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Your IQ in 2 Minutes
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How much could you learn about a person in two minutes, just getting them to answer written questions? I suppose you could ask them their favourite colour or song, or quiz them about their other preferences, occupations, and sundry other demographic matters. Getting them to reveal marital status, religion, politics, earnings and savings might be good. Letting them write a few comments might reveal vocabulary levels and personal attitudes.

In comparison, imagine trying to measure a person’s intellectual level in two minutes. It seems unlikely that anything of interest could be obtained so quickly. That was exactly my supposition when, a year ago, I came across results on a 2 minute intelligence test, part of the UK biobank study. By way of explanation, in clinical settings it takes 45 to 90 minutes to do a full Wechsler intelligence test. Additional special tests, of long and short term visual and verbal memory, can lengthen that to 120 minutes. 2 minutes seemed a little short. I decided to dig a little deeper.

The test is called the verbal-numerical reasoning test by Ian Deary at the University of Edinburgh, and has been incorporated into the UK Biobank study. Here is a relevant study:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4844168/

The cognitive test was limited to a 13-item verbal-numerical test to be completed in 2 minutes, which ought to be enough to grade the general population. The mere notion of such a test will discomfort those citizens who regard their own intellects as more wide-ranging and multi-faceted than could ever be measured by mere earthly means, and who rank their brainpower of greater value to Western Civilization in ways that could not possibly be assayed in 120 seconds. Personally, I quail at the thought of having to subject myself to such a harsh evaluation. I mean, 13 into 120 is, let me see, well, not very long at all to solve each item. On reflection, it is a mere 9 seconds to pass each question. Can such people exist?

This test, Verbal-numerical reasoning (UK Biobank data field 20016) consisted of thirteen multiple-choice items, six verbal and seven numerical. Participants responded to the items on a touch-screen computer.

One of the verbal items was: “Stop means the same as: Pause/Close/Cease/Break/Rest/Do not know/Prefer not to answer”.

One of the numerical items was: “If sixty is more than half of seventy-five, multiply twenty-three by three. If not subtract 15 from eighty-five. Is the answer: 68/69/70/71/72/Do not know/Prefer not to answer”.

Participants had a two-minute time limit to answer the thirteen questions. The “prefer not to answer” option was considered as missing data for the purposes of the present analyses. The scores from the test formed a normal distribution.

Astoundingly, even a 13 point short test arranges itself into a crude bell curve, almost as if it was picking up something real about the population, in this case a very respectable 158,845 participants. A real Foxtrot Oscar number. In terms of proper psychometry, this is excellent, because the researchers know exactly who the participants are, and have tons of data on them, including their genetics. It is extremely rare, to put it mildly, to find samples of that size in most psychological research. You can also get big numbers with web based tests, but that is without getting independent verifiable data from participants.

Of course, I would not wish to make too much of this having been achieved in the United Kingdom, as part of their longstanding avid interest in epidemiology, but I would not want it ignored either.

The Cronbach alpha coefficient for these items has been reported elsewhere as 0.62 which is a reasonable consistency, given that both verbal and numerical aspects of reasoning are being measured.

Test-retest reliability: Two-way random Intra Class Correlation statistics showed statistically significant correlations for verbal-numerical reasoning (ICC = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.63 to 0.67). This suggests stability of the measurement over time.

However, one should not imagine that a test of this brevity has the power of more extensive testing. For example, if you add in another 4 short tests (numeric memory, reaction time, visual memory errors and prospective memory) the resulting g factor on the combined short test comes to 40% of the variance, rather than up to the 50% obtainable with more extensive testing. The raw correlations with the other, rather different, cognitive tasks are low. Reaction times and memory task are not direct measures of fluid ability, which is mostly what the verbal and numerical reasoning task is tapping into. Nonetheless, it is telling that reasoning power can be measured with 13 quick items. It is sobering to find how well it does in such a short time period.

Ian Deary says that measuring intelligence is ridiculously easy. This comes as a severe disappointment to some people, who would like to believe that it would take a very extended period of closely detailed study to even begin to map the outer boundaries of their manifold talents. Exactly so.

We lesser mortals reveal ourselves quickly.

 
• Category: Science • Tags: IQ 
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  1. Anon[176] • Disclaimer says:

    In comparison, imagine trying to measure a person’s intellectual level in two minutes. It seems unlikely that anything of interest could be obtained so quickly.

    It depends on what level of performance you seek to assess.
    Talk about using a chat app with the average avereage-85-nation girl and she’ll mistype the app name (example: watsapp for whatsapp) and/or type her phone number with at least one missing figure, one figure too many, one mistyped figure (and no I am not including in this the cases where a wrong number is purposely issued).
    Then she will stop talking when you point out the mistake (this involves narcissism, to be sure, but it wouldn’t play to such an effect if uncoupled with ≤85 IQ.

    Any IQ up to 130 can be assessed in 2 minutes.

  2. jason y says:

    not surprising.

    but (one of) your critics will not be satisfied until you design a battery of games with different payoff structures and prove that those who score more highly on IQ tests also have higher time-average growth rates across the set of games.

    • Replies: @grey enlightenment2
  3. as you know, with a few items, a computer can zero in on your approximate ability level, & then give you a few more items specifically around your ability level – & voila! ability measured quickly & accurately. item response theory should be taught to teens:)

    • Replies: @James Thompson
  4. @egregious philbin

    Yes, a dynamic approach is best. A universal, anytime intelligence test.

    http://www.unz.com/jthompson/the-oscars-for-intelligence/

  5. @Anon

    Such a conversational assessment of intelligence is probably within the reach of an AI system right now. Or you could you could use a speech-to-text system and get a Flesch–Kincaid grade level.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @James Thompson
  6. The wonderlic test is 50 questions in 12 minutes and s considered very reliable for measuring IQ

  7. @jason y

    They won’t be happy until you create a test that’s uncorrelated with lifetime outcomes

  8. Factorize says:

    What is the value in measuring academic achievement? At all grade levels even starting in grade 1, students typically receive at least a vague description of academic performance. As students progress, increasingly precise psychometric assessments are given.

    Why? Why bother?

    Readers of the blog are highly familiar with the g theorist perspective that intelligence is largely the consequence of a genetically encoded life plan. It seems to me, now that I consider it, quite odd how obsessively focused many people can be on achievement scores when they are merely trying to estimate g. Perhaps one should measure g directly and call it a day.

    Furthermore, simply looking at achievement scores can be highly deceptive. It is not difficult to imagine any number of life circumstances that would put someone at an overwhelming disadvantage if one only considered achievement. What is of most relevance long term is not the result of any given achievement test, but the total psychometric load that an individual can manage at any given time.

    Achievement is ultimately not what the economy is interested in: g is! We are now rapidly approaching a time in which g could be measured with a simple PGS. For me, this would make achievement testing even less informative of true potential.

  9. A researcher in the field sent me the following comments:

    I just saw your post and think that the test is not as good as you imply.

    This test is given under a severe time constraint. When this is done, the standard formula for coefficient alpha as a measure of reliability no longer applies. This is because the items are no longer independent measures of the same trait. If someone does not answer item 10, it is likely that he will not answer 11 and 12.

    Even if we ignore this problem, the fact that the items measure, in addition to g, the verbal and quantitative factors means that Cronbach’s alpha is not a good estimator of the test variance accounted for by g. Alpha will overestimate it. Now it may be that you want to measure the additional factors, but even in this case Cronbach’s alpha is probably not telling you precisely what you want to know.

    A better measure of reliability (if we care about g alone) is the square of the test’s factor loading. According to the attached preprint, this is 0.38. A reliability of 0.38! Now my opinion is that the authors’ model is mis-specified. But even according to my preferred factor model, the reliability of this 12-item test is perhaps about 0.44. All in all, my opinion is that there is a lot of room for improvement in the measurement of abilities in this type of study.

    I replied:

    I can see that the time pressure has a cut-off effect on items not reached, and that it will affect the item covariances. I am not against time pressure per se, because that makes evolutionary sense, but was still surprised at what seemed to have been achieved in two minutes.

    He responded:

    Just to be clear, I am in no way denigrating the genetic results obtained with such crude measures. The results have been outstanding, much more far-reaching than I would have guessed in 2010 if you had asked me then what it would be possible to do with 12-item tests or years of education. But even more is possible.

  10. Factorize says:

    I typically do not achieve high scores on internet IQ tests that require video game like responses to questions. I enjoy trying to solve the difficult questions even if this results in a lower score. Modern IQ tests using adaptive methods do not penalize test takers who are not interested in solving easy questions. Usually I believe that I would perform higher relative to other test takers with relaxed time constraints. Does psychometric literature support this position? This might not help much on the two minute IQ test as you would then have a ceiling effect, though what might happen if the test questions increased in difficulty? For example, create an IQ test that was so difficult that a bell curve would emerge even if there were no time limits. Would measured IQs under both conditions be similar?

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  11. Anon[211] • Disclaimer says:
    @TelfoedJohn

    By your comment I’d estimate your IQ at above 125.
    It took me some rereading, and effort, to decode it (while I assume you wrote it casually) :D.

  12. Anon[211] • Disclaimer says:

    Adjusting for age, I would expect the results to be much alike each other.

  13. @grey enlightenment2

    Oh is it? I scored between 37-39///

    PP(Pumpkinperson) did a post on this

    That would put my IQ at…. 130///

    https://pumpkinperson.com/2019/01/21/more-thoughts-on-converting-wonderlic-to-iq/#comments

    It is actually, apparently it has more than a 90 % correlation with the WAIS

  14. Factorize says:

    Might anyone on forum consider posting their EDU PGS from the Nature Genetics paper posted last July? It would be fascinating to align a person’s PGS with their comments on unz.

  15. I would think some adjustment should be made for age. My IQ was listed as 119 on the military AFQT. a test I took in 1947. But at age 90 I am not sure I would be able to register the same IQ on a two minute test because no doubt in my brain has slowed down If I were given a bit more time I might register the same 119. I suspect that would not be fair.

    • Replies: @Leon Haller
  16. I wonder if a similar short test could be given to chess players, and used to estimate their FIDE rating?
    (I bet it could!)

  17. @TelfoedJohn

    Would help in medical interviews and communications. However, using short words in short sentences generally helps every patient understand what is being advised.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Wizard of Oz
  18. Anon[224] • Disclaimer says:
    @James Thompson

    No, I think.
    What helps us is what is more alike us.
    The impression that simplicity and simpleness help communication matches reality, but allows for its exceptions.
    Somebody who likes to use terms such as “notwithstanding” or “nonetheless” (a non-pragmatic type, let’s say) will understand advice, medical and not, better if given in those terms, with more rounded phrasing.

  19. crimson2 says:
    @Anon

    Then she will stop talking when you point out the mistake

    Perhaps the mistakes are intentional.

    • Replies: @Anon
  20. @Factorize

    For example, create an IQ test that was so difficult that a bell curve would emerge even if there were no time limits. Would measured IQs under both conditions be similar?

    If there were more people like the one you think you are – no.

    • Replies: @Factorize
  21. Astoundingly, even a 13 point short test arranges itself into a crude bell curve

    Why is this ‘astounding‘?

    Nobody who got above a ‘C’ in year 11 mathematics should find this ‘astounding’.

    It’s a convolution of (semi?-)independent binomial variables (1/0 for right/wrong).

    The properties of such convolutions have been a solved problem since the 17th century (albeit in other contexts).

    The “Bell curve” you see, is what you get when you run a binomial ‘tree’ forward 14 times with 1/0 payoffs at each child node … it’s Pascal’s Triangle.

    And that’s the same as 14 consecutive draws from an iid binomial random variable.

    I am interested that the actual distribution looks skewed (and in the direction I have often said I would expect in ‘raw’ scores: mode & mean < median) – with N as large as it is there's a very good chance that the skewness is not an sampling artifact.

    • Replies: @James Thompson
  22. Factorize says:
    @Dieter Kief

    Take home exams? Time limits are relaxed and yet students’ scores continue to be dispersed (though this could be a result more of the grading key). On a high school test, some questions would be unanswerable by testees of certain ability levels even with unlimited time (item response theory). Over-speeding IQ tests leads to an unreliable test. url speaks of adding 10 points to one’s Wonderlic score with 3 hours of coaching. Move up from 50th percentile to 90th percentile in 3 hours? Considering the many tens of billions of dollars that have been spent unsuccessfully trying to raise g over the last few decades, this would seem a true psychometric bargain. https://beatthewonderlic.com/ When time limits are relaxed such dramatic changes in scores would not be expected to occur.

  23. anon[207] • Disclaimer says:

    a few years ago Vox Day linked to some online site that purported to measure your verbal IQ and many of us went over and tried it and almost all of us scored 99th percentile or higher, lol

    apparently it was juiced

  24. @grey enlightenment2

    This website has a ton of wonderlics for NFL players: https://wonderlictestsample.com/nfl-wonderlic-scores/

    The highest name I recognized is Harvard -> NFL QB Ryan Fitzpatrick, 48.

    Kaepernick is 38. Brady 33.

    Out of those three I know who I’m picking with my precise 20/20 hindsight.

    • Replies: @Eddie Collins
    , @Wille
  25. It should be acknowledged that g and IQ scores are not meaningless or without value to measure but “for what?” should be asked.

    Tentatively I divide the question into what it tells you about the individual (and tells him/her) and what generalisations are made available for assessing groups.

    Perhaps the emphasis is on the individual and fairness to the individual if one says “there are only six places available in the Thursday evening special maths class with the graduate student tutor so we will take the top six on the 12 question test, following Eysenck’s advice on the 11 Plus test by having them take it three times”. There doesn’t appear to be anything conceptually wrong about that even if it can be argued that much greater reliability can be achieved with a well designed 30 minute test. The seventh candidate might complain, speculatively or just possibly with evidence that he would benefit from the fairness of a more reliable test. Whose motives and criteria, including those of cost and benefit to the testing authority, become an issue and it is possible in the case hypothesised that a much less verbal test would be fairer or more efficient. But what this snippet of discussion does lead to is a reminder of the limited use of any general IQ test. After all, ex hypothesi one is probably looking for potential mathematicians.

    Sorry I got diverted….

    The test strikes me as the kind I used to blitz (and even now I had the answers to the two questions before I finished reading them). There were even occasions when I got, in one hour, 100 per cent in a first year uni math exam for which three hours was allowed (not in the maths faculty of course) and later passed a three hour 10 questions law exam

  26. What uses do you think the 12 question rest – or slightly more extended version – could sensibly be put to?

  27. @James Thompson

    Sorry what use could the 13 question test be put to?

  28. I have always found the dissident right’s obsession with I. Q. rather amusing. There is no question that a preponderance of groups with a tendency towards low achievement in this respect is deleterious for society. But if a certain group tends to score high on I. Q. tests—well, so what?

    Whites and Jews are among the highest scorers on such tests. (I make no mention of Asians, who outperform them, because they—at least as of yet—wield no great political power in the West.) Yet the Mark Zuckerbergs, John Kerrys, Jean-Claude Junckers, Christine Lagardes, Alan Greenspans, Larry Pages, Jacinda Arderns and so on of the world are precisely the architects of Western society’s collapse. Open borders, sexual degeneracy, curtailment of free speech, erosion of national sovereignty, ethnic/national self-hate, etc.—all these and more are policies devised and dictated by high I. Q. achievers. What good, then, does high I. Q. do for whites, say, when their highest achievers are also possessed by a collective death wish?

    • Agree: Cortes
  29. Hugh says:

    I was stumped by the verbal question: the more I thought about it the more lost I became.

    However, a quick trip to a thesaurus: https://www.thesaurus.com/browse/stop?s=t. made my day brighter.

    The thesaurus lists pause, close, cease and break as SYNONYMS of the key word stop. Only “rest” is missing. Thus, either the correct answer is “prefer not to answer” or multiple correct answers are envisaged…..or the question has been poorly thought out.

    • Replies: @reelt
    , @obwandiyag
  30. I have formulated a number of neurological hypotheses based on peculiarities of my own brain (though I am not sure how closely related my difficulty understanding Scotch and similar strong accents is to my inability – preceding deafness – to understand the words of arias and lieder sung in English). On the one hand I could blitz tests like the two minute one and in fact had the answers to the two questions you quoted before I finished reading them but, though I equally blitzed the tests long ago when I did a rapid reading course, I never found myself reading fast accordingly but always flicking a pedantic nitpicking eye around. Presumably there is something which goes “click” when I am faced with a test requiring speed and it’s not then my usual self which can cause a top civil servant to say “X you always make things too complicated”. (Actually I like to think I can produce an alternative click and jump which cuts through to the point….) 🙂

  31. Ian Deary

    Ian Deary and the Blockheads. Coming to your town.

    • Replies: @onebornfree
  32. Anon[260] • Disclaimer says:

    How does this compare to Wordsum, used in the GSS?

    http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp/2010/05/wordsum-iq/#.XN5R0y-B0UE

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wordsum

    I’d like to see a detailed treatment of ways to determine someone’s approximate IQ without his consent, either when all you have are appearances in the media and writing samples, or when you have physical access to the person and can interact with him.

    I might imagine that as one input one’s own IQ might be important.

  33. 13 into 120 is easy, if they don’t want a decimal value to any precision, which I suspect they wouldn’t. I love the logic exercise; nice touch. Reminds me, however, of the occasional “IQ tests” one sees in the Daily Mail.

  34. @Kratoklastes

    Yes, point taken. I should have said that it was surprising, given that we do not know the pass rates for each item, nor the truncation effects of the time limit on later items in the sequence, nor anything about answers which might be considered “near misses” and worthy of a very small correction factor of a fifth of a point, that the answers are almost normally distributed.

  35. Nice.
    I took a longer test with a really hot Psychologist.
    Might have cost me a hand full of points, but was worth it.

  36. Related:

    Where can I, a mere ignorant bumpkin on the road to further red-pilling, find an accurate and hopefully cheap IQ test?

    I have attempted googling “IQ tests” but am not surprised to find confusing or disappointing results, as the internet search engines are run by the Devil.

    (One friend has suggested I simply take the Wonderlic test and multiply the results by 2 to get a roughly accurate IQ sample.)

    Thanks in advance

    My apologies for the slightly OT nature of this post.

    • Replies: @Eddie Collins
  37. @Anon

    Look, it is an idiotic argument. Miss typing using phones is so common,taking the small size of the pad used. And the response time often involve that it is useless as a argument .

  38. @Nicolás Palacios Navarro

    NAVARRO

    I think Jewish verbal IQ is higher than Asians and this is why Jews have succeeded in Hollywood and litigation.

    • Agree: TTSSYF
    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  39. @simple_pseudonymic_handle

    Looking over that list it’s clear Wonderlic scores have no correlation to playing ability. In fact, I think most NFL scouts might discriminate against players with scores above 35. But looking at the lower end I see names of guys who have issues with the law and behaving off the field. But let that go.

    One of highest scores is Benjamin Watson (48). Watson is black and a big conservative pro-life Christian married to his high school sweetheart. I’ve heard him on conservative talk shows and he’s very warm and articulate. Another top score is Matt Birk (46). He’s a Harvard econ grad and conservative pro-life Catholic starting his own Catholic school. Some of the other top scores are similar. I can’t help but think of Charles Murray’s book Coming Apart, where he mentions that it is among the higher social-economic ranks where you’ll find church goers (contrary to the PC narrative).

    • Replies: @Magyar
  40. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    Where can I, a mere ignorant bumpkin on the road to further red-pilling, find an accurate and hopefully cheap IQ test?

    I have attempted googling “IQ tests” but am not surprised to find confusing or disappointing results, as the internet search engines are run by the Devil.

    (One friend has suggested I simply take the Wonderlic test and multiply the results by 2 to get a roughly accurate IQ sample.)

    Your best bet would be WORDSUM. Razib Khan (and others) have discussed the high correlation between a WORDSUM score and IQ.

    A correlation of 0.71 is not mind-blowing, there’s a significant difference between IQ and WORDSUM as they relate to each other linearly. But I think it’s good enough to get a sense that WORDSUM is a serviceable substitute for a more rigorous measure of g in lieu of any alternatives, and not so clumsy a proxy so as to be useless. Though that call is up to you, and readers are free to disagree with the methodology of the model used to obtain this correlation. Additionally, I would point out that WORDSUM is a subset of the vocabulary subsection of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale. WORDSUM is in effect a slice of an IQ test.

    http://www.unz.com/gnxp/wordsum-iq/?highlight=Wordsum

    You can find a legit online WORDSUM test here: https://openpsychometrics.org/tests/VIQT/

  41. AaronB says:
    @Eddie Collins

    Lol, I just took that wordsum test it takes less than a minute and I scored exactly the same as in a real IQ given by a psychologist when I was 16.

    So I guess it correlates really well.

    Seems to have a low ceiling though.

  42. I recently received a frantic call at 2:30am from my doctor and he asked me to come down to his office immediately. When I got there, he told me my IQ test had come back totally negative. He hooked me up again to the testing machinery and turned it on and the indicator needle didn’t move. He said he’d tested the his machine on other people and it worked with them (they all had at least some IQ), so it wasn’t the machinery – It was that I have zero IQ. He also said he’d made an appointment for me to go up to the university. That they were very interested in my case. No one had ever heard of a case of someone with zero IQ. Possibly, I can earn a living as being the only person on the planet walking around with a zero IQ. This is great.

  43. Magyar says:
    @Eddie Collins

    Wonderlic scores might not correlate with athletic ability but for the NFL they are a strong signal of coachability in a complicated system.

    Very low Wonderlic = very instinctual players. Hmmm. Funny how that works out.

    Too high Wonderlic is also not great for some positions. QBs need to be smart but not too smart such that they clash with their coaches.

    My guess is that their is a target score range for each position and any variation +/- is counted against a prospect.

    One of the many reasons that Brady has had so much success is that Belichick designed an offense around him that prevents him from having to make high latency complicated decisions. Not saying that Brady is dumb just that he benefits from not being too smart.

    • Replies: @james wilson
  44. Beliavsky says:

    Where is the verbal-numerical reasoning test of Deary?

  45. Wille says:
    @simple_pseudonymic_handle

    As a former Cincinnati Bengal fan during the Wonder Years (Wonder if they’ll ever be this good again), Pat McInally is a familiar name. As an aside, he created the Starting Lineup series of sports action figures, with sales of $700 million.

  46. TG says:

    Just a minor comment: “Astoundingly, even a 13 point short test arranges itself into a crude bell curve, almost as if it was picking up something real about the population.”

    Wrong. Many many random variables in nature are bell curves, or thereabouts. It goes back to the central limit theorem: when a bunch of random variables are summed, even if their individuals distributions are not normal, the sum tends to be. So anything that is the result of a lot of complicated factors, tend to produce a bell-shaped distribution. And almost any human parameter – height, weight, distance between the eyes, length of index finger, etc. – will have a roughly bell-shaped distribution. So no, the mere fact of a bell curve BY ITSELF means nothing.

    • Replies: @James Thompson
  47. LOL! What shit.
    The test measures
    Reaction time: Visual memory: Prospective Memory:
    Memory and reaction time is not IQ. Nothing to do with solving problems.
    IQ was originally defined as “the ability to solve problems you had never seen before”.

    There is a report out there on the internet somewhere, about a medical doctor who was making poor judgement calls, and he peers asked for him to be tested. Turned out he had a photographic memory and and IQ of 70. Borderline moron. Yet the “photographic memory” was enough to get him through medical school.

    Sounds like the people who invented this latest test got through psychology, without really being able to think, and are now trying to justify themselves.

    • Replies: @Fuerchtegott
  48. onebornfree says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    Reg Cæsar says: “Ian Deary and the Blockheads. Coming to your town.”

    Regards, onebornfree

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  49. @Nicolás Palacios Navarro

    The holy grail in intelligence testing for liberal university sorts is a test that will show themselves in the top hundredth of one percent, yet blacks and Hispanics well above the mean for the white proles! The reverse ordering of reality, in other words

  50. @Professional Stranger

    I had I girl in my class, her Nickname was RaffNix
    (raffen could be translated with grasp and Nix is just Null),
    but she had exactly that, a near photographic memory, when I remember it correct, she finished school with the highest grades.
    Once I tried to explain to her the not so complicated concept of determinism, took her a while.
    In fact a couple of weeks till she told me now she got it.

    And no, she wasn’t a below 70 IQ points moron, but she could easy be just a slightly below average 95er plus a very good memory.

    • Replies: @Professional Stranger
  51. Maybe we can use this to get rid of everyone under 100 IQ…

    “ISRAEL IS REPORTEDLY developing a biological weapon that would harm Arabs while leaving Jews unaffected, The “ethno-bomb” program is based at Israel’s Nes Tziyona research facility.

    https://www.wired.com/1998/11/israels-ethnic-weapon/?fbclid=IwAR3mnDiNWeyAcaiG_nTobdVZBgnOT6Gg4NCwrsKOsI4Ysn9TcysRXsYXfoc

  52. @Professional Stranger

    That’s sorta against the concept of g is it not? That a person could be top flight at one cognitive task but abysmal at another? Memory and iq strongly are connected

    • Replies: @Professional Stranger
  53. @Yapius the 2nd

    Let me repeat: IQ was originally defined as “the ability to solve problems you had never seen before”.
    To score well on tests of this ability, you just need enough memory so you don’t forget what you are doing half-way through.
    Culturally and educationally-biased IQ tests are a corruption of the original idea.
    Here are some IQ tests on animals that avoid that pitfall …

    “Genius” Chimp Outsmarts Tube | National Geographic –
    And the problem the chimp solved in nothing compared to the problem the crow solved –
    Genius the crow solves amazingly difficult probems – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uNHPh8TEAXM

    • LOL: CanSpeccy
    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
  54. That’s ridiculous. I don’t believe in any 2-second intelligence assessment, even if taken by anti-Trump people who are all geniuses by default by comparison with our great, spelling-phobic leader.

    When I was a kid, I took the Wechsler, scoring relatively high, although not stunningly high as I would have preferred. I remember the mazes of escalating difficulty, cool little shape-manipulation tests and the part where you had long lists of numbers to recall in sequence.

    I’m probably wrong, but I think adeptness at such tasks can be at peak levels during times of life when you’re performing similar tasks on a daily basis.

    In a crazy-busy office job that I once held, we were required to keep long policy numbers in our heads while doing a bunch of other things, like typing data and answering questions on multiple lines. I thought I couldn’t do it when I first got the job, but after a few weeks, it became second nature. It had to be absolutely accurate, too.

    Around that time, in one of the cheesy meetings, we were asked to go around a large circle of people, trying to keep in our heads nicknames made up by each person at the spur of the moment. Naturally, I was alnost at the circle’s close, but just by concentrating hard, I remembered every ****** one of those silly nicknames.

    If I had not been doing similar tasks all day long, day in and day out, I don’t think I would have been able to do it. If I had not gone into concentration mode, reflexively, I doubt I would have remembered all of those random nicknames. I was just used to being under severe pressure to remember long strings of numbers in that job.

  55. @Magyar

    The sweet spot of grand master chess players is 135, well below genius.

    • Replies: @Anon
  56. @Igor Bundy

    I remember the article about Israel’s “ethnobomb”. Similarly, when the SARS outbreak happened I remember there being conspiracy theories about how that virus was developed as a bio weapon to target East Asian people.

    • Replies: @kelvin150
  57. Art says:

    When are we going to get a “moral quotient” test (MQ). Surely there are some moral measurables. Why can’t empathy and honesty be measured in two minutes?

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @James Thompson
  58. reelt says:
    @Hugh

    No, they are not synonymous.

    The correct answer is “cease”, because it (like stop) is permanent.

  59. ● Marilyn vos Savant has an IQ of 228, the highest ever recorded, according to the Guinness Book of Records. And her greatest achievement so far is: She runs an “Ask Marilyn” column on Parade magazine, where she answers readers’ questions on puzzles.

    ● Michael Langan is said to have an IQ of 190 to 210, and has been called the “smartest man in the world”. And his greatest achievement so far is: He runs a horse ranch in Missouri and posts on Quora.

    ● Albert Einstein had an estimated IQ of 160. And he created the General Theory of Relativity which has been called “the greatest intellectual and philosophical leap-forward in human history”.
    Einstein once said: “It’s not that I’m so smart, it’s just that I stay with problems longer”.

    ☛BOTTOM LINE:
    Having the ability to score highly on IQ tests doesn’t mean much, unless you also have the desire and the determination to apply that ability to something profound.

  60. Anonymous[165] • Disclaimer says:

    What about people with slow processing speed or with learning disorders (where one set of skills- verbal vs spacial dominate). Surely this test is either invalidated by them or produces a skewed result?

  61. res says:

    It seems like it would be a worthwhile exercise to calibrate a variety of short IQ tests to one of the standard tests. Perhaps the short tests could be administered to one of the normalization samples for a more rigorous test? Some potential short tests to use.

    – This test. Ian Deary’s 13-item verbal-numerical test to be completed in 2 minutes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4844168/
    – Wonderlic Personnel Test. 50 multiple choice questions to be answered in 12 minutes. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wonderlic_test
    – Wordsum. 10 word vocabulary test. https://emilkirkegaard.dk/en/?p=7645

    Also three short tests from:
    https://www.unz.com/jthompson/so-you-think-youre-intelligent/
    https://www.hungrymindlab.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/von-Stumm-2014.pdf

    (1) Raven’s Progressive Matrices (Set E; Raven, 1968). Twelve items showed grids of 3 rows 9 3 columns each with the lower right hand entry missing. Participants chose from eight alternatives the one that completed the 3 9 3 matrix figure. The test was timed at 4 min; (2) Lettersets (Ekstrom, French, & Harman, 1976): Participants identified the mismatching four-letter set, inferring a rule underlying the composition of four other four-letter sets. The test had 15 items and was timed at 6 min; (3) Nonsense syllogisms (Ekstrom et al., 1976): Participants judged if a conclusion that followed two preceding statements (premises) showed good (correct) reasoning or not. The test had 15 items and was timed at 4 min. All IQ tests have been reported to have internal consistency values of .80 and above (Ekstrom et al., 1976; Raven, 1968)

    Any other ideas?

    What kind of criteria would be best to evaluate? Some that come to mind.

    – Test time and administration requirements.
    – Correlation with IQ from longer test.
    – Floor/ceiling.
    – Accuracy/resolution.
    – Relationship between short tests and longer form subtests (i.e. which areas are over/under represented by the short tests).

    Given the large scale GWAS being done now, it seems like this could be very beneficial for establishing a common set of well understood and easy to administer (by computer?) tests for use quickly and effectively measuring cognitive ability in these GWAS.

    Also consider that combinations of two or more of these tests may work better than any one of them by itself.

    Any thoughts on this?

    • Replies: @James Thompson
  62. @Professional Stranger

    Nobel Prize winner in physics & MIT physics Ph.D., William Shockley, was tested twice and scored both in the 120’s. Nobel Prize winner & Princeton physics Ph.D., Richard Feynman, scored 125. Ron Unz has argued that such test scores show IQ tests to be ludicrous (or the concept of IQ is BS) rather than measuring Feynman’s intelligence.

    168. Ron Unz says:

    I estimated that on the IQ test-like sections of the military aptitude tests that Bush scored somewhere around the equivalent of a 125 IQ (which is in line with his 1206 SAT score [under the harder pre-1995 scoring system])

    This is *exactly* the reason I’m so extremely skeptical of that published claim that Richard Feynman (a notorious jokester) once said his IQ had been tested at 125.

    In my considered opinion, there’s no one in the second half of the twentieth century who had a stronger claim to being the smartest human being in the world than Richard Feynman. And we’re supposed to believe he actually had exactly the same tested IQ as George W. Bush??!!

    As everyone knows, I’m quite skeptical of the more rigid claims advanced by dogmatic IQists. But c’mon. If honest-to-goodness IQ tests actually gave the same score to “W” and Feynman, that single datapoint would be sufficient to totally discredit the very notion of IQ. It’s lucky that the Malcolm Gladwell and his friends have probably never heard of Richard Feynman…

    180. Ron Unz says:

    [Presumably, W. was trying to do well on his military aptitude test (to get into the stateside Air National Guard duty during Vietnam). Could it be Feynman mailed it in on his IQ test?]

    Sure, that’s one possibility. Like I said, Feynman was a notorious prankster and jokester. I’m somewhat more inclined to believe he was just pulling that journalist’s leg, and the silly fellow didn’t realize it.

    But my main point is there’s simply *no* possibility Feynman had an honest-to-goodness true IQ of 125. 251 or maybe even 512 would be likelier. Back in JHS or HS he developed a new type of generalized Calculus after someone gave him a book. In college, he won the Putnam as a last-minute substitute entrant.

    IQ-fetishists have come up with the silliest theories to justify the 125. Maybe he had a bad day. Maybe he did badly on the Verbal questions. The bottom line is if Feynman really scored 125 on a legitimate IQ test (a test that allowed scores higher than 125) then “IQ Is Bunk.”

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/jeffrey-goldberg-is-it-time-for-the-jews-to-leave-europe/#comments

  63. Alfred says:

    I suspect that Google has already measured our intelligences by checking on our search items. They probably put us categories by intelligence.

    I am sure they do with our views about the catastrophe that is Israel or the MH17 or 9/11 or Skripals or WMD or “Syrian” chemical weapons or Ukrainian “democracy” etc.

    • Replies: @Eagle Eye
    , @kelvin150
  64. @Eddie Collins

    But my main point is there’s simply *no* possibility Feynman had an honest-to-goodness true IQ of 125. 251 or maybe even 512 would be likelier.

    It would have to be 128. 256, or even 512 to match Feynman. (2⁷, 2⁸ or 2⁹ )

  65. Anon[169] • Disclaimer says:
    @crimson2

    I already tsaid the cases where they give you a “null info” were omitted (I have the IQ that’s needed to know when they are leading you astray, and it’s not hard to).

    Sometimes, after I communicate the mistake they strain their wits, and find out the mistake.
    Other times I had recourse to all my diplomacy, added them to another app later, and found out only a figure/ID letter had been wrong.

    It’s something normal in the 75-85 IQ range I have come to think.

  66. Anon[169] • Disclaimer says:
    @Eddie Collins

    Feynman was just having fun.
    There is no possibility he had a honest IQ of less than 150. 150 is nothing more than an average for top-tier people in science and humanities alike.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  67. Anon[169] • Disclaimer says:
    @james wilson

    It must take a very chess-suited kind of brain to be grand masters with an IQ as “low” as 135, though.

  68. Anon[169] • Disclaimer says:
    @Art

    You can measure them in a far shorter time span than 2 minutes.
    Show them a half-minute predation scenes, while checking perspiration and scanning what goes on in the brain.

  69. @Igor Bundy

    ‘Maybe we can use this to get rid of everyone under 100 IQ…

    “ISRAEL IS REPORTEDLY developing a biological weapon that would harm Arabs while leaving Jews unaffected, The “ethno-bomb” program is based at Israel’s Nes Tziyona research facility.’

    The difficulty with that is that Zionists are remarkably stupid. The consequences for Israel would be catastrophic.

  70. @Eddie Collins

    ‘IQ-fetishists have come up with the silliest theories to justify the 125. Maybe he had a bad day. Maybe he did badly on the Verbal questions. The bottom line is if Feynman really scored 125 on a legitimate IQ test (a test that allowed scores higher than 125) then “IQ Is Bunk.”’

    Not necessarily. There are always freak results.

    I once caught two fine trout in water that must have been eighty degrees. This doesn’t alter the fact that trout will bite most readily when the water temperature is around 55-60 degrees.

    • Replies: @Eddie Collins
    , @obwandiyag
  71. Eagle Eye says:
    @Alfred

    I suspect that Google has already measured our intelligences by checking on our search items. They probably put us categories by intelligence.

    “Increase your Google IQ score by 15 points in 1 week. Custom package of 150 searches, only $199.98. “

  72. @onebornfree

    Blossom Dearie was of Scottish descent, and yes, that was the name she was born with.

  73. Remember: Einstein’s IQ and Newton’s IQ are now zero.
    All IQs return to zero.
    “..the dust returns to the earth as it was, and the spirit returns to God who gave it.. for all is vanity” – Ecclesiastes.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  74. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Eddie Collins

    But my main point is there’s simply *no* possibility Feynman had an honest-to-goodness true IQ of 125. 251 or maybe even 512 would be likelier. Back in JHS or HS he developed a new type of generalized Calculus after someone gave him a book. In college, he won the Putnam as a last-minute substitute entrant.

    So now we are to infer IQ from a person’s intellectual performance in whatever happens to be their specialty, and if their IQ test result contradicts that inferences, then the data must be a joke. LOL

    Apparently, it never occurs to an IQist that intelligence is not one thing measurable on a single linear scale and precisely defined by a single number.

    If Ramanujan was a mathematical genius, then, according to an IQist, he must have been, by definition, a literary genius, at least potentially, a musical genius and a genius in any other way you can think of. Which is an idea unsupported by any evidence and seems to be a foolish supposition entirely at odds with experience and what we know of the modular structure of the brain, where difference mental processes occur in different lobes and neural networks, that are likely under independent genetic control and which have been affected in different ways by whatever environmental experience, e.g., education, the possessor of that brain has been subject to.

    But then IQists are probably among the dumbest group of people one can find among those who purport to be scientists, so futile to debate the issue here.

  75. @Anon

    150 on one test will be 130 on another, even though both are normed around zero. You have to know which test it is, and the standard deviation.

    Maybe Feynman’s test was from a paperback bought in the drugstore. I once took a Mensa book test– which, by the way, Mensa won’t accept; you have to have the real thing. Victor Serebriakoff’s name was on the cover, but who knows who developed the test.

    I tripped up on a question because I had no idea what a mangetout was. I knew how to pronounce it and what it meant in French, but what the hell did it mean in English?

    In America, we call those snow peas.

  76. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    How many IQ points do you get for knowing that a mangetout is a snow pea?

    And how many IQ points does one get for knowing what Shakespeare meant when he talked of golden lads and chimney sweepers,

    Golden lads and girls all must, like chimney sweepers come to dust.

    Whatever the answer, you can be sure that very few physicists, even very bright ones, would know, so you can deduct that number from their potential IQ test score, before you go on to test their musical intelligence, their spatial ability, their kinesthetic intelligence…

    Oh, but they’re all the same thing you say? Come on…

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    , @TTSSYF
  77. @Colin Wright

    Ron Unz addressed this about freak results. Defending the IQ test by coming up with plausible explanations why the score for a super-genius was measured to be in the very bright level. Btw, apparently Feynman’s sister corroborated the IQ score.

    228. WhatEvvs [AKA “Bemused”] says:
    March 21, 2015
    @Ron Unz

    From the wording you use, I’m not sure what you are skeptical of – the fact that his IQ was actually tested at 123, or of the fact that he claimed it was so?

    http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AnS/physics/brau/H182/Term%20Papers/Ryan%20McPherson.html

    Feynman’s younger sister Joan, also a physicist, once said that “[Richard] had a normal IQ. When I was a kid, I sneaked off and got into the files and looked up our IQ’s. Mine was 124, and his was 123. So I was actually smarter than he was!” (Sykes 25).

    Sykes, Christopher, ed. No Ordinary Genius: The Illustrated Richard Feynman.

    Also, look in GENIUS, p. 30. His IQ is reported as 125.

    • Replies: @Ron Unz

    239. Ron Unz says:
    March 22, 2015
    @WhatEvvs

    That’s astonishing. I’d thought the only source was Feynman’s offhand remark to Gleick, his biographer, and had always vaguely assumed it was some sort of joke or prank on his part. But his sister’s independent testimony indicates it seems to have been true.

    So “W” and Feynman apparently had almost exactly the same tested IQ. I’m completely flabbergasted…

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
  78. @Reg Cæsar

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow_pea
    The snow pea (Pisum sativum var. saccharatum) is a variety of pea eaten whole in its pod while still unripe. The name mangetout (French for “eat all”) can apply both to snow peas and to snap peas

    Never heard of it before. I hate it when pseudo-intellectual snobs use foreign words in English just to show off and belittle their audience by confusing them.

    An example: I remember this smart-ass CNN talking head, interviewing a Russian celebrity and asking him about his “entourage” as though it was normal English. When the Russian guy didb’t know WTF the word meany, the CNN guy called for a translator. The Russian spoke good English and the CNN guy was just trying to belittle him. When someone translated the word, the Russian guy said “Oh! you mean MY ROOMIES!” – which was much better and more mainstream English than the CNN guy’s bullshit. Everybody in the audience understood the Russian guy, and about half didn’t understand the CNN guy – had no idea what “entourage” meant either.

    Another example: those who manage to get a psychology degree because they can’t do math and end up writing IQ tests, are pseudo-intellectual snobs too.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  79. @Nicolás Palacios Navarro

    I like how the other 2 feeb comments to your very cogent point avoid the question and diverge off into their favorite sound-bytes.

  80. @Hugh

    You are the perfect example of the dumb people on here who are so interested in IQ tests. Only dumb people are interested in IQ tests. They want to prove other people dumb to make themselves feel better about themselves. Because they don’t feel good about themselves. Because they are dumb.

    I got the answer in 3 seconds. It is “cease” and only “cease.”

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  81. @CanSpeccy

    Just marvelous. Marvelous. You have made a point, vividly, that I often forget to make.

    Intelligence is not the question. It is how much you actually know. How many actual facts that you actually know. About all the world around you.

    This “factual” way of thinking is unpopular with both the winger IQ nuts on here and the leftwinger education nuts on other sides.

    Because they want to be free!

  82. @Colin Wright

    Defense by lame–and incidentally false–analogy. Bah.

  83. @CanSpeccy

    a literary genius, at least potentially, a musical genius and a genius in any other way you can think of.

    He could’ve been. Who says he couldn’t? He just chose to focus on math.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  84. @Eddie Collins

    IQ tests change. Of course they make them easier. They always make everything easier. It is the force of PROGRESS. Of course nobody takes this into account when comparing IQs taken in different places and times.

    • Replies: @Anon
  85. @Eddie Collins

    Actually, there have been some arguments that the test he might have taken may have been too verbally loaded, or that the psychologist didn’t measure the verbal-logical split well enough.

  86. Factorize says:

    Something that might have been overlooked on thread is that we are now transitioning to a time in which there are actual answers to psychometric questions, that is some answers will clearly be seen as correct by those skilled in the art and other answers clearly incorrect.

    Up till this point in the psychometric dialogue, incorrect answers have been judged as correct due to wiggle room created by the state of the science and the resulting sociopolitical climate created. Now, however, we can ask questions with large samples such as UKBB and expect a near definitive result to be reported. Those who suggest incorrect answers will then be seen as being wrong and will then lose credibility and the esteem of others on thread. I can only hope that as this new reality emerges that truth will be accepted as truth. It does not seem plausible to me that arguments based on transparent calculations from clearly stated procedures could be disputed.

    Given this truth and after reading the URL posted above in the initial write up, I will change my position regarding the Wonderlic. I had thought that such a test would be hopelessly flawed as a test of g. One of the websites spoke of offering testees a 10 point score gain in a mere 3 hours. I was very unclear how this could lead to a reliable result. However, one must appreciate that the testees were likely not aware beforehand about the true nature of the test. So, they were on average at about the same disadvantage.

    With the massive sample size available in the UKBB, it should then not be entirely unexpected that some signal could be detected. The average score is only in the 20s (for the Wonderlic) and some testees score in the single digits. So, there is range available to discriminate between different ability levels.

    I would be interested to know whether a GWAS based on the 2 minute test might report back significant SNPs. Might some of these S Ps overlap with the EDU results? Another question that I find much more interesting than any of the questions on the Wonderlic and that I would require more than 15 seconds to contemplate is whether one could simply resample the UKBB or would need to go to an independent replication sample to compare results with the EDU GS etc.

  87. @Eddie Collins

    That’s not a wordsum at all actually….

  88. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @jeff stryker

    I think Jewish verbal IQ is higher than Asians

    In what language? English or Chinese?

    • Troll: Wizard of Oz
    • Replies: @Anon
  89. CanSpeccy says:
    @BengaliCanadianDude

    a literary genius, at least potentially, a musical genius and a genius in any other way you can think of.

    He could’ve been. Who says he couldn’t? He just chose to focus on math.

    Says you. As an IQ-ist you are bound to believe that. But it’s an assumption, and I think most improbable. But go ahead. Prove it.

    • Replies: @BengaliCanadianDude
  90. @Eddie Collins

    If you’ve read Outliers by Malcolm gladwell, he talks about how William Shockley and Louis Alvarez, famous Nobel laureates in physics, both were excluded from his cohort of elite iq children. E o Wilson says he and a friend, who happens to be a famous theoretical physicist, both had tested iqs in the low 120s. James Watson said his iq score was in the low 120s. It’s because scientists are stupid. Poets tend to test in the 160s.

    • Replies: @Yapius the 2nd
  91. CanSpeccy says: • Website

    Intelligence is not the question. It is how much you actually know.

    Yes, that is important — often. And some people do excel at knowing things. I’ve known people with an eidetic memory. Very interesting people. Wonderful vocabulary and use of words, seemingly able to recall just about everything interesting they ever read, saw or heard. Excellent logic circuits and top scholars too. Sam Johnson is, I suppose, in literature, the most famous example of this type.

    But generally, such peopleare not all rounders. They have difficulty with uncertainty. To them, a thing either is, or is not. Otherwise it’s not worth contemplating. The mental world of the experimental scientist is beyond their comprehension.

    But there are, I am convinced, many mental types. For years I worked with a group of top scholars from diverse fields. It was fascinating to realize how smart people can be, and how different from one another smart people can be in mode of thought. Thus seeing the conniptions of the IQists over the fact that, according to the results of an IQ test, Richard Feynman was not a budding Shakespeare, Beethoven, and Justice of the Supreme Court rolled into one, is quite funny.

  92. @CanSpeccy

    You’re the one who made the claim in the first place. Musical prodigies themselves tend to have higher IQs Not everyone is supposed to be a polymath. They focus on their own fields. Anyways, I don’t do research papers, nor I intend to start now. There are plenty of resources on the internet. They very well could’ve been, does not mean they had to. Intelligence is multi-faceted and people know this.

  93. @Professional Stranger

    Never heard of it before. I hate it when pseudo-intellectual snobs use foreign words in English just to show off and belittle their audience by confusing them.

    I think that’s just what they call it over there. Serebriakoff was a Brit, obviously of Russian descent.

    I refuse to call a rounded dead end a cul-de-sac. Do even the French know what the plural is?

    • Replies: @jim jones
  94. @Professional Stranger

    Genius the crow solves amazingly difficult probems – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uNHPh8TEAXM

    Hey, I could teach a turkey to solve those puzzles if it had 10,000 hours. All bird species are equally intelligent.

    turkeys are DUMB

  95. @Simply Simon

    A very sound observation. Does mental speed precisely parallel mental ability? I doubt it. Of course, there is probably a positive correlation: people who are ‘slow’ are often also stupid; people who can perform complex calculations or tasks quickly are often smart.

    But is the kid in class who is in fact the smartest (to the extent that can be measured) always the one who finishes his exams first? That was not my experience in different schools.

    Also, great intellectual/scientific/technological leaps in the real world are often the product of flashes of insight which are the culmination of very patient investigations, as well as some other mental quality, like originality or wisdom.

    • Replies: @Professional Stranger
  96. TTSSYF says:
    @Nicolás Palacios Navarro

    It is interesting how high IQ is not more clearly correlated with a realistic appraisal (acceptance?) of the world and human nature. (Marx comes to mind. Exactly how realistic is it to assume that the average person will work according to his ability but be content to take only according to his needs?) With some such people, I think it is a form of intellectual snobbery…an indulgence permitted when economic times are good and means of differentiating themselves from the unwashed masses (most of the ones you’ve named). With other high IQ people — the more sincere types — I think it is denialism or wishful thinking about what could be…they are overly imaginative and/or cannot accept the brutalities of life (one or two on your list, and I personally know a few of those types). I’ve often thought that the next best thing to being naturally brilliant is being as brutally honest with oneself and the world as possible. In fact, Ayn Rand once said that a person could immediately raise his or her IQ by 10 points by thinking rationally — it would certainly be a help with the math part of an IQ test.

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  97. TTSSYF says:
    @obwandiyag

    “Dumb” means unwilling or unable to speak. It does not mean “stupid,” stupid.

    An interest in IQ tests is not limited to stupid people (only a stupid person would make that sweeping generalization). In fact, I think a lot of people of average intelligence, but who fancy themselves as well-above average, fear IQ tests because of what the tests would reveal. Reality is not always pleasant or comfortable.

    And what’s wrong with being pleased at being above average, whether in intelligence, beauty, or athletic ability? People are naturally competitive. There’s nothing wrong with that.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    , @Anon
  98. @TTSSYF

    Rand and Marx.

    It says something about the IQ of Jews that most of the most-quoted thinkers in posts were Jews!

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  99. TTSSYF says:
    @Professional Stranger

    Yes, the blank-slaters and egalitarians actually are correct in their thinking…it’s just their timing that’s wrong.

  100. TTSSYF says:
    @CanSpeccy

    Actually, I think a person should get IQ points for knowing what you’ve indicated here.

    The question I have is, why do you and Obwandiyag have such hostility toward IQ tests? If I had to guess, I would say it reflects fear and resentment…probably not for you as individuals, but on behalf of how your ethnic or racial group scores.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  101. TTSSYF says:
    @jeff stryker

    Marx and Rand are good examples of the two extremes in facing reality, despite their likely similarity in raw IQ scores.

  102. @Leon Haller

    Does mental speed precisely parallel mental ability? I doubt it.

    Your doubt is justified. In the real world there is seldom pressure to solve a problem in a certain time frame. The important thing is just that you do solve it.
    I just tried an online IQ test because of this article. There was a 6 minute time limit. And the 2nd question was a missing number in series: 1,16, 81, ? , 625. It took me a while to figure out that the series was 1⁴, 2⁴, 3⁴,4⁴,5⁴. And by that time the test had timed out, and they reported my IQ as 15!
    And I was a mainframe computer programmer for years, and customers used to ask for me to come back and fix stuff.
    Just sayin…

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  103. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @TTSSYF

    If I had to guess, I would say it reflects fear and resentment…probably not for you as individuals, but on behalf of how your ethnic or racial group scores.

    LOL. My ethnic and racial group happens to include Will Shakespeare, Isaac Newton, Sam Johnson, Charles Darwin, Clerk Maxwell, and a few others I’d not be ashamed to mention.

    As for hostility to IQ tests, I have none. A test is a test. It’s the interpretation (and the misleading name) that’s the problem, exemplified by the absurd remarks above to the effect that since George Dubya Bush has the same IQ test score as Richard Feynman the two of them must have been equally intelligent.

    If that doesn’t make you hoot, then you really need to sit down and have a serious talk with yourself about what the claimed mental equivalence between George Dubya Bush, the 9/11 cover-up bullshit man, and Richard Feynman, a rare scientific genius, could possibly mean.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  104. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Professional Stranger

    And I was a mainframe computer programmer for years, and customers used to ask for me to come back and fix stuff.

    Hey, don’t come flaunting your actual mental accomplishments here. If you ain’t got the IQ you ain’t got what it takes to accomplish nuthin’, and if you did accomplish sumpin’, then it shows you’re an uppity gamma who needs to learn his place.

    • Troll: TTSSYF
  105. @Igor Bundy

    I saw something a while ago that one branch of the US Military was actively seeking as many samples of “Russian DNA” whatever that is, as possible.
    Oh, lookie, and within the edit window too…..

    https://www.mintpressnews.com/putin-questions-us-air-force-dna-collection-ethnic-russians/233946/

  106. TTSSYF says:
    @CanSpeccy

    Actually, I am skeptical of Feynman’s purported IQ, but I don’t doubt GWB’s. I do question your ability to be rational and not overly emotional, which I believe clouds the judgment of otherwise intelligent people (thus, my comment about too many of such people being in a state of denial about the harsher realities of life — I think you fall into this category).

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  107. How do I get to take the test?

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
  108. @CanSpeccy

    Professional_Stranger: I just tried an online IQ test because of this article. There was a 6 minute time limit. And the 2nd question was a missing number in series: 1,16, 81, ? , 625. It took me a while to figure out that the series was 1⁴, 2⁴, 3⁴,4⁴,5⁴. And by that time the test had timed out, and they reported my IQ as 15!
    And I was a mainframe computer programmer for years, and customers used to ask for me to come back and fix stuff. Just sayin…

    CanSpeccy: If you ain’t got the IQ you ain’t got what it takes to accomplish nuthin’

    That’s too general. Be specific to the case in discussion; do you mean
    (A) My IQ really is 15 and I only imagined I was a computer programmer, or
    (B) The IQ test gave a false reading because of the time limit.
    (C) I don’t know.

    • Replies: @Wizard of Oz
  109. Factorize says:
    @CanSpeccy

    Should not this be more correctly stated as, if you do not have a high enough PGS for IQ, then nothing else matters? One could earn a bachelor’s, a master’s, or a PhD degree or any number of life accomplishments, be high or low class and yet someone without any of these could simply ante up with their lucky genotype and claim the win.

    Genotype and life outcome could then perfectly correlate- by fiat. People so much want the universe to obey orderly laws that if nature were not to comply to our wishes by choice, then it would be compelled by us to do so by decree.

    Yet, we have already seen in very highly selected long term studies that it is not those who have been chosen to succeed, but those who were not chosen. Telling someone that they are not good enough is the most powerfully effective way of letting them transcend their limits.

    We have already reached the stage at which the research allows us to try this experiment. While it might seem entirely absurd, perhaps at birth babies should be genotyped and then assigned without any further argument to their life roles. Being born would be the only required life challenge for those who possess the correct genotype. The research has clearly shown that such an interpretation of reality would largely overturn the present structuring of society based on socio-economic class.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  110. CanSpeccy says: • Website

    That’s too general. Be specific to the case in discussion; do you mean
    (A) My IQ really is 15 and I only imagined I was a computer programmer, or
    (B) The IQ test gave a false reading because of the time limit.
    (C) I don’t know.

    None of the above. I mean:

    (D) Your IQ really is only 15, you really were a programmer and apparently a good one, but given your low IQ, your accomplishments mean nothing so far as anyone’s judgement of your intelligence is concerned. At best, all one might say is that maybe you’re an idiot savant or something, but that doesn’t count as being intelligent.

    • Replies: @Professional Stranger
  111. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @TTSSYF

    Actually, I am skeptical of Feynman’s purported IQ, but I don’t doubt GWB’s.

    There you go. Just pick and choose. That’s fine with me. I judge people by their accomplishments too, not by some alleged test of intelligence that cannot distinguish between a bullshit artist like G.W. Bush and a man of acknowledged genius like Richard Feynman.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  112. @CanSpeccy

    Leon Halller: Does mental speed precisely parallel mental ability? I doubt it.

    Professional_Stranger: I just tried an online IQ test because of this article. There was a 6 minute time limit. And the 2nd question was a missing number in series: 1,16, 81, ? , 625. It took me a while to figure out that the series was 1⁴, 2⁴, 3⁴,4⁴,5⁴. And by that time the test had timed out, and they reported my IQ as 15!
    And I was a mainframe computer programmer for years, and customers used to ask for me to come back and fix stuff. Just sayin…

    CanSpeccy: If you ain’t got the IQ you ain’t got what it takes to accomplish nuthin’

    That’s too general. Be specific to the case in discussion; do you mean
    (A) My IQ really is 15 and I only imagined I was a computer programmer, or
    (B) The IQ test gave a false reading because of the time limit.
    (C) I don’t know.

    Canspeccy:
    (D) Your IQ really is only 15, you really were a programmer

    Professional_stranger:
    Silly! This is all about time limits on IQ tests. Does this limit the tests ability of measure problem-solving ability. You are not questioning IQ tests at all. You miss the point.
    In anything techie like say computer programming, solving problems like finding the missing number in the series 1,16, 81, ? , 625 is the important thing. You can go and get a coffee while you think about it, if you like. But solving the problem is a must. There is no such thing as skipping it and moving on to the next question, in order to boost your average score. If you don’t solve it you are out the door.

    Again: you are not questioning IQ tests at all. You miss the point of the whole discussion. You are just accepting IQ tests in general as a holy grail, and trolling the board on that premise.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  113. @Professional Stranger

    OMG! I thought the person who used the Troll button was a bit slow on thecuptake but maybe too many years computer programming does some limiting things to the brain!

    Actually you taking too much time to see the series of numbers you were asked about probably supports Eysenck’s point that 11 Plus tests were sound and valid but should be practised for. If you had been a devotee of Martin Gardner’s little books you might well have got the answer in about 10 seconds.

    • Replies: @Professional Stranger
  114. @Hammersmith

    If you have to ask, you fail.

  115. jim jones says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    “cul-de-sac” is a very common term in England, there are cul-de-sacs all over the place

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  116. TTSSYF says:
    @CanSpeccy

    Not picking and choosing at all. I think Feynman’s IQ is not being accurately presented.

    You’re obviously blinded by an irrational, white-hot hatred of Bush if you can say, with such venom, that he is a “bullshit artist” but don’t mention that lying SOB former POTUS for whom the term is much more appropriate; to wit: “History will record that this is the day that the oceans began to recede and the planet began to heal” (this, upon his mere nomination). “If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor. Period.” “Your health care costs won’t increase by a single dime. Period.” “You didn’t build that!” “Not a smidgeon of scandal attached to my administration” (this one is particularly delightful — looking forward to Barr and Durham blowing the lid off the treasonous, criminal acts of the Big Zero administration and his weaponized DoJ, CIA, and FBI and exposing them all for the arrogant criminals that they are…Brennan, Comey, Clapper, Strzok, Page, Lynch, Yates, McCabe…as well as the Big Zero and Herself).

    • LOL: CanSpeccy
    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  117. Factorize says:

    It is time to man up.

    Question: Will the Wonderlic scores on the UKBB sample when GWASed into their DNA report SNPs related to IQ, EDU etc. (at levels beyond chance)?

    This is a right or wrong type question.

    No points will be awarded for IQ tests do not test IQ, IQ is socially constructed based on scientific racism and scientific classism, etc. . Questions of fact are not open to argument. Those who can provide correct answers will earn the esteem of others; those who do not provide correct answers will not earn each esteem: a Darwinian struggle of the correctest.

    For the record, somewhat reluctantly, I choose the answer: Yes. (One uncertainty here is that the sample size might not be large enough. A sample size of roughly 1 million should be sufficient.)

  118. @Wizard of Oz

    Wizard of Oz: OMG! I thought the person who used the Troll button was a bit slow on thecuptake but maybe too many years computer programming does some limiting things to the brain!

    Professional-Stranger: Ad-hominem nonsense. Attacks the man not his argument. If you disagree with something I said, try to say what it was and why you disagree. Give examples, be specific.

  119. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Factorize

    Yes, you make those points well.

    Telling someone that they are not good enough is the most powerfully effective way of letting them transcend their limits.

    I have seen this effect in action. My wife failed the British eleven plus exam, and has been driven ever since. First class honors degree, faculty positions at top US, Australian and Canadian universities in Departments of microbiology, medicine, biochemistry and chemistry.

    At one time, while she shared an office with a future Nobel Prize winner, the university did a departmental audit and concluded that her research was the only program of international significance. She went on to serve as the Editor-in-Chief of several top-ranked international journals. Just retired at 75, she still does the crossword in the national newspaper, perhaps just to prove she can. I can’t. But I don’t give a damn. I passed the eleven plus.

    • LOL: TelfoedJohn
  120. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @TTSSYF

    Yes, you make those points well.

    Telling someone that they are not good enough is the most powerfully effective way of letting them transcend their limits.

    I have seen this effect in action. My wife failed the British eleven plus exam, and has been driven ever since. First class honors degree, faculty positions at top US, Australian and Canadian universities in Departments of microbiology, medicine, biochemistry and chemistry.

    At one time, while she shared an office with a future Nobel Prize winner, the university did a departmental audit and concluded that her research was the only program of international significance. She went on to serve as the Editor-in-Chief of several top-ranked international journals. Just retired at 75, she still does the crossword in the national newspaper, perhaps just to prove she can. I can’t. But I don’t give a damn. I passed the eleven plus.

    • Replies: @mikemikev
    , @TTSSYF
  121. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @Professional Stranger

    You are just accepting IQ tests in general as a holy grail

    Are you kidding? Or you just don’t understand irony?

  122. @TTSSYF

    Insufferable sophomoric pedant. You know nothing.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  123. mikemikev says:
    @CanSpeccy

    I passed the eleven plus.

    Just goes to show some people slip through the cracks.

    • Agree: TTSSYF
    • LOL: CanSpeccy
  124. TTSSYF says:
    @obwandiyag

    Considering the source, I wear your label as a badge of honor (and, even though you know a few big words, I can see why you eschew the verbal portion of IQ tests).

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
  125. TTSSYF says:
    @CanSpeccy

    I don’t know why you responded to me with that blockquote. I didn’t say that. But I agree that some people rise to a challenge and still others spend their lives trying to prove other people wrong. If directed in a productive way, it’s not a bad thing.

  126. Factorize says:

    https://www.11plusguide.com/11-plus-papers-books/free-11-plus-papers/free-sample-11-plus-maths-papers/#grammarschools

    I wanted to give the 11 Plus Test a try.
    Two of the answers for the Bond 11 Plus Maths Sample Test are wrong.

    Q 42. Area of a hole donut without the whole

    Formula: Area of a donut without the hole = Area of the donut with the hole – Area of the hole

    3 x 5 – 2 x 1 = 13 not = 12 which is the given answer.

    Q50. Perhaps the test’s most difficult question: to the nearest decimeter, what is 5 foot 9 inches?

    The best that I could remember, 1 inch ~ = 2.54 cm
    so , 69″ ~= 1.7525 m

    They expected that you would answer this to a quarter of a cm?

    Answer should be 1.8 m.
    Yet, answer given was 1.7 m.

    After expecting an answer one quarter cm above the round off, they rounded the answer down?
    {Checked with an online app, the precise answer is 175.26.}

    https://www.11plusguide.com/11-plus-papers-books/free-11-plus-papers/free-sample-11-plus-maths-papers/#grammarschools

  127. @jim jones

    “cul-de-sac” is a very common term in England, there are cul-de-sacs all over the place

    But why? Why use a frog term? “Dead end” is perfectly good Anglo-Saxon. It even made a Kinks song.

    You’ve got the plural wrong. I don’t know what the proper plural is, but that one clearly isn’t it. What bag has two bums?

  128. Anon[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @TTSSYF

    People are naturally competitive. There’s nothing wrong with that.

    Sure. But much is wrong about doing it overtly, not wrapping it all in a cover of denial, denial for the use of others and oneself alike.

    Basically, the healthy person:

    1) Strives to be as above average as he/she can
    2) Strives to make other people see him/her as above average as possible
    3) Strives to not know 1) (and to know he/she sees everyone as on the same level
    4) Strives to not know 2) (and to make other people think he/she does not, in the least, do 2)

    As a girl has told me several times about her business these days, it’s complicated.
    Humans have a multiplicity of goals — they need to do and believe and show a lot of things in contradiction with each other, almost the whole time.
    Thankfully I am not well adjusted, and that spares me all such fatigue.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  129. @TTSSYF

    Ooh. Scintillating. Incisive. Brilliant riposte! Like all the other boneheads on here, you think you are smarter than people who are smarter than you. But even better is how you think you are funny. Well, you are. You are funny.

    Inadvertently.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  130. kelvin150 says:
    @Alfred

    The Cambridge researchers had already done that on Facebook. If you drink Pepsi you are dumber than those that drink Coke, and both groups are dumber than the average. The Cambridge data were alleged to have been used by the Cambridge Analytica (no relation to Cambridge U) in the Trump election campaign for personalized election messaging.

  131. kelvin150 says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    It was medically proven that initially SARS had higher odd ratio for Asians as it jump species to human there, but it also showed that it fast mutated to affects Whites as there were plenty of Whites in HongKong as well as HongKongers in Canada.

  132. Anon[378] • Disclaimer says:
    @obwandiyag

    Spoken like someone very ignorantly stupid.

    IQ score is relative. Easier test means more people will hit the ceiling, but the stupids are still stupid, there are plenty of space below. It is as stupid as someone who thinks that he can out run his own shadow.

  133. Anon[378] • Disclaimer says:
    @CanSpeccy

    Another ignorantly stupid. True IQ is independent of language and culture, otherwise it is tainted.

  134. @TG

    See my comment 34. Distributions are informative, particularly those of whole populations on well designed tests, beccause if they then show deviations from normality, this might identify a cause. The Scottish sample (I think for Glasgow) showed a big bulge of low scorers, probably due to the very bad conditions for children at that time, leading to frequent illnesses and a profound and possibly damaging inflamatory response.

  135. @Art

    Honesty can be measured by tests, but I don’t think it can be done in two minutes.

    • LOL: AaronB
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  136. @Professional Stranger

    Do you imagine that these reported scores are accurate?

  137. @res

    Thanks. This is exactly what I would like to build up: a list of relatively quick tests which could be used to increase our understanding of a wide range of social phenomena.

  138. @Eddie Collins

    No. A disparity between one person’s reported intelligence test result does not invalidate observations based on a million men. This is not a strong argument. Furthermore, a discrepancy between an actual, validated IQ test result and actual real-life achievements in a notable scientist would be interesting. One hundred such discrepancies between notable achievers in science and their IQ test results would be even more interesting, and lead us to question their relevance.
    Try looking at Lubinski and Benbow for some actual data on the achievements of bright people, these based on cases in which we have actual results.

  139. @CanSpeccy

    No, that is not what general intelligence would predict. General intelligence does not exclude cases of special skills, it includes them. Special skills are rare, but of course they exist.
    I think we have covered this many times before: general intelligence, group factors, special skills plus measurement error.

    • Replies: @CanSpeccy
  140. TTSSYF says:
    @Anon

    I would agree that there is sometimes a very fine line between healthy self-confidence and arrogance.

  141. TTSSYF says:
    @obwandiyag

    I have no interest in being “scintillating or incisive,” nor in making “brilliant ripostes” (but thank you, nonetheless). I also don’t think I’m smarter than people who are smarter than I (how could I, if I know they are smarter?) I said, in an earlier post, that I believe the next best thing to being naturally brilliant is to be brutally honest with oneself, and that comment applies to me. I’m well aware of my strengths and my limitations. Are you? One wouldn’t know it from your comments.

    As a start, you should consider the fact that you are the one who comes to this website and, almost without exception, initiates all of the insults, calling people “dumb,” “boneheads”, and other ad hominems.

  142. @Yapius the 2nd

    Actually, Wilson in letters to a young scientist opines exactly this—that super smart people become bored with science. I think it stems from a misuse of the concept of the iq test. The iq test is not for differentiating among high achieving individuals. It’s for placing people into broad categories, such as hands on workers, Middle clerks, cognitive workers, etc. some researchers say that iq tests administered after age 18 or 20 are actually not predictive. I’ve also read that specific talents become most important for iqs over 120. The system did not fail Feynman. He ended up a cal tech physicist. To have failed you would have to see idiots at cal tech and seemingly talented people working in the checkout line at Walmart. (Like the new change to the SAT might give us lol). This is the fallacy of iq narcissism. “My iq score is over 170 so I’m smarter than Einstein. Even though I’m a couch potato.” Not!
    Simply that Termin’s series excluded Shockley and Alvarez shows that simple testing is not useful for differentiating high achievers. Actually, I became interested in the offspring of famous scientists, looking at where they ended up. Few seem very talented at all. Only von Neumann’s line seems to have created a dynasty of math professors. Abrupt regression to the mean, or are average seeming people a lot more talented than you might think?

  143. TTSSYF says:

    Here’s my final comment, Obwandiyag — I actually don’t like trading insults with commenters on the Web — particularly, anonymously. I don’t do it in my everyday life, and I shouldn’t be doing it here. So this will be my final comment to any Web articles. I wish you well, and whatever is to be, will be.

  144. CanSpeccy says: • Website
    @James Thompson

    General intelligence does not exclude cases of special skills,

    What does that mean?

    It cannot mean that special skills are reflected in IQ test score, since we know that there are people with special skills like Gloria Lenhoff who have extremely low IQ test scores (ca. 65), and people like Richard Feynman and at least several other Nobel Prize winners in physics who though certainly possessed of special skills, had quite ordinary IQ test scores.

  145. Anonymous[458] • Disclaimer says:
    @James Thompson

    Honesty can be measured by tests, but I don’t think it can be done in two minutes.

    Are you sure about this? What kind of honesty?

    Let me explain:

    Wheelchair-bound woman is gang-raped by six migrants at Swedish asylum centre after asking if she could use their toilet

    So let’s talk about honesty and morality:

    1) How many European males would be prepared to gang-rape a wheelchair-bound Swedish woman?

    2) How many of them would be able to get five accomplices in two minutes – among their immediate, speed-dial contacts? Five? Seriously?

    3) Will their children be any better?

    4) What’s your view of the Musilm “culture” in Eurpe, so far? How it’s different from the 7-th century rape-and-pillage methods our ancestors died to repel?

  146. EUROPEAN CHRISTIANS DID IT TOO..
    Witch burning in Europe
    Picture: “Conquistadors slaughter American Indians” following “CHRISTIAN convert or die” RULE in Luke 19:27 “Jesus said.. But as for these enemies of mine, who did not want me to reign over them, bring them here and slaughter them before me.”

    Spanish Inquisition: https://images.immediate.co.uk/volatile/sites/20/2018/09/Inquisition-4-1c3f01f.jpg?quality=90&resize=620,413

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