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A Kind of Introduction: the OK Boomer Moment in Rock History
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As memes go, “Okay Boomer” goes a long way. Though on surface hardly damning or even insulting, it stings precisely because the boomers made such a big deal of themselves. Nothing they did was just ‘okay’. It was meant to be ‘world shaking’, like Cool Hand Luke’s antics. The Boomer Bible would have us believe all previous generations(and cultures) existed only to lead to the Great Boomer Moment, and all successive generations shall live in the shadow of the boomers. So, when a youngster in the Twilight of the Boomers mutters, “Okay Boomer”, it cuts deeper than outright condemnation. At least condemnation implies the boomers still matter, that they are the focus of attention, the center of controversy(as the debates about Woodstock were for several decades). Many boomers probably feel like the overgrown spoiled brat in THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS who gets his comeuppance alright(and many times over), but no one is around to care or even remember why he’s due for a great fall. “Okay Boomer”, slyly more mocking than “Damn You Boomer, You’re the Worst Scum that ever lived”, implies boomers were ultimately no different, hardly special, from those who went before and came after. They had their day in the sun but grew old like everyone else in history. And in the coming decades, they will drop like flies like the generations of World War I and World War II without anyone really noticing or caring(not least because most of them are white, now a discredited people in the West).

Despite their self-aggrandizement, a certain anxiety haunted the boomer psyche. After all, the most emblematic boomer movie, THE GRADUATE, ended on a note of ambiguity. But then, its writer and director were pre-boomers, and indeed so much of boomer mentality was actually shaped by their elders. BONNIE & CLYDE was directed by Arthur Penn, who was born in 1922. Given the difficulty of breaking into the movie business, film culture in the boomer era was dominated by members of the ‘greatest generation’, even if it sometimes pandered to boomer passions. Rock Music was the true expression of the boomer generation because its main trend-setters were either boomers themselves or born on the eve of boomer-dom.

But, Rock Music also poses the biggest challenge for the boomers. A culture so devoted to youth was bound to make the boomers seem increasingly irrelevant and even ridiculous as they aged. Does anyone really want to see another Rolling Stones or Who concert? No wonder Nik Cohn, in his ROCK FROM THE BEGINNING, mused the Stones would have done good to die in plane crash before turning thirty. As it happened, many Rock stars did die young, adding to their romantic mythology, but the details were sordid and ugly, sure signs that the Counterculture was given to self-indulgence and self-destruction(and a hazardous model for younger generations).

Even boomers who steered clear of pitfalls of excess were impacted by the heady idealism. In Albert Brooks’ LOST IN AMERICA, a yuppie couple decides to embark on a journey of self-discovery inspired, rather belatedly, by EASY RIDER. But even the late-blooming idealist acknowledges the guys in the landmark movie had a nest egg: “They sold cocaine”, which gives the lie to the idealism. So, in the end, was it really about dollars and cents, a delusion of searching for meaning fueled by greed and laziness? There is a Jewish angle to LOST IN AMERICA as well, significant as Jews turned out to be the most consequential ethnic group who had most to gain from the vast social and cultural changes wrought between the eve and the end of the Cold War.

In a way, the arch of boomer history has become depressing. Look at the photos of young Bill Clinton and Hillary Rodham, and for all their delusions and egotism, one senses a certain idealism, a resolve that their generation will be ‘different’. And John Kerry was part of the anti-war movement. Yet, what kind of politicians did they turn out to be? Just as corrupt, conniving, and slimy as their predecessors. Perhaps, this shouldn’t be surprising to anyone with a conservative disposition: Human nature is what it is and cannot be ‘saved’ or ‘redeemed’ by spurt of idealism or radical will.

Still, the contrast between their youthful dreams and professional compromises are so stark, in a way, worse because the boomer elites seem less reflective and redemptive, more smug in their sense of rightness. And they took fewer risks. After all, the three presidents of the Sixties Era all paid a heavy price. John F. Kenney was shot dead. Lyndon Johnson’s presidency imploded with the Vietnam War and the race riots. Richard Nixon was brought down by Watergate.

In contrast, for all their spectacular failures, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama enjoyed two term presidencies unscathed(mostly) and haven’t shown the slightest hint of self-reflection. The tragic boomer figure could be Donald Trump but for the fact that his presidency was such a clown show that, instead of failing nobly, just fell flat on its ass(though QAnon morons will claim The Donald meant to do it as part of 4D chess). As it happened, the Boomers took most of the credit for the social changes/progress brought about by the Greatest Generation(for good or ill), and this sense of moral narcissism led to an entitlement mentality whereby they felt justified by the virtue of spouting for the umpteenth time some platitude about ‘racism’ and MLK.

At least during the Sixties and perhaps for the first time, there was a sense among boomers that the biggest crimes committed by the US have been abroad, especially as so many natives perished in the Vietnam War. One would think the boomer generation would have been more reflective about foreign policy, but oddly enough, they fell into the groove of post-Cold War triumphalism and committed themselves to new rounds of hegemonism that, steered by the newly ascendant Jewish elites, turned US foreign policy into more wars and/or hostilities against any nation or people on the Enemies List of the Cabal. Muhammad Ali has been lionized over the years for having stood by his conscience in protest against the war. It was as if America’s conscience about its own past was reshaping its place in the world. One would have thought the boomers of all people, in coming to a deeper understanding of the righteous demands of blacks, would have felt likewise about the rest of the world. And one would have thought blacks, whose political culture owes so much to Sixties activism, would join with White Boomers in shaping US foreign policy toward a friendlier role in the world. Instead, something else happened. In sacralizing the likes of MLK and welcoming/promoting sacralized blacks in the military and key government positions, US revamped its image as a reformed nation with renewed moral license to do as it pleases around the world. US went from Ali refusing to serve in the Vietnam War to whites & blacks in the Air Force painting bombs & missiles with BLM signs to justify wars against Arabs(and whomever happens to be on the current Jewish hit-list).

So much of the promise associated with the boomers turned out to be a bummer. Today, the oldest of the boomers are in their mid-70s, and the world they left behind is no better(and in some ways considerably worse) than the pre-boomer world. Boomers were better dreamers than doers, not least because so many of their ‘ideas’ only made sense as fantasy. Try to make real world sense of John Lennon’s “Imagine”. Worse, the generation associated with Anti-War protests and CCR classics like “Fortunate Son” and “Who’ll Stop the Rain” has turned out to be even more nihilistic as global imperialists and warmongers… though globalists are blind to their aggression as their way is to transgress unto others as you allow others to transgress unto yours. A kind of mutual conquest, “We send our sons and daughters(and all the genders in between) to invade and occupy your lands, and you send your sons and daughters to replace our native folks.” A fair-minded kind of mutual imperialism?

Perhaps, most problematic of all is the Teflon nature of the New Elites. If the old Wasp elite power could at least be criticized and checked, this is no-go with Jewish Power shrouded in the Holocaust Cult. Allied with blacks and homos, two other sacralized groups, the most powerful elites in the US now carry on without any criticism. This is surely more a tribal problem than a generational one, i.e. if Wasps or White Americans continued their elite dominance with the boomer takeover, there would likely be a healthier debate about who has the power and what they’re doing with it. But with Jewish domination in key fields, who dares to speak the obvious lest he be labeled with the career-and-reputation destroying charge of ‘antisemitism’? Does the A.C.L.U even stand for free speech anymore?

One take on the boomers is they turned out just like everyone else. That was Mike Nichols’ point in his ending of THE GRADUATE. Older than boomers by a decade and having honed his skills in the cynical world of comedy, he had fewer illusions. Ben and Elaine will become like their parents. Nothing wrong with that but for the fact that the boomers made claims. Wild claims about how they, as a collective, was like the Second Coming, the End of History, the finders of the Fountain of Youth. Just like Christians come across as worse hypocrites with their sanctimony, Boomers seem insufferable for their fabulous claims. It wasn’t long before their self-absorption with youth turned into self-absorption with materialism(especially in the Eighties). In a way, the shameless hedonism so integral to 60s youth culture paved the way for a more brazen ‘rock star’ kind of capitalism.

In the end, the only lasting contribution of the boomers will be their music. It’s so easy to both overestimate and underestimate this aspect because its impact was so sudden & overwhelming. For countless people since the 60s, Rock Music has been the only music that mattered, and it changed fashions and tastes all over the world. But, so much seem diminished in retrospect(not because the newer music is better, which it certainly isn’t, but because the Zeitgeist has not only passed but been forgotten). The most obvious example is none other than the Beatles SERGEANT PEPPER’S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND, which was showered with some of the biggest raves in music criticism, popular and serious. It was as if Beatles united Heaven and Earth. But was the album really that great? Did the Beatles really have anything to say beyond platitudes? Was it all just a collective delusion?

Critical equilibrium isn’t easy to maintain with Sixties Music culture. Just when one’s about to consign it to another category in cultural history, one is struck by the sheer treasure trove of powerful and original songs. On the other hand, the sum total seems less than the extravagant claims made over the years by canonites for whom Rock Culture is Culture, and truth be told, what other living culture is there in the West but popular music, especially with cinema having turned into another category of video-games?

In a way, it is amazing that two decades made such a difference. Rock Music’s been around for seventy or seventy five years, but it’s the first two decades that really mattered, with nothing fundamental added to the template(with the possible exception of rap, but then part of its resilience is the sheer indifference to the very idea of development and growth). Cinema has been called the Art of the 20th century, but one could argue the two decades from 1955 to 1975(or from 1960 to 1980 if to clarify between Rock n Roll and Rock Music) had the biggest impact on the modern culture, for good or ill. In the end, it was probably for ill as Rock Music was like opening the pandora’s box. But same could be said of cinema. Even as there is so much to admire, the overall impact of movies on world culture has been negative, i.e. for every worthy work, there have been not only many more bad ones but downright corrosive ones as, cinema, like electrified popular music, has narco-tendencies toward mass-mindlessness.

History is about all of time, but the minutes fill the hours, which is to say relatively few bright moments serve as beacons for the rest of time. Greek history is long, but just about the only era that matters is a couple of centuries in ancient times. The period was so seminal that scholars still find new meanings and artists continue to draw inspiration. It wouldn’t be surprising if 99% of literature on Greek culture and history is devoted to the Classical period. While it may seem outlandish to compare Rock Culture to Classical Greece — after all, the only lasting contribution of the boomers is to popular music whereas Greeks achieved so much in so many fields — , the music produced in the first two or three decades of the Rock Era will probably be the subject of countless studies and the inspiration for many future artists(though perhaps, it needs to be forgotten and rediscovered for future generations to recapture the sense of adventure and revolution, like Antiquity was given a new life with its reemergence in the Renaissance). Some may argue the boomers achieved much more than music, especially in computers and high-tech. But, boomer contribution to science and technology seems part of the continuum than precedes and succeeds the boomers, whereas Rock Music was a decisive break that defined boomers as a force in their own right.

The biggest passion among Americans, at least since the Sixties, has been popular music. Perhaps, it owes to the intoxicating and seductive nature of music itself, but people don’t just like or enjoy their favorite music but love it, gorge on it, and even lose their minds over it. Boomers had their favorite TV shows in the Sixties, but they swooned over the Beatles and revered Bob Dylan, almost as a prophet. Boomers were called the Film Generation, but cinephilia was a minority phenomenon in college campuses and handful of big cities with reliable flow of foreign cinema.

It was the synthesis of composer and performer that made Rock Culture so potent in the eyes of youth. With TV and cinema, the writers write, directors direct, and actors act. So, who would be the real author? No wonder the ‘auteur theory’ grew out of controversy in film criticism. Even with the director enthroned as the ideal ‘author’ of cinema, no single figure has been as dominant in cinema as the great icons of Rock Culture.

Of course, it wasn’t always so. The general rule prior to the rise of boomers was the composers would compose and singers would sing, a rational arrangement given that most composers weren’t good singers(and lacked charisma) while the performers couldn’t string two notes together. (Frank Sinatra and Elvis Presley just performed.) Today, one might even argue that the music scene has reverted or reset to the industrial ideal of composers composing and performers performing: A most workable division of labor.

And yet, the cult of music as especially meaningful and significant to youth culture owes to the Sixties when, for a time, the ideal was the songwriter-singer(to distinguish it from the ‘singer-songwriter’ phenomenon of the Seventies). Bob Dylan, as composer and performer, was regarded as a visionary personal artist. John Lennon and Paul McCartney also wrote their own songs. As such, they weren’t mere cute faces or charmers on stage, but artists in their own right, with something to ‘say’. And the Rolling Stones gained stardom only when they dug hard and unearthed a sound hitherto unknown to blues and rock-n-roll(though owing heavily to both). For the boomer generation, these shamanic rock stars represented a unity, a conviction that an individual could be everything. The personal and popular could be one. By technical standards, neither John Lennon, Mick Jagger, and especially Bob Dylan was a great singer, but it didn’t matter as it was about being personal and distinct. Even Brian Wilson, who could sing, agonized over making music more uniquely his own.

Especially under the influence of Bob Dylan, the Sixties Rockers were no longer content to write mere hits; they had to personalize their material, and this made them ‘poets’ in the eyes of the young(and even older) generation. To be a poet and also to perform, this was prophetic stuff for impressionable youth, and this template never went away(despite the resurgence and even dominance of the Pop Idol who relies on composers, many of whom are more like chemists than artists). The only thing comparable would be the standup comic who writes his own jokes. In the case of Woody Allen, he not only wrote and acted but directed, an incredible feat that explains his assured place in cinema — he may not be the best writer, best actor, or best director, but to be able to do three and churn out one personal work after another, that’s almost unheard of. Still, comedy focuses on the moment, whereas music resonates long after it’s over.

George Lucas is one of the giants of popular culture, a man who changed movie history(for good or ill). But, he remained behind the lens and is nowhere to be seen in STAR WARS. In other words, for all his talent and vision, he’s a geek. In contrast, Harrison Ford lit up the screen with his looks and charm, but what is an actor but a parrot who reads lines handed to him? As such, neither the writer/director or actor makes an ideal subject of cult worship. The creator creates but remains off-stage, and the performer commands the stage but cannot create.

In contrast, when boomers fixed their eyes and ears on their favorite Rock Stars, it was as if everything in the universe had come into singularity. Personality cult is probably wired into the human mind in search of heroes and gurus, and it all came to a heady mix in the Rock Era. The Boomer Ideal of the Rock Star fused the private and the public. Today, that ideal may be embodied by the Rapper, but rap music(at least most of it) seems like cheating. It’s like microwaveable ready-made food. If a Rock Star like Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Neil Young, or Robert Plant/Jimmie Page were like chefs who took raw ingredients and labored over cooking up something unique and special, rappers essentially take pre-packaged material and give it a bit of twist, mainly with more lewdness and foul language(but how many more F-bombs can you load into a rap song?)

In a way, it’s almost incredible. It took Rock Music only a couple of decades to create a whole new universe of meaning and longing. So short a span but so much to understand. Entire millennia can pass without fundamentally altering a culture or even civilization, but short bursts of energy can turn the world upside down.

Rock Culture was like a big bang moment in history, and even after so much of the Sixties has been forgotten(or neglected), the music lives on. And despite the eulogies that Rock is dead, no template has replaced the Sixties Ideal of the Rock Star as a totality, the one who has it all and can do it all. No wonder then that Martin Scorsese, for all his successes as a film artist, defers to Rock Stars of his generation as the true titans with talent that he can’t even begin to fathom. Also, without technology, the film-maker is nothing, but even if all the power plants were to shut down, the musician goes on making music. On the other hand, Rock Music is inconceivable without electricity. For awhile when electric guitar was the king of all instruments in pop culture, it was as if Rock Stars had the power of Zeus. They weren’t merely poets, performers, and prophets but gods as well.

The Rock Star was all the more a figure of awe because of the odds stacked against him. How many in a million have composing skills? How many in a million can sing(even adequately)? How many have stage presence, or charisma? Of course, being part of a band eased the odds. Roger Daltrey couldn’t compose but could sing the songs by Pete Townsend. Paul Simon was a decent singer, but his songs reached new heights with the vocals of Art Garfunkel.

I’m not sure where this blog will take us, but one way is to approach it as a way of understanding how popular culture and popular music(in particular) so profoundly changed the world when something both miraculous and monstrous crawled out of the lab of the boomer experiment of the Sixties.

 
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  1. Some disaffected Boomer, to avoid looking in the mirror, projects his failures onto politicians and blames the forces of his unconscious, which he calls Jews.

    In old age, he looks back to how he played as a youth and tries desperately to understand the numismatic presence, in his mind, of ancient rockstars, especially Bob Dylan (see above.)

    Via the type of overthinking that placed him in this vice, he will later try to find that same numinousness in projections onto fascist politics.

    In this way, meanderings will serve as a defence against reality without and, more importantly, within.

    The readership will consist of 80% antisocial types who just need to shout racial and sexual slurs, and 20% boomers who have landed in the same trap as the writer. Let’s hope that 20% work their way through it, perhaps in seeing themselves in each other, and slip this dark forest of morose nostalgia.

  2. Nat X says:

    Jibba jabba.
    ZZZ

    • Agree: profnasty
    • Replies: @Richard B
  3. Trinity says:

    An article about Boomers from a guy who OBVIOUSLY doesn’t know shit about the era he is talking about. I’m a late Boomer and where I lived no one gave two shits about Bob Dylan or Woody Allen, not because they are Jews, but because no one listened to their shit “music” or watched their phoo phoo movies about some Jews idea of living in Manhattan. This guy doesn’t know that a lot of late Boomers were still teens into the 1980s and just starting out in life in the 1980s as young adults. While the Rolling Stones were still around, MTV brought a whole new list of new talent to the table. Perhaps no other era can top this one for such an eclectic group of music and an abundance of very talented female rock stars.

    Late Boomer movies would be Saturday Night Fever, Rocky, Cool Hand Luke, Good, Bad and the Ugly, Dirty Harry movies, etc. The movies you mentioned were only watched by lames. Yeah, we had Star Wars geeks as well but I certainly wasn’t one of them.

    LAMEST GENERATIONS : ALL POST BOOMER GENERATIONS WITH THE ZOOMERS/MILLENIALS OR WHATEVER YOU WANT TO CALL THEM THE WORST OF THE WORST.

    MOST TRAITOROUS GENERATIONS: WORLD WAR ONE GENERATION FOLLOWED BY THE SILENT GENERATION.

    SURE THING, ZOOMER.

  4. Trinity says:

    Take a look at some concert footage of rock groups performing before a packed stadium in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and look at the young people attending. You will see a lot of attractive and in shape people or at least they are not overweight for the most part. No purple haired 300lb lesbians, no Black dude and White chick couples ( this existed but was very rare, remember Altamont? hehe) The emaciated and wimpy dudes were indeed present but they were the hippie EARLY BOOMERS but even those wimpy hippies look better than some of the Zoomer/Millennial freaks we see today.

    Transgenders were still considered freaks and homosexuals were mocked, mostly behind their backs, I seriously never ran into someone who wanted to physically harm someone just because they were gay but we certainly didn’t approve of it. Music of the Late Boomers was very eclectic. John Travolta who didn’t start Disco but helped make it more popular also popularized the Urban Cowboy fad. “Not A Cowboy I Just Own The Hat” was a popular bumper sticker. You had everything from Black Sabbath and Metallica to Donna Summer moaning “I Love To Love You Baby” to Hank Williams Jr. talking about “Family Tradition.” It wasn’t strange to walk into a dive and hear everything from Eddie Money to Kool & The Gang to Johnny Paycheck blaring from the jukebox. “Take Me Home Tonight” by Money was a signature tune that would often play at closing time. hehe.

    Mega Movies for Late Boomers? Cool Hand Luke and The Good, The Bad and The Ugly were from the 1960s but late Boomers loved these movies. Other movies

    1975: One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest
    1976: Rocky and Taxi Driver
    1977: Star Wars for the space geeks
    1981: Indiana Jones
    1982: E.T. for the geeks & First Blood introduces Rambo, Rocky III with Eye Of The Tiger
    1983: Scarface
    1986: Platoon

    The only people watching Woody Allen movies were phoo phoo douchebags or people who were not Boomers.

  5. “Human nature is what it is and cannot be ‘saved’ or ‘redeemed’ by spurt of idealism or radical will”?

    How about: human nature is what it is and cannot flourish in a system dedicated to competition and materialism while enabled by a hateful dystopian religion that sees life merely as the sinful prelude to the fantasy existence that happens after you die?

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  6. anonymous[472] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s woefully remiss to discuss 60s music seriously, without discussing the Laurel Canyon operation launching all those ‘famous 60s music groups’ – many 1960s musicians being children of CIA agents, military officers etc., as the late great David McGowan documented:
    https://centerforaninformedamerica.com/inside-the-lc-the-strange-but-mostly-true-story-of-laurel-canyon-and-the-birth-of-the-hippie-generation-part-i/

    One example – the Doors’ Jim Morrison was the son of Admiral Morrison who ran the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin false flag essentially starting the full-scale US-Vietnam war … many other 60s music people like that, the public never learning their 60s fave bands were often gov-intel kids.

    The 60s sex-drugs music scene, turned out to be run by gov-intel-media oligarchs to wreck righteous white culture, just like the gangsta-rap stuff has been peddled in recent decades, as part of oligarch efforts to destroy positive potential in black community life.

    Young Jim Morrison and his father, war-starting Admiral Morrison, aboard the US Navy Bonhomme Richard:

  7. This article takes a bunch of cliches that supposedly typify “the boomers” who are Americans born between 1946 and 1964 and tries to put them into a convenient box. This is 80 million people or equivalent to the entire population of Germany today. Not every person who was born in this era liked Rock Music, took drugs, or engaged in the left-wing anti-establishment politics. Many millions of good, solid citizens came out of this era and I’m annoyed by the association made by media types that degenerates like the Clintons are typical of people born between ’46 and ’64. Many blame the mess that the country is in today, on the “boomers”, but the roots of the pathologies that plague us today can be traced back to many years before that. The worst of the “boomers” like the Clintons were just going along for the ride that the prosperity created by the previous generation provided. The smart ones knew it wouldn’t last forever and got educated and built proper careers for themselves and their families.

  8. @Joe Paluka

    As Joe wrote, a bunch of cliches. There are a few true points this essay makes but I don’t recognize my generation for the most part in how it is described. For one thing, this counter culture idea is somewhat exaggerated. The boomers legacy was not only rock music, great as a lot of it was, but also the invention of the personal computer, the software that was needed and the whole culture around it. It revolutionized the world in the way the Gutenberg and the printing press did. Back to the counter culture. It is estimated that at the height of the movements most radical phase, no more than perhaps a half million people, really participated in its most radical manifestations.

    What I’m saying here is that most of the boomers were not that extreme. Millions of them still followed the few values that their parents had. And as for the movie The Graduate, the Robinson Family and I took the and the Braddock’s, seemed like a typical Jewish Family to me. Indeed, I wonder if Mike Nichols, who was Jewish, was projecting his own experiences. In the move, the two families are implied to be the typical wasps. I didn’t see it. In any case, I couldn’t agree more with your description of the typical boomer. The did create many innovations and the boys did have many garage bands— while taking off to the surplus store with dad, or often hitting the newly created malls with mom.

    • Replies: @Dr. Charles Fhandrich
  9. @Dr. Charles Fhandrich

    Sorry for all the typo’s. I got ahead of myself and couldn’t do corrections.

  10. That could be the key: the “progress” of the 60s was actually brought about by The Greatest Generation (itself a misnomer if ever their was one), but the Boomers’ took credit for it.

    This, in turn, gave them that “sense of entitlement” that is their key characteristic. Just as their own lives were unexamined, since they were already “golden” (Joni Mitchell, “Woodstock”), foreign policy was unchanged, but now conducted with a sense that “America is the essential nation” guiding the world (e.g., Clinton bombing Serbia for peace, a notion that the Fugs would find amusing).

    Remember people saying Geo. W. was “born on third base and thinks he hit a triple”? True, but also true of the whole generation.

    • Replies: @animalogic
  11. FWIW, growing up in Detroit in the 60s/70s, Beatles and Dylan didn’t mean shit to us. I never heard anything from Sgt Pepper until I saw George Burns sing “With a Little Help” on the Ed Sullivan show. My reaction was, hey, he’s singing that song Joe Cocker sang at Woodstock!

    (Which makes sense; most of the Pepper LP is songs about adults: “20 years ago,” “when I’m 64”, “she’s leaving home,” Mr. Kite’s vaudeville show, etc. None of that meant shit to us. Even the Stones’ imitation, Satanic Majesties, has the same music hall crap, which for some reason the Brits thought was “psychedelic, baby.”)

    Of course, Detroit (“The Paris of the Midwest” — WSJ) was unique in that we had our own music scene, and didn’t need NYC heebs to tell us what was “cool”. Conversely, Detroit (and Cincinnati) was the only place in the US that “got” the Who. Look at posters for the Grande Ballroom and you’ll see local acts (MC5, Stooges, Amboy Dukes, SRC, Bob Seger, etc.) and The Who & Cream. It think the Dead played there once.

    Iggy gave his bandmates John Coltrane and Sun Ra LPs to get the sound he wanted, not some Dylan or Beatles shit.

  12. Trinity says:

    (((The Okay Boomer))) movement was more than likely started by some rat faced Jew no doubt. Hell, it really wasn’t started it is just a continuation of divide and conquer that was used way back when. (((THESE PEOPLE))) are not known for their originality.

    This divide the generations is so old and played out, just like male vs. female, Black vs. White. The Jew’s beloved “greatest generation ever” aka traitorous WWII generation was the target of the Jew back in the hippie generation. I can remember as a little elementary skoo snot watching programs like (((All In The Family))) where the hip hippie Baby Boomers would mock or complain about old fogies from WWII. (((Meathead))) was always telling poor ole Archie Bunker about how wrong good ole Arch was, in real life Carrol O’Connor was white traitor trash. Figures, he goes on television and tries to make older White working class people look stupid.

    Funny thing, when it comes to the Jew and Aye-rab, EVERYONE in (((our media))) has been speaking with the same tongue since 1948 or longer. It is always, Jew = good, Aye-rab = bad. Of course IF that Aye-rab is raping White women in Europe and/or America, no problemo as far as (((our media))) is concerned.

  13. AaronB says:

    The reason the music of the 60s, and to some extent the 70s, was so epochal is because it was the last time our music was genuinely spiritual and critical of modernity and the insipid notion of progress. It had depth.

    I was thinking how all music today is basically about love and sex.

    The 60s was the last great spiritual age of America, when a different way of life was envisioned.

    I wasn’t around for the 60s, but compared to what cake after it’s hard not to be nostalgic for it.

    • Agree: Right_On, Marcion
    • Replies: @nosquat loquat
  14. @anonymous

    Looks like Jim Morrison is back, and working for the enemy again:

    MSNBC Banned From Rittenhouse Trial After Employee Follows Jury Bus; Network ‘Regrets’ Incident

    “The judge added that the employee taken into custody was James J. Morrison who claimed to be working for Irene Byon of NBC in New York.”

    Every. Single. Time.

  15. Trinity says:
    @Trinity

    Damn it, Jim.

    I forgot the movie, “Jaws” for the year 1975. Also in the Seventies we had all those disaster movies like “The Poseidon Adventure and The Towering Inferno.

    Jaws was WAY OVERRATED and Poseidon and Towering Inferno were mediocre at best. However, “Jaws” was definitely a blockbuster hit when it came out and spawned terrible sequels. Much better movie than all of the above was the ORIGINAL, “Walking Tall” and the ORIGINAL, “The Longest Yard.” Both of these Seventies hits were Jew-downed and Blackened-up to make the remakes totally unwatchable IMO.

  16. One take on the boomers is they turned out just like everyone else. That was Mike Nichols’ point in his ending of THE GRADUATE. Older than boomers by a decade and having honed his skills in the cynical world of comedy, he had fewer illusions. Ben and Elaine will become like their parents. Nothing wrong with that but for the fact that the boomers made claims. Wild claims about how they, as a collective, was like the Second Coming, the End of History, the finders of the Fountain of Youth. Just like Christians come across as worse hypocrites with their sanctimony, Boomers seem insufferable for their fabulous claims.

    Mike Nichols was a Jew, the main actors were Jews, the songwriters for the movie were Jews. Hollywood was Jewdom. The people who organized and funded Woodstock were Jews. Bob Dylan was a Jew (Zimmerman), John Lennon said show biz was an extension off the Jewish religion. Pete Townsend booted of the stage of Woodstock the Jew Hoffman. Is the writer young?

    • Replies: @Franz
    , @Franz
  17. Anon[392] • Disclaimer says:

    Jung and Freud can’t go in the same sentence. I’d say they can’t go in the same last name; or first name; or screen name; or any name at that.

  18. R.C. says:

    The writer seems to be using the term boomer to mean those born during and/or immediately after WWII through the 1940s. Those born in 55 forward like my siblings and I (born in 59) are far from the type persons than here described, and I’ve gotta say, bitching about our music? STUPID!
    Then the writer comes up with this bit of silliness:

    Does anyone really want to see another Rolling Stones or Who concert?

    Granted, the Stones have been around and rocking a long time but have a listen to Exile or Goats Head Soup to understand what great music they were putting out there.
    How many Who concerts has the writer seen? I’ve seen two and they don’t really exist as a group any more since Entwistle died. Most people I know have never seen them in concert. (I first saw them with Keith Moon in Jacksonville on 8/7/76 and they were damn good. Empty concert too.) How about Ziggy Stardust? Allman Brothers – The Band, ELO, NY Rust Never Sleeps, I give up. too many to list.
    The music from the 70s (for those like we long haired surfers who didn’t ever listen to the pop pabulum that was all there was on the radio back then) was frankly atypically and incredibly great and certainly better than those more ‘modern’ groups that have come along.
    I see now that many of the other commenters have made similar points. Kudos all.
    My impression is that the writer’s a millennial who’s just jealous about the lesser quality music that followed these great groups and the fact that they’re still have the audacity to breathe and play should be a positive thing. Sounds like he’d prefer that we’d all just die already.
    R.C.

    • Thanks: Trinity
  19. Right_On says:

    The Boomers are most celebrated for the sixties’ counter-culture, which was a supposed revolt against all forms of authority: “The Man” (Freud would have diagnosed daddy issues). But when the seventies arrived, many of those same people turned to Indian rascal-gurus – Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, Chögyam Trungpa, the Divine Light Mission – and assorted western cults and New Age movements like est training, which all claimed to have The Truth which our faux rebels had to accept slavishly.

    Reminds me of Dostoevsky’s Grand Inquisitor who believed that most people couldn’t handle the freedom that Alyosha Karamazov wanted for them.

  20. @Trinity

    Late Boomers more like Generation X that farts from the 1940’s.

    • Replies: @Trinity
  21. Trinity says:

    There was some great music pre-1974 like “All Right Now by Free” in 1970, Paul Rodgers has to be one of the most underrated lead singers in Rock & Roll history. Some other decent tunes pre-1974 “Dream On,” by Aerosmith, “Maggie May” by Rod Stewart, one of the Stones best IMO, “Bitch” in 1971, etc., However, the best years in music were without a doubt between 1974-1997. After 1997, with a few exceptions, it has all been shit. I would even say the 1980s were the best decade in music IMO, followed by the Seventies.

    Cue: All Right Now by Free. Listen up, kids, this is rock & roll.

    • Disagree: Emslander
    • Replies: @Curle
    , @animalogic
  22. Trinity says:
    @Reverend Goody

    Nah, early Generation X are more like Late Boomers you mean. hehe. Late Boomers have nothing in common with late Gen X. Gen X = 1965 to 1980? Up to 1969 is definitely just like the Late Boomers, after 1970 it gets further away with each passing year.

  23. SafeNow says:

    Plus, we could explain, in um-free speech, why The Ancient Mariner shot the albatross.

  24. @Trinity

    You forgot Smokey and the Bandit and The Outlaw Josey Wales,

    Saw Walking Tall at a drive in in West Tennessee.

    SATB could not be made today as it was entirely too sympathetic to rural Southerners. But then Reynolds did quite a few movies as the Southern Good Ol Boy hero/anti hero.

    • Replies: @Trinity
  25. Franz says:

    First, we learn to count.

    If a film or song was released in the 60s it had to be made by adults, which included zero booms.

    Three films cited, The Graduate, Cool Hand Luke, and Bonnie and Clyde were made by adults, for adults. The last was explicitly marketed for people who remembered the Depression years and the assorted tropes that went with the era. Nobody born after would have recognized them.

    The media fed “my generation” nonsense to every generation since the 1920s (“You are all a Lost Generation” — Gertrude Stein). Mostly people ignore it because most people are not Jews. This is media creating disorder, adding to it makes you an accomplice. Generation is not a job description or the name of a profession. It’s time to put a stop to the Gertrude Century.

    Most of that generation then and all since had no generational regard. They went to shitty schools or got shitty jobs and saw their opportunities shrink and their towns get shittier. Identity came from the work they did (only a fifth went to college) and the fact that boomers took the brunt of de-industrialization. Homes and savings lost, etc, which is why most will work till they drop but you won’t hear of them. You didn’t hear of them when they made cars and steel so why now?

    Since they had no real power, eventually they said the hell with it and watched too much TV. This is why there are more “Old Hippies” now then there were young ones back then. A century ago, just the same, hundreds of thousands of late coming westerners told tales of how they shot Jesse James.

    The earliest boomer MUSIC was punk stuff in the 70s — further from hippie you cannot get. This makes sense when you remember that the Beatles broke up in 1969 when the average boomer was about 12.

  26. Maybe the dude (or whatever…I don’t know “gender pronouns”…too boomer!) who wrote this should read my trilogy about a ficitious rock band that did not perform in the 60s and 70s… as if boomers only know about rock music of the 60s and 70s! Sheesh! https://omegabooksnet.com
    As for dead rock stars, let me say this opening line of my third trilogy novel: “If dead rock stars could talk.”

  27. @R.C.

    I saw the Who at the 1970 Isle of Wight (Britain’s Woodstock at the time) festival, as well as Moody Blues, Pink Floyd, Traffic, and a few others…had to leave Sunday so I missed Jimi Hendrix, who died two weeks later (NOT choking on his own vomit…he was murdered with the help of his manager who cashed in an Jimi’s life insurance policy), and missed Led Zep who I saw the following year at Madison Square Garden….never saw the Stones (and, after Altamont, didn’t want to!), but I was amazed visiting Jacksonville a couple of years ago (for a memorial to a friend of my hubby) that the Stones were performing there! But really, a present day Stones or Who gig would not be on my bucket list… Cheers!

    • Replies: @animalogic
  28. @Trinity

    You left out

    1984: The Terminator

    Wash day tomorrow – nothing clean, right?

    • LOL: Trinity
    • Replies: @Trinity
    , @bike-anarkist
  29. @Anon

    Except perhaps “Although part of a pathetic pseudosciuentific rabble, Jung wasn’t a complete fraud – unlike Freud.

  30. @Franz

    First learn to count, indeed sir.

    Most of modern mythology comes crashing down if you do as much as counting days, months and years, the rest will fall if you do some simple adding or subtracting.

    No need for anything more complex.

    • Replies: @animalogic
  31. Nobody used, or even heard, the term “boomer” before the middle 1980s, unless it referred to nuclear subs or Oklahoma football. It’s a bogus concept unworthy of serious thought. There was a “baby boom”, but the individuals weren’t labelled.

    This OK Boomer is just the latest version of Daddy-O, Dapper, Old Man, or Pops. “We’re smarter than the old folks” has been a recurring theme for centuries. Samuel Johnson and Mark Twain remarked upon it. The only difference in the 1960s was the sheer numbers crowded into freshly-built schools. That number itself was the result of the poor decisions of the previous two “generations”– war, depression, etc– leading to a huge backlog of progeny once the whole mess was finally over.

    That we had to “duck and cover” under our classroom desks (something taken very seriously in Honolulu, which had seen bombers) didn’t give us confidence in our elders. The New Math didn’t help, nor the GI Bill leading to the college craze.

  32. Stick says:

    The Graduate was a story about Californian Goyim wealth and expectations and the angst felt by the first son. The importance of it was that director and lead actor were Jews. This film marks the last Jewish movie attempting to become, or identify, as American. The next big Jewish film was Goodbye Columbus which examined Jewish success and questioned its authenticity. Jews did not like this movie. Finally, Little Big Man was flipped 180 degrees from the original author’s conclusion to indict the Goyim. It should be remembered that up until this time Jews sorely wanted to identify as American. Recall Bob Dylan and the folk music scene was heavily populated by Jews wishing to fit in and be authentic. There were two ethnic identities coming of age in the sixties; Jews and Italians. The Italians became Americans while Jews remained a separate wandering tribe.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Chester
    , @Anon
  33. The Beatles were a triumph of marketing, and still are to this day. Nothing beats the fact that every milestone anniversary of the band was breathlessly covered by TV News anchors on Network TV decades after they occurred (“Today is the 10th anniversary of the Beatles’s last concert”; “this Year marks the 25th Anniversary of the Beatles’ final album”).

    etc.

    Fake News is Old News.

    • Replies: @animalogic
  34. JackOH says:

    Only had time for a quick scan.

    I’d like to think an essay on rock history ought to include a mention of how electronics in the making and recording of music affected our thinking about what music is. Top of my head–better guitar pickups, better and more powerful amplifiers, effects circuitry such as reverb, tremolo, distortion, wah-wah, echo, Leslie, use of articulated feedback, multi-tracking, flanging, “backwards” recording, Moog and other synthesizers, etc.

    Cf. “All Along the Watchtower” by Bob Dylan and Jimi Hendrix. (FWIW-I like both versions.)

  35. Zumbuddi says:

    Jung-Freud = Yiddish for Priss Factor

    one trick pony and pony’s lame

    • Thanks: Trinity
  36. anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    That photo was supposedly taken in January of 1964. The morbidly obese fourteen year old boy with terrible posture is apparently Jim Morrison at twenty-years old.

  37. @Triteleia Laxa

    Jews run the music industry, Hollywood, Jews run a lot of things. That is not “the subconscious” that is reality, anybody downplaying that reality is TROLLING us.

    • Agree: Robert Dolan
  38. @Franz

    Bonnie and Clyde ………..was explicitly marketed for people who remembered the Depression years and the assorted tropes that went with the era. Nobody born after would have recognized them.

    You must not have had parents or grandparents who lived through The Depression. I was born in 1969 and had heard enough stories about the 20’s and 30’s to recognize the “tropes”.

    • Replies: @Franz
  39. Sir Paul should do a re-write entitled When I was Sixty-Four as one last hurrah for his cohort in the old folks homes, before the Coof culls them.

    To someone else’s comment earlier, the films Boomers gave us were things like


    The Breakfast Club
    Pretty in Pink
    Sixteen Candles
    Home Alone (ad nauseum)
    Ferris Beuller’s Day Off
    etc.

    Its no wonder successive generations grew up so neurotic and every bit as self-obsessed as the Boomers.

  40. Trinity says:
    @Chris Mallory

    Outlaw Josey Wales was one of Eastwood’s best IMO.

  41. Trinity says:
    @Kratoklastes

    I like the scene in Terminator II where Arnold walks into the biker bar naked. lmao. I actually had a friend that pulled that shit off. He didn’t walk into a biker bar but just a regular old juke joint dive bar. My friend at the time had a problem with the bottle and wasn’t in the right frame of mind, had been 86’ed countless times from this particular bar. He walked in there butt naked on a Friday night. The female bartender who hated him started yelling, “oh hell no, oh hell no.” My friend actually ordered a pitcher a beer. Bartender served him and he sat down at a table. Of course the cops arrived. I think he paid a small fine and did a few days in county jail. That had to be a sight to see, man. lmao.

  42. I’m a late Silent. These faggots who hate their own parents and grand parents get no sympathy. The world was already fucked up when the boomers got here and will still be fucked up when more recent generations have had their say.

  43. Anon[180] • Disclaimer says:
    @Trinity

    You got that completely backwards, everybody loved Archie and he came off as the better half against Meathead. The worst part about Boomers is YOURSELF, always something about YOU and how it “feels”.

    • Agree: Biff
    • Troll: Trinity
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  44. Anon[180] • Disclaimer says:
    @Stick

    Italians are not Americans

  45. Boomers didn’t do any of the things they are blamed for.

    The 60’s “revolution” was fueled by the minds of marxist jews in Hollywood, academia, and the CIA.

    Boomers didn’t ruin the country; the small hats did.

    Boomer bashing (as I get tired of saying) is a way to blame someone, ANYONE (other than the nose) for the rise of degeneracy, misery, chaos, violence, and stupidity.

    The worst you can say about boomers is that they were naive and gullible and wanted to try to make the world a better place.

    Sadly, this idealism was also infused with deracination and jewish brainwashing.

    Tucker often mentions that we took the left at their word, that people should be judged by the content of their character and not the color of their skin. Obviously the J-left lied to us as we can now see their anti-white hatred was always the motivating factor for every move they made.

  46. Franz says:
    @Chris Mallory

    My post should have said “would not have recognized ON THEIR OWN.”

    That given, B&C had an agenda and the elder Okies of my family were not happy to see criminals portrayed as heroes. They had a point there. No matter how destitute, the Depression era people were law-abiding as were their children during the Deindustrial era.

  47. This guy got so many things completely wrong. Why do these Gen-X idiots right this nonsense? Is there a factory somewhere that turns them out on a conveyor belt?
    Is there some school somewhere (the University of Boomer Bashing) that certifies them?

    Quite a few of the commenters have already addressed many of the things: The Boomers are roughly divided into 3 (or more) segments. For example, I’m an early Boomer who came up in the SF Bay Area smack in the middle of the birth of the so-called counter culture, but that just meant a bunch of people, slightly older then us, experimented with living arrangements, because of the cheap rents available at the time in SF and NYC. People paid 100 bucks a month for a flat.

    Lots of ideas were being tried out and tested then, is all that meant. The same was happening in music: people were making music that was new and innovative. Period.

    To assert that this was “the counter culture” was always utterly ridiculous. It was a media trope and little more, except that so many started to believe their own propaganda and the propaganda of the media, who needed to label everything.

    But by the time my little sister came around (6 years younger than me), the music scene, the hippy scene, and the Vietnam War was already over. Not only that, in 1970 there was a recession that made jobs hard to come by, followed by a stagflation by the end of the decade. The party if there ever was one was over.

    Add to that the birth of the neo-cons, 3rd wave feminism, affirmative action. and the assassination of our major leaders (who were all older than Boomers) and you have a different boomer than we early ones were.

    Another commenter is right: the Boomers led little if anything for most of their life span, because early generations were still running things for so long. Clinton, BushII and Obama are the first Boomers but even then, much of those behind them were older.

    So laying anything on the Boomers is utter nonsense.
    Assigning certain music or certain practices to “the” Boomers as if they were a monolith is also asinine.

    In fact, all and any of these Boomer bashing articles? They got to go. They are all meaningless trash. I chalk it all up mostly to Gen-X loony birds who seem to have a hard-on for Boomers and have had one since their 20s. It’s just getting worse now they are in their 50s and it’s a part of their generational makeup: bash Boomers..

    The younger generations seem to have a bit more respect (or they just don’t care).

    In the meantime, everything passes, including the generations. Many great and innovative things were done during the Boomer generation’s time. Now we can watch how they hold up in the years to come. We don’t need to hear some ignorant fool writing historically incorrect crap in articles like these.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    , @Robert Bruce
  48. @R.C.

    Granted, the Stones have been around and rocking a long time but have a listen to Exile or Goats Head Soup to understand what great music they were putting out there.

    The Stones of the ’60s and ’70s delivered some overrated but still exciting albums (Sticky Fingers, It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll); and one masterpiece (Exile on Main Street).

    Despite the wonderful “Angie,” Goats Head Soup pre-echoed worse to come, beginning with the illiterate lack of an apostrophe in the title. And the crass “Star Fucker,” camouflaged as “Star Star” in print, was the great-grandfather of today’s depraved rap.

    • Agree: profnasty
    • Replies: @Curle
  49. Trinity says:

    TAKE A GOOD LOOK AROUND AT THE TYPE OF PEOPLE WHO ARE DOING THE BOOMER BASHING. lololol. Look no further than the people who attacked Kyle Rittenhouse.

    HOWEVER, we saw Kyle Rittenhouse a man-child of 18 freed today and that kid is a special lad. Hopefully more and more of the younger generation will quit the antiquated Jew game of bashing mommy and daddy. That game is so friggin’ old.

    The Jew is always self projecting anyhow, maybe a lot of Jews have mommy and daddy issues considering how prevalent incest is in the Jewish community and how women are treated like second class citizens in Jewish culture. Maybe mommy and daddy bashing goes deeper than divide and conquer with the J people.

  50. AceDeuce says:

    None of the Beatles were Boomers.
    Ditto the Stones.
    Ditto Hendrix.
    Ditto Mr. (((Zimmerman))).
    Ditto Mr. Mojo Risin’

    George Lucas and Harrison Ford aren’t Boomers, either.

    This writer has issues. I think that the guy’s daddy copulated with a flower pot, which is why he grew up to be a blooming idiot.

    OK, Loser.

    • Replies: @Emslander
  51. @Triteleia Laxa

    ?? Boomers love Jews. They are the idiots that think Israel is our greatest ally, that there was a holocaust, that Germany needs to be punished forever for Jews, and that democracy and freedom means killing Muslims.

    • Agree: Nancy
    • Replies: @Nancy
  52. The Beatles and the Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan and Joan Baez and the Jefferson Airplane are not “boomers,” idiot.

    This whole article is like some illiterate Counterpunch article or something. Sheesh.

    • Replies: @Graham Seibert
  53. @restless94110

    I date the never-ending Depression from 1973, the beginning of adulthood for most “boomers”.

    The real stereotype of a “boomer” is a hippie handyman, just making ends meet, scrabbling around looking for work.

    Because there were so many in his cohort, for any job, there were thousands of applicants. You just couldn’t get anywhere if you were born from 1945 to 1964. Especially in the middle, in the 50s.

    (All those help wanted signs, so common now, so absent all their lives, must gall the more thoughtful of the cohort.)

    Yuppies were some tiny minority, most of whom already came from well-to-do families.

    Most “boomers” starved to death and worked their asses off at shit jobs for peanuts all of their lives.

    (And their children hate them, not because they ruined the world, but because they are poor.)

    This fact never makes it into the legend.

    • Replies: @profnasty
  54. Chester says:
    @Trinity

    All I got out of this screed is “I’m a boomer, I hate myself, but am a coward, so I project”

  55. Chester says:
    @Stick

    “Italians became Americans.” That’s debatable.

    • Replies: @animalogic
  56. Curle says:
    @Trinity

    “ MOST TRAITOROUS GENERATIONS: WORLD WAR ONE GENERATION ”

    I don’t think they knew what was happening to them any more than those who fought in WW2. And, if you read Paul Fussell, most of those recruited or drafted for WW2 only started figuring things out after the war.

    • Agree: animalogic
    • Replies: @Trinity
  57. Curle says:
    @Trinity

    “ Paul Rodgers has to be one of the most underrated lead singers in Rock & Roll history.”

    Underrated by whom? Everyone sings his praises.

  58. The Boomers destroyed the planet’s life-support system for our species, no mean achievement.

    • Replies: @Curmudgeon
  59. Curle says:
    @Franz

    Sixteen year old Peter Frampton joined Herd in 1966, he was an boomer. David Bowie, also an boomer, released his first album in 1970.

    • Replies: @Franz
  60. @James J O'Meara

    Indeed — there’s no intelligent discussion of the boomers possible without the fundamental context of their inherited prosperity.
    The whole 60’s culture is premised on teenagers & the 20’ish with \$\$\$ in their pockets. Never before had the young had such freedom to spend. As someone said, the hippies experience was “an adventure in poverty”. Adventure over — they all withdrew into middle class existence. Some kept their “ideals”…& we all know how that turned out.
    In many ways the 60’s, the boomers etc died not at Altamont but in ’71 when Nixon shut the Gold Window. The Post War Dream was over.

  61. @Trinity

    I like music from the 50’s & 60’s, but the best “decade” of music I would run from about ’76 to say ’96. That is – from punk to grunge, via “new wave”.

  62. @omegabooks

    A Stones concert in 2021? I’d be so anxious about Jagger suffering a spontaneous hip fracture I wouldn’t be able to concentrate on the music.

  63. Franz says:
    @Jack McArthur

    The people who organized and funded Woodstock were Jews. Bob Dylan was a Jew (Zimmerman), John Lennon said show biz was an extension off the Jewish religion. Pete Townsend booted of the stage of Woodstock the Jew Hoffman. Is the writer young?

    I think you’re right with that.

    Woodstock, in particular, was probably the birth of the Yuppie, and totally kosher. The book about the lads behind the show is called Young Men With Unlimited Capital by Joel Rosenman. The title alone pretty much gives the game away. Originally published shortly after the “festival” and reprinted in 1999. It’s available.

    People with money owned the publishing and entertainment world then just like now. The big difference is there was no Internet. Meaning there’s no excuse to fall for the generational claptrap anymore.

  64. @Trinity

    Good grief T, your musical references are disappointing. As an early Xer (b. late 1968), I know the best of the tastes of Generation Jones (late Boomers), including early metal i.e. Iron Maiden (1980), Priest (1975), etc.; the hard rock from which it spawned, i.e. UFO, Thin Lizzy; hard prog i.e. Rush; the best of 1977 Punk, etc., etc., etc.

    • Replies: @Trinity
  65. Franz says:
    @Jack McArthur

    The people who organized and funded Woodstock were Jews. Bob Dylan was a Jew (Zimmerman), John Lennon said show biz was an extension off the Jewish religion. Pete Townsend booted of the stage of Woodstock the Jew Hoffman. Is the writer young?

    Good research. I can recall how Woodstock became a Holy Word a few months after it happened — a pretty good calling card from the ones who created it.

    Woodstock, honestly, was probably the birth of the Yuppie, totally kosher. The book about the lads behind the show is called Young Men With Unlimited Capital by Joel Rosenman. The title alone pretty much gives the game away. Originally published shortly after the “festival” and reprinted in 1999. The Yuppie ruled from Woodstock till Christian Bale tore it down in American Psycho. The word seems dead now.

    People with money owned the publishing and entertainment world then just like now. The big difference is there was no Internet. Meaning there’s no excuse to fall for the generational claptrap anymore.

    • Thanks: Nancy
  66. Welcome to the most open place on the Internet to express your ideas. I’m glad that Ron has seen fit to add you.

    The first 50 comments offer the same rude introduction offered to every writer. Those who can, write. The others just throw rocks. Keep your helmet on.

    For what it’s worth, I was an adult living in San Francisco when the 1960s swept over us. Marijuana, the summer of love, and the Fillmore Auditorium. My girlfriend insisted that we usher at a video presentation of the Beatles at a Berkeley movie theater. I absolutely did not understand what the fuss was about until I saw it. I likewise made fun of Bobby Dy-lan pretentiously assuming the name of an established poet to sing songs that were musically nothing, at a time when my good friend Ed’s younger sister was swooning over them. I later came to appreciate that if you listened to something like Positively Fourth Street it was satirizing the hippies. He did have a message.

    Sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll certainly put an end to the fertility of the Greatest and Silent generations. The rose covered cottage dream of Bing Crosby and Perry Como disappeared forever, and with it our ability to conceive children in the first place, and raise them to be anything at all like ourselves. The 1960s, as you write, set the generations against each other.

    Let me repeat my welcome. Hope you have a thick skin, and look forward to reading more.

  67. @restless94110

    Xers had nothing much to do with the OK Boomer meme. It usually has been Millennials it seems by the writings I have read or Boomers writing about the meme.

    • Agree: Trinity
    • Replies: @restless94110
  68. The centerpiece of the author’s essay seems to be that the Boomers only lasting contribution is their music, but he has little understanding of the topic. The only worthwhile music of the Boomer era was based on blues created by Southern blacks (originating from gospel) or country created by Southern whites (originating from Scottish and Irish immigrants and their folk music).

    Dylan and the Beatles were both originally Tin Pan Alley artists. Dylan transformed himself into a country blues artist after allying with The Band. The Rolling Stones “Exile on Main Street” is a work of art combining the blues and country strains of American Southern music.

    Popular music of today (excluding country) has turned into garbage because there is little blues influence. Country of today is a mixed bag, but there are still gems to be found if you take the time to look. The gems preserve the Southern white heritage with an admixture of Southern black blues.

    Since brevity is the soul of wit, I’ll conclude by saying the author’s essay looks like a first draft and could use some serious editing for brevity.

    • Agree: Biff
  69. WHAT says:
    @Trinity

    You are so very typical in your boomerism. Actually of you here are so deliciously tilted. I guess the writer did touch the nerve lolkek.

    • Replies: @Trinity
    , @interesting
  70. Anonymous[661] • Disclaimer says:

    “…Jews turned out to be the most consequential ethnic group who had most to gain from the vast social and cultural changes wrought between the eve and the end of the Cold War.”

    Not to mention financial gain. Having worked in the music industry in LA for a few decades, I watched with some bemusement as the merchants of music sold the very same catalog of recordings five times over. And the market bought the same thing five times, first on LPs, then 8-track, cassettes, CDs, and finally digital downloads. Nothing like selling the same used car to the same customer five times lol.

    • Replies: @Sir Launcelot Canning
  71. @obwandiyag

    Joan Baez became popular in the late 50s, Dylan and the Stones maybe ’63 or ’64, and the Airplane a couple of years later. Grace Slick, Bob Dylan, Janis Joplin and Jim Morrison are all Silent Generation by birth, but appealed to mostly Boomers.

    The music that epitomized us of the Silent Generation was Andrews Sisters, Perry Como, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Bing Crosby. Towards the end, Elvis, Big Bopper and other rock ‘n roll stars.

    • Replies: @gsjackson
    , @obwandiyag
  72. @Wade Hampton

    Though my comments are positive with regard to content, I’ll have to agree with regard to brevity. This is a 2000 word article stretched out to 3500. Fewer words = more readers.

  73. Miro23 says:

    I’m not sure where this blog will take us, but one way is to approach it as a way of understanding how popular culture and popular music(in particular) so profoundly changed the world when something both miraculous and monstrous crawled out of the lab of the boomer experiment of the Sixties.

    There was an interesting comment from Mevashir on this:

    Many years ago I saw an interesting photo on the internet. The top of the photo showed a Chinese University graduation event. The men were dressed in jackets and ties and the women in dresses. Everyone looked smart and respectful. The bottom photo showed a graduation party at a fraternity of an American University. The students were wearing shorts and rags. Many of the women were topless. Most of them were holding bottles of beer or joints of marijuana and laughing at the camera. I thought way back then that this is a sure sign that America is doomed.

    That was probably about Woodstock time (1969). Since then it has been Counter Culture all the way defined as the destruction of anything to do with traditional Anglo America. A project mostly coordinated and run by radical Jews happy to augment their own power and destroy Anglo culture.

    Hence where we are today – America with a counter cultural elite using their Antifa and BLM enforcers against the remnants of Anglo America. This is the ” monstrous thing that crawled out of the lab of the boomer experiment of the Sixties”

    One consolation is that it’s a highly maladaptive in international terms. Those serious and respectful Chinese men dressed in jackets and ties and women in dresses are still there and doing a lot better than they were in 1969.

    So it’s not such a big surprise that the world is turning its back on this “monstrous thing” – even staunch allies like the Western Europeans. The West Europeans allied themselves with post WW2 Anglo America – not the current ZioGlob NWO version.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
  74. gotmituns says:

    One would think the boomer generation would have been more reflective about foreign policy
    ———————————————————————————————————
    Yep, you would have thought there’d be some reflection by the boomers. But the fact is when those young men who were against the Vietnam war stayed home in comfort instead of standing up to the lousy war (and our government) they condemned themselves and their children to this hell our nation has become. As it turned out, that was for their souls. Those of us who went to Vietnam and did their our duty to the nation are not to blame for this (C Co., 1st, Btn., 26th Marines).
    ———————————————————————————————————
    As far as Rock music goes, I can’t stand that stuff anymore. Somehow I’ve found myself listening classical and country/bluegrass. I never would have seen this coming in a million years

    • Replies: @Commentator Mike
  75. Biff says:

    Love the sixties era of music – rock, blues, Motown, country(not western), and the like – how did it turn to shit with the likes of rap – hip-hop garbage?

    PS
    Rap is as bad as some of the commentators on this thread(cut the fucking wires!).

  76. Richard B says:
    @Nat X

    Jibba jabba.
    ZZZ

    Exactly!

    Jung-Freud*, more like Young Fraud.

    *How pretentious, pseudo-intellectual, semi-literate and corrny can you get?
    Like the article itself.

  77. Jesus and Mary Chain – Head On.

    I can’t play it loud enough.

    A rare Gen-X gem.

    Yeah, yeah, yeah.

  78. Yeah, I think the whole Baby Boomer counter culture “project” was a big bust. Yeah, I still love the music and anyone who could get close to the sound (Aimee Mann, Jason Isbell and Drive By Truckers, Tony Joe White, a few others). But in the country where I now live and work — a biggish non Anglo industrial country — nobody except tiny handful of the elderly know who Bob Dylan is. Rolling Stones used to pass through on tour — the last one was 25 years ago. Nobody here – absolutely nobody – knows who the Rolling Stones are. Yes, some of them know who the Beatles are, but would not be able to identify a particular song or names of any of them. I expect this is true of great portions of non-Anglophone globe. The Rock Stars are passing into history, a very local history-they are the Lillian Gishes and Gloria Swansons of the future. I don’t think it matters. A lot of them had some fun. They made money. Had sex. Some didn’t end up liking it so much and OD’d. Some went out in other ways. Personally, I no longer find Dylan as interesting as I once thought he was. Some good melodies and nice chord sequences, but the lyrics are muddled TS Eliot. But personal opinion aside, do you really think anyone in present-day China, India, Indonesia, Mideast, all the stans, Mongolia, the whole of Africa knows anything about any of these people?

    • Replies: @profnasty
  79. Before attacking a group one must first demonize it. So it goes, but Zoomers should keep in mind that Karma is a bitch.

  80. @Trinity

    I think you forgot to mention “Apocalypse Now” and “Godfather”.

  81. Some old black guy playing the blues well into old age, like say BB King, doesn’t seem incongruous, so why with rock stars who draw their inspiration from the blues? They may not be able to jump as high as in their youth but if the music is good why not keep playing it?

  82. Damn, I didn’t know any of this about my generation despite living with them and thru some of it (technically an old sole late boomer). Obviously you never met a Vietnam vet or boomer farmer/factory worker. Also I was unaware of our importance other than a presumed voting bloc to be exploited. OK my generation did think it invented sex, but that was more of a sign of generational cognitive decline. I’ll admit we are dumber than our elders, but so are the later generations dumber than we are. The kosher takeover technically happened 1914, and we weren’t even twinkles in are yet to be born parents’ eyes. But hey, at least we boomers were less than 2% gay and always knew what public bathroom to use.

    • LOL: Trinity
    • Replies: @Curmudgeon
  83. profnasty says:
    @obwandiyag

    Been there.
    Got the t-shirt.

  84. @but an humble craftsman

    “mythology” ? The answer is in the root — “myth”

  85. @gotmituns

    Amazingly Deep Purple recorded “Concerto for Group and Orchestra” with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Malcolm Arnold at the Royal Albert Hall, London as long ago as September 1969. It consisted of a concerto composed by Jon Lord, with lyrics written by Ian Gillan and was released on vinyl in December 1969. So I wouldn’t knock those hard rockers as being classical music ignoramuses.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concerto_for_Group_and_Orchestra

    Sure nowadays every other rock band has recorded some live show with an orchestra, and classical and rock fusion is popular but in those days?

  86. @R.G. Camara

    Doesn’t mean the Beatles weren’t something special, unique. What comes after is not their fault…. Parasites on a dog.

  87. @Trinity

    I’m a late Boomer and where I lived no one gave two shits about Bob Dylan or Woody Allen, not because they are Jews, but because no one listened to their shit “music” or watched their phoo phoo movies about some Jews idea of living in Manhattan.

    “Highway 61 Revisited” and “Blonde On Blonde” were Top Ten albums, “Like A Rolling Stone” went to #2 on the charts while several of his songs covered by other artists became worldwide hits (such as The Byrds’ cover of “Mr Tambourine Man,” which went to #1).

    Dylan’s music was clearly very popular at the time. You must have lived in a backwards area. (I don’t know if Woody Allen was ever extremely popular, but he was successful enough to be a frequent guest on late night television in the 60s and 70s)

    • Replies: @Curle
  88. Trinity says:
    @Curle

    That was a typo, I meant to type that World War II generation was the most traitorous generation and that is easily provable. They destroyed the continent of Europe and killed TENS OF MILLIONS of fellow Whites fighting FOR instead of against Jewish Globalism. They tried their best to take out Germans who were not only fighting for Germany but for Nationalism vs. Jewish Globalism. The result of WWII brought us to where we are today.

    I might add that many of these younger generations are just as traitorous, look at all the white traitor trash in Antifa or white traitor trash that march with BLM. Of course some youngsters out there are the polar opposite, Kyle Rittenhouse is one example.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Curle
  89. profnasty says:
    @Matt Lazarus

    Yeah Dylan.
    He was recently accused of, while a young musician, bedding a 12yr old girl.
    I believe her.
    Also. The late great Norm Mcdonald told a story. At a Dylan concert, Bob saw Ringo in the audience. “Hey people, look Ringo’s here. Ringo, would you like to request a song?”
    Ringo, “Um, howabout Like a Rollin Stone.”
    Dylan, “We just played that one!”

  90. Trinity says:
    @WHAT

    Sure Thing, Zoomer/Millennial drip.

  91. @Chester

    ““Italians became Americans.” That’s debatable”
    For God’s sake! How pissy do you need to get?
    Neither did the Irish…. or the Scots or the English…. or the “natives”…. “American” — a Tabla Rosa you can paint any damn thing you want on.

    • Agree: Matt Lazarus
  92. gay troll says:

    LOL, what is this shit? “Jung-Freud”? Is this ghost written by Priss Factor? Or is it another Ron Unz joint? Raches no longer supplying the dopamine?

    The Boomer Bible would have us believe all previous generations(and cultures) existed only to lead to the Great Boomer Moment

    Well this is plainly false, since Baby Boomers are defined as the offspring of the “Greatest Generation”. Ubiquity has always been their claim to fame. Just a huge outpouring of protoplasm from the loins of our heroic forebears.

    Although, the young whippersnappers have no room to talk. When the boom of Babies first became old enough to fuck, they gave birth to “Generation X”, followed by Generation Y (aka Generation Pepsi, aka “Millennials”), followed by “Generation Z”. I can only surmise that TPTB started labeling generations alphabetically beginning with the third to last letter of the alphabet as a little in joke for the 2020’s as spike proteins put an end to our lineage once and for all.

    As for the Greatest Generation, what made them so great anyway?

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  93. @Wade Hampton

    Dylan transformed himself into a country blues artist after allying with The Band.

    You are clearly unfamiliar with Dylan’s body of work. He was recording country blues on his first album which was released in 1962, long before he hired The Hawks (who became The Band) as his backing group.

    And neither Dylan nor The Beatles ever worked on Tin Pan Alley. In fact, Dylan saw himself as the antithesis of that style of songwriting: “Tin Pan Alley is gone. I put an end to it,” he once said.

  94. Trinity says:
    @Eric Novak

    Nah, your list is pathetic. I just pulled some random musicians out. Punk? hahaha. Really and you want to talk about taste in music. I like actual MUSIC, boy.

    Favorite groups and/or solo artists
    The Rolling Stones
    Bad Company
    Lynyrd Skynyrd
    Allman Brothers
    The Doobie Brothers
    Grand Funk Railroad
    The Isley Brothers
    Tina Turner
    Leann Rimes
    Melissa Etheridge
    Patsy Cline
    Elvis Presley
    Pat Benatar
    Rod Stewart
    Journey
    Al Green
    Hall & Oates
    Bruce Springsteen * hate the man but like his music
    Waylon Jennings
    ………. I could go and on and on and on, I love all music except for (c)rap, MOST heavy metal ( I do like some Black Sabbath), punk ( is not music, boy), and MOST of the shit produced today. I have forgotten more about music than you know. LMAO.

    • Replies: @Eric Novak
    , @Matt Lazarus
  95. “In contrast, for all their spectacular failures, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama enjoyed two term presidencies unscathed(mostly) and haven’t shown the slightest hint of self-reflection.”

    Talk about a Jewish angle if ever there was one. All three louts benefitted Israel the most in the entire existence of these great United States and individual Jews didn’t do so badly either under their “Sanhaderin” sanctioned regimes. Is it any wonder then those three self-righteous, smug assholes are still proud as peacocks? All of them belong behind bars for crimes against America!

  96. Anonymous[269] • Disclaimer says:
    @Trinity

    This guy doesn’t know that a lot of late Boomers were still teens into the 1980s and just starting out in life in the 1980s as young adults.

    Dude, you need to shut your piehole. Like the author you have no clue when the baby boomers started and ended. “Teens in the 1980s”? No, not for every dollar Satan owns. You go screw now, m’kay?

    P.S. You sound like a hewge dewsh.

    • Replies: @Quartermaster
    , @Trinity
  97. anon[397] • Disclaimer says:
    @Trinity

    Was Stalin’s USSR that bad from today’s vantage point? I highly doubt Stalinist version of communism would take kindly to modern-day kike/nigger/faggot/tranny worship, just a guess.

    • Replies: @gotmituns
  98. @Trinity

    You’re a nigger-lovin’ Boomer clown then. Who knew? Hall & Oates is music for spics and faggots.

    • Replies: @Trinity
  99. “In the end, the only lasting contribution of the boomers will be their music.”

    Here was another Jewish angle if ever there was one in that they dominated (the industry, not the talent). David Gaffen is a case in point: would Cher have not sung those songs without the “guidance” the homo? Show me one gentile (we’re not talking about negroes and a occasional Turk … is he still alive?) that had made beau coup amounts of money “managing” the rock stars. Gene Simmons, a non talent, lives a bourgeois life after having fcuked a gazillion Shikshas, while all the best Gentiles died young. So, yes their music is the only thing that will live in infamy, to their everlasting shame!

  100. Emslander says:
    @Trinity

    “Late Boomer” is just a wannabe.

    • Replies: @HbutnotG
  101. One last note: When (((they))) started to dominate the movie business (and that’s all it was then), at least then they had the sense to make great flicks, i.e. leave the great actors (oh, the list is so long of the handsome and talented gentile boys and girls) and directors alone to do their work and then the founding stock was followed by their nebbishy boomer progeny and what we have is a list of schlock coming out of Hollywood. And it continues to date.

  102. @Anonymous

    The last of the boomers turned 20 in ’84. I know math is hard, but it would have come in handy here, and prevented you from acting like a millenial idiot.

  103. Emslander says:
    @AceDeuce

    It’s the audience that makes the art, not the artist. The artist is nothing more than a cultural aggregator.

  104. Trinity says:
    @Anonymous

    SHAT up, Dipshit. Boomers born in 1961-1964 were all teens in 1980, ya friggin’ RETARD. They started hitting their 20’s anywhere from 1981-1984. And shut your asshole, queer, that orifice is an exit door not an entry door.

    Trying to imagine which category of Boomer Hater you fall into.

    Is it the emaciated sunken chest type with 3 chin whiskers who already is hunched over at 20 something.

    or

    Are you some fat obese slob who still plays Pokemon and lives with your parents at 28 years old.

    Cue: Loser by Beck * this is the Zoomer/Millennial theme song. haha. Not all youngsters of course. I actually meet some young guys and gals at the gym who are the polar opposite of losers like this clown.

  105. Dually says:

    Boomers collectively decided they were non-conformist right around 1967 however, everyone cannot be non-conformist at the same time. It was a petty fiction, one of many that boomers tell themselves and their kids to make them feel good about themselves – which is their primary concern. In a similar manner, they lied to their hippie brats of the following generation about how they all “marched with dr. king” however not all of them could have “marched with dr. king” on liberal crusades, because the numbers just don’t add up. The end result of the self -mythologizing is the current social justice warrior phenomenon, where the deranged children and grandchildren of boomers are trying to outdo their deluded parents in self righteous political activity.

    The true music of the boomer generation is disco, just as the music of their tone deaf kids is rap and hip hop. Most people in general – and certainly most boomers – have zero ability to appreciate music, so instead they immediately start politicizing music and musicians. For instance, at that time they worshipped the second rate guitarist Jimi Hendrix whilst Elvin Bishop – a white man – was far more of the accomplished Chicago style Blues style player that Hendricks pretended to be – why? It’s because Hendrix was black, and tone deaf people look to things that don’t have any relation to music, like politics and “authenticity”, as a criteria for what is good in music.

  106. Trinity says:
    @Eric Novak

    Oh yeah and you are a misfit outcast who was shunned at keg parties because of your body odor and total creepiness.

    No one likes that punk shit but losers, outcasts, freaks, dorks, and mentally ill people who spent time in the psych ward.

    ROTFLMMFWBAO.

    Cue: Loser by Beck * Yeah, I know we have already played that one, but how about an encore.

  107. gotmituns says:
    @anon

    Sir, you’re mostly right but as for the jews, the jews were at the bottom of the communism. They were 85% of the top commisars at the time of the revolution and were the driving force of the murder of all those Ukrainians in the early 1930s. The jews also ran Stalin’s Gulag.

    • Agree: Miro23
  108. Anon[321] • Disclaimer says:
    @Stick

    …. There were two ethnic identities coming of age in the sixties; Jews and Italians. The Italians became Americans while Jews remained a separate wandering tribe….

    Profound

    • Agree: Smashed Squash
    • LOL: Trinity
  109. Curle says:
    @Trinity

    My point was that neither war generation had a clue what the war was about and the WW2 generation only started figuring things out after the war, represented in such war cynical movies as Key Largo. My uncles fought in WW2. By the ‘60s I believe they figured out that Hitler never was going to invade N America and that Britain brought their war problem on themselves. Thus is the power of propaganda.

  110. Curle says:
    @Punch Brother Punch

    Not only was Dylan extremely popular but the radio was dominated by his stylistic followers including The Byrds, the Beatles for a short period, Buffalo Springfield, etc.

  111. Curle says:
    @Etruscan Film Star

    “Star Star” in print, was the great-grandfather of today’s depraved rap.

    Blacks didn’t need Jagger to show them the way. Look up Shave ‘Em Dry by Lucille Bogan (1935) on YouTube. I won’t reproduce the lyrics, they would make Lil Kim blush.

  112. @Dually

    Most people in general…have zero ability to appreciate music

    One sentence later…

    For instance, at that time they worshipped the second rate guitarist Jimi Hendrix whilst Elvin Bishop –

    Way to confirm your assertion.

    Look, my politics are pretty anti-black and anti-hippie, but Hendrix was clearly superior to the guitarist in a decent if uninspiring ersatz blues band. Even if Hendrix had stuck to playing straight Chicago blues he would have been Bishop’s superior.

    This has nothing to do with “authenticity” – in fact many accused Hendrix of inauthenticity, of aping white psychedelic music, which is why towards the end of his life he was attempting to shift toward a more “black” sound – it’s just an objective fact that Hendrix was a far more creative and fluid guitar player, capable of playing in multiple genres, then anyone else in popular music at the time. To call him second rate, by the standards of 60s rock or blues, betrays an embarrassing tin ear.

    • Replies: @Dually
  113. This was a good article: insightful and well written.

    Not sure why it is getting so much comment-hate.

  114. @Triteleia Laxa

    Yup.
    I agree Trite Laxative
    Yer Jewish.
    No capability of self-reflection.

  115. Nancy says:
    @RedpilledAF

    More pilpul. Born ’46, I fell for the 60’s HH campaign… ‘Exodus’ and the rest… made by ? boomers? or termites? The 60’s immigration bonanza.. organized by… TT’s (Termite Tribe …. or Talmuds). Termite Lyndon’s social engineering disguised as altruism. And the lovely music.. check Dave McGown, et al. Etc, etc, etc. But… nice try, Bulb : )

    • Thanks: RedpilledAF
    • Replies: @RedpilledAF
  116. @Trinity

    Spoken like a red neck boomer!

    Music still evolves, and unlike the era you are STUCK in there is so much that was even BETTER than many of those listed in your previous comment.

    All music genres have a spectrum of quality, but it is their MARKETABILITY that gives some the leg up, and others become unknown.

    The disparagement of “Punk” is understandable, as it was a punk artist that declared,
    “What the hippies didn’t achieve with peace and love, we will achieve with violence.”

    Now the hippie generation has resorted to violence on their fellow man, and Scorched Earth Policy on ANY EXISTING BIOLOGICAL SYSTEM.

    I HOPE THE “PUNKS” ACHIEVE THEIR OBJECTIVE.

    • Agree: Lancelot_Link
  117. @Trinity

    Thank you for the obligatory unz.com article response of the form: Author doesn’t know shit about X and is a giant faggot.

  118. @Anon

    “Jung and Freud”

    The work of Jung, at least the parts I can fully understand, will continue to offer a guide to consciousness for generations to come. What I know of Freud comes from his critics who seem to sweep him into the the Continental philosophy miasma. Freud appeared to be obsessed with intergenerational incest.

  119. @gay troll

    “Raches no longer supplying the dopamine?”

    I think Ron Unz wears a costume of some kind when he writes in the voice of Raches.

    • Replies: @Punch Brother Punch
  120. @Mulga Mumblebrain

    You got that wrong. Smog had been killing people for decades, until someone actually made an issue out of it in the 1950s. The Great Caledonian Forest was gone in the 19th century. Clear cut logging was going on for a century in North America, until people started to protest. Dumping raw sewage into rivers and lakes started in the 19th century.
    The first generation poisoned with vaccines were Boomers.

    • Replies: @HbutnotG
  121. @Old and Grumpy

    OK my generation did think it invented sex,

    LOL My old man, born in the first decade of the 20th century, often told me and my brother (both early Boomers) “Do you think you invented that?” His sister had to leave the city because of a “scandal” involving “wild parties” of influential people.

    • Replies: @Curle
  122. The twentieth paragraph of this aimless article describes Woody Allen as a multifaceted talent. Marking his role as a propagandist will be an honest summary.

    I am not tuned in to his entire body of work, yet his recent works have been masterpieces in exposing his own delusions in regards to New York immigrants and were they fit in with polite society. A person with more film knowledge than I could take these points and create a meaningful essay out of them.

    A couple of examples, for which Mr. Allen was the writer:

    “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” features title characters whom could not have more WASP names. Yet they are twenty somethings adrift in Europe, and they happen upon two charismatic, mentally ill persons who fight continuously. The two agitators are feature actors (Bardem, Cruz) who are put on as Mediterranean heritage, yet it is a ploy as the behavior Semitic to the core.

    “Midnight in Paris” features a father who follows the shiftless future husband around Paris to find out what he is about. This is a Semitic mockery of a strong, capable, and potent father. It is a long form mockery of regular white persons scene through a urban lens.

    “Rainy Day in New York” features a break out role Timothy C. of DUNE fame. This is the modern film echo of Catcher in the Rye, which is a wholly mediocre book not fit for reading by high school students. The key to this film (spoiler alert) is that all of the women are blonde and WASPish, and every single one of them is a prostitute of some form. The fact that no feminist group has sounded the alarm on this dreck should point to the joint nature in agenda amongst a pair of empires.

    Each film is revealing of this psychosis, and the fact that this is happening in series is like watching a train derail, one car at a time.

    Truly, a man of film or literature could take these points much further than I could in this space.

    Last: “Catcher in the Rye” is neither interesting in edgy. The cannon of literature for high school and college students in this age prepares the students and graduates for nothing.

  123. @Trinity

    Why the omission of Zardoz (1974)?

  124. Curle says:
    @Trinity

    “ Music of the Late Boomers was very eclectic.”

    In addition, these summary histories always discard social events that either didn’t appeal to their in group or were disparaged by ‘taste’ makers like Rolling Stone magazine.

    Check out this chart for some forgotten history:

  125. gsjackson says:
    @Graham Seibert

    George Lucas is the same age as you, and he suggested a demarcation line for musical taste in American Graffiti when he had the character John Milner say, “Rock-n-roll hasn’t been the same since Buddy Holly died,” and dismiss the newly emerging (in 1962) “surfin shit.” I guess the surfin shit was seen by Silent Generation sophisticates as bubble gum music for vacuous baby boomer teeny-bops?

    The surfin shit has held strong with the erstwhile teeny-bops. Some friends went to see the Beach Boys a week ago; said the crowd entered as senior citizens, left as teenagers.

    • Replies: @Graham Seibert
  126. @Trinity

    Jaws was great. Bugger off! You probably liked Rocky Horror.

    • Replies: @Trinity
  127. @Trinity

    I’m early Gen X and I’m not at all like boomers nor is anyone I know in that age group. Again, just go and bugger off!

    • Replies: @Trinity
  128. @Joe Paluka

    I agree, Joe. And I was even one of the hippies.

  129. The only band that matters…

    See what I mean?

    • Replies: @Etruscan Film Star
  130. @AaronB

    You’re absolutely right, Aaron. I was there, a naive adolescent, not quite old enough to participate. It shook my young soul to the core, and I saw it change everyone around me for the better. (Or almost everyone.) There has been nothing remotely like it since.

    Music, and art, can change the world.

    • Replies: @Change that Matters
  131. @Trinity

    I have to agree with most of what you said.

    I was born in 1950 and that is when the “boomer” generation started (1950 to 1964). Some may say that we boomers actually started in the late 1940s but who really knows.

    I have no idea what the author is talking about since only a handful of boomers actually went into politics. Most of us went to university to study science and the technical professions. Those who went into business administration, teaching, political science, and the like were looked down upon.

    I never understood the interest in Woody Allen. Except for “Sleeper”, his movies made no sense to me or much of anyone else.

    Bob Dylan literally could not sing until after his car accident when for some reason his voice dramatically changed and for the better. It was like night and day. In any event, he was looked upon as a great folk song writer and cultural icon. Phil Ochs was the same.

    The big movies I remember were…

    The 7th Voyage of Sinbad – the first true “block buster” in 1958 and premiered at the Roxy Theater
    (what a beautiful place)

    Lawrence of Arabia (premiered at the Criterion, the last of the awe inspiring movie theaters in New
    York City)

    Sink The Bismark

    A Man for All Seasons

    Z – one of the first foreign films to gain national acclaim in the US

    Cool Hand Luke

    These were really thought provoking movies, which can’t be really produced today since so few people can actually think anymore…

    The list goes on and the time was a truly a marvel for great cinema. Not today with all the drivel that comes out of Hollywood. And as The Critical Drinker would say, “So much shite…”

    • Replies: @Punch Brother Punch
  132. @Triteleia Laxa

    Nonsense.

    I can hear you munching on foreskins from here, rabbi.

  133. @Dually

    Jimi Hendrix was a genius guitar player, and every top guitar player has said so: Clapton, Beck, Page, etc.

    I played for years and I was always amazed at what Hendrix could do.

    Bob Dylan is insanely overrated. Saw him in concert a few years ago….it was just a wall of noise. You could not tell one song from the next….they all sounded the same…..just a blast of noise.

    Dylan was surely awed by the Hendrix version of “All Along The Watchtower.”

    Oh….a while back I saw a clip with Joni Mitchell and Bob Dylan…..Dylan had to be jealous of her monster talent as she made him look like an amateur.

    Owen Benjamin does a hilarious Bob Dylan imitation! A must see. Really funny.

    By the way, I’m not shitting on Dylan because he’s jewish. I didn’t even know he was jewish until a few years ago. I thought he was some kind of country boy.

    Trinity….you don’t like The Clash?

    I noticed Led Zep and Clapton were not on your list either.

    Love the Allman Brothers.

    • Replies: @Dually
    , @Trinity
  134. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:

    is “rock history” a thing?

    it was daltrey inter alia who said that rock had played itself out, was an exhausted art form.

    the last hit of The Who was You Better You Bet recorded november 1981.

    since then there have been a few good rock songs but…very few.

    there was Smells Like Teen Spirit and Seven Nation Army and ??? i draw a blank…

    the Talking Heads did their genius in the 70s.

    Once in a Lifetime was recorded in 1980.

    • Replies: @Curle
  135. Freedom Rock: The Essay

  136. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:

    it’s the same with jazz.

    there are only so many combinations of notes…

    thelonious monk is the ne plus ultra.

    thus you see monk’s figure keeps growing until today…

    why would anyone play jazz…

    everyone knows monk is everest.

    in particluar Thelonious Monk Trio killed jazz…forever.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thelonious_Monk_Trio

    monk killed jazz.

  137. @Graham Seibert

    Gee, duh. You’re kind of stupid, aren’t you?

    • Replies: @Graham Seibert
  138. Dually says:
    @Punch Brother Punch

    Hendrix was a far more creative and fluid guitar player, capable of playing in multiple genres, then anyone else in popular music at the time.

    Really? I don’t remember any of his signature ‘wall of noise feedback’ style on any Mersybeat or Nashville hits of the day. Ridiculous.

    • Replies: @Punch Brother Punch
  139. Dually says:
    @Robert Dolan

    ….it was just a wall of noise. You could not tell one song from the next….they all sounded the same…..just a blast of noise.

    But… Oh, no – not your boy Hendrix.

  140. Trinity says:
    @Semi-Employed White Guy

    Nah, “Rocky Horror” is right up your Hershey highway, Jew boy.

    I don’t think the Boomers had that many dudes dressing up as women back then.

    Couple of tunes for you, Shlomo.

    Cue: Dude Looks Like A Lady by Aerosmith

    Cue: Lola by The Kinks

    Now do that little Jew boy dance. LMAO.

  141. Trinity says:
    @Robert Dolan

    I could fill a whole page with artist or groups that I like, I just randomly threw some off the top of my head. I enjoy classic rock, old school country, soul/R&B, folk, SOME heavy metal, etc.

    What I hate is punk, (c)rap, A LOT of heavy metal, and MOST of the crap that has come out in this century regardless of genre.

  142. Curle says:
    @Curmudgeon

    “ His sister had to leave the city because of a “scandal” involving “wild parties” of influential people.”

    Right. Read any John O’Hara novel for confirmation; hippies not first partiers.

  143. Curle says:
    @anon

    “ since then there have been a few good rock songs but…very few.”

    Not hits as much as good albums, most if not all of them British. The Smiths and later Morrissey, uniformly good. Yes, the gay sneaks in but nothing much. London Suede, if you can take the gay. Electronica. Happy Mondays. The Libertines. Babyshambles. Blur. Pulp.

    All much better than content being produced in US at the time.

  144. Mr. Ed says:

    Dylan is just a very successful ((business man)); Jagger is a money hog; Lennon was simply a fool.

    Rock music is boring and barbaric!

  145. Clapton talks about Hendrix.

  146. anon[222] • Disclaimer says:

    born in late 1940s. still alive today, so guess I’m a boo-mer.

    scratching head: never heard of 98% of “music” OR movies mentioned in this essay or its comments.

    where in the world was I all that time? what was I thinking?

    the essay reads like notes from a marketing seminar of jewish film and recording executives.
    maybe that’s it: catholics were not invited.

  147. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:

    almost all the best rock songs came out before i was born. i’ve been aware of this since i was in hs. at my hs the kids who listened to rap or contemporary rock were ridiculed.

    my mom is a late silent who said my generation had the best music.

    she was right.

    gen-X agrees.

  148. @Robert Bruce

    Maybe. Your research shows?

    My research shows a 30 year trail of Gen-X’ers who Boomer bash.

    If Millennials have taken up what their dad and mom used to? It still comes from stupid Gen-X’ers.

    Ask a Millennial: Who gives a shit what a Boomer thinks or is or stands for or ever was?

    Wait for their answer.

    Wait.

    Wait..

    Wait. Until the day you drop dead. Because?

    NO ONE GIVES A SHIT ABOUT A BOOMER.

    30 years ago Gen-X took over.

    The Millennial needs to go home and say to mom and dad: why did your generation fuck us over????????

    Mom? Dad? Gen-X!!!! You screwed everything up for us!!!

    There. Fixed it for ya.

    Focus. Keep to it. Gen-X-psycho victims. Blamers. Their kids need to break free. Only then can they join us Boomers .

    We are waiting for you.

  149. Although I am GenX, I think the 60s ruined everything. I would have loved to have been alive in 1953 in the Jim Crow South, coming out of the whites only men’s room, wearing a pink tie, getting in my new Studebaker Starlight Coupe, lighting up some cherry blend in my pipe, and tuning the car radio to listen to the rhythm and blues sounds of Wynonie Harris and Ruth Brown and the Five Keys on Randy’s Record Shop on WLAC. What a time that must have been. (I wish Uncle Rico’s time machine actually worked.). And this wonderful world was actively destroyed in the 60s.

  150. @Anonymous

    And don’t forget “remastered” and “boxed sets.”

  151. @Dually

    Really? I don’t remember any of his signature ‘wall of noise feedback’ style on any Mersybeat or Nashville hits of the day. Ridiculous.

    I didn’t say he played “all” genres, and really these two particular genres require a simpler, more specialized style of playing than Hendrix would even have been interested in. I mean, Merseybeat wasn’t exactly known for guitar heroics.

    • Replies: @Dually
  152. @SunBakedSuburb

    I think Ron Unz wears a costume of some kind when he writes in the voice of Raches.

    I’ve never understood the theory that Raches is Ron Unz. They don’t sound anything alike to me. Raches’ style of writing is far more arabesque than anything I’ve ever read by Unz.

    • Agree: Biff
    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
  153. Sparkon says:

    I‘ve already written extensively about Baby Boomers at UR, so I’m not going to waste too many words sparring with Priss Factor or Trinity, neither of whom is a bone fide Boomer, as far as I can tell.

    I should note that my two youngest siblings were both born in the very early ’60s, so I do think I have a better appreciation and understanding than your average bear about the differences between the beginning and the end of the traditionally defined Baby Boomer generation, i.e. 1946 – 1964.

    Briefly, I define the real Baby Boomers as those cohorts born between 1946 (my year of birth) and about 1954. By then, the real post-war baby boom was over, and life in America had reached a kind of turning point, both with TV and also with popular music, two of the biggest cultural influences then as they remain now.

    From just 0.5% of U.S. households having a television set in 1946, by 1954, over 50% of U.S. homes had a boob tube, rising to 86% by 1959, so one of the defining characteristics of the real Boomers are those cohorts who learned to read and write before there was a television in the house, and/or before television rose to its preeminent position of popularity and influence, shoving aside cinema.

    A second defining characteristic of the real Boomers is the music we were exposed to in our youth, and again 1954 is the tipping point and dividing line. Early Rock & Roll dates from the late ’40s and early ’50s, it is true, but it didn’t begin to enter the mainstream until about 1954, when Bill Haley & His Comets had a hit with “Shake, Rattle, and Roll,” which was originally recorded by Big Joe Turner on Feb. 15, 1954.

    Take a look a Billboard’s top hits of 1954:

    For the first part of our young lives, real Baby Boomers were listening to the same kind of music our parents liked, which was anything but Rock & Roll and would probably be classified as Easy Listening by many.

    1954’s top hit was “Little Things Mean a Lot” (Amen to that) by Kitty Kalen. Little things would include adhering to style guides in one’s writing. I mean is it that friggin’ hard to put movie titles in italics?

    Anyway, here’s Kitty:

    Look at some of those titles and the performers from 1954 like Frank Sinatra’s “Young at Heart,” Doris Day’s “Secret Love,” Eddie Fisher, Patti Page, Rosemary Clooney but along with Sinatra’s hit, I’m going to play another hit from late 1954 that didn’t make Billboard’s Top 30 for 1954, but is ranked as #18 from 1955.

    Frank Sinatra, “Young at Heart” 1953-1954

    The Chordettes, “Mr. Sandman” 1954-1955

    As for Freud and Jung and the sexual revolution, feature this:

    While watching the waving crowds from the deck of his ship as it docked in New York, he [Sigmund Freud] turned to his fellow analyst Carl Gustav Jung and said, “Don’t they know we’re bringing them the plague?”

    https://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/23/books/review/adventures-in-the-orgasmatron.html

    Finally, to wrap this up, an OK Boomer Moment in Rock History from 1952…

    “Hound Dog” Ellie Mae “Big Mama” Thornton

    • Replies: @johnny johnny
    , @Resartus
  154. @Steve Naidamast

    Bob Dylan literally could not sing until after his car accident when for some reason his voice dramatically changed and for the better.

    The temporary change in Dylan’s voice circa “Nashville Skyline” was due to him briefly giving up smoking.

    I’m not sure what you mean by “better.” It’s universally acknowledged by Dylanologists and common fans alike that Dylan’s peak as a singer was 1965-66, before the motorcycle accident.

    After he resumed smoking, his voice returned to what it was before, and then gradually began its permanent decline to the point where it’s been pretty shambolic live for the past quarter century.

  155. Dually says:
    @Punch Brother Punch

    these two particular genres require a simpler, more specialized style of playing than Hendrix would even have been interested in. I mean, Merseybeat wasn’t exactly known for guitar heroics.

    Wow! Suddenly the blues is complicated. Hendrix himself admitted that he wasn’t good enough to play jazz.

  156. @Nancy

    As a late boomer/proto-gen X-er I unfortunately can vouch for how easily we fell for the TT propaganda too…sigh…

  157. anarchyst says:
    @anonymous

    Admiral Morrison wanted to hold israel responsible for the act of war against the USA–the deliberate israeli attack on the USS Liberty (AGTR-5) but was countermanded by none other than Admiral John McCain, senator John McCain’s “daddy”.
    Admiral Morrison never received another promotion for his position on the USS Liberty (AGTR-5)

  158. Hendrix wasn’t just a blues guitarist. He was a psychedelic musician whose ambitions ran the gamut from the baroque pop of “Burning Of The Midnight Lamp” to the sci-fi prog rock of “1983 (A Merman I Shall Turn To Be” to straightforward heavy rock. Your method of interpreting music seems to be very rigid, formal and genre-oriented. You confine Hendrix to a certain genre (Chicago blues, apparently) despite the fact that he put out very little pure blues music in his career.

    Hendrix didn’t have the discipline or training to be a professional jazz musician (although he did record some proto jazz-rock style songs and jammed with jazz musicians including Miles Davis). Like other 60s pop/rock performers including The Beatles, who never learned to read music, Hendrix wasn’t interested in form or genre but in spontaneous creativity.

    • Replies: @Dually
  159. @WHAT

    I think what he trying to say is that the “late boomer” was 5 when “Woodstock” happened and yet that “late boomer” is supposed to have something “in common” with a boomer that attended Woodstock.

    AND they don’t.

    • Agree: Charon
  160. @Sparkon

    The seeds (or saplings) of our current debauched culture were apparent then. When people today get wispy for Sinatra, I wonder what they’re thinking. For example, “One More for the Road” if that’s the title, what an absolutely horrible song. About a guy who had an affair, and in feeling sorry for his sorry ass needs to use alcohol for an escape, and has no friends so has to confess to the bartender selling him the booze. Total loser sketch but made into some sort of cool, modern sympathetic stock character. And then we wonder what happened to marriage. Yeah. “I did it my way.” And we have to ask why the me generation appeared, after lionizing this crap for decades.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
  161. @anarchyst

    Mr Mojo Risin faked his own death and resurfaced as Rush Limbaugh.

  162. Anonymous[244] • Disclaimer says:

    even if you’re into (((lou reed)))…

    Walk on the Wild Side
    Satellite of Love
    Wild Child
    Lisa Says

    all from 1972.

    please click each image containing a jew.

    sad.

  163. AceDeuce says:
    @Miro23

    Those serious and respectful Chinese men dressed in jackets and ties and women in dresses are still there and doing a lot better than they were in 1969.

    I’ve been saying this for years–the ghookers and dotheads that have flooded to America have prospered mightily by acting just like White Americans from the 1950s.

  164. Dually says:
    @Punch Brother Punch

    Pilpul! I should have recognized two consecutive posters with the same inane opinion – but only one who responds. Poor unz must be infested.

    • Replies: @Punch Brother Punch
  165. HbutnotG says:
    @Emslander

    Yup. Boomer births ended in 1960 or so. After 1960 is Gen X. Totally different education, for starters; and, parents born after 1930. Sesame St instead of Ding Dong School and Howdy Doody; Mickey Mouse Club fragmented re-runs not anything like it originally was.

    Wannabe. Good term.

  166. HbutnotG says:
    @Curmudgeon

    Poisoned? People stopped dying from polio, diphtheria and tetanus. Lots of people did die from those things before 1950. Not just a few. Look it up.

    • Replies: @Curmudgeon
  167. Mehen says:
    @Triteleia Laxa

    An author who may or may not be the one you think.

    Someone who may or may not offer penetrating analyses into the Jewish psyche.

    And that little crumb of evidence is enough for you to psychologize the author.

    Yeah. You’re pretty transparent despite your efforts to hide.

  168. @Dually

    For instance, at that time they worshipped the second rate guitarist Jimi Hendrix whilst Elvin Bishop – a white man – was far more of the accomplished Chicago style Blues style player that Hendricks pretended to be – why?

    Hendrix did not “pretend” to be anything. Jimi expanded the stylistic range of the electric guitar in a style never heard before. Most of his recorded songs are not blues. He was a prime mover in the short-lived but fascinating (to some of us) form known as psychedelic rock.

    Elvin Bishop was a fine electric guitarist in the traditional Chicago blues mode. His only outside-the-box effort I know of was “East-West” on the Butterfield Blues Band album of the same name. His exotic contribution to the track is excellent, but aside from that, Elvin’s playing has always had a touch of the routine about it. Mike Bloomfield, the other guitarist in the Butterfield band, was far more imaginative.

    Are the first two Butterfield Blues Band albums forgotten today? They should not be. Both set high standards for the developing electric blues bands in their time and hold up well after all these years.

  169. @Smashed Squash

    Not the only band that matters, but brilliant. Unfortunately punk quickly degenerated because no one could equal The Clash, and the field was left to untalented groups like the Dead Kennedys.

  170. @Dually

    I’m confused. Are you saying I’m a Jew engaging in pilpul? How, exactly? And there’s some connection between me and another commenter?

    Oh well, I’ve learned there’s four accusations you’re guaranteed to have levelled at you at some point on Unz:

    1) You’re a complete moron who knows nothing about anything.

    2) You’re a Jew.

    3) You’re a faggot/beta/cuck

    4) You’re someone else using an alias or sock account for nefarious/conspiratorial purposes.

  171. iffen says:

    A new blogger at TUR sets me to wondering:

    exactly how many Jew-haters can fit on the head of a pin?

  172. @gsjackson

    The Beach Boys were real musicians. Brian Wilson’s stuff will stand the test of time whatever generation it is associated with.

    There were others who were kind of hors de genre. This morning I sang the New Christie Minstrals to my wife when she asked for a song incorporating yesterday, today and tomorrow that she could teach a Ukrainian student. She loved it. Another that pops immediately to mind is Once Upon a time there was a Tavern, adapted from a Slavic folk melody.

  173. Resartus says:
    @Sparkon

    so I do think I have a better appreciation and understanding than your average bear about the differences between the beginning and the end of the traditionally defined Baby Boomer generation, i.e. 1946 – 1964.

    You got into much of what I was thinking last night….

    Boomers are not a distinct group to say….
    We had some that grew to age in the 50s, some in the 60s, other like me in the mid to late 70s….

    Rock & Roll had some part in our upbringing…
    Though, IMHO, we all grew up in entirety, with the cold war looming over our heads…..
    Boomers inherited the government once it ended, with few to no members in senior levels of government while it was happening…
    Afterwards, with no external enemy, the government turned on it’s own….

  174. @Trinity

    I’m an early Boomer in my seventies and always preferred Elvis to the Beatles, though I did go through a brief period of Beatlemania and Elton John. Today, I mostly listen to classical music. But when I do listen to popular songs, they are mainly of the earlier rock ‘n roll variety, especially Elvis, and a lot of classic country music from the late fifties and sixties. Go figure.

  175. @Trinity

    Excellent! Most people had no idea and still do not, that the creator of All In The Family, is a committed communist, nor are these dunderheads aware that the whole show is a mocking of the average, everyday white working stiff, who happened to make the world go around—at least the U.S. I’m sure that most viewers are thinking, that’s funny but it doesn’t apply to me. Yes, it was a rant about YOU. Even when I was barely out of my teens,I saw through it. It is not funny in my opinion and only looks more ridiculous with the passage of time. One thing was true and still is, the actual “meathead” IS a real meathead.

  176. @Götterdamn-it-all

    It might be that your view of the world, or to talk like a pretentious boob, your “weltanschauung”, is broadening. That’s usually a good thing but can also bring you some grief.

  177. Trinity says:
    @Götterdamn-it-all

    Yeah, I never did think the Beatles were special although I really like the Rolling Stones. Actually one of my favorite Rolling Stones tunes was from 1990, “Almost Hear You Sigh.” I like ONE SONG by The Beatles and that is “Let It Be,” other than that, I really don’t or didn’t care for their brand of music.

    Elvis was indeed worthy of the title of “The King Of Rock & Roll.”

    I like lots CLASSIC country as well but lean more towards 70s-80s-90s stuff because of my age bracket.

  178. ST says:

    We had the fastest cars, the baddest assed bikes, the finest girls, the howlenest rock and roll, and parties so damned good some people even died. You dont get all that in one generation but just once…

  179. AceDeuce says:
    @johnny johnny

    The song “One For My Baby” had nothing to do with an extramarital affair.

    I suppose it’s safer to be a modern incel. Carry on, one-armed bandit.

    • Agree: Charon
  180. Anonymous[533] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    It’s crass to blame a large demographic group, but younger generations are not wrong to cast aspersions on baby boomers, the generation responsible for the decline of America. Mainstream authors have provided the data, such as Gibney’s “A Generation of Sociopaths,” and just because it’s relatively acceptable to bash boomers doesn’t mean they’re entirely wrong.

    A Generation of Sociopaths



    Video Link

    Simply interacting with typical boomers makes this abundantly clear. And one of the most obnoxious issues with boomers is the pathological, utter inability to take any form of responsibility.

    • Replies: @Curle
    , @Lancelot_Link
  181. Anonymous[267] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s crass to blame a large demographic, but the evidence shows that baby boomers are simply a generation of narcissistic, thin-skinned sociopaths. Just because its vaguely fashionable to bash them doesn’t mean it’s entirely wrong. Their ascendancy to power, in both political parties, largely heralded the decline of America.

    https://marketmadhouse.com/how-the-baby-boomers-wrecked-america-and-tried-to-wreck-the-world/



    Video Link

  182. One of the best articles I have seen on unz.com

  183. @Punch Brother Punch

    I’ve never understood the theory that Raches is Ron Unz. They don’t sound anything alike to me. Raches’ style of writing is far more arabesque than anything I’ve ever read by Unz.

    “Raches” is obviously an Unzian vanity project, but that doesn’t mean that Ron does all the writing himself. Ron supplies the Greek (he was a classicist in college) and the deep linking software with which “Raches” peppers his interminably self-referential posts.

    Then there are other writers who work on camouflaging and festooning the over-the-top style. Ron has a whole stable of regular trolls whose job is to stir up this honeypot. Even many of the better known commenters on this site are part of it.

    Finally, there are the AI bots which do a lot of Ron’s content-generating and are heavily represented in the Rachean universe. Ron himself let the cat out of the bag when he tried to “recall” the names that Raches went by in previous internet forums. The names he came up with were Wintermute and Colin Laney. Look them up if you don’t get the references.

    • Wintermute: An AI in the William Gibson novel Neuromancer.

    Colin Laney: A data analyst with preternatural abilities in the William Gibson novel All Tomorrow’s Parties.

    “Very important software work,” solipsistic conversations, dripping condescension—it’s all just Ron being Ron.

    • Troll: Charon
    • Replies: @Punch Brother Punch
  184. Curle says:
    @Anonymous

    A few minutes in and he’s equating sociopathy with failure to fight climate change and voting forTrump.

  185. @Trinity

    No Pantera? Just kidding. But no Janis? and how about the first Flying Burrito Brothers album? or, more recently, Drive By Truckers?

    • Replies: @Trinity
  186. Trinity says:
    @Matt Lazarus

    I got “Shaky Town” and “Convoy” on the list for them truck driving git-r-dones.

  187. @Curle

    What kind of criticism did you expect? Just look at that faggot. You think he’s going to go after boomers on the race traitoring angle?

  188. @Intelligent Dasein

    Seems like an awful lot of work – to what purpose? Just to screw with people?

    Pardon my skepticism, but I’ve been accused of being Raches myself.

  189. Anonymous[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @Curle

    They were originally called the “me generation.” Before them, it was always considered normal and expected that future generations would have a better, or at least easier life, than previous generations. America was largely improving by every metric. It was really only when boomers took the reins of power that this all changed.

    Boomers have collectively decided that they will refuse to pass on power and wealth to the next generation or to plan for the future. Almost as if they can’t envision a future without them. They gave us the disastrous wars of the Bush era and all the worst politicians and policies of the last few decades.

    It’s true Gibney comes at it from a mainstream Democrat perspective, and largely focuses on the economic and cultural aspects. Both leftists and right-wingers have written about the “boomer question” (BQ). Obviously not all individual boomers, or boomer politicians, are malicious, but I find the case fairly indisputable.

    • Replies: @Sparkon
    , @Curle
    , @gsjackson
  190. Sparkon says:
    @Anonymous

    They were originally called the “me generation” …

    Boomers have collectively decided that they will refuse to pass on power and wealth to the next generation or to plan for the future.

    No, that’s all wrong. Google’s Ngram Viewer indicates the term “baby boom” first appeared in the mid ’40s, while the term “me generation” did not appear until the mid ’70s, no doubt as the result of a barely readable cover article for New York Magazine in 1976 by the infallible Tom Wolf, where he called the ’70s the “Me Decade.”

    Beyond that, Boomers certainly haven’t acted in concert or decided anything collectively, but of course it’s easy to reach erroneous conclusions by relying on broad, sweeping, but ultimately invalid generalizations.

    My generation is and has been far too large and diverse to stuff us into any pigeon holes. However, the endless fascination with my generation is flattering, and I call it Boomer Envy, a kind of jealous resentment stirring in those unfortunate souls who didn’t get to live through the fun times of the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s.

    Indeed, Boomers are the last generation that enjoyed a mostly intact America, but Boomers who lived through the ’50s came of age as the country was changing rapidly due to factors entirely out of our hands, like the Cold War, the rise of TV, the assassination of Pres. Kennedy, the ascension of Lyndon Johnson, Vietnam, and Feminism.

    We were lucky in some ways, cursed in others.

    I was a lonely teenage broncin’ buck
    With a pink carnation and a pickup truck
    But I knew I was out of luck
    The day the music died…


    Don McLean “American Pie”
    Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group

    Happy Thanksgiving 2021!

  191. Curle says:
    @Anonymous

    “America was largely improving by every metric. It was really only when boomers took the reins of power that this all changed.”

    Boomers didn’t control the country in the ‘90s-‘00s any more than the Flappers controlled the country in the ‘30s. The finance industry and assorted oligarchic families controlled the country in both eras just as they have every decade since the end of the civil war.

    You want bad metrics take a look at reconstruction and the dust bowl.

  192. ohpr says:

    So I see the commentariat are well-versed in the art of looking down their noses at younger – and older! – generations. This social game is fulfilling I’m sure, but it’s the opposite of special. And then there’s the insistence on “I listen(ed) to cool music so I’m cool!! Great artists debuted during my lifespan so some of their greatness rubs off on me!!”. I don’t see any good reason to keep hitting the comments for this writer’s articles.

  193. Hitmarck says:
    @R.C.

    Sounds like he’d prefer that we’d all just die already.

    Everyone does. And you Boomers cant grasp why.
    You parents though can and understood why you’re hated. Your children and grandchildren too do.

    The only thing we politely ask for is to shut up till that day comes. Not very hopeful for that to happen, but hey, politeness dictates.

    ————————————————–

    Read the first 20 comments, and it is ridiculous how boomerish they all are.

    Worse, the generation associated with Anti-War protests and CCR classics like “Fortunate Son” and “Who’ll Stop the Rain” has turned out to be even more nihilistic as global imperialists and warmongers… though globalists are blind to their aggression as their way is to transgress unto others as you allow others to transgress unto yours. A kind of mutual conquest, “We send our sons and daughters(and all the genders in between) to invade and occupy your lands, and you send your sons and daughters to replace our native folks.” A fair-minded kind of mutual imperialism?

    You simply cant shut up about your fake and gay music.
    The essay contained more.

    • Replies: @Resartus
    , @R.C.
  194. @Anonymous

    Don’t forget the boomers of the ruling classes and their lapdogs were raised in all white areas. Their inexperience combined with ideas of always being right and being born to run crap are what make me hate them.

  195. @Trinity

    You realize it is the closed-minded, ever living in their past types who make most of us cringe. While I listen to and love some of the music you’ve listed the dislike of punk is not something in which I share.

    While there’s conformity in every genre at least punk allows people to easily participate. When you realise that you create and other’s revel in “product, not process” you begin to get a grasp of how ludicrous CCR and the Doors were. Those rich boys were focused on being lords of the world and kowtowed to money, ego, drugs, etc…

    • Replies: @Curle
  196. Resartus says:
    @Hitmarck

    Worse, the generation associated with Anti-War protests and CCR classics like “Fortunate Son” and “Who’ll Stop the Rain” has turned out to be even more nihilistic as global imperialists and warmongers…

    Then again, none of the artists that brought this forth were even boomers…….
    War Babies… whatever that generation was called…..

  197. Factorize says:

    What if everything could be explained by the well known neurotoxin, lead?

  198. Curle says:
    @Lancelot_Link

    CCR were the antithesis of rich.

  199. Wokechoke says:
    @Franz

    Very important point. Boomers would have only really dominated music performance and production in the 70s.

    • Agree: Franz
  200. Wokechoke says:
    @Götterdamn-it-all

    Beatles are mostly George Martin. A classical music producer. Lennon was a real talent though.

  201. Wokechoke says:
    @Observator

    Christianity and it’s material expression in cathedrals and art is the high point of civilisation.

  202. R.C. says:
    @Hitmarck

    So, you’re apparently angry because your generation had weaker music. (Granted, there are several worthwhile groups/musicians there but . . . ) I likewise detect that you are NOT a musician.
    Frankly, I am. I’m surrounded by three guitars that I can see plus a piano.
    You ought to open your horizons rather than bitch about the fact that your birth moment was under a bad sign.
    R.C.
    BTW, I think you meant ‘your parents’ rather than claiming that I might be one. Get a life son. Time is running out.
    RC

  203. Franz says:
    @Curle

    Sixteen year old Peter Frampton joined Herd in 1966, he was an boomer. David Bowie, also an boomer, released his first album in 1970.

    True but they were statistical flukes. The way Frankie Avalon made a fortune by imitating 1940s Frank Sinatra in the Fifties. Slick trick, Frankie, but it only happened once.

    And Bowie was something of a prodigy with very a very excellent management team. That don’t happen often. Frampton is usually thrown in with 70s acts even if he started earlier because he didn’t have much of a following (like Bowie) till then. Both are considered 1970s acts.

    They were gimmicky too, not much different from David Cassidy, but nobody counts The Partridge Family when they talk old music.

  204. @nosquat loquat

    You should have been around in 30 A.D.

  205. @HbutnotG

    I lived through it, and knew 6 people that had polio, only 2 had life long consequences. The numbers were plummeting before the vaccine was introduced, and Salk admitted that it harmed as many as it helped.
    In the 1920s measles caused pneumonia has an fatality rate of 25%. By the time the vaccine was introduced, it was less than 1%. I don’t know anyone who died or suffered any other effects of measles. I have been asking people for more than 25 years if they know of anyone who died or suffered from measles, and so far, no one has.
    https://www.weblyf.com/2020/05/microbiologist-and-virologist-dr-stefan-lanka-viruses-do-not-cause-diseases-and-vaccines-are-not-effective/

  206. gsjackson says:
    @Anonymous

    When Tom Wolfe coined “me generation” the oldest boomers were still in their 20s, many not even in high school yet. Wolfe used est seminars as a jumping off point for the thesis. Like almost every other aspect of “self discovery” the thesis was built on, est seminars required plenty of disposable income, which few boomers had at the time. This was hardly a generational indictment Wolfe was making.

    Timing is also a bit inconvenient for the author’s point about divorce. No-fault divorce came along I think in 1970, just at a time when the earliest boomer marriages were reaching traditional stress points. I think it’s fair to say that almost no boomers were involved in the making of this policy, which arguably had unfortunate consequences. If subsequent generations came to see some of the disadvantages of divorce, including in the financial realm, that is simply a matter of living with a new policy and learning.

    The author’s thesis is built on a lot of nothing. The way boomers were raised is much closer to how earlier generations were brought up than to the self-esteem-enhancing, participatory-prizes-for-all, stay-in-your-safe-space style of child-rearing in recent decades, an era in which solipsism and narcissism have devolved into their ultimate perverse form — autism.

  207. Timing is also a bit inconvenient for the author’s point about divorce.

    That’s a typical Boomer dodge. Boomers are always insisting that they didn’t enact the changes they’re often blamed for. It doesn’t matter—they are the ones who embraced those policies and lived by them, making no effort to change them. Things like no fault divorce, the civil rights movement, women’s lib, and abortion really are Boomer policies because this is what they did. It doesn’t matter that they weren’t the ones directly involved in making the legislative sausage.

  208. gsjackson says:
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Since we all know (((who was “involved in making the legislative sausage”))) and in pushing it into the culture, these attempts at analysis through a generational lens strike me as a typical dodge, distracting attention away from where it should be focused.

  209. Anonymous[360] • Disclaimer says:
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Even if most of the defenders of boomers are correct that twenthieth century trends like divorce, the Hart-Cellar act, and abortion are correct, their behavior over the last twenty years alone is enough to damn nearly every last one of them to hell. They’re simply a generation of sociopaths with no redeeming qualities for anyone except themselves. And no matter what, they simply refuse to retire and pass on power, turning the US into a corrupt gerontocracy unable to move forward on any issue.

    The generations that succeed them owe them absolutely nothing, and when the opportunity arises should vote to cancel their pensions and social security, and generally remove them from power and privilege with extreme prejudice.

    For now, they should relentlessly spread awareness of boomer privilege and the engineered wealth gap between boomers and younger generations.

    https://www.amerika.org/politics/why-boomers-want-white-genocide/
    https://www.amerika.org/politics/pull-the-plug-on-baby-boomers/
    https://www.amerika.org/politics/kill-the-boomers/

  210. Anonymous[360] • Disclaimer says:
    @Intelligent Dasein

    The boomer issue doesn’t get enough coverage, and it transcends political party.

    Boomers typically have a raging hatred for their own descendents, unlike previous generations. They uniquely defined their existence in opposition to their doting, tradition-minded parents and “the man.” One might have thought they would sympathize with millennials, but instead as they grew older they redirected the same animus towards those younger instead. They themselves know the power of empowered young people seeking to overturn the establishment. You can believe Joe Biden when he says he has no empathy for millennials, yet he fervently believes America becoming non-white is the “absolute” source of its strength.

    Left wing boomers oversaw the Democrat party transformation into the anti-white, anti-working class neoliberal monstrosity it is today, while boomer conservatives are resp0nsible for trillions of dollars spent on Middle Eastern wars and a party that worships GDP.

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