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"We Are All Michael Reinoehl Now! "(At Least, the American Psychological Association, Yale School of Medicine, WASHINGTON POST, and SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Say They Are).
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Above, the head of the Black Psychological Association, Theopia Jackson, and the CEO of the American Psychological Association, Arthur C. Evans Jr.

[Excerpted from the latest Radio Derb, now available exclusively through VDARE.com]

As I start writing here on Friday morning, the news headliner is that Michael Reinoehl was killed Thursday evening in a shoot-out with cops who were trying to arrest him. It seems that no-one else was hurt in the shoot-out; it was, as our own inimitable Steve Sailer observes, Mostly Peaceful.

Reinoehl was, by his own confession in an interview with Vice published earlier that same day [Man Linked to Killing at a Portland Protest Says He Acted in Self-Defense, September 3, 2020], the person who shot dead an unarmed Trump supporter in Portland OR last Saturday.

The rioting anarchists of Antifa and Black Lives Matter may be in the service of a cynical elite hoping to bring down Trumpism and restore a happier state of affairs for globalist-corporatist-neoliberalism. They may, like Robespierre and Trotsky, end up under the guillotine themselves. But when I get a glimpse of their actual personalities, they are in the true revolutionary mold, like the Russian and Chinese revolutionaries in the late-19th, early-20th century.

We actually have quite a few specimens now. Reinoehl was a dedicated supporter of Black Lives Matter, with their clenched-fist symbol tattooed on his neck. He’d been arrested and cited in July for possessing a loaded gun in a public place, interfering with police, and resisting arrest [Michael Reinoehl, sought in fatal Portland shooting after Trump rally, killed by officers in Washington, OregonLive, September 4, 2020 ]Before that, in June he got a failure-to-appear warrant issued against him; charges there were driving under the influence of a controlled substance, recklessly endangering another, unlawful possession of a gun and driving while suspended and uninsured.

He claimed to be a professional snowboarder; but the firm he named says they never employed or sponsored him. He claimed to be an Army veteran, but the Army has no record of him. His sister disowned him some time ago.

Then there’s 36-year-old Joseph Rosenbaum, the first of the three people shot in self-defense by Kyle Rittenhouse in Kenosha WI. He was a convicted child rapist. Court documents from 2002 reproduced on the internet list a range of sex crimes against several boys from the ages of nine to eleven years old, including outright rape [HUGE: Court Documents Reveal Shot Kenosha Rioter Joseph Rosenbaum Was a Convicted Child Rapist, by Richard Moorhead, BigLeaguePolitics, September 3, 2020] His prison record shows 40 disciplinary infractions for arson, disobeying orders, manufacturing a weapon, refusing to work … This guy was a real no-goodnik.

Anthony Huber, the other guy killed by Kyle Rittenhouse, was only 26, but he already had quite a rap sheet going back to at least 2016: possession of drug paraphernalia, and a whole host of charges under the heading “domestic abuse”—strangulation and suffocation, false imprisonment, battery, disorderly conduct, …

The guy Kyle Rittenhouse shot but didn’t kill is Gaige Paul Grosskreutz, also 26. He’s been comparatively well-behaved: convicted of a criminal misdemeanor in 2016 for going armed with a firearm while intoxicated, and some nuisance offenses.

So of these four anarchists who chance to have come to our close attention, every one could fairly be described as a misfit. These are not normal, stable people. Revolutionaries hardly ever are.

Here’s one of them from the 19th century: Sergey Nechaev, Russian of course, supposed to have been the model for Verkhovensky in Dostoyevsky’s novel Demons:

A revolutionary is a doomed man. He has no private interests, no affairs, sentiments, ties, property nor even a name of his own. His entire being is devoured by one purpose, one thought, one passion—the revolution. Heart and soul, not merely by word but by deed, he has severed every link with the social order and with the entire civilized world; with the laws, good manners, conventions, and morality of that world. He is its merciless enemy and continues to inhabit it with only one purpose—to destroy it.

[Catechism Of A Revolutionist, 1869, as quoted in Stalin, by Edvard Radvinsky, 1997]

That’s the true revolutionary personality. But back of those revolutionaries and their various levels of nihilistic passion there is of course an ideology. It’s not just their ideology, either: It is mighty in the land.

APA is the American Psychological Association. Sample text:

Today’s inequities, psychologists say, are deeply rooted in our past, and the status quo is no longer acceptable. “Every institution in America is born from the blood of white supremacist ideology and capitalism—and that’s the disease,” says Theopia Jackson, Ph.D., [Email her] president of the Association of Black Psychologists.

[by Zara Abrams, APA Monitor, September 1, 2020 ]

Has the Association considered that perhaps “today’s inequities” are deeply rooted in biological race differences?

Good heavens, no! Get out of here, Nazi!

The APA is on the case, though. In June it launched a series of virtual town halls for its members, with the aim of “establishing a racially diverse psychology workforce and more efficiently and effectively translating research insights into action.”

You don’t get very far into an article of this sort before you come to the guilt section. From APA CEO Dr. Arthur C. Evans Jr. [Tweet him](who also happens to be black):

APA has a long history of taking a stand on these issues, but we also know that we have our own issues as an association and as a field. We have to look at our role as a discipline in perpetuating some of the things that are being protested. That has to be a part of our commitment.

We are guilty, guilty! We are all guilty!

This proposal appears in a multi-author article in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. [Blackface in White Space: Using Admissions to Address Racism in Medical Education, by Nientara Anderson, Dowin Boatright, and Anna Reisman, June 29, 2020, pictured below]

Key passage:

Many medical schools have made efforts to address pervasive racism in medical education by forming committees and appointing deans focused on diversity and inclusion, adding health equity classes to their curricula, conducting training on implicit bias and microaggressions, and expanding racial and social-economic equity in admissions.

However, [the authors of the article] believe a more direct way to address racism in medical training is to “stop admitting applicants with racist beliefs.”

…For example, essays, resumes, letters of recommendation, and interviews could be used to evaluate whether applicants “hold racist beliefs or invalid and fixed views on biological differences between races.”

i.e. a political test.

This is a medical school, dammit! We’ll have none of that filthy biology here!

  • The long arm of medical racism even reaches into the grave. Here’s a piece from the Washington Post: Autopsies can uphold white supremacy. Subheading: They have long provided scientific and medical excuses for white killings of nonwhite people. [June 3, 2020]

The author of this article is history professor Elizabeth Kolsky, [Email her] author of a book titled Colonial Justice in British India: White Violence and the Rule of Law. She starts off of course with the death of George Floyd:

The preliminary findings of the Hennepin County medical examiner’s report … used the veneer of scientific respectability to advance the outrageous claim that Floyd was partly responsible for his own death—something we know is untrue, given the subsequent reports.

Hm. I wonder how well that will age?

Then Prof Kolsky rambles off into a long tale about how beastly the colonial Brits were to the people of India, and my eyes glazed over. White people bad, dark people good; OK, got it.

  • But for keening, slobbering, self-flagellating confessions of guilt, the September issue of Scientific American is hard to beat … as it were.

This touches me more than the other examples, as I was once a keen reader of Scientific American. I can still remember the first issue I ever read: January 1960, cover story The Green Flash.

The magazine has long since gone CultMarx, though, and I haven’t looked into it for years, except when friends send me links to especially egregious specimens of wokeness. Which a friend just did.

Headline: Reckoning with Our Mistakes. Subheading: Some of the cringiest articles in Scientific American ‘s history reveal bigger questions about scientific authority. by Jen Schwartz and Dan Schlenoff, September 2020

Well, no, they don’t really. The article does, though, reveal how racked with guilt a respectable old magazine has to be, or pretend to be, nowadays if it wants to stay respectable:

During the 19th century, Scientific American published articles that legitimized racism … By 1871 Charles Darwin had concluded that all living humans were descended from the same ancestral stock … But none of that stopped the rise of scientific racism, including false ideas about biological determinism.

Down with biological determinism! Just because you’re a fish, that doesn’t mean you need to be in water all the time!

In fact, Darwin had a bit more to say about the descent of man. In fact he wrote an entire book about it (The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex, 1871). Sample quotes:

At some future period, not very distant as measured by centuries, the civilized races of man will almost certainly exterminate and replace the savage races throughout the world …

Looking at the world at no very distant date, an endless number of lower races will be eliminated by the higher civilized races.

How are Scientific American’s Schwartz and Schlenoff not aware of this? Do we have to Cancel Darwin now?

John Derbyshire [email him] writes an incredible amount on all sorts of subjects for all kinds of outlets. (This no longer includes National Review, whose editors had some kind of tantrum and fired him.) He is the author of We Are Doomed: Reclaiming Conservative Pessimism and several other books. He has had two books published by VDARE.com com: FROM THE DISSIDENT RIGHT (also available in Kindle) and FROM THE DISSIDENT RIGHT II: ESSAYS 2013.

(Republished from VDare by permission of author or representative)
 
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  1. TG says:

    There is much here to think about. BUT:

    “A revolutionary is a doomed man. He has no private interests, no affairs, sentiments, ties, property nor even a name of his own. His entire being is devoured by one purpose, one thought, one passion—the revolution. Heart and soul, not merely by word but by deed, he has severed every link with the social order and with the entire civilized world; with the laws, good manners, conventions, and morality of that world. ”

    George Washington?
    Paul Revere?
    Thomas Jefferson?
    Thomas Paine?
    John Adams?
    Benjamin Franklin?
    BENJAMIN FRANKLIN????

    Really?

  2. I am Kyle, we are all Kyle, that Trumps your Negan, uhh, Satan, uhh what was his name? Doesn’t matter, he’s dead. Like he needed to be.

    • Agree: Realist
  3. I canceled my subscription to Scientific American back in the 1980s. A few years later, I stopped reading it entirely, except for an occasional informative article which friends alerted me too.

    SciAmer’s precipitous decline into a prog house journal began almost immediately after a German concern took it over. What is it about the current German establishment? They seem to be so macerated in undeserved guilt for WW II (most current Germans were either still infants or not yet born when that war concluded), that they are intent not just on their own ethnic suicide but in adding all Europeans and European descendants to their self immolating funeral pyre.

  4. A bit OT, but the convergence of anarchists with sexual predators apparently started way back. The main anarchist character in one of Dostoevsky’s novels recounts how he seduced an 11-year-old girl. Dostoevsky’s original publisher balked at including this chapter in the novel, so it didn’t show up in print for a couple generations.

  5. Gunga Din says:

    Interesting (but not so surprising) that all the American authors cited were either negro or jew.

    • Replies: @RoatanBill
  6. For example, essays, resumes, letters of recommendation, and interviews could be used to evaluate whether applicants “hold racist beliefs or invalid and fixed views on biological differences between races.”

    They could just have a candidate walk down a sidewalk and observe his, her, or its behaviour when a large black male approaches from the other direction.

    • Replies: @Polemos
    , @Hibernian
  7. @TG

    Although the conflict between the American colonies and Great Britain is generally known as the Revolutionary War, all of these men, with the possible exception of Thomas Paine, were simply secessionists from the British Empire. Had they been given their proper rights and status as Englishmen, likely there would have been no secession.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  8. @TG

    The New Englanders wouldn’t have considered themselves revolutionaries. They had been self governing and viewed themselves as fighting to preserve their way of live and their liberties as Englishman, not overturn the status quo. As for the Virginians, I don’t feel like I know enough about them to say. I suppose Jefferson would view himself as a revolutionary.

    • Replies: @Realist
  9. Rich says:

    Is it possible for these “racist” myths to go on? How long will people be able to ignore black criminality? Facts, logic, truth, can a society continue to exist if it ignores them? The cognitive dissonance necessary for a White person to support a movement that wants to deprive him of his civil rights, is bewildering.

    • Replies: @Realist
    , @Currahee
    , @Hibernian
  10. @Gunga Din

    The other interesting thing is that they all have basket weaving degrees; degrees that can’t prove a damned thing but they get to pretend they know something and some fools take them seriously.

    • Agree: Realist, Pat Kittle
    • Replies: @Polemos
  11. The colonial Brits were not nice people. I thought reasonable folks agreed on this. For Derb, pointing out that they were sadists means agreeing with the totality of the Marxist BLM platform, Robin DeAngelo and Shaun King. (Zionists do this too; if you’re for BDS you’re also automatically for X)

    I guess the syllogism goes something like this:

    – BLM is psychotic
    – BLM would agree that the British Empire was brutal
    – Only psychos would question the tactics of Kitchener & Churchill

    He may be the only “American” to hold this view.

  12. unit472 says:
    @TG

    As Diversity Heretic correctly pointed out the ‘American Revolution’ is more correctly called a War of Independence. There was no desire to replace the standards of English common law or install a new economic system. Just a desire for Americans to enjoy them on an equal footing with the citizens of Great Britain.

    Look at the people you list. With the exception of Thomas Paine all were successful men no different than their British peers who also were chaffing at and resenting the privileges afforded a hereditary aristocracy.

    Ironically we seem to have been busy recreating that antique social order again with a new technocratic and academic class which if not hereditary serve no useful function other than to lord their power and privilege over productive citizens. Like an 18 century Duke however this new class has no real role or job to do so they busy themselves with utopian fantasy and, instead of extravagant balls, they hold equally meaningless conferences at luxury hotels and fancy resorts.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  13. I would say none of the rioters, at least the ones shot, who we have a lot of information about, would qualify as true revolutionaries. I realize This is hairsplitting, but these rioters must be assumed to be criminal elements who have reverted to type in the absence of state authority. A true revolutionary must act from conviction and purity of motive. Xe must have a realatively clean record outside revolutionary activity. Hitler and Lenin had been imprisoned but for revolutionary activity. These foot soldiers are the useful idiots Lenin or was it Trotsky spike of.

    Thanks for another great podcast!

    • Replies: @Alfa158
  14. @Diversity Heretic

    Had they been given their proper rights and status as Englishmen, likely there would have been no secession.

    They had all the proper rights and status as Englishmen … they merely wanted to deprive the Crown of its cut. The colonials actually paid less in tax than their cousins back in Old Blighty.

  15. Anonymous[401] • Disclaimer says:

    Reisman
    Kolsky
    Schwartz
    Schlenoff

    All pro-American Christianish folks, right?

    ———-

    Nientara Anderson
    Dowin Boatright
    Theopia Jackson
    Arthur C. Evans, Jr.

    All Caucasians, correct?

    • Replies: @ogunsiron
  16. Realist says:
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I canceled my subscription to Scientific American back in the 1980s.

    Yes, sadly many scientific journals were turned into bird cage liners, decades ago.

  17. Realist says:
    @Chris Screwtape

    They had been self governing and viewed themselves as fighting to preserve their way of live and their liberties as Englishman, not overturn the status quo.

    They fought for independence from the crown.

  18. Realist says:
    @Rich

    The cognitive dissonance necessary for a White person to support a movement that wants to deprive him of his civil rights, is bewildering.

    Yes, there are many really stupid White people. The fact that the average White IQ is considerably higher than the average black IQ…does not preclude the abject stupidity of many Whites.

    For a good laugh…or cry read the Wikipedia offering on Race and Intelligence.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race_and_intelligence

  19. This is like a Joseph Heller novel. All the psychologists are actually insane. Their only hope is that psychiatrists have not gone down the same path.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  20. @The Alarmist

    You’re right, there’s a lot of truth in that. I’m increasingly of the opinion that North America north of the Rio Grande would have been better governed as a British colony, achieving independence in the manner of Canada, Australia and New Zealand, than as a separate country.

    Can’t change history, though.

    • Agree: martin_2
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    , @Bill Jones
  21. @The Alarmist

    The leaders of the American Revolution were all property holders and lawyers. As such they were familiar with Blackstone’s “Commentaries on the Laws of England”. In fact, the Declaration of Independence begins with a variant on Blackstone’s enumeration of the most basic rights of all Englishmen, the rights to life, property and liberty (In the Declaration, “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness”). Blackstone goes on to enumerate essential “auxiliary subordinate rights” that are necessary to maintain these most basic rights.

    The first of these is representation in parliament, an essential right of Englishmen which the North American colonists were denied. Parliamentary statesmen such as Edmund Burke agreed that the colonists had a legitimate beef here. If George III’s ministers had acknowledged and corrected this, the vast majority of colonists would have been happy to acknowledge their status as the King’s subjects, although a few wealthy smugglers, e.g. John Hancock, might still have chafed under parliamentary rule.

    For more on Blackstone see here: https://sparkscommentary.blogspot.com/2019/06/blackstone-and-auxiliary-subordinate-rights.html

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  22. @Diversity Heretic

    Can’t change history, but mistakes can be corrected:

    Queen Elizabeth II revokes independence of the United States of America

    To the citizens of the United States of America from Her Sovereign Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

    In light of your failure to financially manage yourselves and inability to effectively govern yourselves responsibly, we hereby give notice of the revocation of your independence, effective immediately. (You should look up ‘revocation’ in the Oxford English Dictionary.)

    Her Sovereign Majesty Queen Elizabeth II will resume monarchical duties over all states, commonwealths, and territories (except Kansas, which she does not fancy).

    Your new Prime Minister will appoint a Governor for the former United States of America without the need for further elections. Congress and the Senate will be disbanded. A questionnaire may be circulated sometime next year to determine whether any of you noticed.

    h/t https://birdgei.com/2020/01/15/queen-elizabeth-ii-revokes-independence-of-the-united-states-of-america/

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
  23. Alfa158 says:
    @Happy Tapir

    Was this Xe you are referring to one of Mao’s comrades in the revolution? I don’t remember seeing his name in any of the histories of the Chinese Communist revolution or it’s aftermath.

    • Replies: @Happy Tapir
  24. A B C D E, Theopia
    Drink a glass of pee, Theopia

    F G H I J, Theopia
    Eat some sh*t, okay, Theopia?

    • Agree: throtler
  25. We are all Weimarxists now.

  26. @Alfa158

    No, it’s the gender neutral personal pronoun. I’m trying to be woke.

  27. 22pp22 says:
    @Bragadocious

    I live in a small New Zealand town. We know a lot about the colonists who founded this place, including their flaws and character failings. A lot of them were very nice people.

    • Replies: @Bragadocious
  28. @Jus' Sayin'...

    The Colonial’s gripes about taxation with no representation were largely made moot by the 1766 repeal of the Stamp Act 1765. Our Canadian and other colonial cousins in many cases simply ignored the Act while protesting it vigourously to the Mother country. In typical American fashion, however, we elevated it nine years later to a crisis demanding a fundamental change to our very way of life.

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
  29. Currahee says:
    @Rich

    The BLACK! Delusion Bubble is thick and vast.

  30. Polemos says:
    @The Alarmist

    How do black people themselves do in these tests? Some of the harshest criticism of black people I’ve heard were from black people. 👨🏿‍🏫

  31. Polemos says:
    @RoatanBill

    The other interesting thing is that they all have basket weaving degrees; degrees that can’t prove a damned thing but they get to pretend they know something and some fools take them seriously.

    Okay but that’s what we’re doing here, too, right? 🤐

    • Replies: @RoatanBill
  32. @Polemos

    Not exactly.

    We all express our opinions on most topics. These outright frauds demand we take their ruminations as absolute fact when they’re pontificating on something tangential to their supposed expertise.

    They have PhD’s in what are essentially opinions but because they learned how to ape their teachers, we’re supposed to listen to them carefully. I’ll listen to just about anyone on some topic of interest, but I reserve the right to use my education and experience to accept or totally dismiss the message.

  33. @22pp22

    Not talking about the colonists, I’m talking about Kitchener, Churchill, Baden-Powell and the other murderous ass clowns running around the globe on behalf of a sick nation.

    • Replies: @22pp22
  34. @The Alarmist

    The Colonial’s gripes about taxation with no representation were largely made moot by the 1766 repeal of the Stamp Act 1765

    False. The colonists still had no representation in Parliament, Blackstone’s first auxilliary subordinate right of every Englishman. The repeal of the Stamp Act just rubbed in the aggravation since colonists had no say in this, they were only allowed to lobby Parliament via Benjamin Franklin. The colonists and their Parliamentary supporters, Rockingham, Pitt, Burke, et al., argued that the colonists deserved the rights of Englishmen but this issue was never formally considered. If the King and his ministers had granted these rights then the American Revolution would have been still born. Instead the tax was repealed but the larger issue was never resolved. It’s worth noting that the tax levies of later British ministries on the colonies, e.g., those of Townsend, were far from onerous but met with even more bitter opposition than the Stamp Act.

    Our Canadian and other colonial cousins in many cases simply ignored the Act while protesting it vigourously to the Mother country.

    The Canadian possessions of the Crown contained relatively few descendants of Englishmen at the time of the Revolution. The inhabitants principle concerns at that point were not the rights of Englishmen, since most hadn’t any claim to have inherited these. After the Revolution and the immigration of many Tories into Canada — my many times great grandfather was one — the Lower and Upper Provinces (Quebec and Ontario) eventually became restive and for much the same reasons as earlier animated their southern cousins. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebellions_of_1837%E2%80%931838

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  35. Anonymous[366] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s hard to believe that Scientific American is the same magazine that published Martin Gardner. I think I was 11 years old when I came across a copy of his Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science. Reading it inoculated me against all sorts of alluring asininities.
    The current editorial staff of the magazine could benefit from reading it.

  36. fnn says:
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    It’s because Germany (most of it) has been the most closely monitored part of the American Empire for the entire post-WW2 era. You probably know that the most right-wing part of Germany today is the former Soviet Zone.

  37. 22pp22 says:
    @Bragadocious

    I know what you mean. Baden Powell left a trail of blood all over the planet. I hear Florence Nightingale was an absolute brute as well.

  38. Rich says:
    @Bragadocious

    The colonial Brits weren’t angels, but they did build schools, roads and industry. They brought modern medicine and science to many of the backwards nations they conquered and colonized. In most cases, they were much better than the savages who took over after them. Were any of the African nations better off after the Brits left? They were rulers, and they could often be brutal, but instances of kindness were common and those who served with them, were often quite fond of them. Baden-Powell and Kitchener were soldiers who fought to win. War is hell and people suffer, they were not, however, unprofessional or unnecessarily cruel to those they defeated. Their tactics worked, and in war, however unfortunate it may be, winning is everything. Lose, and every woman from 8 to 80 is raped by Soviet soldiers, as the Germans found out.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Bragadocious
  39. @Bragadocious

    The colonial Brits were not nice people.

    This stuff gets so old.

    My ancestry is Irish and Confederate here in the US. Can we try to put this victimology bullshit to bed once and for all? I have no problem with historical truth and perspective, as long as it’s not some one-sided Marxist Jew diatribe.

    Please make a list of all the “nice people” who shouldn’t have to pay and pay and pay…in perpetuity.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
  40. Reisman, Kolsky, Schwartz, Denhoff. Hmmm.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  41. @The Alarmist

    Piss off, Lizzy. AS if the kingdom that can’t control its Muslim rape gangs and arrests people for WrongThink tweets would be an improvement.

  42. Biff says:

    However, [the authors of the article] believe a more direct way to address racism in medical training is to “stop admitting applicants with racist beliefs.”

    …For example, essays, resumes, letters of recommendation, and interviews could be used to evaluate whether applicants “hold racist beliefs or invalid and fixed views on biological differences between races.”

    What about the authors “fixed views”?

    • Replies: @throtler
  43. @Rich

    they were not, however, unprofessional or unnecessarily cruel to those they defeated

    Yeah, they were darlings.

    Personally I don’t care about this issue that much, but Derb brought it up. And the Brits love going on and on about Wounded Knee and the Trail of Tears. And no it’s not just the British Joos who do this.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    , @Rich
  44. @Jus' Sayin'...

    What is it about the current German establishment

    All — all — significant German newspapers were licensed by the western allies after the war and therefore careful not to print news unfit to print.

    The rule that a perpetrators nationality must not be named stems from those times. A situation as in Okinawa, where rapes and other transgressions by occupying soldiers caused native unrest had to be avoided.

    This rule came in handy to disguise the true cost of the 2015 wave of illegal mass immigration.

    Mentioning problems in Germany is proof of racism, antiamericanism and, obviously, antisemitism even if you never mentioned the j-word.

    The Free West does not like Germany, and now that the Soviet Union is bankrupt, does not need those German tank divisions any more to scare the Russians.

    Thus their minions, the so called German elites, are under orders to liquidate the country and the natives with it.

    You cannot be part of Germany’s elite unless you hav sworn allegiance to the Western powers

    • Replies: @Anon
  45. @Bragadocious

    One instance and a disturbing photo is not a refutation of a statement that is generally true. It’s as if someone said, “Americans are generally nice people,” and you put up a photo of the Manson murders saying, “Oh, yeah? Does this look like the work of nice people?”

  46. @Tsar Nicholas

    The entire discipline has as much intellectual heft as extipsicy, phrenology, astrology or homeopathy. It is basically a bunch of people with +σ verbal IQ, making up a bunch of semi-coherent bullshit checklists and couching it in jargon. That is more than enough to fool the sorts of individuals gullible enough to become customers.

    The reason that you’ll find a bunch of blacks among the Peak Charlatans of the psychosphaster’s trades unions, is because they can get there by merit: Talented Tenth blacks, competing against Beta bullshit-artist whites… trying to gain market share in the market to convince stupid, troubled people that the snake oil on offer outperforms placebo.

    • Replies: @Thomasina
  47. tyrone says:
    @TG

    Here’s a good test for a true revolution……did it end in tyranny…..French yes, Russian yes, American NO.

  48. @The Alarmist

    That’s the whole thing right there. In a 17th century version of the “trickle down” theory, the American colonies were granted exemptions from most ordinary taxes that other Englishmen paid. And the people were protected by the 1689 English Bill of Rights, sections of which would be adopted verbatim into the US Bill of Rights a century later. By the 1760s the colonies had become prosperous enough to pay their fair share of the tax burden, and England had in fact nearly gone bankrupt defending the American colonies during the French and Indian War. But 18th century spinmeisters coined the catchy phrase condemning “taxation without representation” because they were furious their long tax exemptions were ending, that’s all. The obvious counter argument is that there were precious few Britons in the home country, let alone people anywhere on earth in the 1700s, whose interests were represented by government.

    Note that the Trump Supreme Court finally, officially repudiated that supposedly sacred principle in its 2018 decision in “South Dakota v. Wayfair Inc.”, ruling that mail order customers can now be forced to pay sales tax to state governments outside the state in which they reside and vote.

    Note also that among the first Acts of the new federal Congress at its first session in in New York in 1789 were laws imposing a wide variety of new taxes on the people of the new nation.

    • Replies: @obvious
  49. Rich says:
    @Bragadocious

    What is this picture? Did an Englishmen keeps this obviously starving person in their basement? I’m sure you’re aware that other Englanders fed poor people, taught them modern farming techniques and animal husbandry methods, right?

    • Replies: @Bragadocious
  50. @Rich

    Did an Englishmen keeps this obviously starving person in their basement?

    Since there are almost no basements as you or I know them in the UK, I doubt it.

    It’s a photo of Lizzie Van Zyl, now google away.

    • Replies: @Thomasina
    , @Rich
  51. Hibernian says:
    @The Alarmist

    That might tend to eliminate too many white leftists.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  52. Hibernian says:
    @Rich

    Facts, logic, truth, can a society continue to exist if it ignores them?

    There’s a lot of ruin in a nation.

  53. @Diversity Heretic

    American history is a history of secessions, the successful one in the 18th century and the unsuccessful one in the 19th.

    I read that the Wreckers are war-gaming secession by the three states on the Pacific Coast in the increasingly certain event of a Trump re-election in 2020. I wish them the best of luck and hope they will take the entirety of New England, NY and NJ with them when they go.

    As the great patriot General Robert E. Lee said, “A Union that can only be maintained by swords and bayonets, and in which strife and civil war are to take the place of brotherly love and kindness, has no charm for me.”

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  54. Hibernian says:

    This seems to be in part a rationalization for excluding any conservatives or even moderates from the practice of clinical psychology.

  55. Anon[367] • Disclaimer says:

    The left, indicting itself again…..

  56. @Hibernian

    Most psychologists and psychiatrists I have met in life struck me as a bit insane. Can you imagine a world in which a significant number were also PoCs?

  57. Anon[367] • Disclaimer says:
    @but an humble craftsman

    True. The so called Free West however, is run by the greediest and most unpatriotic people that ever existed. The American Tech moguls, for example, sell out the U.S. public and its inherited freedoms to China, almost daily. These are the most despicable people ever to be referred to as “AMERICANS. By the way, the Unz report Disclaimer, says that people who sign in with Anonymous should be treated with caution. Really? Even when the it’s the only way they can sign in to comment?? LOL

  58. Thomasina says:
    @Bragadocious

    “Lizzie Van Zyl was a South African child inmate of the Bloemfontein concentration camp who died from typhoid fever during the Second Boer War.”

    One of my distant relatives died in that war too; he was only 17, naive, and thought he was fighting for a just cause. Wrong! He’s buried in South Africa too.

    But follow the money. Follow the diamonds and gold. It was these precious commodities that the Brits were after.

    Who benefited? Follow the flow of money and you will see who really benefited.

  59. Rich says:
    @Bragadocious

    Apparently the story isn’t quite black and white though, is it? The Brits claimed that she arrived at the camp in that condition and her mother was threatened with prosecution for neglect. I agree the camps for relatives of Boer fighters was wrong, I’m not sure if they did anything but punish the relatives, but it beat the fire bombing of Dresden by a mile and a half. War is hell, that’s for sure.

    • Replies: @Bragadocious
  60. Thomasina says:
    @Kratoklastes

    It’s an industry. The well-written article by Corey Giles, “The White Plague”, published a few weeks back on Unz, describes this beautifully. From the making of the DSM to the associations created around the industry in order to give it a polished, professional look.

    Not only is it a money-making machine, but the psychobabble is used to mold society. The paid industry shills – I mean “experts” – are called in whenever needed to convince the public that something has to change, usually for the worse.

    The fields of psychiatry and psychology were created to benefit the “chosen ones”. That they would allow Blacks to enter into this world speaks volumes. They’re going to use them like tools to change things up.

  61. @Rich

    “The Brits claimed”

    And you should have stopped right there.

    I’m sure the friendly Brits were teaching her animal husbandry, she was making progress, then she had to harsh everyone’s buzz by going and getting sick. Those damn ungrateful Boers.

  62. @The Alarmist

    No taxation without representation was a legitimate English demand. Of course, it would have been amplified by the unfair tax treatment in favor of the colonials even after the increases. People who enjoy privileges always think they’re entitled. That applies to people of all races and levels of income. [email protected]

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  63. Anon[192] • Disclaimer says:

    Ludicrous level of political corruption in institutions = intent to destroy institutions.

    Be ready for a period of cycling into, again, intense religiosity.

    You may not see it in your lifetimes, but its coming in the same manner that the corruption of the Religious institutions of the Middle Ages, as well as the trauma of the unimaginably barbaric Thirty Years War, birthed the Enlightenment.

    Think of the philosophy and science corrupting effect of the two World Wars (obviously, especially the Second) as our cultural Thirty Years War.

    If history is any indication, after our cycle again into an Age of Religion, it will be twenty or more generations before we again cycle into an Age of Reason.

    You will think this coming religiosity is a Good Thing, due to the fact that the current Age of Reason has been so intolerably corrupted. I offer that this corruption is intentional.

    The cycling is, in fact, fundamentally not a Good Thing in isolation. It may be a Good Thing in a broad historical context that one can only guess about (as I do later below)

    Both Religion (defined as the primacy of the abstract, or of illusion) and Reason (defined as the primacy of the Mind’s World interpretation via the most accurate possible information gained from the five senses) can be corrupted.

    The difference is that it is much easier to corrupt religion / abstraction / illusion. Objectivity is much more difficult to corrupt. It can be done, as we see today, but the corruption is much less convincing, is easier to revert to a degree, and is easier to persuasively refute.

    Even as we approach peak corruption of Reason, we are aware of strong differences of opinion over vast portions of the populace. In an age of religion, contradicting Church corruption will be far less widespread and far less assertive. Primarily because abstraction can not be refuted with reality unless it is entirely abandoned. It takes another abstraction to refute abstraction on the playing field of abstraction (religion), which by its nature also is not real.

    The difference is that objective interpretation of the World is the higher and vastly preferable psychological state.

    It is more spiritual in its pure, uncorrupted state because accurate World perception defines the sanity that is the optimal and evolutionarily preferred state of the human mind. Everything else is the mythical Nod, or haze. It is the spirituality difference between being drunk or high vs. sober and crystal clear.

    In fact, the Serpent’s temptation may have been a temptation toward religion among other sexual (race mixing) connotations. The Eden story may have started as instructive myth, not religion. Remember that the serpent gives the Law and the Guardian God of Eden prescribes against it. Later, it is the Serpent’s lineage that is cast out into Nod. Which may be a reference to the illusion and haze of his law and religion.

    The religious Romans had the most military issues with the most atheistic early Germanic tribe of Europe, and the later Charlemagne has the most issues converting the same tribe to Christianity. Later, this same tribe was most fundamentally responsible for Europe’s early technological advancement into the modern age.

    Objective perception of the World prioritizes the reflection by the most spiritual, accurately interpretative, and moral organ that the animal Kingdom knows: the human mind. It reflects a much finer, more accurate view of reality than does religion that seeks to cover reality with abstraction.

    Some philosophical-spiritual abstraction is within the limits of sanity, but by definition a wide departure from accurate perception of objective reality is formally defined as psychosis.

    An unmitigated and progressive mass psychosis may be the most dangerous threat to humanity’s existence, aside from representing a type of psychological prison and hell, in the same manner that a gambler’s delusion in regard to the odds will best assure his bankruptcy over a stretch of time.

    These cycles may be an engineered method to keep such psychosis from gaining a permanent hold on humanity’s collective mind. That psychosis avoidance may be the point of the cycle between Reason and Religion. By keeping our collective minds always in a state of fluctuation and chaos, no wrong ideas can take permanent hold. The mind is constantly forced to refocus its perception (within a longer single cycle range of several hundred years or longer). This could be one symbolism of the role of the drunk and chaotic yet Divine Dionysus (of many symbols that he may represent) who dies and resurrects. Humanity is kept in a constant state of chaos to keep its mind from self directing possibly and predictably into a state of permanent mass psychosis.

    Of course, I am aware of all of the religious counter arguments. I believe them to be spiritually invalid, but also don’t have the room here to dissect them.

    A Religious Age may be the beginning of our entrance into the proverbial land of Illusion, or Nod. Into a type of psychological hell. But it may be necessary to stave off a permanent psychological corruption within any single Age. Instead, we may have long ago worked out a cycle dependent on a controlled demolition of any one Age.

    If I’m wrong, I would feel terrible about (somehwat ironically) inducing a State of delusion in anyone who become mistakenly convinced. So keep the possibility in mind, but also don’t put all of your psychological eggs in this basket.

    Though, regardless of the wider theory, I do hold that the current age predicts a return to a Religious Age.

    Imagine if there was a group that was in charge of and directed this chaos and its resulting cycles.

  64. Hibernian says:
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    Also the Proclamation Line of 1763 severely limited opportunities for new settlement, and then there was the British practice of using Indians a proxy warriors.

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
  65. @Wade Hampton

    ‘I read that the Wreckers are war-gaming secession by the three states on the Pacific Coast in the increasingly certain event of a Trump re-election in 2020.’

    That’ll be fun. Outside of Portland and Eugene, Oregon is Trump Country.

    Ditto for Eastern Washington and even Northeast California.

    I do believe I’d like to see them try it.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
  66. @Donald A Thomson

    The Colonials had representation in their own legislatures, and most of what one called taxation flowed from those bodies. What the Crown in Parliament was asking of the Colonials could best be characterised as a franchise fee.

  67. throtler says:
    @Biff

    If people of color had to prove that they were not racist to get a job or be admitted to a school, they would fail almost every time.

  68. throtler says:

    You may be Michael Ass-oehl, but I am not.

  69. @Colin Wright

    The secession of Virginia from the United States provoked the secession of West Virginia from Virginia.

    An interesting case of “the secession that might have been,” was the sentiment in 1814 for New England seceding from the Union over the issue of the War of 1812.

  70. @Diversity Heretic

    “Can’t change history, though.”

    Oh, the naiveté is strong in this one.

  71. @Hibernian

    An important point. Ben Franklin pointed out that the prosperity of Americans depended on the availability of new land. (Steve Sailer has pointed this out on multiple occasions.) By restricting westward immigration the British government was posing a threat to the prosperity of Americans’ posterity. Pioneers like Daniel Boone ended up ignoring restrictions which the British had trouble enforcing except by refusing to protect colonists from Indian depredations and even encouraging Indian attacks on illegal western settlements.

  72. ogunsiron says:
    @Anonymous

    “Presbytarians” and the Golems they’ve created and unleashed.

  73. ogunsiron says:

    Has anyone lived through the times of the Black Panthers in the late 60s? I gather that it was a time of considerable “racial conflict”, but did it feel like blacks were trying to completely and utterly dismantle European civilization?

    I feel that blacks are being so offensive to Whites right now that if Whites don’t actually succomb to the assaults (not impossible), the White backlash to all of this will be a return to the late 19th century hyper racism that will be translated into, at the very least, the complete expulsion of blacks from the mainstream of American (and Western) society.

    A few years ago I read that there had been considerably warm feelings towards blacks on the part of the “progressives” of the 19th century in the USA. That enthusiasm soured into intense hatred by the late 19th century, though. But back then Whites formed a huge, unassailable majority and they were in charge of telling their own stories. They weren’t being told who they were, what to think and how to think by a hostile, elitist people who look vaguely like them but are not really like them.

    • Replies: @Ragno
  74. I feel that blacks are being so offensive to Whites right now that if Whites don’t actually succumb to the assaults (not impossible), the White backlash to all of this will be a return to the late 19th century hyper racism that will be translated into, at the very least, the complete expulsion of blacks

    Not gonna happen because because most Whites on both sides believe that race doesn’t exist and all behavior is environmental in origin.

  75. Ragno says:
    @ogunsiron

    I feel that blacks are being so offensive to Whites right now that if Whites don’t actually succomb to the assaults (not impossible), the White backlash to all of this will be a return to the late 19th century hyper racism that will be translated into, at the very least, the complete expulsion of blacks from the mainstream of American (and Western) society.

    We would never be that fortunate.

  76. Do a count and the only way the numbers lose, is if they surrender, which is possible.

  77. utu says:

    The Invisible Man at the Race Riots by E. Michael Jones
    https://culturewars.com/news/the-invisible-man-at-the-race-riots

    “When Donald Trump referred to Antifa as a terrorist organization, the Israeli newspaper Ha’aretz came to their defense, “Trump’s Attacks on Antifa Are Attacks on Jews.” According to an article which appeared in the Forward, Antifa activism “is an affirmation of Jewish identity, both religious and secular” which stretches all the way back to 1897 with the founding of Bundism, which “sought to organize the working-class Jews of Russia, Poland, and Lithuania.” After members of a specifically Jewish Antifa group defaced a plaque in New York City honoring the president of Vichy France Philippe Petain, they left a note which defended the rationale behind their act of vandalism:

    With Monday’s actions, Jewish antifascists and allied forces have served notice that fascist apologism will not be tolerated in our city in 2019; that anti-Semitic ideology and violence will be confronted with Jewish solidarity and strength; and that the Holocaust will be remembered not only with sadness and grief but also with righteous anger and action: ‘We will never forget. We will never forgive.

    In the final analysis, Antifa is a Jewish organization in the same way that Bolshevism and Neoconservatism were Jewish political movements. Not every member of Antifa is a Jew, but Jews invariably find their ways into leadership roles in places like Portland, Washington, DC, and even in China, as was the case during the Cultural Revolution of 1966, because they have an advantage over non-Jews in embodying the Jewish Revolutionary Spirit which is the hidden grammar of all revolutionary movements.”

  78. At some future period, not very distant as measured by centuries, the civilized races of man will almost certainly exterminate and replace the savage races throughout the world …

    Looking at the world at no very distant date, an endless number of lower races will be eliminated by the higher civilized races.

    Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man, 1871

    After 150 years, the boot is clearly on the other foot. Strangely, we are required not to notice or mention that fact, and at the same time to deplore Darwin’s quaint optimism about the civilized races.

  79. obvious says:
    @Observator

    customers don’t pay sales taxes, vendors pay the tax. good job getting it completely backwards

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