, and six months in the US, in Florida. We had a house in Marathon, in the Florida Keys.

In 2010, I was getting bored, and I’m a nomad anyway, so I said to Olga, “Let’s take a ride down to Portugal!” We spent the summer there. We almost bought a house, but didn’t, and the reason is: Portugal is a beautiful country, and the people are wonderful, but there’s no culture to speak of, and the restaurants are kinda primitive. It’s a country where the people haven’t changed in a hundred years.

In 2011, we spent four months in France, looking to buy a house, but we didn’t buy one until next year, in Brantôme. A beautiful village, it’s called the Venice of the Périgord.

In 2013, we sold that house, and moved to Spain, in the mountains east of Malaga. However, in 2014, the whole side of the fuckin’ mountain was on fire! We watched the fire almost encircle our house, right behind it, below it, so I thought, Oh, this house is toast. No insurance. When we went back the next day, the house was fine! Right after that, I decided to sell the house, and get the hell out of there.

Luckily… I’m always lucky, Linh. I should have been killed years ago.

There are two reasons why we’re in Europe now, permanently. Olga terribly missed her daughter, and her grandson, and I just thought she should be close to them.

The second reason was my lack of faith in the US financial system. The American economy is going to collapse.

That Lehman collapse in 2008 should have blown up the whole fuckin’ system, but this time, it’s going to, for sure, and maybe even during this summer.

It always amazes me that the country is still functioning, sort of, half-assed, today. There’s no way in hell it should be. It’s insane! Yesterday, they announced the monthly consumer index number, which is the measure of inflation in the US, supposedly, which it really isn’t, because they changed the way they do that, about 15 years ago. They used to include things like food and energy, but now, they don’t consider important how much food costs, or gasoline, or heating oil.

I just went through their bullshit list. All their data are phony. They lie about everything, the unemployment report, number of jobs, payrolls. It’s all lies. The GDP number, they lie about that, every single time.

Now, we’re in a village of 900 people, not far from Toulouse. Until this Covid bullshit, everything was fine, but the French are like scared little mice, afraid of their own shadows, cowering in the corner. They really believe in this Covid bullshit!

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We have a very close French friend, a woman who’s about 60-years-old. She was broadly criticizing her French woman friends. The reason being, her mother died, which broke her up, she was very depressed, yet all her close friends wouldn’t come over to help her, to grieve with her. They were afraid of Covid!

Give me a fuckin’ break, you know. It’s sick.

I like to assign an adjective to each country, so for England, it’s arrogant. Germany is smartest. Italy is craziest. Spain is close to Italy. I’d say it’s the most irrational. Nothing makes sense in Spain. Poland is dumb as a doorknob. For France, it’s a work in progress, because I’m learning more about them every day, but I guess I’d say timid.

As for Russia, that’s a work in progress too, but the Russians are also extremely smart, in general. I give you an example: these artificial intelligence engineers who work in the Silicon Valley? A huge percentage of them are Russian, but they’re considered in Russia as traitors, for going to work for the Americans.

Everybody in Russia looks at America as a bad joke. They just laugh at them. They’re not afraid of the US attacking them, or anything else. If it does, it will get its ass kicked.

You told me that after reading my articles about Albania, you started to check housing prices in Tirana!

But I’m really too old to move again…

But you might have to, if France gets really crazy!

That’s true. As an ethnic Russian, Olga can move to Russia and become a Russian citizen. As her husband, I’m also welcome there, but it’s way too cold. We’d have to live in the Crimea, maybe.

Jack (80-years-old)

Linh Dinh’s latest book is Postcards from the End of America. He maintains a regularly updated photo blog.

 
• Category: Culture/Society 
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  1. Toza says:

    Crazy guy. Reminds me of Leskov’s Flyagin with his tongue-in-cheek picaresque adventures. Good luck to both of you!

    • Replies: @Rev. Spooner
  2. R.C. says:

    Man, I’d love to meet that guy.
    Lucky bastard! 😉
    Nice to see that there are aware folks out there.
    Good one, Linh!
    R.C.

    • Agree: mark green, moi
  3. Trinity says:

    Covid is indeed “bullshit.” Good for this guy.

    • Agree: Fred777, Alfred, John Wear
  4. No says:

    I would have a beer with this guy. 😉

  5. Must have a trust fund or some other inheritance. Working class people don’t start all these businesses.

  6. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @obwandiyag

    Hi obwandiyag,

    You love socialism and don’t think a man can be self-made. It’s very telling.

    He spent a decade in the navy, where he acquired knowledge, skills and saving, then he went to an affordable state school, where he acquired more knowledge. He worked his way up.

    Linh

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    , @obwandiyag
    , @anon
  7. Biff says:

    Like his taste in women..

    • Replies: @gleongelpi
  8. @Linh Dinh

    People, I have found, lie.

    Under capitalism or under socialism, you pays yer money and you takes yer choice.

  9. @Linh Dinh

    A. The overwhelming majority of working class people work just as hard as, or harder than what he says he does, and get nothing.
    B. I will concede this. If he is 80, then he was born in a real rootin-tootin baby bust year. Thus, growing up, wherever he went for a job, it was just him–there was nobody in his cohort there to compete with him–unlike most of us, for whom, wherever we went for a job, all of our lives, there were always thousands of our cohort already in line ahead of us.

    And thus, it is possible that he may have won out by luck. Pure luck.

    Which is still not bootstrapping.

    Nor dependent on pluck and can-do spirit and hard work. Which characteristics, as I have been at pains to point out, almost all of the time result in nothing, or even worse, punishment from the envious, because nobody likes a smart guy.

  10. frankie p says:
    @obwandiyag

    Personally, I read what the man said and came to my conclusions. The businesses that he said that he started were all pretty humble, “I had, in fact, started small businesses. One, I imported leather furniture from Brazil. When I got tired of that, I opened a foreign auto part store, selling parts for Jaguar, MG, Austin-Healey and stuff like that.” So, he was a race-car driver and opened a few small businesses. These, along with his business school education, got him the job as the regional account executive for the roofing company. He has some success there, and the competition scalped him. Another stroke of good fortune made him the national sales manager of that company. He made some good money, but that was back in the 1980s or early 1990s. The money quotes, and the reason he has had freedom in his later years, come after he moved to Australia with Gail:

    “For myself, I was doing real estate, buying and fixing houses, but in 1995, you could trade stocks, equities and commodities on the internet, so I taught myself how to do that, to make money. By 1995, I could do it anywhere. It didn’t matter where I was. I could make money.”

    I imagine he took a hit on 2008, unless he taught himself extremely well, but let’s face it, the Hebrews keep western monetary policy based on excessive, unprecedented money printing, and this tends to blow huge bubbles in stocks, equities, and commodities.

    Frankie P

  11. R.C. says:
    @obwandiyag

    You ought to focus on seeing what you can do rather than bitching; you might be surprised.

    • Agree: Alfred, Druid55
    • Replies: @Emslander
    , @Fred777
  12. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:

    Jack’s submarine stories sound like a version of the patrols of the USS Halibut (SSGN-587), but they all happened after he left the Navy. And there is no record of the sub being depth-charged.
    I know several bubbleheads and used to live near the Horse and Cow, a famous submariner hang-out in Tamuning, Guam, and frequently spent time there after work. I often heard stories about her patrols and those of her sister boats conducting similar operations in other parts of the world.
    The verifiable adventures of the Halibut are truly fascinating, involving amazing feats of seamanship and technical skill, and divers working at amazing depths, all the while dodging the Soviet navy.
    Seeing that he is 80 years old, maybe his memory of his own time in the Navy, especially if he actually served on the Halibut, but before she was converted for special operations, may have become conflated in his mind with stories he heard about her later career or may have read.
    It happens.

    • Replies: @Linh Dinh
    , @ThreeCranes
  13. With this Covid mandemic, the Masters of the Universe just want to stop such people from moving from country to country…

  14. Dumbo says:

    A fun read, thanks.
    Slightly crazy guy, but variety is the spice of life, as they say. He seems to have had a fun life, and is still enjoying it. How many people can say that.

  15. How can you not like this guy? He admits he’s lucky. He doesn’t love money but he had a knack making it. He spent years looking for genuine love & at 80 he can still look back on his teenage self, & joyfully say “Anyway, the ship’s party was in a brothel! It was at a fuckin’ brothel, with free pussy for everybody!”
    Great guy, an example for us all.

  16. Polemos says:
    @obwandiyag

    And thus, it is possible that he may have won out by luck. Pure luck.

    Deep into the narrative:

    Luckily… I’m always lucky, Linh. I should have been killed years ago.

    Some people take the luck they are given and live long enough to find love and poetry. Other people take that luck and hurt others maliciously or hoard what cannot cross over. We are all working off the karma of our collective species, but some of us join the oversoul sooner than others. Not because of accumulated wealth, but choices made with the luck we pray for.

  17. koolking says:

    Jack has had and still has an interesting life, good on him.

  18. Trinity says:

    Was going to join the Navy back in 1980 and they offered me a bonus to go to submarine “skoo” and/or some nuclear program, forget which. They “trew” in some bonus and I would have had to sign up for 6 years instead of 4 years. Me and my friend were going in under the buddy system. I backed down, thank God and would wait “tree” years later before joining the shallow water sailors, the USCG, thank gawd. Ship life is bad enough, submarine duty has got to be the pits for anyone who values privacy. Sure you travel the world but at what expense. As for food? Hell, I never ate better, I always heard the sailors get the best food and in my case, we ate great. I was good friends with cooks and mess cooks, and sometimes would consume three steaks on the side. We were served “tree” great meals a day, breakfast to order when it came to eggs. Want an omelette? What do you want on that omelette. Under way they served an additional meal of “sammiches” for those with the mid-watch.

    We would pull into Gitmo and I would guess that at least 50-60 % of the navy guys I met on ships that were pulling in there couldn’t wait to do their 4 years and get the hell out of Dodge City. FTN was the order of the day. hehe. Gitmo the land of warm beer, outdoor movie theater, iguanas, and little else.

    Linda Ronstadt equated being a rock star on the road and riding a tour bus to being a sailor. The bus is the ship traveling on land, your band members are your shipmates who you stay cooped up with, eat with, do everything with. Once you hit the next tour stop, the band like drunken Irish sailors look to prowl, pillage and plunder, no different than sailors cooped up on a ship. Of course, Linda, being a woman might have chose to do needlepoint. hehe. Very interesting metaphor/comparison between traveling rock stars and sailors. Never thought of that one, but the only difference is one travels by land the other by sea.

    Cue: Brandy by Looking Glass

    • Replies: @Curle
  19. @Toza

    Crazy guy? I think he’s very sane and humane. You, on the other hand are probably a bank teller.

    • LOL: TKK
    • Replies: @Toza
  20. Toza says:
    @Rev. Spooner

    I didn’t mean crazy in a bad way. He’s had a lot of wild adventures in his life, telling about them very matter-of-factly. Buying and selling houses in a short time in foreign lands at that age is not very usual, you would have to agree. I agree that he is humane, adopting that little girl from Poland.

    And I am not a bank teller. I have lived in four different countries on three continents, and changed jobs pretty regularly, mostly teaching foreign languages. I haven’t had as many wives, though.

    • Replies: @Rev. Spooner
  21. Pete F says:

    Linh – You have no idea what a big fan I am of your writing, and this was one of your best interviews yet. Really interesting to read and I sent it to several friends (how this site remains blocked on FB)

    I am 38 years old and have been abroad for the better part of 12 years now. Currently, I am living in Saigon.

    If in 2020, Vietnam was a global success story with Covid, this year they are a total failure. Everything is hysterically locked down and roped off. Benches are covered in ribbon. You get scolded by locals if your face isn’t totally covered in a mask. It striking that the same people who treat rivers, beaches, canals, and streets like their personal trash cans and then claim ignorance in doing so – have so quickly mastered the art of authoritarian style social distancing.

    They are now starting to deport foreigners or shake them down for money in the form of all sorts of newly found visa laws… No vaccines in sight. The communist thugs that run this place are resorting to sending out text messages panhandling for donations! And receiving them!

    Anyway, your timing in leaving here was impeccable, as those of us here now are facing another lost of lock ups. Reading your Albania writing reminded me of my fond times there and make me miss the years of my life I have spent wandering the globe..

    • Replies: @Linh Dinh
  22. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @Pete F

    Hi Pete,

    I first heard about what was happening in Vietnam about two weeks ago. It’s really stupid, what they’re doing. By shutting down public spaces and chasing out foreigners, they’re shooting themselves in the foot. All those foreigners staying there contribute to the economy, and don’t pose any health risk, since they are already inside the country.

    Serbia, too, has tightened up, though not as severely. Albania, though, has loosened its already very lax Covid restrictions, so it’s even freer. I used to have to put on a mask to enter a shopping mall in downtown Tirana, but now, it’s not even required. When I got here four months ago, most people wore masks on city buses, but now, only a few bother.

    Perhaps it’s time for you to head back this way?

    Linh

  23. Emslander says:
    @R.C.

    Two points:

    1. If you have your own business and it makes enough profit to keep you alive, in a home, with food, you are wealthy. Not working for someone else is worth a million dollars a year.

    2. People who pay attention to the needs of other people or manufacturing firms often see niches that will support a new firm. You supply the need in exchange for a fair price and you win. In those cases the person may get very rich.

    If you’re a socialist, you’re just too dumb to understand that.

    • Agree: Sarah, Montefrío
    • Replies: @R.C.
  24. gsjackson says:
    @Linh Dinh

    Linh, sounds good. Look for me in mid-July. Going to spend not a little time at the beach, and pretend the old normal’s back.

  25. R.C. says:
    @Emslander

    I get the impression that you meant to reply to @obwandiyag, not to me.
    I’ve been self employed for four decades and am the furthest thing from a socialist.
    R.C.

    • Replies: @Emslander
    , @Mustapha Mond
  26. @Linh Dinh

    ‘I first heard about what was happening in Vietnam about two weeks ago. It’s really stupid, what they’re doing. By shutting down public spaces and chasing out foreigners, they’re shooting themselves in the foot. All those foreigners staying there contribute to the economy, and don’t pose any health risk, since they are already inside the country.

    ‘Serbia, too, has tightened up, though not as severely…’

    And here I was, thinking we’d collectively agreed this was ‘over.’

    Oh well.

    • Replies: @Skeptikal
  27. This guy sounds like a friend of mine, get’s bored with women and things and moves on but can never figure out that the problem’s mostly with him. He’s cheap and self-centered. This guy is a lot smarter than my friend, but some of the personality traits are there. I think this guy has some sociopathic or psychopathic traits (both included in the diagnosis of Anti Social Personality Disorder) and people with these traits tend to be attracted to each other.

    “One of the black guys became my best friend. We’d go get some women together, and stuff like that, and drinks.”

    This one statement demonstrates how screwed up his generation was and is one of the reasons why we’re in the mess we are today. The white American males’ love affair with the black man, which continues unabated till today.

    He later laments the fact that back in the 50’s and early 60’s, Blacks and Filipinos weren’t allowed to go beyond the rank of steward, calling it racist. I will simply ask the question, do we have a better military today, where non-whites are everywhere and there is no cohesion. It’s a well known fact that the US military would not be able to win against the monoracial Chinese or Russian militaries. Do you think seriously that the Filipinos and Blacks that are in the US military for the benefits and nothing more, would fight to the death for Old Glory? They would desert at the first sign of hostilities. There’s nothing wrong with racism, it keeps people’s and nations strong.

  28. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Sir,

    I think it’s reasonable to say that only a tiny fraction of any war is recorded, and misrecorded at that, so it’s no surprise that Jack’s secret submarine mission is not on the record.

    I mean, they can’t even tell us the truth about the USS Liberty or World Trade Center 7, and so on.

    As for the Cold War, we have only the vaguest idea of what the US, Russia or China did. Compared to actual events, history books are like coloring books for retards, I think.

    Linh

    • Agree: Emslander, Curle
    • Replies: @Pontius
    , @One-off
  29. Trinity says:
    @Joe Paluka

    Even in the 1980s I noticed that most of the Blacks in the USCG, at least on my ship, The USCG Gallatin, were yeoman, storekeepers, or cooks. We had this one Filipino cook who would always be singing while cooking. haha. I still can hear him sing, “The Warrior” by Patty Smyth and Scandal. A yeoman is a glorified secretary, a storekeeper is a supply clerk. Filipino and Black guys and gals still flock to being cooks in the USN and USCG or at least they did back then. In Gitmo they had what looked like some kind of funky cattle car or bus to take drunk guys back to their ships, the Filipino dude was on their one night I guess as some kind of off duty shore police trying to calm everyone down. haha. He was a cool cat and we were picking him up and having fun with him. You had to see these things, drunk guys, yelling and screaming and these shore patrol or police going calm down, calm down. It was surreal.

    When we would pull into port, I would hang out with only a few friends, or either go out alone. The last thing on earth I wouldn’t to do was go out and party with guys that I had to live, shower, eat, and sleep around for up to 20-something days at a time. Usually in USCG, we would only stay out maybe 7 days before pulling into some Caribbean port of call, but still that is long enough to grow tired of the same people around you 24/7. Longest stay was when we did drills with the USN and stopped in Glasgow, Scotland. Try crossing the Atlantic on a 378 foot ship, but I never got sea sick.

    NEVER did I hang around any Black dudes, but we had two Mexican guys that were pretty cool and 2 Puerto Rican dudes from NYC, one who went by the name of Angel once brought a pistol on board, somehow he accidentally shot the gun while showing it off in our berthing area. Another Puerto Rican guy was from Goshen, New York, both of these guys hung out with Whites. A Colombian guy who was racist as well as bisexual. We had a Black Puerto Rican guy from NYC who got caught trying to steal meat off the ship in his duffel bag. We really had all kinds. None of the Brown guys hung out with Blacks only Whites that I could think of, we might run into each other in certain clubs in the Phoenix in Puerto Plata, City Club or Royal Haitian in Port-au-Prince, some club in Curacao, or the Black Angus in San Juan, because these are places everyone flocked to. Once back in NYC, I NEVER saw Blacks and Whites hanging out together, the two Mexican guys hung out with us and so did the Puerto Rican from Upstate New York.

    We got along just enough to live together as far as Blacks and Whites for the most part. There were physical fights and we even had boxing matches on the fantail while under way to settle disagreements.

    • Replies: @bj0311
  30. @Anonymous

    Agree. Sounds like he’s confusing some of the books he read with his supposed lived experience.

    “OK, so you embellished your resume..”

    That’s not the only thing he embellished. With him, embellishment is raised to a high Art.

  31. @Joe Paluka

    Yeah, he’s not smart enough to realize that the black guys took the same aptitude tests that he did and that they are cooks because they didn’t qualify for anything better? Blames it on racism, which shows he didn’t really know black guys that well. Anyone who has been around them for long comes to the realization that they don’t give a hoot for learning or responsibility.

    It’s totally disbelievable that he would have an intrinsic aptitude for engineering if he’d had no formal instruction. You have to know math to do well on those tests, and that’s not innate, it’s learned. No guy who couldn’t even survive a welding class would have had the math skills. Sorry, but I call bullshit on most of this guy’s stories.

    • Agree: Che Guava
  32. anon[564] • Disclaimer says:

    The last few posts generally show your lack of understanding of life during the late 1950’s. It was the best period in recent Amerikan history. It was downhill ever since. It was a period when you could accomplish success in most any goal if you had basic intelligence and desire! As for the submarine story, Read the book “Blind Mans Bluff”, ( a summary on Amazon) , an “untold story of the espionage adventures during the cold war”. It describes our spy operation we did! It doesn’t matter at all to me if people, who done little in life adventurous or dangerous don’t understand. I don’t expect you to understand. As far as Blacks are concerned, The story was during 1958, when segregation was in full bloom! Most blacks were not the street thugs then as today. It was a different time before you were born, so you can’t be expected to understand. Today America is worse than the Soviet Union was back then!

    • Agree: Trinity
    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  33. @Toza

    Right after I responded, I felt remorseful. My apologies

  34. @Joe Paluka

    “I think this guy has some sociopathic or psychopathic traits (both included in the diagnosis of Anti Social Personality Disorder)”

    Doesn’t seem to have done him any harm with the ladies, or indeed in his employment.

  35. Emslander says:
    @R.C.

    Your impression is correct. I am sorry I directed that reply to you. I’m getting old and confused. I won’t run for President.

    • LOL: Annony Mouse
  36. @R.C.

    “I’ve been self employed for four decades and am the furthest thing from a socialist.”

    If not too personal, R.C., and if you are willing to share, what did you do for those 4 decades?

    No problem if you decline. The info sought simply allows for a better picture of where you are coming from with your opinions. Many of us ‘regulars’ here have shared same, but again, no problem if you decline, of course.

    And I agree with your post (#11) to obwandiyag (a regular). Like or dislike him, at least he is consistent: he whines a lot (although now and then he gets a really good point across, albeit in an abrasive way sometimes. But that’s just obwandiyag…..)

    Thanks!

    MM

    • Replies: @Mefobills
    , @R.C.
  37. ricpic says:

    What a vital guy! Reminded me of Saul Bellow’s Augie March in The Adventurers of Augie March or Bellow’s Henderson in Henderson The Rain King. In other words a bona fide adventurer. What they all share in common is extraordinarily high energy and fearlessness.

    Having a lot less of both those qualities I felt a twinge of jealousy as he recounted his rich life, rich in experiences, adventures, romance. But on second thought why be jealous? The guy’s a gift.

    Good on you, mate, as the Aussies say.

  38. Anon[105] • Disclaimer says:

    One of your best !

    There used to be a lot of Jacks in America. They all had done a longish stint in the Navy for some reason. You meet them in dive bars or they’d shown up at a friends summer bar-be-que as the friend Uncle with what used to be called ‘a dance hall gal’ in tow.

    Good on Jack that he lives well !

    • Replies: @doubtful
  39. Anon[105] • Disclaimer says:
    @obwandiyag

    “…Must have a trust fund or some other inheritance. Working class people don’t start all these businesses. …’

    They used to back in the day. Country has changed a lot.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  40. @animalogic

    I find it fascinating how many commenters seem to cherry-pick aspects of his story that appeal to them and ignore the horrendous parts. As if Jack had an unusually happy, swashbuckling life. Hhmm…

    Being married to a manic-depressive HAD TO (no equivocating on that) have been a very rough road. And scary in that era because people didn’t tell others about family members with mental illness plus resources were few. You kept it hidden. The ill were still substantially thought of as behaving voluntarily or people were referred to them quite harshly as “NUTS”.

    Then he married the psychopath and spent a long time with her. No doubt, there are some horrible stories to go with that.

    Bottom line, like any writer, the author decides what to edit and omit – and what overall arc he wants for the story. Plus the subject, no doubt, kept plenty to himself.

    • Replies: @animalogic
    , @bj0311
  41. @ThreeCranes

    Notice that the career he seemed to dramatically excel at was that of salesman, sales manager, Dir of Sales, etc.

    He’s a good story teller (embellishments are often key). But, facts? Well, let’s not let them get in the way of a mighty good tale!

    Ya, much was left out of that story but, I enjoyed the read none-the-less (even if I found myself smiling and shaking my head towards the end).

  42. Mefobills says:
    @Mustapha Mond

    he gets a really good point across, albeit in an abrasive way sometimes. But that’s just obwandiyag…..)

    His point is legitimate. During WW2, public spending was not even accounted for in some cases, they just did it as line items in the budget.

    Aviation companies, tire companies, etc. were started for $1, and then after the war said companies were given to the American people. This line item spending was essentially debt free money, which then paid wages, and wages paid down private debts built up before the great depression.

    During WW2 period, private debts were paid down by public spending. (Private debts are bad.)

    Post war, there was an economic boom making white goods in now paid for war factories. The Sterling Zone was converted to a dollar zone (with a predatory dollar loan given to Britain), and now America had new international markets. There was demand at home, and internationally for industrial goods made in America.

    Think of it as a rising tide lifts all boats period, which lasted up until the late 70’s, and then the private debt creation mechanism started petering out. Women were then induced into the workforce to start a new debt cycle. (New debts pay off old debts).

    People today don’t get the same deal, as the economy is structured completely different than then. This is just an objective fact, and anybody who does the “I did it” why can’t you type of comment, is not thinking clearly.

    With regards to Socialism, the founding fathers of the U.S. wanted a form of socialism. There were high tariffs, and the first bank issued state credit into industry and the commons.

    The commons were things like ports, roads, public infrastructure, schools, post office, public health including public hospitals, clean water, etc. Grants were given to states for low cost state colleges. The idea was to have low cost and highly educated labor, to then compete at home and with the world. Advanced industry multiplied productivity of labor, creating a middle class.

    This whole “socialism” argument is arguing against what made the American Economy low cost and rich in the first 100 years. It is an implanted memory that the U.S. has always been finance capitalist. That implanted memory gained foothold after the election of 1912, which was rigged by foreign money interests.

    Correct social(ism) spending into the commons and industry, lowers access price for labor.

    We don’t have a rising tide lifts all boats economy now, we have an oligarchy which siphons off the economic surplus.

    So, if people get a little butt-hurt that they don’t have the same opportunities, then have a little compassion. They don’t have the same opportunities.

    Of course today’s generations have it better than the settlers, who had to carve an country out of the wilderness.

    But, in living memory, the post WW2 generation had a better deal than today’s generations (millennials, Gen X and Zoomers), which is why they make fun of Boomers and don’t consider the greatest generation so great.

    The generational pact is to leave subsequent generations better off, not worse.

    https://cheekyvideos.net/murdoch/The%20Greatest%20Generation.html

    • Thanks: Truth, profnasty, Druid55
    • Replies: @Trinity
    , @Mustapha Mond
  43. This guy is every nerd’s nightmare.
    In some way, he seems to be without a spine and a real interest in the world. He just floats with a current.
    I mean, he saw the (almost) entire world and nothing enchanted him.
    Japan, Fiji, Australia, Spain, France…
    Nothing wonders him.
    He just exchanges real estates.
    He is an archetypical seller.
    He could be successful only in America, the land of sellers, and only in his age.
    He is right: he was very lucky.
    He has a kind heart (first wife, the adoption, leaving Navy to avoid a complicity in mass murder) and that is his only saving grace.

    His submarine story seems to have been a full-developed bullshit, however, but well, he is a seller, probably selling mostly to women (which seems to have been his one interest, even if he tries to downplay it), who are great buyers of such stories.
    I have some pet interest in sea warfare, and never-ever I read about such a ridiculous operation like approaching Arkhangelsk, Murmansk, Vladivostok (the only probable destinations here) in order to listen to an underwater cable, which surely stretched many miles beyond the port (otherwise it wouldn’t be underwater). No one approaches a port in a submarine to listen to underwater cables. No one.

    • Replies: @Hacienda
    , @Bardon Kaldian
  44. Curle says:
    @Trinity

    “ like drunken Irish sailors”

    I’m sure the world has seen plenty of drunken sailors and plenty of drunk Irish but did the Irish ever have a navy? Perhaps the Irish were so good at landlocked drinking because they didn’t have a navy.

    • Replies: @Trinity
  45. Curle says:
    @ThreeCranes

    “ Anyone who has been around them for long comes to the realization that they don’t give a hoot for learning or responsibility.”

    Truer words.

  46. grr says:

    Take Australia off the list. Some of the most brutal cowardly police and draconian “laws” are in place.
    It is a ZOG with an Eastern European Joo migrant offspring in govt.
    Many MPs both state and federal are Zionist before Australia turncoats.

    Most people are sheeple, ingesting the latest bullshit from the Murdoch owned ministry of propaganda AKA NewsCorp.

    Melbourne and Sydney are migrant majority shitholes. Housing is expensive. Pre cog type laws, Fixated Persons Acts, are in three states and being used against people that stand up to corruption.

    Prisons are being privatised and more and more ‘customers” are provided for Serco and the other criminal so called ‘security” companies.

    It will be nuked by Russia and/or China when it’s boss, the Zionist infested USA, tells it to go to war once again as the good little puppet soldiers regularly do.

    It could have been the greatest country on earth with it’s weather, topography and resources but has been taken over by neoconservative/Zionist scum.

    Greed, corruption, and abuse of power by the top few percent and ignorance in abundance for the rest.

    Australia is fucked.

    • LOL: Sarah
  47. GMC says:

    Now this guy Jack, I can relate to. Yo Jack – come to Crimea – I have some stories for you too. Thanks Linh Dinh.

  48. doubtful says:
    @Anon

    Are you Jack? God bless you for your love & mercy on a Polish orphan. If so, or for anybody for that “matter”, I recommend this astute & humorous analysis on “A reason for living” by Keller, modern day philosopher apologist from New York. It makes a lot of sense, order out of 2021 chaos. I wish you true meaning.

  49. Anonymous[939] • Disclaimer says:
    @Joe Paluka

    I will simply ask the question, do we have a better military today, where non-whites are everywhere and there is no cohesion. It’s a well known fact that the US military would not be able to win against the monoracial Chinese or Russian militaries.

    I find it interesting how “well-known facts” have an amazing propensity to shoot out of the ass cracks of Unz.com posters.

    The actual fact is that the US milittary is far more professional, capable, and less disproportionately minority, than it was 60 years ago. The creation of an all-volunteer military greatly increased aptitude standards, and the blacks who make it to the military today are a cut above the white population average.

    The US military could in fact defeat Russia or China in a war today. Show me a single credible source that says otherwise, and I’ll send you 5,000 USD via paypal.

    • Disagree: TKK
    • Troll: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @bj0311
    , @TKK
    , @Badger Down
  50. @anon

    Who is this anon? From his remarks it appears he is the subject of LinhDinh’s story but it would be nice to know. And why the anonymity?

    • Replies: @republic
  51. @The Real World

    He’s 80 whatever years old. He seems to have dealt with his shit.
    I don’t want pick thru all the bones & sinews of his time.
    I like his story — & that is fucking that.

    • Replies: @The Real World
  52. Fred777 says:
    @R.C.

    Don’t know R C, that sound like an awful lot of work.

  53. Skeptikal says:
    @obwandiyag

    That is a ridiculous assumption.
    Really, ignorant.

    All kinds of people start businesses.
    At least, in the past they did. And could.
    Not sure now, though, of course, under psy-op conditions now obtaining.

    Actually, nowadays many people are running small businesses using the Internet.
    Have you heard of eBay, Dumby Pants, or Etsy?
    Or they have their own websites.

    People who like to travel often start a small import business.
    They have spotted something on their travels for which they think there is a market.
    I know of a few myself.
    One acquaintance traveled to Bali, met his wife there, then they started a business importing beautiful stone garden statues from Bali to the US.

    One way to get some capital is to take an equity loan on one’s house. Another is to have—gasp!!—some savings.

    Jack *may* have had some pension $$ from the Navy, but that doesn’t make him a trust fund baby.

    Your sourness is kind of a downer.

    • Replies: @gleongelpi
  54. Skeptikal says:
    @Colin Wright

    “And here I was, thinking we’d collectively agreed this was ‘over.’”

    In that case you have misidentified what “this” actually is.

    Head for the hills. Or join the resistance. Or do both.

  55. John Hagan says: • Website

    A life very similar to mine regard travel etc. and I lived and worked in many countries published a couple of books and spent much time painting, teaching and working various businesses and jobs. In discovering the world today my sincere hope is that the young discover the ability to disconnect and observe from a distance. I encourage this by introducing them to satire which inherently requires objectivity and a sense of humour. Today I find that illustrative satire carries the greatest punch. Here is my latest example where no prisoners are taken. This is on youtube that have a propensity to take down my more outreagous examples …

    • Thanks: Alfred
  56. Alfred says:
    @Joe Paluka

    It’s a well known fact that the US military would not be able to win against the monoracial Chinese or Russian militaries.

    The Chinese are not all the same. They may have the same writing and official language, but they all have regional spoken languages.

    The Russians have over 100 nationalities. Again, their official language is the same everywhere – Russian.

    Take a look at the Russian minister of Defence, Shoigu. Does he look like a Slav?

    Their foreign minister, Lavrov, had an Armenian father. The Armenians were around a long time before the Rus.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    , @frankie p
  57. bj0311 says:

    $1 a carton for Luckies from the ships store in 1957. As a young Marine I paid $2 a carton twenty years later from the ship’s store on the USS Juneau and by that math they should be about $4 a carton now instead of $50 or so. Talk about inflation!

    It was like reading an account of my own love life, decent 1st wife who needed help, psychotic second wife and finally third times a charm! My Russian wife is perfect–exactly what a woman is supposed to be. Here is some advice for you guys looking for a mate–skip the heartache and just go straight to Russia–you will be amazed.

    • Agree: Alfred
  58. bj0311 says:
    @obwandiyag

    Sorry pal but I grew up with people like Jack. Men who quit school in 6th-9th grade to go to work to help support their families during the Depression or later to go to war. When the war was over many started their businesses or used their GI Bill benefits to further their education. Yes and many went to work in factories, but one thing they didn’t do was bitch about how oppressed they were, they were grateful to be able to provide for their families because they had seen actual hardship. How they raised such a worthless generation of kids is another story.

    The overwhelming majority of working-class people work just as hard as, or harder than what he says he does, and get nothing.

    And that is because there is a class of human beings called “drones”. In the America before Clinton, it was not hard at all to find success somewhere. But if you are smart you still can–it is just a little harder now. You display the classic success envy of the left–I lack the “intelligence/drive/desire” whatever you call it to succeed on my own therefore those who actually to succeed must be “lucky/evil/privileged” etc. I worked my entire life for my money pal and if you want some money–get a job.

  59. bj0311 says:
    @Trinity

    I noticed that most of the Blacks in the USCG, at least on my ship, The USCG Gallatin, were yeoman, storekeepers, or cooks.

    And? And that is called the results of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test, not discrimination.

  60. Pontius says:
    @obwandiyag

    Sounds like he had a positive attitude, an open mind, tried lots of things, worked hard and never let setbacks get him down for long. I doubt he has many regrets. I wish I was like him.

    Did things work out OK for his Polish daughter?

    • Replies: @Linh Dinh
  61. Pontius says:
    @Linh Dinh

    The most accurate maps of the see floor inside the Canadian arctic archipelago were made by the Russian navy.

    • Replies: @Alfred
  62. This man sounds like a typical footloose extrovert. I knew 3-4 such types. No inner drive or talent for anything in particular, easily bored, self-centered but not selfish, basically good-natured, mentally vacuous, happy go lucky, not without sense of morality, searching for “love”, …

    A benign drifter.

  63. @Alfred

    There is a world of difference between Euro-Asians & Africans, when it comes to people whites are to deal with.

  64. anon[161] • Disclaimer says:

    “The air was getting very screwed up.”

    You don’t say! Try to imagine 10 cartons of cigarettes on a submarine. Was that for real?

  65. frankie p says:
    @Alfred

    Shoigu’s father is Tuvan, closer to Mongolian than Slavic. The Russians are all Russian though, as the (((destroyers of stable culture and civilization))) no longer have great political influence there. The Americans, however, are no longer united, as the (((destroyers))) have moved their parasitic base to the fair shores of the US and taken aim at all that was great in that once great nation.

  66. Truth says:
    @Joe Paluka

    LOL, that’s what you got out 80 years of this guy’s whole life story? Marriages, travel, business, trading, military service, He’s a Nigger-lover?

    Man, when all you have is a hammer…

  67. Truth says:
    @ThreeCranes

    Oh, so you and Obwandiyag agree.

    You see, there really is cohesion between the races in America.

  68. Trinity says:
    @Curle

    Well I am sure as much as the Irish hate those Limeys some have been members of the British navy. Hell, look at the Irish who live in England. Tyson Fury is as Irish as it gets being a Traveler and all but he lives in England and was born in Manchester. Ever heard of the merchant marines? Tug boats? I had several Irish American friends who worked on tug boats out of Philadelphia and NYC, one week on and one week off. Last I heard, one could be a sailor and not join the navy or coast guard? DUH?

  69. Truth says:
    @ThreeCranes

    Yeah, he’s not smart enough to realize that the black guys took the same aptitude tests that he did and that they are cooks because they didn’t qualify for anything better?

    Oh this is how it worked in the 1960s?

    LOL.

    Well, at least you’re getting some young guys to read your blog Linh.

  70. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @Pontius

    Hi Pontius,

    The Polish daughter is 25 now, and financially set for life.

    Linh

    • Thanks: Bardon Kaldian
  71. republic says:
    @Wizard of Oz

    In the escape from America series,one of the few times that
    the subject of the article replied was the one entitled,An American in Brighton, (november 2015)

  72. gotmituns says:

    Escape from America: Australia, Costa Rica, Colombia, Latvia, Spain and, Now, France
    ——————————————————————————————————
    Of course, you always have these type of shitbirds in any society – when the going gets tough, the these type get going. But the hard core (your best people) are always true and stand fast until victory or defeat.

  73. Trinity says:

    Don’t know how it works in the USN but in USCG once you make E3 you choose which “skoo” you wish to attend and then go on a waiting list. The Coast Guard is such a small branch that jobs like Sonar Technician require longer waits and you have to have so much time left to serve after attending school. Lots of guys go to cook school as a last resort because not much time is needed to have left if you plan on doing a 4 year hitch and haul ass. Plus, the school is very short. I would imagine jobs like yeoman, and storekeeper fit the bill as well.

    My first choice was going to be the USAF because at the time they had a veterinarian school in the early 1980s but I would have had to wait about a year because the wait list to get into the services back then were long. Listened to my damn uncle and joined the Coast Guard. Last time I ever let someone make a choice for me.

    Anyhow, my general quarters position while serving on board the USCGC Gallatin was the helmsman, and there was not a single person of color on the “bridge.” Every quartermaster was White, every sonar technician was White, and the officer of the deck was always White. We had one Black female ensign and an ensign was not going to try and dock a 378 foot ship or do “unrep” aka underway replenishment with a USN ship. haha. A ship as small as 378 foot does not use tugs to dock or at least we didn’t back then. I was on the helm and those officers on the deck responsible for docking the ship would always be shitting their pants or at least some would. I would sit there with my little joystick and stifle a laugh hearing and seeing these “collage” boys sweat it out. Left 15 degrees, aye, aye, asshole. hehe.

    The Gallatin is now a ship in the Nigerian navy. LMAO. You wonder if the ghost of Trinity is still on board and can be seen removing his mattress and walking to the fantail to sleep outside for some fresh air. They put a stop to that one real quick for safety reasons. Those Nigerians are saying the White man walks at night with a blanket on top of his head and flip flops on his pale feet.

    • Replies: @gotmituns
    , @Alfred
  74. @Linh Dinh

    “I used to have to put on a mask to enter a shopping mall in downtown Tirana, but now, it’s not even required. When I got here four months ago, most people wore masks on city buses, but now, only a few bother.”

    It is the same here in Ukraine, at least where I am in Zaporozhye. We often head out for a Sunday restaurant and there is nothing in the way of masks.

    Great read Linh. My own story shadows many parts of his life.

  75. @grr

    “It could have been the greatest country on earth with it’s weather, topography and resources but has been taken over by neoconservative/Zionist scum.”

    Could not agree more, it is why I am no longer there.

  76. gotmituns says:
    @Trinity

    I can’t imagine a darkie running a real ship (anything bigger than a ducky in a tub).

    • Replies: @Trinity
    , @Truth
  77. bj0311 says:
    @The Real World

    There are some of us who have lived lives remarkably similar to Jack’s. What are we supposed to do, obsess over the bad things? Jack comes from an era that believes in the concept of “water under the bridge”. Yeah, those things happened, but look at all the really cool things I got to experience as well. If I hadn’t married my psychotic second wife like Jack married his, I would have never met my perfect third wife. I am a realist (which to most people means a negative person), but even I can move on and enjoy what is in front of me while looking back and seeing how marvelous most of it was, and that in spite of my best efforts to screw my life up permanently–it turned out pretty damn good.

    • Replies: @The Real World
  78. The submarine mission story sounds like total BS. As others have pointed out, no one gets close to a harbor to eavesdrop on cables, and although secret, these operations were fairly routine during the Cold War. Just ask anybody who served on an SSN in any appropriately high function during the time.

    The Russian reaction also seems rather out of place. The sides were content to intimidate one another; although that this allegedly happened in USSR national waters (where no US ship would have been ordered to venture anyway) might have changed the rules a little.

    The only way their mission would have made any sense is if they intended to take some photos at periscope depth, which seems highly unlikely considering the risk.

    Most likely they had a small incident like hitting a bunch of rocks while approaching the cable and our friend applied some grandpa embellishment to the story.

    • Replies: @republic
  79. Trinity says:
    @gotmituns

    Taken a look at all the darkies and diversities being (((promoted))) to General, Admiral, and other high ranking positions in the U.S. military lately? Becoming a General or Admiral ALWAYS involved politics but now more than ever. I knew a Brigadier General who I met through a friend. The guy was cardiothoracic surgeon who was talented enough to run a large VA hospital. Good man. He told me about politics and obtaining rank when it came to moving high up in the military. Of course, I saw that one with my own two eyes. Captain was the top ranking officer on our ship but the Commander was the one who usually played the role of bad cop. Our Captain was cool as hell. Dude came back a bit tipsy on more than one occasion once we hit a port while underway. The Commander told my friend that he was not going to be allowed to leave the ship in Scotland because of some previous issues, and the Captain overrode the prick and told my friend to go out and have a good time. haha. I would imagine the colonels and commanders are the real pricks, guys trying to make that jump into high ranking positions, while the Generals, Captains and Admirals might be more forgiving and down to earth, well at least the White high ranking officers, Blacks and other nonwhites do not do well handling authority.

    Never saw a Black Captain or even a Commander back then, but you can bet they exist today, and not because they earned the rank.

  80. Truth says:
    @gotmituns

    Yeah. But then you’re… not too bright.

    • Replies: @gotmituns
  81. bj0311 says:
    @Anonymous

    The actual fact is that the US milittary is far more professional, capable, and less disproportionately minority, than it was 60 years ago. The creation of an all-volunteer military greatly increased aptitude standards, and the blacks who make it to the military today are a cut above the white population average.

    I served three decades Carter to Bush the second. I came in at the beginning of the AVF in the Marine Corps at 17 and I could see even as a young Marine that things were changing and not for the better. Sure Reagan gave us huge pay raises and all kinds of new toys, but they also began to infiltrate females into male positions at that time and they were absolutely worthless and caused nothing but trouble. It was also around that time that they began issuing maternity uniforms instead of kicking pregnant females out like they used to and still should. How is it not malingering if someone deliberately makes themselves non-deployable? That is real professionalism. When I went to Officer Candidate School with the Army in the early 90’s they had to lower all the physical standards just so they could have three females graduate in my class. As I progressed I noticed yet another issue, Family Care Plans. The Army was deliberately enlisting black single mothers into the ranks (and some others as well) and they had to have a plan for the care of their children in case of deployment. What a pain in the ass for leadership because with most of them you had to constantly check on them because they had invalid care plans, but were allowed to get away with it. I had a congressional investigation on me because I said to one female who was noncompliant, “Look sister, you are in the Army and the Army expects you to be available for the job for which you enlisted–get a care plan now or you will be processed out.” Evidently that was abusive language. Black males? Don’t even get me started there–or with all the Ukrainians, Poles, white South Africans and even Russians who by and large were great guys but had a hard time communicating. And don’t get me started on all the time wasted teaching “Consideration of Others” and “EEO” crap instead of doing military training. Have you ever been to a FOB in one of the war zones we created? It is like living at the Mall of America–hamburger joints, coffee joints, gourmet chow halls–but absolutely no booze or broads of any kind (you are not even supposed to mate with those in uniform)–how is that even military?

    • Agree: TKK, AceDeuce
  82. Hard rules for foreign adoption in Poland were an outcome of few scandals after 1989, where foreign money played a decisive role. It created inequality between Polish foster parents and foreign ones.
    Also, some Polish people have trouble to comprehend why foreigners seek children in Poland instead of their own countries (ok, are they no orphans in USA?). Frankly, such a wish for a foreign adoption to some sounds like an intention to steal children.
    In result, foreigners have greater chances to get a handicapped child since then an answer may sound reasonable: ‘there is better medical care in USA’ etc.

    But it is not impossible to get a healthy child, just very hard. I read that the process takes around 2 years in case of foreign adoption. But forget it if you are single or homo. Then, you go to Romania, as some say.
    It is easy to get a Gypsy orphan, and I know a single Italian woman who got one. It didn’t work out well, though. He became a stray child, essentially. On the other hand, her friend got a child in Brasil and that worked out well: he became an engineer in shipyard in Genova.

    • Replies: @utu
  83. “Poland is dumb as a doorknob.”

    That’s the Russian pussy talking who has gotten you brainwashed about Poland and as to the IT workers in the Silicon Valley, they’re Jews not ethnic Russians. You don’t know jack, old Jack!

  84. TKK says:
    @obwandiyag

    You are intentionally combative, but there is sometimes kernels of truth in what you write.

    When I was reading Jack’s story, I kept thinking:

    He lived in another world.

    America has undergone such rapid change. Nothing is simple now in America. Laws choke us, and hatred of whites undercuts our ambition.

    If Jack tried to join the service now, he would be drilled and indoctrinated in the demonic nature of his white supremacy. Foreign adoptions are now almost non existent and costs about 100K.
    Buying homes all over the world costs real money, and carries substantial risk.

    He is a Boomer, and the world was at their feet. That “rooting tooting” time is America is dead.

    We are serfs, peasants in a post truth, post realism world- where a mouth breathing criminal ape is given a federal holiday.

    • Replies: @HbutnotG
    , @AceDeuce
  85. Great interview, Linh. Thanks.

    Well whatever about terminological inexactitudes ref Lucky Strikes in the control room while listening in on Soviet undersea cable … your man has a good Soul … Polish orphan … two dud marriages yet goes on to a third … good attitude to money … philosophy …

    Wish him fair winds and smooth seas.

    When my Grandfather left his native Dublin to join his RN ship in Liverpool, he looked over the stern of the ferry and hoped Ireland would “go down with all hands” …

    But that’s another story … lol …

    • Replies: @Pontius
  86. republic says:
    @threestars

    See Operation Ivy Bells in early 70s,regarding a underseas telephone tap inside Soviet waters,the operation was later exposed by Pelton,who worked for the NSA

  87. @Skeptikal

    I’m surprised anybody bothers to read his posts anymore, specially the long one, and much less answer them. LOL

  88. TKK says:
    @Anonymous

    The actual fact is that the US milittary is far more professional, capable, and less disproportionately minority, than it was 60 years ago. The creation of an all-volunteer military greatly increased aptitude standards, and the blacks who make it to the military today are a cut above the white population average.

    I worked as an attorney for the Department of Defense and the Dept. of Veterans Affairs. My brother has supported the US military in the Middle East with KBR/Dynacorp since 2006. He was just sent to Bulgaria.

    For you to claim that the US military is not an Affirmative Action joke , Diversity Soaked FUBAR organization means you are either a liar, delusional or a troll.

    • Agree: One-off
    • Replies: @One-off
  89. Hacienda says:
    @Another Polish Perspective

    I’ve met and worked with enough DNA-level liars that this guy does give off that stink.
    Some are so good, that you will never know it. Others combine lying with a practical
    intelligence so skillful, you will become a loyalist, a fan, or seductee.

    He’s lucky that he was born in America at the time of white America’s peak. Madison Ave, Hollywood war movies, etc. His second wife was not the psychopath as advertised. She was likely his karmic leveler and destroyer.

    And he’s savvy enough to know who LD is, serves good tales, and takes care not to offend him.

  90. R.C. says:
    @Mustapha Mond

    Well, I wasn’t a doctor and I wasn’t an Indian chief. I wouldn’t have provided even this but for the polite and reasonable way you framed it. Thank you.
    R.C.

    • Replies: @Mustapha Mond
  91. @animalogic

    I would have been the timid and introverted guy who refused to go to the brothel. When I was that age, all I felt in regard to the Great Orgy was a general revulsion, and an uneasy sense that I was being expected to go for the gusto in the prescribed picaresque way by red-blooded, lusty fellows who were more comfortable with the Zeitgeist (or with the age-old experience of whoring around) than I was. Now, looking back, I wonder if I would have been better off having all of the dumb fun, and not floundering in frustration for most of my prime years.

  92. utu says:
    @Another Polish Perspective

    And then there is this memory of WWII:

    The children the Nazis stole in Poland: Forgotten victims
    https://www.dw.com/en/the-children-the-nazis-stole-in-poland-forgotten-victims/a-52739589

    Kidnapping of children by Nazi Germany
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kidnapping_of_children_by_Nazi_Germany

    • Replies: @Biff
  93. HbutnotG says:
    @ThreeCranes

    Attending a magnet HS in a large city, mid 1960’s, I remember black kids, including those from poor neighborhoods, more motivated and inherently smarter than many white kids from my middle class white neighborhood. Please explain.

    I’ll give you a clue: It’s not your color, it’s your culture.

    • Agree: The Real World
  94. Bob61 says:

    Not enough oxygen for a flame? Smoking on a submarine underway, with airscrubbers off? Too much sounds contrived, not necessarily the Op, but my Psycopathy checklist had a lot of checkmarks at the end of the story.

  95. HbutnotG says:
    @grr

    And what’s with this Latvia stuff? Latvians are as weird as they look. Costa Rica has bad earthquakes (now long overdue for the big one) that can occur at any time and poisonous scorpions all over the place. Columbia? Heh…I’d be living in rural Nebraska if it wasn’t for meth labs with meth addict crazies busting into houses – Columbia is just that, but on steroids.

    Dumb Poles (“dumb” but highly cultured) should be the least of your worries. You’re 80, dammit! Any day now, sailor.

  96. @Another Polish Perspective

    I wouldn’t be so hard on this man (although submarine story doesn’t sound plausible). Simply- people differ.

    Historically, men with the highest intelligence & imagination, or, better, dynamic inner life, didn’t bother to move much, some not even beyond confines of their town (Kant), or barely to a different, close city (Spinoza, Hegel, Shakespeare, Newton, Proust,..). They had all what they needed in their heads.

    On the other hand, there are people, extroverts, who are almost forced by inner pressure to experience “wider world”, which fires their mental/emotional life – Richard Francis Burton, for instance.

    Our hero Jack belongs to the third category, footloose drifters who basically have no idea what to do with their life & just go with the flow of any new impulse. I don’t have anything against such people, as long as they don’t hurt others. Everyone is entitled to his own way of life, if he can afford it. There are no rules which is better or worse.

    As one Upanishad says: Better live your Dharma miserably, than another man’s successfully.

  97. HbutnotG says:
    @TKK

    He’s 80. He’s not a boomer. He’s pre-boomer. Boomers, by definition, came along starting in 1946.

  98. @animalogic

    I enjoyed it too but, recognized it for what it was…..incomplete.
    That’s fine – the authors prerogative.
    My primary point was the commenters who seemed to buy it as the whole story whereas the interview was delivered more as a movie script.

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian
  99. Pontius says:
    @Arthur MacBride

    https://www.rte.ie/archives/2020/1001/1168735-early-opening-pubs/

    Why would anyone feel like dahttt?

    Ahh the grey skies, bleak employment prospects, free flowing drink and general malaise….just like growing up in St. John’s.

  100. anon[564] • Disclaimer says:

    Ther were no fucking air scrubbers on a WW2 diesel submarine bozo, only on later nuke subs, which I as on as well………

  101. @obwandiyag

    He’s a non-white so governments give him your money interest free to start businesses.

  102. gotmituns says:
    @Truth

    Just another affirmative action darkie.

    • Replies: @Truth
    , @gotmituns
  103. @bj0311

    My statement was primarily about the commenters who seemed to believe they had the full picture about Jacks life and that it was extra grand, all-around. That’s silliness; there is much more.

    See my prior comment. Both subject and author decided to present the info in certain way and that’s their right. Intelligent people recognize the article is an edited version of reality, that’s all.

  104. BorisMay says:

    Well, that is the ‘official version’ of his life. We all have ‘official versions’ for strangers, suckers and officials.

    Since he states quite clearly he is economical with the truth and that he prefers mentally challenged women like Gail, one can only deduce that almost everything he says is pure fantasy.

    While it is best to base lies upon truths, as this man quite clearly realises, the story does beg the question: how would all of his women perceive him?

    My guess is: a selfish little shit that is self consumed with his own importance.

    The odd thing out in all this is the piece about the Polish orphan, but as he points out it was a kudos thing with Gail…so why was he with his psychopathic wife? There is something very fishy about this story.

    Don’t think I’d like to get to know this man. He comes across as a bit of an idiot.

    Surely you can do better than this LD…

  105. Trinity says:

    Good ole Trinity’s playlist while relaxing on the fantail on my mattress all by myself with my 1980s Walkman.

    Europa by Santana
    Sailing by Rod Stewart
    Follow You, Follow Me by Genesis
    It Keeps You Running by The Doobie Brothers
    Trinidad by Eddie Money

    these were always my first go to tunes, along with some others to lull good ole TeeTee into a deep sound sleep. Man, I slept like a baby. Gentle rocking, fresh salty air, on that smooth as glass Caribbean water. Cue: Gimme Some Water by Eddie Money.

    Of course, sometimes I wanted to rock with Bad Company, or maybe some good ole Southern Fried rock and roll like Lynyrd Skynyrd. Maybe some bagpipes and “It’s A Long Way To The Top When You Wanna Rock & Roll by AC/DC.

    Of course, pretty soon other people were following my lead and the fantail looked like a homeless camp set up in Commiefornia so TPTB ended the fantail sleeping arrangements. Traveling the Caribbean the odds of someone falling overboard where akin to hitting the Powerball. The North Atlantic, now that would have been understandable..

  106. gepay says:

    Linh did a very good job at interviewing = letting the interveiwee do the talking. From the questions alone, which were good, I wouldn’t have known it was Linh doing the interview. I only know for myself that as I get older (I’m 72) it becomes harder to stick to “the truth is almost always the best option”. Minor embellishments and not leaving out important but what I ‘d prefer to leave out details gets harder and harder. My father had no problem with that in his tales. As for Jack I would imagine on those psychological trait tests he would score very low on conscientiousness. I also think he is not one of those people who cause misery for others for their own gain; My observations of blacks is that they have changed since the civil rights openings in America. There is a larger middle class black many of which needed the equal opportunity. Many more oreos also. There is an even larger amount of black violence, black on black black on white. The inner city slums have grown worse and worse. Much of it is due to systematic racism rather than individual racism whereas before it was both. It is not caused by the way math is taught. There are many inner city areas that are as Chris Hedges calls them = throwaway zones. In those areas crime is much more lucrative than the few lower level job opportunities that are available.

  107. Truth says:
    @gotmituns

    And what’s your excuse?

  108. Druid55 says:
    @grr

    Unfortunately, we’re all owned by ZOG! Maybe things will change but I don’t think so.

  109. @R.C.

    “Well, I wasn’t a doctor and I wasn’t an Indian chief.”

    That made me laugh, the ‘Indian chief’ part. 🙂

    Thanks.

    (I just thought I may have recognized you from another website, that’s all. Sorry to pry.)

    Be well.

    MM

  110. @obwandiyag

    Man, your brain is all over the place. Of course it is possible that this guy got where he is by random chance and pure luck, but why not believe what he says?

    Road deaths have halved in the past few decades. My guess was that safety belts and better tyres were the cause. But the police say it’s because drunk-driving laws are stricter, and better enforced. Why not believe people who actually have some experience?

    Everybody knows Americans spend beyond their means. That’s why they’re called USers. Observe the Chinese immigrant: open a little shop, restaurant, or laundry. Sleep on the floor at night to save rent money. And here’s the trick: they do save the rent money. La vie, elle passe tres vite; elle n’est pas gratuite. (Life goes quickly; it aint free.)

  111. @Anonymous

    The US military is helplessly unable to defeat the illegal entity occupying Palestine. You lost that war.

  112. gotmituns says:
    @gotmituns

    I don’t make excuses – excuses are for assholes (I mean that only in the best way of course)

  113. Trinity says:
    @Mefobills

    Millennials and Zoomers are lazy fags. As a late boomer, I can tell you that one of the reasons why so many working class Whites joined the military in the early 1980s is because the economy sucked back then. Late Boomers ( 1958-1964) hardly had it made, at least not the working class type.

    Now lets cruise off and set sail with some more tunes from TeeTee’s walkman and look at that sunset.

    Voyage To Atlantis by The Isley Brothers
    Summer Madness by Kool & The Gang

    • Agree: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @Mefobills
  114. Biff says:
    @utu

    Anything on Wikipedia about Nazi Germany is going to peg the bullshit meter.

    • Replies: @utu
  115. One-off says:
    @Linh Dinh

    In the last years of the Cold War there were many skirmishes, primarily in the Pacific around Sakahlin, that almost led to total war. I had the misfortune to be in one of these invisible battles as a carrier configuration came under brief fire from Bear bombers. That certainly wasn’t reported and was one of many, most far worse. The pain to be expected from talking about what happened was made explicit. So you are spot on. Most of war is unrecorded.

    That aside, your interview here is fantastic and what a colorful character! He’s right about the American economy but off on the timing. The controlled demolition will be after the fall of 2022 elections, with the usual suspects detonating the bombs to enrich their Tribe and to harm all others. The United States will be even more ghastly in about three years.

    • Thanks: Linh Dinh
  116. @Mefobills

    Hi Mefobills-

    First, your reply would have been better directed to R.C., as I was just agreeing with his ultimate assessment of whine less, work harder and you might be surprised with what you can accomplish. But since you directed your comment to me, I will respond.

    Not sure about your life experiences, but for me, relentless hard work has always paid off, while whining gets you nowhere. When I applied to law schools way back when affirmative action was just getting started, up to 30% of set asides existed at many major universities. Where I went to law school it was at least 25% set asides, IIRC, which made getting into such a top ten law school much more difficult that it already was before affirmative action was instituted.

    So? I sure as shit didn’t whine about it. Hell, it was just another roadblock, but what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger and all that. I simply worked harder to insure I’d make the cut. Besides, I honestly felt (at least at that time more than four decades ago) that lending a helping hand to historically disadvantaged minorities was a good thing to do, and so I did not have a problem with it, but rather in general was actually supportive of the program. But I sure as hell didn’t whine or complain or get ‘butt-hurt’ as you say. Besides, what good would it do?

    But in my life, successful people I have known are usually hard-working stiffs with at least a little smarts who relentlessly bust their asses. Yeah, some folks get it handed to them on a platter (think trust fund babies), and yes there were more opportunities in the USA immediately post WW2 due to the effects of same world-wide, but let’s be honest here: there are ALWAYS opportunities for people with a little smarts, a lot of heart, and an unbreakable spirit embodying a hard work ethic. Yes, life is not always fair, but whining won’t make it any fairer. Hard work and a positive attitude can, and usually will, make a difference.

    Otherwise, your reply was, as usual, excellent in its marshaling of facts and logical flow towards your conclusion, which in general terms I do not dispute and actually agree with. It is when we get down to the individual level, though, that your arguments weaken, as there are always good times and bad times, ups and downs, and unfairness in life, and I think all RC was saying (and which I agree with) is that hard work, a positive attitude and belief in one’s self worth can make for success in the hardest of times, and that with such efforts one may surprise even one’s self……

    Thanks for a thoughtful reply. Cheers!

    MM

    • Replies: @Mefobills
  117. Mefobills says:
    @Trinity

    The late boomers got a screwing. I did say a new debt cycle began around then.

    Late boomers should not be lumped in with baby boomers.

    Sorry, but a blog doesn’t allow long definitions.

    Not lazy, but tuned out…apathetic.

    • Replies: @One-off
  118. E_Perez says:

    Wow, I’m impressed.

    In the third world, there a is a stereotype for US citizens, which I always found inappropriate: the “Ugly American”.

    But this guy checks all the boxes:

    Unstable and immature in private relations,

    I mean, I never disliked her. I liked her, but I wasn’t really in love with her, you know.
    Why did you marry her if you didn’t feel that strongly about her?
    It was a thing to do at the time. All your friends are getting married…

    no hard working professional,

    It was kinda fun, because I didn’t do hardly anything.

    superficial in his judgement of foreign cultures,

    I like to assign an adjective to each country, so for England, it’s arrogant. Germany is smartest. Italy is craziest. Spain is close to Italy. I’d say it’s the most irrational. Nothing makes sense in Spain. Poland is dumb as a doorknob. For France, it’s a work in progress,
    … It’s kind of like Bangkok, San Jose, Costa Rica, so I lost interest.

    hypocrite,

    I have never, ever had any desire to be rich, or to make a lot of money. My intention in life, from a very early age, was to have the lowest stress life I could figure out for myself. As long as I had a roof over my head, as long as I had enough food to eat,

    getting rich without desire and without hard work,

    but in 1995, you could trade stocks, equities and commodities on the internet, so I taught myself how to do that, to make money. By 1995, I could do it anywhere. It didn’t matter where I was. I could make money.

    … and without business experience,

    Yeah, in a way, but I didn’t do it seriously. My passion was racing cars, and making enough money to do that.

    actually without deep knowledge of anything,

    I wasn’t much of a student anyway. I signed up for welding class and woodworking class, so I didn’t have to do any work,
    I was a self-taught car mechanic, so I got a job at this foreign car repair shop.
    I had never read books in my life, but in the navy, because I was at sea for so long, I started reading books. .

    But with big, big ambitions,

    My intention was… I wanted to get a degree in philosophy

    Oh my God, we have been spared an American submarine philosopher!

    Plato, Kant, Nietzsche and Heidegger… would have turned in their graves.

    • Replies: @One-off
  119. One-off says:
    @TKK

    For you to claim that the US military is not an Affirmative Action joke , Diversity Soaked FUBAR organization means you are either a liar, delusional or a troll

    If the United States fucks around and gets in an actual war, Boy-o will soon learn the quality of the American military. It will be a choice between surrender or nuclear war, which would mean the Tribe and their coastal conspirators would actually have skin in the game. Does anyone doubt which of those two options will is more likely?

    I personally know a black captain who is functionally illiterate. So maybe there is a third option: “or both nuclear war and surrender.”

  120. One-off says:
    @Mefobills

    It’s the demographics who are at fault. Anyone born between 1958 and 1964 literally has nothing in common with the 68’ers. I read where someone described the late Boomers as the appalled younger siblings. Seems about right. And if memory serves, the first birth year that required people to work longer to draw Social Security was in fact 1958.

    • Replies: @Mefobills
  121. One-off says:
    @E_Perez

    All good points but the guy was fascinating, in no small part due to his flaws. DL’s interviews are all the better for the unsaid parts.

    As for the “ugly American” cliché, the upper classes here always thought it was a reference to blue collar types although it was aimed directly at them. So while it painted with too broad of a brush, there was merit to the cliché, however inadvertent.

  122. aandrews says:
    @obwandiyag

    I think a primary ingredient of his secret sauce was a Navy pension check rolling in every month, which probably was/is very generous. The tell-tale is, being a newly enrolled, married undergrad at the Univ. of Conn. and making an $85 ($719 in 2021 money) house payment every month in 1966. He had a nice little cushion to weather any setbacks. Too, he definitely sounds like a sharp, go-getter guy, the other primary ingredient.

  123. utu says:
    @Biff

    Wikipedia was created on March 9, 2000. Pretty much everything about Nazi Germany that you can find on Wikipedia existed in historical literature before the date of Wikipedia creations.

  124. AceDeuce says:
    @TKK

    The world “was at the Boomers’ feet” because they weren’t childish, soulless, mean spirited pussies like their spawn. These young snots actually have it easier in many ways-no one makes any demands on them, and they have probably received more help from their parents than any other generation.

  125. Alfred says:
    @Pontius

    The most accurate maps of the sea floor inside the Canadian arctic archipelago were made by the Russian navy.

    After the USSR broke up, I was in Oslo, Norway. The Norwegians were shocked to find that the Soviets had more detailed maps of all their ports than the Norwegian navy. It was all over the newspapers at the time.

    Soviet mini-sub discovered in Jarfjord by Norwegian special forces in 1990

  126. Alfred says:
    @Trinity

    I was on the helm and those officers on the deck responsible for docking the ship would always be shitting their pants or at least some would.

    I spent some time in Rørvik, Norway. It is a small island along the Norwegian coast. Norway is blessed with a chain of similar islands which largely protect coastal shipping from the worst of the Atlantic storms. But there are notorious whirlpools, reefs and all the rest of it.

    Along the coast of Norway, all the way from Bergen to Kirkenes, there are ships that operate almost like a bus service. A daily service in each direction. There are around 34 ports of call. Rørvik is where ships simultaneously arrive. People go down to the port to watch two ships tearing into the tiny harbour – one heading north and the other south. The officers have a perfect understanding of the attributes of each berth. They literally throw these ships towards the quays and then reverse engines at the last moment. It is a really impressive sight. They make it look so easy.

    In no time at all, the ships take off and continue their journey. Some of these ships are 20,000 tons.

    Hurtigruten

    • Replies: @Trinity
  127. anon[355] • Disclaimer says:
    @Linh Dinh

    Hi obwandiyag,

    You love socialism and don’t think a man can be self-made. It’s very telling.

    He spent a decade in the navy, where he acquired knowledge, skills and saving, then he went to an affordable state school, where he acquired more knowledge. He worked his way up.

    Linh

    Hi Linh Dinh,

    You must love socialism and not think a man can be “self-made” too. It’s very telling.

    Jack spent a decade in socialist paradise, where he acquired knowledge and skills from others, and accrued savings, then he went to another socialist institution, where he acquired more knowledge from others. He wasn’t “self-made” and could be a poster boy for socialism.

    Anon

  128. Mefobills says:
    @One-off

    It’s the demographics who are at fault. Anyone born between 1958 and 1964 literally has nothing in common with the 68’ers.
    _____________________________________________________________

    That’s a good point. The Demographers are not economists and don’t know how to overlay debt cycles onto populations.

    Economists don’t know how to calculate debt cycles for that matter!

    It is pretty remarkable that war (or some sort of explosion) follows low commodity prices and low circulating M1. M1 follows private debts peaking and making demands (M1 disappearing into the ledger.)

    But, yeah – some generations grind their teeth when they are lumped in with others who have had completely different experiences.

  129. Mefobills says:
    @Mustapha Mond

    Hi Mustapha,

    Yes, you are right. I should have better directed my comment.

    When the rubber meets the road, the individual has to take responsibility for his actions, not matter the macro situation. Hard work does matter.

    I am a “generalist” and big picture type of person, but admit readily that individual behavior counts for a lot.

    I am watching the latest generations tune-out and appear as if lazy and incompetent. It could be the video games changed their brain wiring, it could be chemicals in the environment (their bodies and sperm counts are bad), it could be the debt cycle foreclosing life.

    In this environment the one-eyed king (those who can work hard) in the land of the blind will be at a big advantage.

    I consider what is going on today as a step-function, a discontinuity from all that has come before.

    • Agree: Mustapha Mond
  130. Trinity says:
    @Alfred

    My best friend while serving in the Coast Guard lived in Upstate New York, his mom and dad came to Brooklyn from Norway in the 1950s. My friend and his dad worked on tugs out of NYC. The name of one of the tugboats my friend worked on was The Empire State which was a former Exxon vessel. He also worked on the Surrie Moran out of Philly. He said working in Philly was a piece of cake compared to NYC. His father worked with Exxon, he did a week on and a week off. Both these Norwegian Vikings were born and bred sailing men. His mom and dad still spoke with heavy accents in the 1980s despite being in New York for 30 years. I remember his mom made us waffles for breakfast and I asked for the syrup. They put cheese on their waffles. Well, what do you expect from a redneck like me. hahaha. They still have some kind of Norwegian Parade in Brooklyn every year if I am not mistaken, went to one with these fine people and had a blast. Norwegians, half the street where they lived in Upstate New York were Norwegians it seems, are some fine, decent and genuine people. God Bless them. My friend and his dad could tie any knot under the sun just as easy as I tie my shoelaces btw.

    • Thanks: Alfred
    • Replies: @Joe Paluka
  131. @Trinity

    I didn’t know there were any white people left in Brooklyn (far less Norwegians). I hope their political leanings aren’t the same as the Norwegians in North Dakota, Minnesota and Norway itself.

  132. @Anon

    It may be more difficult in some respects nowadays, but thankfully, regular Americans still start small businesses. Here’s a way to lend small amounts of money at ZERO interest to regular people who are trying to start or save a business:


    http://Www.kiva.org

    My wife and I have lent a ton on the site, and we’ve gotten more than 95% of our money back. You typically lose very little due to non-repayment, but of course that could change fairly quickly in a severe downturn. The other part of your “donation” is that you sustain a loss due to any price inflation occurring after you lent the money, as the $100 you get back over a year or two won’t buy as much as it did when it left your pocket.

    But quite a worthwhile and kind endeavor if you can spare a few bucks. Helps to cut out the big rapacious banks too.

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