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  1. It sure was great the way that Trump and Bannon came in with all those great ideas on how to reform the media and set about implementing them in a calm, rational, consistent way and everything….

    • LOL: The Alarmist
    • Troll: GeneralRipper
    • Replies: @Matt Buckalew
    @Guy De Champlagne

    They didn’t solve your erectile disfunction either. Rolf boomer blowhards who never did shit.

  2. Your Tax Dollars at Work

    I thought the thread was going to be about the Mueller Special Counsel investigation which, according to Donald Trump in last night’s debate, cost $48,000,000.

    Btw, Kamala Harris badgered Brett Kavanaugh, during his Supreme Court nomination hearings, to call for the FBI to investigate himself. Will she badger Joe Biden (and herself) to call for FBI investigations into her and Joe? It would give them a change to “prove” they are not corrupt politicians.

    I wonder how much Crossfire Hurricane, Mueller’s Special Counsel, the impeachment, and the coronavirus pandemic have cost the U.S. taxpayer in total?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Coemgen

    Amazing that men his and Bidens age view it as acceptable to still be milking funds from law firms government etc while the next generation cant so much as buy a 1 bedroom home.

    Enormously selfish and destructive to a legacy.

    , @Morton's toes
    @Coemgen

    I am thinking I could have bought a house with what the virus taxes are going to sum to.

  3. Yes, it is not wise to bite the hand that really feeds it, and that ain’t the US taxpayers … they just bear the costs committed to by the Criminal Elite.

  4. Is NPR really financed with tax dollars (more than anybody else, that is?)

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @El Dato

    National Public Radio is funded by listeners like you, whether you listen or not! [oops, sorry bout that exclamation point, we usually are very calm and quiet ... this is like library ... picture Nina Totenberg as your favorite librarian ... a spinster by the looks of her ... take off those glasses and long skirt ... inside is a sexually unaware as of yet young quiet NPR announcer ... "ooohhh, Achmed, fund me, fund me!" .... oh, oh ... Nina! Nina! oh, I'll double my pledge!"]

    The post "All Things Considered", it's been a long road to Peak Stupidity has a couple of pictures.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Art Deco

    , @eD
    @El Dato

    "Is NPR really financed with tax dollars (more than anybody else, that is?)"

    No, corporate funded. I think PBS gets some derisory federal funding for its childrens' programs, not sure about NPR.

    Actually the same foundations that are bringing you the COVID 19 panic bring you "public" broadcasting as well.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Jack D, @1BigJohnson

    , @Rob McX
    @El Dato

    I know Ray Kroc's widow left $225m to NPR when she died in 2003.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Buffalo Joe, @The Wild Geese Howard

    , @res
    @El Dato

    https://www.npr.org/about-npr/178660742/public-radio-finances

    https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2019/12/20/npr-revenues-donut-chart-2019_custom-b801c4108cc69c881a705ab8b332588171cf60be-s1600-c85.png

    Replies: @Jack D

  5. Well, the Hunter Biden story IS a distraction. It distracts people from their task to vote against Trump.

    • Agree: Charles
    • Replies: @Icy Blast
    @Stogumber

    Obviously, we're not talking about a corruption scandal involving just Hunter Biden. We're talking about a corruption scandal involving Hunter and Joe Biden! Busted! The corruption of the Democratic Party is staggering - almost beyond belief. In fact, millions of gullible and uninformed Americans cannot accept it. Decades of TV propaganda have succeeded in rendering them intellectually dead. Most Republican voters are in a similar state of mental decay. That's why they still support the cause of empire.

    , @Bill Jones
    @Stogumber


    Public Radio and Federal Funding

    Federal funding is essential to public radio's service to the American public. Its continuation is critical for both stations and program producers, including NPR.

    Public radio stations receive annual grants directly from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) that make up an important part of a diverse revenue mix that includes listener support, corporate sponsorship and grants. Stations, in turn, draw on this mix of public and privately sourced revenue to pay NPR and other public radio producers for their programming
     
    From NPR's annual financial report.
  6. State propaganda is there to shape mass belief.

    Forward, Soviet!

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    “Great is truth, but still greater, from a practical point of view, is silence about truth. By simply not mentioning certain subjects… totalitarian propagandists have influenced opinion much more effectively than they could have by the most eloquent denunciations.” ~ Aldous Huxley (N.ational P.ropaganda R.adio's policy?)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWyCCJ6B2WE
    “The conscious and intelligent manipulation of the organized habits and opinions of the masses is an important element in democratic society. Those who manipulate this unseen mechanism of society constitute an invisible government which is the true ruling power of our country.” ~ Edward L. Bernays, "Propaganda" (1928) https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/481391-propaganda

  7. I really enjoy NPRs classical music & jazz broadcasts……it would be nice if they were music only

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @Neoconned

    NPR/PBS does put out some good stuff -but- I think it's only to try an hook rubes into being exposed to NPR/PBS propaganda.

    Prime example is Project Smoke which is wrong on so many levels for the true NPR/PBS audience (smoke? red meat? no leftist politics?) but it attracts normies who may get caught in one of NPR/PBS' bait-and-switch productions where they reel one in to believing the NPR/PBS propaganda.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @HammerJack
    @Neoconned

    Which is why God made streaming services.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Neoconned


    I really enjoy NPRs classical music & jazz broadcasts……it would be nice if they were music only
     
    Minnesota Public Radio gives you that option, with two stations. My car radio is set to the all-music one. Perfect for 5-speed FWD drives through leafy country backroads in the autumn.

    Actually, three. There was an independent classical station at St Olaf College which closed down and became a pop format, "The Current". Which is now part of MPR. How ironic.

    They reach five surrounding states and two provinces, and are streamed online.

    As far as politics, MPR Classical recently fired a black DJ for getting political over the air. On the other hand, their site reposts a Ford Foundation op-ed by a black guy with the ridiculously Jewish name Aaron Dworkin, calling for US orchestras to devote 10% of their programming to " Black and Latinx" composers.

    Come on, now... do they even devote 10% to American composers?

    https://www.classicalmpr.org/story/2020/10/20/aaron-dworkin-sound-of-silence

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Jack D

    , @Alden
    @Neoconned

    I’ve clicked on their music shows. Just yakety yak pompous liberals blathering about the music instead of just playing it.

    , @Known Fact
    @Neoconned

    Most NPR member station are so clogged with talk and news that the window for classical or jazz is pretty tight. You want unfettered classical you need to find a station like WMNR or WDAV that is independent, listener-supported, maybe college-run but NOT beholden to NPR. These are small stations but thanks to the internet they now have worldwide followings.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @Dissident
    @Neoconned


    I really enjoy NPRs classical music & jazz broadcasts……
     
    Marian MacPartland's Piano Jazz* and Nancy Wilson's Jazz Profiles were great NPR productions.
    (*At least up to a certain point; by the end of the show's run MacPartland, sadly, was but a rather pathetic shadow of her once vivacious, witty, pert self.)

    There was also Jazz at Lincoln Center hosted by Wynton Marsalis.

    I used to listen to WBGO 88.3 FM the NPR-affiliate jazz station out of Newark, NJ.

    Replies: @Jack D

  8. To the media’s sorta credit, they’re also not terribly interested in all the business Trump continues to do in office or Jared Kushner mixing bailouts of his family’s finances with official foreign policy. They hate Trump for what makes him different from opponents like Clinton and Biden and so don’t focus on corruption, nepotism. or corporatism and instead focus on Trump being vaguely pro white and pro male. Unlike the commenters here who want to pretend Trump is aparagon of virtue and Biden is horribly corrupt

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Guy De Champlagne


    To the media’s sorta credit, they’re also not terribly interested in all the business Trump continues to do in office or...
     
    We must consume different media.

    I'm practically a hermit, but I see plenty of things like this.

    Replies: @Guy De Champlagne, @Anonymous

    , @Art Deco
    @Guy De Champlagne

    or Jared Kushner mixing bailouts of his family’s finances with official foreign policy.

    Thanks for the latest from the Democrat's talking point mills. Always an education.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    , @Anonymous
    @Guy De Champlagne

    I ran because of you, Guy D. Champagne

    , @J.Ross
    @Guy De Champlagne

    >pretend that Trump is a paragon of virtue
    Said literally no one ever.
    >Biden is
    Connected to child molestation, narcotics, and enabling our enemies to effect hostile takeovers of American military manufacturing, not in a broad globalist way but in a direct sale by which he personally profited. Peter Schweizer called him the most corrupt politician working.

    Replies: @Guy De Champlagne

  9. @El Dato
    Is NPR really financed with tax dollars (more than anybody else, that is?)

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @eD, @Rob McX, @res

    National Public Radio is funded by listeners like you, whether you listen or not! [oops, sorry bout that exclamation point, we usually are very calm and quiet … this is like library … picture Nina Totenberg as your favorite librarian … a spinster by the looks of her … take off those glasses and long skirt … inside is a sexually unaware as of yet young quiet NPR announcer … “ooohhh, Achmed, fund me, fund me!” …. oh, oh … Nina! Nina! oh, I’ll double my pledge!”]

    The post “All Things Considered”, it’s been a long road to Peak Stupidity has a couple of pictures.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Ach, years ago I was driving home from I think Boston and the strongest station I could find on the radio was an NPR station. Best call in I have ever heard. Caller to the program host..."You know you'd have a nice program if every Saturday wasn't you and four guests that agree with you. Thank you,good bye."

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Hypnotoad666

    , @Art Deco
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Not a spinster, just childless. She was canned from the Boston Post for plagiarism many moons ago but managed to rebuild her career at NPR.

    She was married to a Colorado pol named Floyd Haskell. It should tell you something about their seminal culture that the network's founding president was George McGovern's campaign manager and their star reporter was the wife of a Democratic member of Congress. They knew the audience they wanted to build.

    Replies: @Jack D

  10. Yet Russia, Russia, Russia is still going on.

    • LOL: Old and Grumpy
  11. Even if the initial story, as reported by the Post, was all smoke (and I don’t think it was), the reaction to it – specifically Twitter’s reaction – has unquestionably been newsworthy.

    The dishonesty of the press strikes me as absolutely criminal. Everyone who runs these media organizations needs to be… in prison. If there’s no legal basis for that, we need new laws. If there’s no constitutional basis for that, we need a new constitution. I would like to think the Founding Fathers would never have imagined the extent to which “the free Press” would entirely become an unofficial propaganda ministry for the state and the oligarchs who run it.

    • Agree: ben tillman, Kylie
    • Replies: @Altai
    @AndrewR

    It actually exactly resembles GamerGate. It started when a BPD gadfly who calls herself Zoe Quinn (Nee Chelsea Valkenberg,) who was a Hunter Biden esque cluster B fuckup.

    The video games industry was long regarded as profoundly corrupt with a pre-existing online communities dedicated to criticising it and particularly the media outlets who covered it for being spectacularly unprofessional and corrupt.

    When Zoe Quinn's ex-boyfriend made a blog post about how poorly he'd been treated by her and her affairs with at least 5 other men who had been in professional positions to help further her career (Including her direct boss and journalists who covered her 'games'). This was posted to those communities but due to her relationships with the games media as a social gadfly, they colluded to bar any mention from their forums and other places. This led to a Streisand effect and building on previous outrage with them, led to the issue breaking out. The cluster B SJWs who'd been making inroads then took it up as an example of 'misogyny' as Quinn was a woman and this narrative was fed to the broader media who declined to actually look at the entire event being documented online.

    Games journalists then flipped out and simultaneously all wrote similar editorials denouncing 'Gamers' and saying they didn't have to be the audience for games. Their shared discussion lists were leaked. Similar 'JournoLists' also exist for the MSM media.

    This event jumpstarted the SJW culture war as it was the first time some backlash was experienced due to it targeting anonymous people over the internet (Social shaming had no purchase and thus they had no way to enforce their dogma or suppression counter narratives) who were also mostly liberal or libertarian who had previously assumed they were a part of the coalition of the fringes.

    Could this be another situation where personal connections led to massive censorship from top elements in the media? That backfires by said Streisand effect.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @AndrewR

    Yes, they are openly, blatantly dishonest, Andrew. No, that's NOT criminal. No, we do NOT need new laws. What YOU need to do, Andrew is not support these people. That means don't click on their links, don't go to their websites, and probably the most important, don't pay money for them to feed you this openly, blatantly dishonest BS by subscribing to cable TV!

    It's up to you, Andrew. Don't put all your screw-ups over the years, and those of all the other Lyin' Press supporters, on the US Congress and the US Constitution.

    I see your finger pointing over there, Andrew, but you've got 3 more fingers pointing back at you, yeah.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uv5gj_Z1soA

    Replies: @Guy De Champlagne, @theMann, @ben tillman

    , @Jack D
    @AndrewR

    The Founders were quite familiar with a partisan press. In fact that was the main kind of press in those days. Some papers used to actually have the name of a party (the "Arkansas Democrat") in their name. The idea that newspapers should be neutral and print only "the facts" on their news pages is a relatively new concept. In fact news coverage was always biased - it was a successful snow job that they convinced us that Uncle Walter was the Voice of God and not just another liberal Democrat. We are just going back to the days when it wasn't necessary to make a pretense of being unbiased. Everyone is biased. Unbiased humans don't exist.

    The view of the Founders was that by mandating a free press, all sides would be able to peddle their POV in the marketplace of ideas and the best ideas would win over the public. Whether we have a truly free market in ideas or an oligopoly is a real question. Arguably it was worse in the days when there were only 3 TV networks and they were the main source for news, but that market was regulated in some ways (the "equal time rule"). But you can make an antitrust type argument that if there is no true open competition in a certain industry then it is appropriate for the government to intervene in order to restore a competitive marketplace. Certainly they should not be adding fuel to the fire by (partly) funding some of the offenders (but it's also true that government always played a part, for example by designating a paper as the official place to publish legal notices).

    OTOH, you could argue that the Internet is the ultimate free market - anyone can start a website or create a phone app. But anyone can start an online store also and yet Amazon accounts for 50% of all web commerce.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Unladen Swallow, @Anon, @AndrewR, @Reg Cæsar, @utu

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @AndrewR

    Sorry, Andrew, that middle paragraph was too harsh. I just don't like being told we need a new Constitution. Perhaps we need a population that understands the existing one...

    What I mean was that change starts with you.

    Replies: @Louis Renault, @Rob McX, @AndrewR

    , @Kratoklastes
    @AndrewR


    I would like to think the Founding Fathers would never have imagined the extent to which “the free Press” would entirely become an unofficial propaganda ministry for the state and the oligarchs who run it.
     
    Jefferson understood the risks, which is why the language of the First Amendment explicitly enjoins Congress from making laws

    abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press
     
    He also understood that newspapers exist to promote their proprietors' interests. Any public-information function that is served, is secondary to the proprietor's interests.

    There are three pretty famous Jefferson references to newspapers:
    ① a society without government is preferable to a society without newspapers; and
    ② anyone whose sole source of information was newspapers, would have very biased understanding of the world; and
    ③ the man who doesn't read newspapers has an informational advantage: he will hear of the great controversies by other means and will not be spoon-fed biased versions of events.

    Full quotations below the MORE.

    ② and ③ come from the same source: a letter from Jefferson to John Norvell of June 1807 - by which time Jefferson was already pretty unimpressed by the direction that things were headed. (Bear in mind that by then, the BlackRobes had claimed the non-existent right to strike down legislation: Marbury v Madison was in 1803).

    And he was clear from the late 1780s what ought to happen if despotism - of any type, including judicial - reared its head: this deserves to be above the fold...


    "what country before ever existed a century & half without a rebellion? & what country can preserve it's liberties if their rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance? let them take arms. the remedy is to set them right as to facts, pardon & pacify them. what signify a few lives lost in a century or two? the tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots & tyrants. it is it's natural manure."
    Letter to William Smith, Nov 1787
     

    Jefferson on the Press

    the basis of our governments being the opinion of the people, the very first object should be to keep that right[NB]; and were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter. but I should mean that every man should receive those papers & be capable of reading them. - Letter to Edward Carrington, January 1787

    [NB]: 'right' here is used in the sense of 'correct' or 'aligned with the facts', not as in a right.
     

    ~

    Nothing can now be believed which is seen in a newspaper. Truth itself becomes suspicious by being put into that polluted vehicle. The real extent of this state of misinformation is known only to those who are in situations to confront facts within their knolege with the lies of the day. I really look with commiseration over the great body of my fellow citizens, who, reading newspapers, live & die in the belief, that they have known something of what has been passing in the world in their time; whereas the accounts they have read in newspapers are just as true a history of any other period of the world as of the present, except that the real names of the day are affixed to their fables. General facts may indeed be collected from them, such as that Europe is now at war, that Bonaparte has been a successful warrior, that he has subjected a great portion of Europe to his will, &c., &c.; but no details can be relied on. I will add, that the man who never looks into a newspaper is better informed than he who reads them; inasmuch as he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. He who reads nothing will still learn the great facts, and the details are all false. - Jefferson to John Norvell, June 1807
     
    Note that this prefigures Michael Crichton's "Murray Gell-Mann Amnesia Effect", where even the educated give the (modern) press the benefit of the doubt, despite observing obvious, glaring errors in stories about which the educated have specific expertise.

    ~

    Jefferson was pretty clear in his view that Marbury had absolutely no constitutional basis.


    "But the opinion which gives to the judges the right to decide what laws are constitutional and what not, not only for themselves in their own sphere of action but for the Legislature and Executive also in their spheres, would make the Judiciary a despotic branch." — letter to Abigail Adams, September 1804
     
    ~

    He also had plenty to say on #FakeNews and foreign interference in domestic opinion...


    "The British ministry have so long hired their gazetteers to repeat and model into every form lies about our being in anarchy, that the world has at length believed them, the English nation has believed them, the ministers themselves have come to believe them, & what is more wonderful, we have believed them ourselves". - Letter to William Smith, Nov 1787.
     
    אֵין כָּל חָדָשׁ תַּחַת הַשָּׁמֶשׁ
  12. @Guy De Champlagne
    To the media's sorta credit, they're also not terribly interested in all the business Trump continues to do in office or Jared Kushner mixing bailouts of his family's finances with official foreign policy. They hate Trump for what makes him different from opponents like Clinton and Biden and so don't focus on corruption, nepotism. or corporatism and instead focus on Trump being vaguely pro white and pro male. Unlike the commenters here who want to pretend Trump is aparagon of virtue and Biden is horribly corrupt

    Replies: @bomag, @Art Deco, @Anonymous, @J.Ross

    To the media’s sorta credit, they’re also not terribly interested in all the business Trump continues to do in office or…

    We must consume different media.

    I’m practically a hermit, but I see plenty of things like this.

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Guy De Champlagne
    @bomag

    Compared to the number of articles about how Trump's a racist, sexist, fascist?

    , @Anonymous
    @bomag

    Ironically a total exit of hotel and resort, NY commercial real estate in 2017 would have enormously benefitted Trump. Would have been THE legendary trade of the Covid era.

    To his credit he seldom mentions the costs to his own holdings of the covid panic of 2020.

  13. @Neoconned
    I really enjoy NPRs classical music & jazz broadcasts......it would be nice if they were music only

    Replies: @Coemgen, @HammerJack, @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @Known Fact, @Dissident

    NPR/PBS does put out some good stuff -but- I think it’s only to try an hook rubes into being exposed to NPR/PBS propaganda.

    Prime example is Project Smoke which is wrong on so many levels for the true NPR/PBS audience (smoke? red meat? no leftist politics?) but it attracts normies who may get caught in one of NPR/PBS’ bait-and-switch productions where they reel one in to believing the NPR/PBS propaganda.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Coemgen

    I don't know what it is like where you are, but where I live they have moved most of the "how to" and travel shows to the "Create" subchannel so that the main channel has more time to show political propaganda. I enjoy the Create channel because it is one of the few stations left that is relatively free from non-stop politics and Wokeness.

    My main objection to Raichlin is that he seems to burn everything he cooks black. A rich golden brown is nice but burning your food until it resembles charcoal is not in my book. Also there is a lot of product placement in his show for really expensive cooking rigs. I abide by the motto that it ain't the cooker but the cook. Some of the greatest barbecue in the world has been produced in literally a hole in the ground (this is why it is called a barbecue "pit").

    Still it is better than Food Network where all they seem to have nowadays are ridiculous phony cooking contests and the winner is predetermined to be whoever is highest on the diversity totem pole - you just know that that African Muslim woman with the hijab is going to beat the stale pale males with the sleeve tattoos.

    Replies: @Alden, @Coemgen, @GeneralRipper

  14. @bomag
    @Guy De Champlagne


    To the media’s sorta credit, they’re also not terribly interested in all the business Trump continues to do in office or...
     
    We must consume different media.

    I'm practically a hermit, but I see plenty of things like this.

    Replies: @Guy De Champlagne, @Anonymous

    Compared to the number of articles about how Trump’s a racist, sexist, fascist?

  15. The gatekeeper of what is news on NPR.

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @JimB

    He looks like the sort of cartoon Negro you'd see in an issue of Instauration. (Or so I've been told...)

    Replies: @JimB

  16. @The Wild Geese Howard
    State propaganda is there to shape mass belief.

    Forward, Soviet!

    Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers

    “Great is truth, but still greater, from a practical point of view, is silence about truth. By simply not mentioning certain subjects… totalitarian propagandists have influenced opinion much more effectively than they could have by the most eloquent denunciations.” ~ Aldous Huxley (N.ational P.ropaganda R.adio’s policy?)

    “The conscious and intelligent manipulation of the organized habits and opinions of the masses is an important element in democratic society. Those who manipulate this unseen mechanism of society constitute an invisible government which is the true ruling power of our country.” ~ Edward L. Bernays, “Propaganda” (1928) https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/481391-propaganda

  17. There’s no izvestia in Pravda and no pravda in Izvestia, and none of either of those in NPR.

  18. So what they’re saying is Donald Trump’s sons have a free hand to commit the same crimes Hunter has been discovered having done and for it not to be reported in the sensitive run-up to the election, as those things would be purely a distraction and contaminate American democracy.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Altai

    "You are correct, sir"!

    , @Aardvark
    @Altai

    That is not at all what they are saying. Anything scandalous about a Democrat party member or their relatives must by Democrat News Media Propaganda law, be swept under the rug and ignored.

    If Donald Trump Jr. had so much as received a box of Girl Scout cookies improperly, this must by Democrat News Media Propaganda law, be a one to three day news cycle with assorted "experts" to explain how wrong it was.

    This was the thing that attracted me to Trump was that when other Republicans cowed themselves to the press and had to act all meek and apologize, Trump pushed back. He called them out for the propaganda artists they are by calling them fake news. This hurt their feelings and when they tried to lash back by making up more fake news it just got worse.

    I think what is very telling is that there was an hour long program on Vice the other day that was described as something like "journalists review their coverage of Trump and the mistakes they made...".

    Only problem is, even if they can come to admit they made mistakes covering Trump, they won't stop screwing up.

    , @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    @Altai


    So what they’re saying is Donald Trump’s sons have a free hand to commit the same crimes Hunter has been discovered having done
     
    This comparison is specious.

    The untalented crack smoking pedophile of a sitting Vice President almost certainly leveraged his position as relative of the sitting Vice President to extract cash payments from foreign governmental entitities and moved a chunk of that money into the VPs accounts.

    It's orders of magnitude FAR FAR worse that whet the Trump kids have done.

    Ivanka and Kushner are taking no salaries. Ivanka had her fashion business before Dad got into the Oval Office, and she exited her China fashion business but kept the trademarks and put together some new ones, largely to prevent knock offs while she was still in the White House, and, yes, to position her for a post White House fashion empire. Totally legitimate.

    Trump's out of the day to day running of The Trump Organization, which is arguably moribund now, having sold off a bunch of properties. Yes, sovereign entities did participate in purchases, but again, totally legitimate and, frankly, transparent. They sold a penthouse to a Chinese lobbyist, who supposedly paid above market price, but you can make they argument that they actually fleeced HER, given how they've given China such a hard time.

    The only potentially "squirrely" deal was the buyout of Kushner's 666 Fifth Avenue, where the Qatari government apparently put in some money through intermediaries, though they claimed they didn't know anything about it. Yet the scuttlebutt in real estate circles is that Kushner barely broke even and mostly got out from under an albatross.

    So in other words, they shut down or sold stuff they already owned.

    Oh, and one last thing. Trump's kids and his son-in-law actually have some business talent.

    Hunter brings knew meaning to the expression ne'er do well seeing as how he may be banging his underage niece in between tokes on the crack pipe.

  19. @Neoconned
    I really enjoy NPRs classical music & jazz broadcasts......it would be nice if they were music only

    Replies: @Coemgen, @HammerJack, @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @Known Fact, @Dissident

    Which is why God made streaming services.

  20. @Altai
    So what they're saying is Donald Trump's sons have a free hand to commit the same crimes Hunter has been discovered having done and for it not to be reported in the sensitive run-up to the election, as those things would be purely a distraction and contaminate American democracy.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Aardvark, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    “You are correct, sir”!

  21. Distraction = “Look a Squirrel!”

    • Replies: @Mike Zwick
    @Buffalo Joe

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPoHevoTarg

  22. Until the MSM’s reaction to this story, I never realized that the movie “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” was a documentary.

    • LOL: Alden
  23. @El Dato
    Is NPR really financed with tax dollars (more than anybody else, that is?)

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @eD, @Rob McX, @res

    “Is NPR really financed with tax dollars (more than anybody else, that is?)”

    No, corporate funded. I think PBS gets some derisory federal funding for its childrens’ programs, not sure about NPR.

    Actually the same foundations that are bringing you the COVID 19 panic bring you “public” broadcasting as well.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @eD

    No, about 1/4 of the funding for public broadcasting from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Another chunk arrives courtesy state and local governments. The swag is passed out to local stations who kick back funds to the networks.

    , @Jack D
    @eD

    While NPR gets very little DIRECT Federal funding (a few grants here and there), about half of its revenues come from the fees it charges member stations for its programming and those stations in turn derive maybe 1/3 of their revenues from various types of government funding although only a third of that is direct Federal funding. So NPR does in the end benefit from some degree of Federal funding, although it's not their biggest source of revenue. And yet they depend on government funding to balance their books - if they lost 15 or 20% of their budget that is traceable to the government, they might not be able to continue in operation or would have to cut back dramatically. And the foundations that they depend on are in large part a creation of the Federal tax code.

    Replies: @JMcG

    , @1BigJohnson
    @eD

    >No, corporate funded. I think PBS gets some derisory federal funding for its childrens’ programs, not sure about NPR.

    Most of the public money goes to the "Corporation for Public Broadcasting," which then buys programming from NPR, Inc. This arrangement lets NPR, Inc. claim that they only get [some small %] of their funding from the government.

  24. @Achmed E. Newman
    @El Dato

    National Public Radio is funded by listeners like you, whether you listen or not! [oops, sorry bout that exclamation point, we usually are very calm and quiet ... this is like library ... picture Nina Totenberg as your favorite librarian ... a spinster by the looks of her ... take off those glasses and long skirt ... inside is a sexually unaware as of yet young quiet NPR announcer ... "ooohhh, Achmed, fund me, fund me!" .... oh, oh ... Nina! Nina! oh, I'll double my pledge!"]

    The post "All Things Considered", it's been a long road to Peak Stupidity has a couple of pictures.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Art Deco

    Ach, years ago I was driving home from I think Boston and the strongest station I could find on the radio was an NPR station. Best call in I have ever heard. Caller to the program host…”You know you’d have a nice program if every Saturday wasn’t you and four guests that agree with you. Thank you,good bye.”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buffalo Joe

    Haha... and yet, he probably listens...

    Joe, I personally don't recommend to even the most leftist of drivers listening to NPR while going down the highway. Drowsiness-caused single-car accidents are no laughing matter. Neither do I recommend banjo bluegrass, as 4 tickets for 20-mph over the limit on windy mountain roads will require one to go all the way to the Turks and Caicos for another license. It starts to get expensive.

    Replies: @Escher

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Buffalo Joe

    The best way to describe NPR is polite, well-produced, and evil.

    Replies: @Pat Kittle

  25. @AndrewR
    Even if the initial story, as reported by the Post, was all smoke (and I don't think it was), the reaction to it - specifically Twitter's reaction - has unquestionably been newsworthy.

    The dishonesty of the press strikes me as absolutely criminal. Everyone who runs these media organizations needs to be... in prison. If there's no legal basis for that, we need new laws. If there's no constitutional basis for that, we need a new constitution. I would like to think the Founding Fathers would never have imagined the extent to which "the free Press" would entirely become an unofficial propaganda ministry for the state and the oligarchs who run it.

    Replies: @Altai, @Achmed E. Newman, @Jack D, @Achmed E. Newman, @Kratoklastes

    It actually exactly resembles GamerGate. It started when a BPD gadfly who calls herself Zoe Quinn (Nee Chelsea Valkenberg,) who was a Hunter Biden esque cluster B fuckup.

    The video games industry was long regarded as profoundly corrupt with a pre-existing online communities dedicated to criticising it and particularly the media outlets who covered it for being spectacularly unprofessional and corrupt.

    When Zoe Quinn’s ex-boyfriend made a blog post about how poorly he’d been treated by her and her affairs with at least 5 other men who had been in professional positions to help further her career (Including her direct boss and journalists who covered her ‘games’). This was posted to those communities but due to her relationships with the games media as a social gadfly, they colluded to bar any mention from their forums and other places. This led to a Streisand effect and building on previous outrage with them, led to the issue breaking out. The cluster B SJWs who’d been making inroads then took it up as an example of ‘misogyny’ as Quinn was a woman and this narrative was fed to the broader media who declined to actually look at the entire event being documented online.

    Games journalists then flipped out and simultaneously all wrote similar editorials denouncing ‘Gamers’ and saying they didn’t have to be the audience for games. Their shared discussion lists were leaked. Similar ‘JournoLists’ also exist for the MSM media.

    This event jumpstarted the SJW culture war as it was the first time some backlash was experienced due to it targeting anonymous people over the internet (Social shaming had no purchase and thus they had no way to enforce their dogma or suppression counter narratives) who were also mostly liberal or libertarian who had previously assumed they were a part of the coalition of the fringes.

    Could this be another situation where personal connections led to massive censorship from top elements in the media? That backfires by said Streisand effect.

    • Thanks: Lot, TWS
    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Altai

    Off of your comment, here is a strange little glimpse into the minds of gamers.

    First: I'm not a gamer, I'm too square and a little too old, and I lack a gamer's sensibility, so I'm a total outsider to that industry. (The only game I like is "Portal", and it's only because I find the character of GLADYS, the chatty, mocking, evil mainframe computer who provides nasty running commentary, to be hilarious).

    This is a little outré, so bear with me. Ordinarily when I watch a movie on DVD, I don't bother with any of the "Special Features". But one time I was watching some dumb action film and it was boring, so I switched on the "commentary" track provided by one of the actors. It turned out the actor was very eccentric, so his comments on the film were irrelevant and weird and sort of oddly tedious, which I found funny.

    Flash forward to three months later. A friend of a friend runs a small computer-game development company, and he asked my friend who is a gaming pro to come help rewrite a story arc for an afternoon, and for clumsy social reasons this guy brought me along to keep him company, so I accidentally wound up sitting in on a game development session with about a dozen professional gaming nerds. I thought I would just keep my mouth shut and observe.

    In the course of the session, the actor's name came up who was so peculiar on the DVD. I couldn't help myself, so I made a very obscure joke about the odd nature of his commentary. What happened next sort of surprised me. EVERYBODY IN THE ROOM KNEW EXACTLY WHAT I WAS TALKING ABOUT. They all cracked up and started riffing on the premise, and for the rest of the afternoon, the whole story arc became about inside jokes about this actor. It was an obscure riff on an obscure riff on an obscure riff, but they were confident that their audience would know precisely what was meant.

    These people are total space aliens.

    Replies: @Lot

  26. @AndrewR
    Even if the initial story, as reported by the Post, was all smoke (and I don't think it was), the reaction to it - specifically Twitter's reaction - has unquestionably been newsworthy.

    The dishonesty of the press strikes me as absolutely criminal. Everyone who runs these media organizations needs to be... in prison. If there's no legal basis for that, we need new laws. If there's no constitutional basis for that, we need a new constitution. I would like to think the Founding Fathers would never have imagined the extent to which "the free Press" would entirely become an unofficial propaganda ministry for the state and the oligarchs who run it.

    Replies: @Altai, @Achmed E. Newman, @Jack D, @Achmed E. Newman, @Kratoklastes

    Yes, they are openly, blatantly dishonest, Andrew. No, that’s NOT criminal. No, we do NOT need new laws. What YOU need to do, Andrew is not support these people. That means don’t click on their links, don’t go to their websites, and probably the most important, don’t pay money for them to feed you this openly, blatantly dishonest BS by subscribing to cable TV!

    It’s up to you, Andrew. Don’t put all your screw-ups over the years, and those of all the other Lyin’ Press supporters, on the US Congress and the US Constitution.

    I see your finger pointing over there, Andrew, but you’ve got 3 more fingers pointing back at you, yeah.

    • Replies: @Guy De Champlagne
    @Achmed E. Newman

    For thousands of years it was uncontroversial that when an industry caused problems you regulated it and then......the 1980s happened. The sheer scale of the trauma Reagan did to you people is really remarkable. A rabid hatred of the media combined only matched by the complete unwillingness to actually do anything about it. Sad!

    Replies: @Art Deco, @anon, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Achmed E. Newman

    , @theMann
    @Achmed E. Newman

    You do have one good point- getting rid of cable is a great idea. I did it 10 years ago when I realized that I liked going to Las Vegas way more than paying a cable bill. After a few months, I realized I had done something momentous, because I had pulled a filth current out of my brain. As an act of self improvement, I cannot think of a easier fix.


    However;

    You are quite wrong about AndrewR's base assertion. All broadcast Media in the USA purchases or leases bandwidth from the FCC, and and the FCC is obligated to operate in the Public Interest. In addition Libel Laws, the RICO applied to conspiracy to deny First Amendment Rights, and Sedition Laws all currently exist on the books.

    The Media filth, who no longer even have to pretend to tell the truth (Corona Fraud, anybody?), are in fact an organized conspiracy on two fronts:

    First, as Seditionists they are part of a conspiracy to overthrow the legitimate elected government of the USA

    Second, they are an organized conspiracy to deny millions of Americans their rights to free speech, freedom of religion, and much more ominously, their right to know - particularly their right to know facts about elected officials.

    The first crime is a death penalty offense, the second worthy of long prison sentences, and treble damages for their tortable actions

    , @ben tillman
    @Achmed E. Newman

    No, that won't cut it. Conspiracies to restrain the information flow and mislead the public to its detriment should be illegal to the extent they are not currently. And video and audio media are not created by a "press".

  27. @Buffalo Joe
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Ach, years ago I was driving home from I think Boston and the strongest station I could find on the radio was an NPR station. Best call in I have ever heard. Caller to the program host..."You know you'd have a nice program if every Saturday wasn't you and four guests that agree with you. Thank you,good bye."

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Hypnotoad666

    Haha… and yet, he probably listens…

    Joe, I personally don’t recommend to even the most leftist of drivers listening to NPR while going down the highway. Drowsiness-caused single-car accidents are no laughing matter. Neither do I recommend banjo bluegrass, as 4 tickets for 20-mph over the limit on windy mountain roads will require one to go all the way to the Turks and Caicos for another license. It starts to get expensive.

    • Thanks: Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @Escher
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Rock music has a similar effect, especially driving related songs like “Born to be Wild”.

  28. NPR’s response to the New York Post expose of Biden corruption indicates that NPR can neither refute the story nor impugn the sources. To the aware this is further proof that of the NY Post’s revelations are factual.

    Likewise the MSM’s failure to cover the story and MSM attempts to dismiss it with silly hit pieces like this (https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/tech-news/inside-campaign-pizzagate-hunter-biden-n1244331), prepared by NBC’s doxer in chief, Brandy Zadrozny, and Soros-trained disinformation specialist, Ben Collins, are just further evidence that the NY Post’s revelations regarding Biden are true and well sourced.

  29. The media is saying that what suburban moms really want is millions of illegals given amnesty followed by more felons let out of jail.

    They say this with a straight face. I know there are the god-awful moderate White women who go for this junk when it comes to virtue signaling, but I bet after a summer of rioting and increase in shootings, they’ve cooled their jets on the feel good stuff.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @RichardTaylor


    The media is saying that what suburban moms really want is millions of illegals given amnesty followed by more felons let out of jail.

    They say this with a straight face. I know there are the god-awful moderate White women who go for this junk when it comes to virtue signaling, but I bet after a summer of rioting and increase in shootings, they’ve cooled their jets on the feel good stuff.
     
    One would think.

    But
    a) The mainstream/Democrat media just lies and lies and lies and women lap up the media.

    b) Trump/Republicans have to make the case about both the nonsense minoritarian "oppressed" blacks hunted by the police narrative and the Democrats destruction of the rule-of-law--and what it portends--with unmistakably visceral cuts-to-the-bone clarity. Have they?

    Replies: @ic1000

  30. @Achmed E. Newman
    @AndrewR

    Yes, they are openly, blatantly dishonest, Andrew. No, that's NOT criminal. No, we do NOT need new laws. What YOU need to do, Andrew is not support these people. That means don't click on their links, don't go to their websites, and probably the most important, don't pay money for them to feed you this openly, blatantly dishonest BS by subscribing to cable TV!

    It's up to you, Andrew. Don't put all your screw-ups over the years, and those of all the other Lyin' Press supporters, on the US Congress and the US Constitution.

    I see your finger pointing over there, Andrew, but you've got 3 more fingers pointing back at you, yeah.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uv5gj_Z1soA

    Replies: @Guy De Champlagne, @theMann, @ben tillman

    For thousands of years it was uncontroversial that when an industry caused problems you regulated it and then……the 1980s happened. The sheer scale of the trauma Reagan did to you people is really remarkable. A rabid hatred of the media combined only matched by the complete unwillingness to actually do anything about it. Sad!

    • Agree: utu
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Guy De Champlagne

    The sheer scale of the trauma Reagan did to you people is really remarkable.

    The trauma was a business recession which lasted about 18 months. The rate at which goods and services were produced in this country declined by about 2% during those 18 months.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @anon
    @Guy De Champlagne

    For thousands of years it was uncontroversial that when an industry caused problems you regulated it

    Thousands? Really?

    Shill patrol not sending their best for sure.

    LOL!

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Guy De Champlagne


    Guy De Champlagne says:
    January 8, 2020 at 10:24 am GMT • 100 Words
    Hopefully Sanders gets the nomination and wins.
     
    That was good Guy, we should be sorry that we didn't get on board for our Glorious Soviet Future (tm) in the 1980s like you wanted. And you think we are rabid. Open a GoFundMe to raise the money for your plane ticket to go to Venezuela. Promise to actually go to Venezuela and stay for at least a year, and be sure to take your hydrophobic self along for the ride. Then come back and explain your wonderful experiences there.

    Replies: @Guy De Champlagne

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Guy De Champlagne

    For a couple of hundred years we had this thing called the US Constitution, with that Amendment I in it. The sheer stupidity of those who have thrown away something that gave people the best, most-limited government the world has ever seen is staggering. Dumbass!

  31. @Buffalo Joe
    Distraction = "Look a Squirrel!"

    Replies: @Mike Zwick

    • LOL: Buffalo Joe
  32. Does NPR not believe the story, or do they just not want to believe the story?

    • Replies: @anon
    @Mike Zwick

    Does NPR not believe the story, or do they just not want to believe the story?

    They don't want their listeners to even know about the story. They might start thinking!

    https://hateandanger.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/looks-like-youve-had-a-bit-too-much-to-think-support-your-local-thought-police-dont-speak-out-or-question-closed-minds-stop-thought-crimes.jpg


    New shirt for NPR donors, coming to a pledge drive near you!

    https://www.zazzle.com/rlv/ignorance_is_strength_1984_t_shirt-r259a928d63d7429a90df0e0e6128a7fc_jyr6t_324.jpg

  33. @Guy De Champlagne
    To the media's sorta credit, they're also not terribly interested in all the business Trump continues to do in office or Jared Kushner mixing bailouts of his family's finances with official foreign policy. They hate Trump for what makes him different from opponents like Clinton and Biden and so don't focus on corruption, nepotism. or corporatism and instead focus on Trump being vaguely pro white and pro male. Unlike the commenters here who want to pretend Trump is aparagon of virtue and Biden is horribly corrupt

    Replies: @bomag, @Art Deco, @Anonymous, @J.Ross

    or Jared Kushner mixing bailouts of his family’s finances with official foreign policy.

    Thanks for the latest from the Democrat’s talking point mills. Always an education.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Art Deco

    Hope Jared sees this, bro

  34. @eD
    @El Dato

    "Is NPR really financed with tax dollars (more than anybody else, that is?)"

    No, corporate funded. I think PBS gets some derisory federal funding for its childrens' programs, not sure about NPR.

    Actually the same foundations that are bringing you the COVID 19 panic bring you "public" broadcasting as well.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Jack D, @1BigJohnson

    No, about 1/4 of the funding for public broadcasting from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Another chunk arrives courtesy state and local governments. The swag is passed out to local stations who kick back funds to the networks.

  35. @Achmed E. Newman
    @El Dato

    National Public Radio is funded by listeners like you, whether you listen or not! [oops, sorry bout that exclamation point, we usually are very calm and quiet ... this is like library ... picture Nina Totenberg as your favorite librarian ... a spinster by the looks of her ... take off those glasses and long skirt ... inside is a sexually unaware as of yet young quiet NPR announcer ... "ooohhh, Achmed, fund me, fund me!" .... oh, oh ... Nina! Nina! oh, I'll double my pledge!"]

    The post "All Things Considered", it's been a long road to Peak Stupidity has a couple of pictures.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Art Deco

    Not a spinster, just childless. She was canned from the Boston Post for plagiarism many moons ago but managed to rebuild her career at NPR.

    She was married to a Colorado pol named Floyd Haskell. It should tell you something about their seminal culture that the network’s founding president was George McGovern’s campaign manager and their star reporter was the wife of a Democratic member of Congress. They knew the audience they wanted to build.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Art Deco

    She was also close personal friends with RBG. Inside the liberal ecosystem, people go back and forth seamlessly from government to academia to foundations to cultural institutions to NPR - it's all one big happy echo chamber. The fact that Republicans control the White House and/or the houses of Congress barely causes a ripple on the march thru the institutions - at best it slows "progress" down a little bit temporarily until the next Dem administration.

  36. @eD
    @El Dato

    "Is NPR really financed with tax dollars (more than anybody else, that is?)"

    No, corporate funded. I think PBS gets some derisory federal funding for its childrens' programs, not sure about NPR.

    Actually the same foundations that are bringing you the COVID 19 panic bring you "public" broadcasting as well.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Jack D, @1BigJohnson

    While NPR gets very little DIRECT Federal funding (a few grants here and there), about half of its revenues come from the fees it charges member stations for its programming and those stations in turn derive maybe 1/3 of their revenues from various types of government funding although only a third of that is direct Federal funding. So NPR does in the end benefit from some degree of Federal funding, although it’s not their biggest source of revenue. And yet they depend on government funding to balance their books – if they lost 15 or 20% of their budget that is traceable to the government, they might not be able to continue in operation or would have to cut back dramatically. And the foundations that they depend on are in large part a creation of the Federal tax code.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer, JMcG
    • Thanks: Anonymous Jew
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Jack D

    You can tell that they need the money by how hard they scream whenever someone mentions turning off the tap. I used to read the allegedly libertarian Megan McArdle until she championed the ongoing funding of NPR. Her contention was that it was so little money, it didn’t really matter. My contention was that if we couldn’t stop funding that, we couldn’t stop funding anything.

  37. Can you imagine if Eric Trump had a photo with a crack pipe let alone all the other stuff?

    24/7 coverage wouldn’t begin to describe it

    The gloves are truly off and their hands are rotting claws

  38. @Achmed E. Newman
    @AndrewR

    Yes, they are openly, blatantly dishonest, Andrew. No, that's NOT criminal. No, we do NOT need new laws. What YOU need to do, Andrew is not support these people. That means don't click on their links, don't go to their websites, and probably the most important, don't pay money for them to feed you this openly, blatantly dishonest BS by subscribing to cable TV!

    It's up to you, Andrew. Don't put all your screw-ups over the years, and those of all the other Lyin' Press supporters, on the US Congress and the US Constitution.

    I see your finger pointing over there, Andrew, but you've got 3 more fingers pointing back at you, yeah.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uv5gj_Z1soA

    Replies: @Guy De Champlagne, @theMann, @ben tillman

    You do have one good point- getting rid of cable is a great idea. I did it 10 years ago when I realized that I liked going to Las Vegas way more than paying a cable bill. After a few months, I realized I had done something momentous, because I had pulled a filth current out of my brain. As an act of self improvement, I cannot think of a easier fix.

    However;

    You are quite wrong about AndrewR’s base assertion. All broadcast Media in the USA purchases or leases bandwidth from the FCC, and and the FCC is obligated to operate in the Public Interest. In addition Libel Laws, the RICO applied to conspiracy to deny First Amendment Rights, and Sedition Laws all currently exist on the books.

    The Media filth, who no longer even have to pretend to tell the truth (Corona Fraud, anybody?), are in fact an organized conspiracy on two fronts:

    First, as Seditionists they are part of a conspiracy to overthrow the legitimate elected government of the USA

    Second, they are an organized conspiracy to deny millions of Americans their rights to free speech, freedom of religion, and much more ominously, their right to know – particularly their right to know facts about elected officials.

    The first crime is a death penalty offense, the second worthy of long prison sentences, and treble damages for their tortable actions

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Thanks: Dissident
  39. @Coemgen

    Your Tax Dollars at Work
     
    I thought the thread was going to be about the Mueller Special Counsel investigation which, according to Donald Trump in last night's debate, cost $48,000,000.

    Btw, Kamala Harris badgered Brett Kavanaugh, during his Supreme Court nomination hearings, to call for the FBI to investigate himself. Will she badger Joe Biden (and herself) to call for FBI investigations into her and Joe? It would give them a change to "prove" they are not corrupt politicians.

    I wonder how much Crossfire Hurricane, Mueller's Special Counsel, the impeachment, and the coronavirus pandemic have cost the U.S. taxpayer in total?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Morton's toes

    Amazing that men his and Bidens age view it as acceptable to still be milking funds from law firms government etc while the next generation cant so much as buy a 1 bedroom home.

    Enormously selfish and destructive to a legacy.

  40. Hahaha. More lies from National Propaganda Radio.

    Wife and I used to play the NPR GAME for 10 min before we got out of bed each morning.

    1 point for each mention of a minority or “victim” (gay, lesbian, immigrant, transgender, woman, etc.) Score 1 point.

    1 pt for story about Climate change, electric cars, green energy, etc.

    1 pt for Republicans are bad or Democrats are good story.

    1 pt linking any Conservative or Republican to Hitler, Nazis White surpremism, racism, antisematism

    2 pts each mention of Holacaust/Nazis/Hitler. Why is this subject mentioned 10 times a day on NPR?

    3 pts. The coveted TRIFECTA — 3 or more of the above in a single story.

    4 pts. The HIGHLY COVETED QUADFECTA, jamming 4 or more victims or Leftist ideas into a single story, such as a gay Jewish feminest immigrant who is fighting for BLM.

    5 pts. Special Bonus score for mention of EMMET TILL

    In 10 min of listening to NPR, we could always score 3 to 15 pts. It made waking up fun. Try it, yourself.

    • Replies: @Patriot
    @Patriot

    Referring to the previously mentioned NPR game (Post 26). Whenever we scored a Quadfecta or the Super Special Emmit Till 5 bonus points, both my wife and I would throw back the covers and jump wildly up and down on the bed laughing hysterically and screaming,"Yes, yes, yes!!!!"

    Again, it was a great way to wake up in the morning. It made the chore of getting out of bed fun.

    During the 1990's a typical NPR segment consisted of a Jewish NPR moderator interviewing a Jewish authority on something to do with Jews, such as a book or movie about the Holocaust or a modern (Jewish) artist, Sigmund Freud, or some Jewish lesbian feminist, etc. Hahahaha.

    Also, as a previous commenter noted, NPR will have "debates", but in fact both "debaters" are way on the Left. For example, they will interview 2 authorities about immigration, but one will be for absolutely unrestricted open borders, and the other will be for more-or-less unrestricted immigration, but for massive welfare aid for the sacred newcomers (housing, medical care, food stamps, etc.).

    Do they honestly think we don't notice the constant Marxist propaganda?

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @prime noticer

    , @Known Fact
    @Patriot

    From my last few long vacation drives with only NPR coming in on the radio -- Bonus point for yet another lament about the ongoing national murder spree against trannies, or the specific observation that Trump has no "guardrails."

    I will grudgingly add one positive -- they ran a lot of good reporting from Hong Kong during those protests, mostly British news.

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Patriot

    Pat, ok I would like to try it .Where do you live and what is your wife's name?

    Replies: @Patriot

  41. NPR was also the home of Mike Oreskes, a longtime journo and forcible kisser who liked to corner women and shove his tongue down their throats. He did this for years, including at the NY Times, until he was finally me-too’d a few years back. Suffice to say Oreskes is a member of the tribe, a point Larry David is allowed to make, but no one else is. Your tax dollars at work.

  42. @bomag
    @Guy De Champlagne


    To the media’s sorta credit, they’re also not terribly interested in all the business Trump continues to do in office or...
     
    We must consume different media.

    I'm practically a hermit, but I see plenty of things like this.

    Replies: @Guy De Champlagne, @Anonymous

    Ironically a total exit of hotel and resort, NY commercial real estate in 2017 would have enormously benefitted Trump. Would have been THE legendary trade of the Covid era.

    To his credit he seldom mentions the costs to his own holdings of the covid panic of 2020.

  43. Anon[863] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: The fire in Colorado that caused the evacuation of Estes Park, Granby, and Grand Lake is now known to have been human-set. Antifa arsonists has been trying to set fires ever since the riots started and have been caught at it, so it’s obvious they set the Colorado fires. They’re trying to up their game in the days before the election, because anarchy, you know. But many Coloradoans who had their houses burned down by the left will still vote Democrat because they’re kneejerk leftists who are not very tied to reality.

    Anyone remember this video of a guy setting arson fires in California? California’s been having the worst fires in its history because of Antifa Arson this year.

    Or this one where a woman caught an arsonist on her property?

    https://www.foxnews.com/us/oregon-wildfires-woman-seen-holding-suspected-arsonist-at-gunpoint

  44. While NPR gets very little DIRECT Federal funding (a few grants here and there), about half of its revenues come from the fees it charges member stations for its programming

    This is correct and why they will eventually be defunded.

    Those member stations depend on selling $100 tote bags or $85 CDs to wealthy Whites.

    The deluded Whites that run these stations will be like newspaper editors where they cheer hispanic immigration and then fret about declining subscriptions.

    They seem to think there is an endless supply of White liberals with money and that hispanics will be just as likely to buy a $100 tote bag. Good luck with that.

  45. JONATHAN TURLEY in The Hill
    Censoring the Biden story: How social media becomes state media

    https://thehill.com/opinion/technology/521517-censoring-the-biden-story-how-social-media-becomes-state-media

  46. @AndrewR
    Even if the initial story, as reported by the Post, was all smoke (and I don't think it was), the reaction to it - specifically Twitter's reaction - has unquestionably been newsworthy.

    The dishonesty of the press strikes me as absolutely criminal. Everyone who runs these media organizations needs to be... in prison. If there's no legal basis for that, we need new laws. If there's no constitutional basis for that, we need a new constitution. I would like to think the Founding Fathers would never have imagined the extent to which "the free Press" would entirely become an unofficial propaganda ministry for the state and the oligarchs who run it.

    Replies: @Altai, @Achmed E. Newman, @Jack D, @Achmed E. Newman, @Kratoklastes

    The Founders were quite familiar with a partisan press. In fact that was the main kind of press in those days. Some papers used to actually have the name of a party (the “Arkansas Democrat”) in their name. The idea that newspapers should be neutral and print only “the facts” on their news pages is a relatively new concept. In fact news coverage was always biased – it was a successful snow job that they convinced us that Uncle Walter was the Voice of God and not just another liberal Democrat. We are just going back to the days when it wasn’t necessary to make a pretense of being unbiased. Everyone is biased. Unbiased humans don’t exist.

    The view of the Founders was that by mandating a free press, all sides would be able to peddle their POV in the marketplace of ideas and the best ideas would win over the public. Whether we have a truly free market in ideas or an oligopoly is a real question. Arguably it was worse in the days when there were only 3 TV networks and they were the main source for news, but that market was regulated in some ways (the “equal time rule”). But you can make an antitrust type argument that if there is no true open competition in a certain industry then it is appropriate for the government to intervene in order to restore a competitive marketplace. Certainly they should not be adding fuel to the fire by (partly) funding some of the offenders (but it’s also true that government always played a part, for example by designating a paper as the official place to publish legal notices).

    OTOH, you could argue that the Internet is the ultimate free market – anyone can start a website or create a phone app. But anyone can start an online store also and yet Amazon accounts for 50% of all web commerce.

    • Agree: AnotherDad, Alden
    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Jack D


    it was a successful snow job that they convinced us that Uncle Walter was the Voice of God and not just another liberal Democrat.
     
    Yup. Now and then I watch a fifty-year-old clip of him or his colleagues an I'm thinking, Wow. I wasn't aware of it at the time because I was a teenager and didn't yet think for myself.
    , @Unladen Swallow
    @Jack D

    During the Big Three network days in was different because although as you pointed out they were still biased there was the "Fairness Doctrine" imposed by the FCC and the media back then actually believed that reporting and editorializing were different things and shouldn't be mixed. Around the late 1980's early 1990's time period the Mainstream Media started merging reporting and editorializing and they have not stopped or looked back since, now there is effectively no difference, oh, and the Republicans got rid of the "fairness doctrine" because it was anti-free speech or something.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Anon
    @Jack D


    OTOH, you could argue that the Internet is the ultimate free market – anyone can start a website or create a phone app. But anyone can start an online store also and yet Amazon accounts for 50% of all web commerce.
     
    Yep, it's just a big free market.

    You can't share those views here. Get your own website.

    Ok.

    You can't host that website here. Develop your own servers and webhosting software.

    Uhhh.. That seems like a lot of work but, OK.

    You can't have that internet address. Create your own unaccountable monopoly that issues and controls all internet domains. Ummmm...

    Somehow, you're still on the net? No funding for you. Create your own credit card and banking systems. Ummmm....

    There is no more free market on the internet.

    , @AndrewR
    @Jack D

    I never implied the Founders weren't familiar with partisan press. But there wasn't anything analogous to CNN/NYT/etc in terms of reach and influence in those days. And Twitter/Facebook have become our de facto public squares. When they act in biased ways, it's equivalent to someone going into a public square in 1780 and physically muzzling/binding people sharing ideas they disagree with.

    The story about Hunter Biden being suppressed by Twitter, and the elite media refusing to even report even on the censorship and controversy shows how toxic they are.

    I'm not sure why you feel the need to point out that unbiased humans don't exist. Yes, we are all biased. We are all also often tempted to commit immoral/illegal acts. Anyone who claims otherwise is a liar. But we still expect people not to steal, not to be violent except in defense, and to not act on their urges to bang their neighbor's wife, dog or 13 year old daughter. It's not asking much to expect people, particularly in the media, to strive for a lack of bias, even if attaining that unbiasedness is seldom possible in practice.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    The idea that newspapers should be neutral and print only “the facts” on their news pages is a relatively new concept.
     
    And relatively American.
    , @utu
    @Jack D

    "The idea that newspapers should be neutral and print only “the facts” on their news pages is a relatively new concept." - This idea was a business decision to extend the coverage and increase sales.

    Replies: @Jack D

  47. @Guy De Champlagne
    It sure was great the way that Trump and Bannon came in with all those great ideas on how to reform the media and set about implementing them in a calm, rational, consistent way and everything....

    Replies: @Matt Buckalew

    They didn’t solve your erectile disfunction either. Rolf boomer blowhards who never did shit.

  48. @El Dato
    Is NPR really financed with tax dollars (more than anybody else, that is?)

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @eD, @Rob McX, @res

    I know Ray Kroc’s widow left $225m to NPR when she died in 2003.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Rob McX


    I know Ray Kroc’s widow left $225m to NPR when she died in 2003.
     
    This is part of the "woman problem", or "women swallowing the narrative problem".

    However dumb their husbands might be about political issues--it varies--women, and apparently quite often the rich pampered wives of successful entrepreneurs--are even dumber.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Rob McX

    Rob, that is so sad. Mrs. Kroc could have seeded the Reparations Fund and we would be ever so close to a better America. Actually, McDonalds probably contributes to the early deaths of more blacks than cops.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Rob McX

    I see Ray Kroc's widow and raise you MacKenzie Scott:

    MacKenzie Scott, ex-wife of Jeff Bezos, announces $1.7 billion in donations

    https://thehill.com/homenews/509429-mackenzie-scott-ex-wife-of-jeff-bezos-announces-17-billion-in-donations-to-charities

    Replies: @Rob McX, @S. Anonyia

  49. @Art Deco
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Not a spinster, just childless. She was canned from the Boston Post for plagiarism many moons ago but managed to rebuild her career at NPR.

    She was married to a Colorado pol named Floyd Haskell. It should tell you something about their seminal culture that the network's founding president was George McGovern's campaign manager and their star reporter was the wife of a Democratic member of Congress. They knew the audience they wanted to build.

    Replies: @Jack D

    She was also close personal friends with RBG. Inside the liberal ecosystem, people go back and forth seamlessly from government to academia to foundations to cultural institutions to NPR – it’s all one big happy echo chamber. The fact that Republicans control the White House and/or the houses of Congress barely causes a ripple on the march thru the institutions – at best it slows “progress” down a little bit temporarily until the next Dem administration.

    • Agree: Alden
  50. @AndrewR
    Even if the initial story, as reported by the Post, was all smoke (and I don't think it was), the reaction to it - specifically Twitter's reaction - has unquestionably been newsworthy.

    The dishonesty of the press strikes me as absolutely criminal. Everyone who runs these media organizations needs to be... in prison. If there's no legal basis for that, we need new laws. If there's no constitutional basis for that, we need a new constitution. I would like to think the Founding Fathers would never have imagined the extent to which "the free Press" would entirely become an unofficial propaganda ministry for the state and the oligarchs who run it.

    Replies: @Altai, @Achmed E. Newman, @Jack D, @Achmed E. Newman, @Kratoklastes

    Sorry, Andrew, that middle paragraph was too harsh. I just don’t like being told we need a new Constitution. Perhaps we need a population that understands the existing one…

    What I mean was that change starts with you.

    • Replies: @Louis Renault
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Perhaps we need a population
     
    Biden's going to give us millions of

    that understands the existing one…
     
    Oh, sorry. Biden isn't though, not giv'n a damn about the constitution is a feature, not a bug, of their immigration policy.
    , @Rob McX
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I just don’t like being told we need a new Constitution. Perhaps we need a population that understands the existing one…
     
    It adds up to much the same thing. The population is being replaced with people for whom the Constitution can't work. It was written for white people, mostly of Northern European Protestant stock. Diversity has many consequences, some of which even the most astute observers couldn't predict. But one thing it unfailingly does is result in more laws, more refining and interfering with traditional interpretations of the Constitution. SCOTUS will keep wringing new meanings out of it to keep up with the requirements of an increasingly alien population.

    I agree with AndrewR's opinion that the state has to crack down on the media for their biased reporting and suppression of news unfavourable to their preferred candidate. It would be far better if there were dozens of big players in the Internet search and social media industry, some competing to expose what others wish to conceal. But this isn't happening. There's less diversity of opinion among those who control the flow of information than there was in the Moscow Politburo. People should start referring to Big Tech as Silicon Pravda.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    , @AndrewR
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I second Rob's comment. Import new people and you will need new laws and likely even new foundations for laws. We are already seeing how our enemies aren't even bothering to value broad freedom of speech. If I had a dollar for every time I've seen someone say "hate speech isn't free speech," I could pay for a luxury vacation to Cozumel. And we all know those people all define "hate speech" as pretty much anything they disagree with.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  51. They have to report important stoies like this:

    An Ice Cream Truck Jingle’s Racist History Has Caught Up To It
    https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2020/08/14/902664184/an-ice-cream-truck-jingles-racist-history-has-caught-up-to-it

    Just how many future KKK memebers are being recruited by good humor!

  52. Abolish bandwidth set-asides for public broadcasting.

    Auction off 88.1 MHz (or whatever it is) to the highest, private bidder.

    Rebate the proceeds to local taxpayers.

    The FCC is the omnidirectional post office. Does General Powell’s son still run it?

  53. Anonymous[231] • Disclaimer says:

    Nancy sitting tight just breaking Trump over her knee. And he deserves it.

    White House immediately countered with Press Secretary McEnany saying Pelosi is making it harder by not budging “even one inch” on her stimulus demands

    Trump may be world’s greatest ABC sales guy.

    But he is a weak negotiator. Has beclowned himself again in a high stakes negotiation.

    If Trump allows any blue state government bailouts he will be committing seppuku… THE ONLY WAY TO PUNISH THE BLUE STATE LOCKDOWN GOVERNORS IS MAKE THEM FEEL THEIR OWN SELF CAUSED FINANCIAL PAIN

    https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/stocks-slide-session-lows-after-white-house-says-pelosi-making-deal-harter-not-budging-one

  54. All Our Things Considered

  55. @Jack D
    @AndrewR

    The Founders were quite familiar with a partisan press. In fact that was the main kind of press in those days. Some papers used to actually have the name of a party (the "Arkansas Democrat") in their name. The idea that newspapers should be neutral and print only "the facts" on their news pages is a relatively new concept. In fact news coverage was always biased - it was a successful snow job that they convinced us that Uncle Walter was the Voice of God and not just another liberal Democrat. We are just going back to the days when it wasn't necessary to make a pretense of being unbiased. Everyone is biased. Unbiased humans don't exist.

    The view of the Founders was that by mandating a free press, all sides would be able to peddle their POV in the marketplace of ideas and the best ideas would win over the public. Whether we have a truly free market in ideas or an oligopoly is a real question. Arguably it was worse in the days when there were only 3 TV networks and they were the main source for news, but that market was regulated in some ways (the "equal time rule"). But you can make an antitrust type argument that if there is no true open competition in a certain industry then it is appropriate for the government to intervene in order to restore a competitive marketplace. Certainly they should not be adding fuel to the fire by (partly) funding some of the offenders (but it's also true that government always played a part, for example by designating a paper as the official place to publish legal notices).

    OTOH, you could argue that the Internet is the ultimate free market - anyone can start a website or create a phone app. But anyone can start an online store also and yet Amazon accounts for 50% of all web commerce.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Unladen Swallow, @Anon, @AndrewR, @Reg Cæsar, @utu

    it was a successful snow job that they convinced us that Uncle Walter was the Voice of God and not just another liberal Democrat.

    Yup. Now and then I watch a fifty-year-old clip of him or his colleagues an I’m thinking, Wow. I wasn’t aware of it at the time because I was a teenager and didn’t yet think for myself.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon
  56. Anonymous[231] • Disclaimer says:

    Incoherent jackass Trump is trying to give Pelosi an extra trillion for the Democrat machine. But she won’t take it. “Not enough, bitch.”

    Nancy has completely pwned the Art of the Deal guy.

    This is embarrassing. She is schooling a child.

    Trump running batsh!t Kushner plan to pass the turd to senate let them be the bad guys. But the deal could’ve been done down near 1 trillion. Her caucus was cracking.

    This is Trump’s worst negotiating debacle yet.

    • Troll: Manfred Arcane
  57. @Achmed E. Newman
    @AndrewR

    Sorry, Andrew, that middle paragraph was too harsh. I just don't like being told we need a new Constitution. Perhaps we need a population that understands the existing one...

    What I mean was that change starts with you.

    Replies: @Louis Renault, @Rob McX, @AndrewR

    Perhaps we need a population

    Biden’s going to give us millions of

    that understands the existing one…

    Oh, sorry. Biden isn’t though, not giv’n a damn about the constitution is a feature, not a bug, of their immigration policy.

  58. NPR’s defenders are out in force on Twitter saying that NPR only recieves 2% of it’s funding from the Federal Government. 2% too much, if you ask me. I suspect they likely receive more than that, as commenters Art Deco and Jack D have said above.

    Of course public TV and radio receive the lion’s share of their funding from corporations and foundations, neither of whom are disinterested actors. Foundations are mostly vehicles for liberal social change. And if you’ve ever watched any public TV programming, you’ve seen the blurbs at the end where they state that this or that show is funded by Raytheon, or Merck, or whatever. Think that sponsorship doesn’t influence their coverage? Sure it doesn’t. Public TV’s News Hour received a large grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for coverage of public health issues, the same foundation that is one of the largest financial players in public health. Conflict of interest? Of course not.

    The very term “public” in public TV and radio is a sham. They do not represent “the public”. They represent the wealthy interests that pay for their programming.

  59. @Achmed E. Newman
    @AndrewR

    Sorry, Andrew, that middle paragraph was too harsh. I just don't like being told we need a new Constitution. Perhaps we need a population that understands the existing one...

    What I mean was that change starts with you.

    Replies: @Louis Renault, @Rob McX, @AndrewR

    I just don’t like being told we need a new Constitution. Perhaps we need a population that understands the existing one…

    It adds up to much the same thing. The population is being replaced with people for whom the Constitution can’t work. It was written for white people, mostly of Northern European Protestant stock. Diversity has many consequences, some of which even the most astute observers couldn’t predict. But one thing it unfailingly does is result in more laws, more refining and interfering with traditional interpretations of the Constitution. SCOTUS will keep wringing new meanings out of it to keep up with the requirements of an increasingly alien population.

    I agree with AndrewR’s opinion that the state has to crack down on the media for their biased reporting and suppression of news unfavourable to their preferred candidate. It would be far better if there were dozens of big players in the Internet search and social media industry, some competing to expose what others wish to conceal. But this isn’t happening. There’s less diversity of opinion among those who control the flow of information than there was in the Moscow Politburo. People should start referring to Big Tech as Silicon Pravda.

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Rob McX

    "But one thing it unfailingly does is result in more laws, more refining and interfering with traditional interpretations of the Constitution. SCOTUS will keep wringing new meanings out of it to keep up with the requirements of an increasingly alien population."

    The problem is that those "white people, mostly of Northern European Protestant stock" created a Constitution modeled on their idea of Holy Scripture; unchangeable and without error. Of course, as conditions changed, it needed "interpretation" by the Sanhedrin -- excuse me, Supreme Court -- nine old guys dressed in black robes so you know they're SERIOUS. Hence, increasingly convoluted and absurd "interpretations". The inability to settle the slavery issue was another consequence, due to the absurdly difficult (deliberately so) amendment process: no slave state would vote to eliminate slavery, just as no state will vote to eliminate the Electoral College.

    Other nations...all other nations... take their Constitution as what the Germans call a Basic Law; basic, but just another law. They amend them all the time, write new ones when the old one proves unworkable -- how many Republics is France up to now? In Sweden, the new government can rewrite the whole thing, as Olaf Palme did (then they JFK'd him).

    It's another one of those things Americans are so proud of and think is essential, which no one else has and gets along without just fine, or better.

  60. @Patriot
    Hahaha. More lies from National Propaganda Radio.

    Wife and I used to play the NPR GAME for 10 min before we got out of bed each morning.

    1 point for each mention of a minority or "victim" (gay, lesbian, immigrant, transgender, woman, etc.) Score 1 point.

    1 pt for story about Climate change, electric cars, green energy, etc.

    1 pt for Republicans are bad or Democrats are good story.

    1 pt linking any Conservative or Republican to Hitler, Nazis White surpremism, racism, antisematism

    2 pts each mention of Holacaust/Nazis/Hitler. Why is this subject mentioned 10 times a day on NPR?

    3 pts. The coveted TRIFECTA -- 3 or more of the above in a single story.

    4 pts. The HIGHLY COVETED QUADFECTA, jamming 4 or more victims or Leftist ideas into a single story, such as a gay Jewish feminest immigrant who is fighting for BLM.

    5 pts. Special Bonus score for mention of EMMET TILL

    In 10 min of listening to NPR, we could always score 3 to 15 pts. It made waking up fun. Try it, yourself.

    Replies: @Patriot, @Known Fact, @Buffalo Joe

    Referring to the previously mentioned NPR game (Post 26). Whenever we scored a Quadfecta or the Super Special Emmit Till 5 bonus points, both my wife and I would throw back the covers and jump wildly up and down on the bed laughing hysterically and screaming,”Yes, yes, yes!!!!”

    Again, it was a great way to wake up in the morning. It made the chore of getting out of bed fun.

    During the 1990’s a typical NPR segment consisted of a Jewish NPR moderator interviewing a Jewish authority on something to do with Jews, such as a book or movie about the Holocaust or a modern (Jewish) artist, Sigmund Freud, or some Jewish lesbian feminist, etc. Hahahaha.

    Also, as a previous commenter noted, NPR will have “debates”, but in fact both “debaters” are way on the Left. For example, they will interview 2 authorities about immigration, but one will be for absolutely unrestricted open borders, and the other will be for more-or-less unrestricted immigration, but for massive welfare aid for the sacred newcomers (housing, medical care, food stamps, etc.).

    Do they honestly think we don’t notice the constant Marxist propaganda?

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Patriot

    "During the 1990’s a typical NPR segment consisted of a Jewish NPR moderator interviewing a Jewish authority on something to do with Jews, such as a book or movie about the Holocaust or a modern (Jewish) artist, Sigmund Freud, or some Jewish lesbian feminist, etc. Hahahaha."

    I might date my personal awokening to an episode of the MacNeil Lehrer report sometime in the 80s-90s when I realized that they had two Jews "debating" whether "America should support Israel building more settlements" or "America should support Israel building not so many settlements".

    , @prime noticer
    @Patriot

    "During the 1990’s a typical NPR segment consisted of a Jewish NPR moderator interviewing a Jewish authority on something to do with Jews..."

    about the same time frame for me, with Terry Gross and Stale Air and all that. i wasn't a big NPR listener or anything but i started to catch on. my mom was big on NPR and listened to it all the time so i heard it since the late 70s, early 80s.

    my mom is a good person and votes Republican and is race aware, but still picked up all kinds of kooky, stupid ideas from NPR over 40 years that she subjected us to now and then, especially the bad music. people who dislike africans, muslims, random hostile foreigners and the huge immigration wave still often don't catch on to the jewish dimension behind it.

    towards the end of the Obama era, me and my dad were literally yelling at her, and yelling at the radio, whenever she would turn it on in the house.

    i got a little bit spooked 5 years ago or so when she started asking me about random shooters and shootings that NPR would report on, because she would say, isn't that the stuff you believe in too? so i knew they had been rolling out Cultural Marxism and Critical Race Theory to their listeners by that point.

  61. @Jack D
    @AndrewR

    The Founders were quite familiar with a partisan press. In fact that was the main kind of press in those days. Some papers used to actually have the name of a party (the "Arkansas Democrat") in their name. The idea that newspapers should be neutral and print only "the facts" on their news pages is a relatively new concept. In fact news coverage was always biased - it was a successful snow job that they convinced us that Uncle Walter was the Voice of God and not just another liberal Democrat. We are just going back to the days when it wasn't necessary to make a pretense of being unbiased. Everyone is biased. Unbiased humans don't exist.

    The view of the Founders was that by mandating a free press, all sides would be able to peddle their POV in the marketplace of ideas and the best ideas would win over the public. Whether we have a truly free market in ideas or an oligopoly is a real question. Arguably it was worse in the days when there were only 3 TV networks and they were the main source for news, but that market was regulated in some ways (the "equal time rule"). But you can make an antitrust type argument that if there is no true open competition in a certain industry then it is appropriate for the government to intervene in order to restore a competitive marketplace. Certainly they should not be adding fuel to the fire by (partly) funding some of the offenders (but it's also true that government always played a part, for example by designating a paper as the official place to publish legal notices).

    OTOH, you could argue that the Internet is the ultimate free market - anyone can start a website or create a phone app. But anyone can start an online store also and yet Amazon accounts for 50% of all web commerce.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Unladen Swallow, @Anon, @AndrewR, @Reg Cæsar, @utu

    During the Big Three network days in was different because although as you pointed out they were still biased there was the “Fairness Doctrine” imposed by the FCC and the media back then actually believed that reporting and editorializing were different things and shouldn’t be mixed. Around the late 1980’s early 1990’s time period the Mainstream Media started merging reporting and editorializing and they have not stopped or looked back since, now there is effectively no difference, oh, and the Republicans got rid of the “fairness doctrine” because it was anti-free speech or something.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Unladen Swallow

    "The Press" and the media have always contained bias, or just bullshit. "The People" have always consumed it, because it keeps them entertained and tells them what to think.

    Here is a classic sermon about television, from the movie, Network:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQAzpV7GC0U

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

  62. @Altai
    @AndrewR

    It actually exactly resembles GamerGate. It started when a BPD gadfly who calls herself Zoe Quinn (Nee Chelsea Valkenberg,) who was a Hunter Biden esque cluster B fuckup.

    The video games industry was long regarded as profoundly corrupt with a pre-existing online communities dedicated to criticising it and particularly the media outlets who covered it for being spectacularly unprofessional and corrupt.

    When Zoe Quinn's ex-boyfriend made a blog post about how poorly he'd been treated by her and her affairs with at least 5 other men who had been in professional positions to help further her career (Including her direct boss and journalists who covered her 'games'). This was posted to those communities but due to her relationships with the games media as a social gadfly, they colluded to bar any mention from their forums and other places. This led to a Streisand effect and building on previous outrage with them, led to the issue breaking out. The cluster B SJWs who'd been making inroads then took it up as an example of 'misogyny' as Quinn was a woman and this narrative was fed to the broader media who declined to actually look at the entire event being documented online.

    Games journalists then flipped out and simultaneously all wrote similar editorials denouncing 'Gamers' and saying they didn't have to be the audience for games. Their shared discussion lists were leaked. Similar 'JournoLists' also exist for the MSM media.

    This event jumpstarted the SJW culture war as it was the first time some backlash was experienced due to it targeting anonymous people over the internet (Social shaming had no purchase and thus they had no way to enforce their dogma or suppression counter narratives) who were also mostly liberal or libertarian who had previously assumed they were a part of the coalition of the fringes.

    Could this be another situation where personal connections led to massive censorship from top elements in the media? That backfires by said Streisand effect.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Off of your comment, here is a strange little glimpse into the minds of gamers.

    First: I’m not a gamer, I’m too square and a little too old, and I lack a gamer’s sensibility, so I’m a total outsider to that industry. (The only game I like is “Portal”, and it’s only because I find the character of GLADYS, the chatty, mocking, evil mainframe computer who provides nasty running commentary, to be hilarious).

    This is a little outré, so bear with me. Ordinarily when I watch a movie on DVD, I don’t bother with any of the “Special Features”. But one time I was watching some dumb action film and it was boring, so I switched on the “commentary” track provided by one of the actors. It turned out the actor was very eccentric, so his comments on the film were irrelevant and weird and sort of oddly tedious, which I found funny.

    Flash forward to three months later. A friend of a friend runs a small computer-game development company, and he asked my friend who is a gaming pro to come help rewrite a story arc for an afternoon, and for clumsy social reasons this guy brought me along to keep him company, so I accidentally wound up sitting in on a game development session with about a dozen professional gaming nerds. I thought I would just keep my mouth shut and observe.

    In the course of the session, the actor’s name came up who was so peculiar on the DVD. I couldn’t help myself, so I made a very obscure joke about the odd nature of his commentary. What happened next sort of surprised me. EVERYBODY IN THE ROOM KNEW EXACTLY WHAT I WAS TALKING ABOUT. They all cracked up and started riffing on the premise, and for the rest of the afternoon, the whole story arc became about inside jokes about this actor. It was an obscure riff on an obscure riff on an obscure riff, but they were confident that their audience would know precisely what was meant.

    These people are total space aliens.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “ These people are total space aliens.”

    Video game programming is the whitest and worst paid end of the programming profession. They do it for the love of gaming and get abused and overworked by their employers.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  63. @Unladen Swallow
    @Jack D

    During the Big Three network days in was different because although as you pointed out they were still biased there was the "Fairness Doctrine" imposed by the FCC and the media back then actually believed that reporting and editorializing were different things and shouldn't be mixed. Around the late 1980's early 1990's time period the Mainstream Media started merging reporting and editorializing and they have not stopped or looked back since, now there is effectively no difference, oh, and the Republicans got rid of the "fairness doctrine" because it was anti-free speech or something.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    “The Press” and the media have always contained bias, or just bullshit. “The People” have always consumed it, because it keeps them entertained and tells them what to think.

    Here is a classic sermon about television, from the movie, Network:

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    @Buzz Mohawk

    No doubt, but they consciously began to spin things around thirty years ago, the 1988 Presidential election disheartened the news media, because it meant that the Democrats had not only lost three straight, but three straight landslides, as well as five out of the previous six presidential elections. Prior to that they really did try to prevent journalists from inserting their opinions into reporting. Joel Kotkin who a is libertarian-ish writer tells a story about when he was a junior reporter ( and a liberal ) he tried to insert a liberal opinion into a news story and his editor told him to take it out and that no one gave a shit about his politics, this is believe was in the late 70's early 80's time period and the paper was I believe the Washington Post. Hard to imagine that happening today.

  64. @Guy De Champlagne
    To the media's sorta credit, they're also not terribly interested in all the business Trump continues to do in office or Jared Kushner mixing bailouts of his family's finances with official foreign policy. They hate Trump for what makes him different from opponents like Clinton and Biden and so don't focus on corruption, nepotism. or corporatism and instead focus on Trump being vaguely pro white and pro male. Unlike the commenters here who want to pretend Trump is aparagon of virtue and Biden is horribly corrupt

    Replies: @bomag, @Art Deco, @Anonymous, @J.Ross

    I ran because of you, Guy D. Champagne

  65. @Rob McX
    @El Dato

    I know Ray Kroc's widow left $225m to NPR when she died in 2003.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Buffalo Joe, @The Wild Geese Howard

    I know Ray Kroc’s widow left $225m to NPR when she died in 2003.

    This is part of the “woman problem”, or “women swallowing the narrative problem”.

    However dumb their husbands might be about political issues–it varies–women, and apparently quite often the rich pampered wives of successful entrepreneurs–are even dumber.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @AnotherDad

    Still not as bad as the 1.7 billion that retarded dumbass Mackenzie Bezos donated to Black Lives Matter. Blacks would love to burn her house down and steal her money. She's even dumber than her ex-husband.

    Unfortunately, 1.7 billion goes a long way. Fingers crossed the corrupt officials spend it on goodies for themselves instead of molotov cocktails.

  66. We can’t blame NPR, they’ve got to keep space for stories about gay Lebanese musicians being banned by Christian bishops or black Mormons leading critical race theory training sessions at their local temple (both of these are actual news stories I’ve heard over the past year).

  67. @AnotherDad
    @Rob McX


    I know Ray Kroc’s widow left $225m to NPR when she died in 2003.
     
    This is part of the "woman problem", or "women swallowing the narrative problem".

    However dumb their husbands might be about political issues--it varies--women, and apparently quite often the rich pampered wives of successful entrepreneurs--are even dumber.

    Replies: @Anon

    Still not as bad as the 1.7 billion that retarded dumbass Mackenzie Bezos donated to Black Lives Matter. Blacks would love to burn her house down and steal her money. She’s even dumber than her ex-husband.

    Unfortunately, 1.7 billion goes a long way. Fingers crossed the corrupt officials spend it on goodies for themselves instead of molotov cocktails.

  68. @Buffalo Joe
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Ach, years ago I was driving home from I think Boston and the strongest station I could find on the radio was an NPR station. Best call in I have ever heard. Caller to the program host..."You know you'd have a nice program if every Saturday wasn't you and four guests that agree with you. Thank you,good bye."

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Hypnotoad666

    The best way to describe NPR is polite, well-produced, and evil.

    • LOL: Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @Pat Kittle
    @Hypnotoad666


    The best way to describe NPR is polite, well-produced, and evil.
     
    Make that pretentious, smarmy, and evil.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @ben tillman

  69. @Jack D
    @eD

    While NPR gets very little DIRECT Federal funding (a few grants here and there), about half of its revenues come from the fees it charges member stations for its programming and those stations in turn derive maybe 1/3 of their revenues from various types of government funding although only a third of that is direct Federal funding. So NPR does in the end benefit from some degree of Federal funding, although it's not their biggest source of revenue. And yet they depend on government funding to balance their books - if they lost 15 or 20% of their budget that is traceable to the government, they might not be able to continue in operation or would have to cut back dramatically. And the foundations that they depend on are in large part a creation of the Federal tax code.

    Replies: @JMcG

    You can tell that they need the money by how hard they scream whenever someone mentions turning off the tap. I used to read the allegedly libertarian Megan McArdle until she championed the ongoing funding of NPR. Her contention was that it was so little money, it didn’t really matter. My contention was that if we couldn’t stop funding that, we couldn’t stop funding anything.

  70. Will “All Things Considered” EVER get around to considering how overwhelmingly (((tribal))) All Things Considered is?

  71. @Hypnotoad666
    @Buffalo Joe

    The best way to describe NPR is polite, well-produced, and evil.

    Replies: @Pat Kittle

    The best way to describe NPR is polite, well-produced, and evil.

    Make that pretentious, smarmy, and evil.

    • Agree: Farenheit
    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Pat Kittle

    "The Mellifluousness of Evil" -- not Hannah Arendt

    , @ben tillman
    @Pat Kittle

    I was going to vote for Hypnotoad's characterization, but he didn't say "smarmy", so you win.

  72. Anon[102] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @AndrewR

    The Founders were quite familiar with a partisan press. In fact that was the main kind of press in those days. Some papers used to actually have the name of a party (the "Arkansas Democrat") in their name. The idea that newspapers should be neutral and print only "the facts" on their news pages is a relatively new concept. In fact news coverage was always biased - it was a successful snow job that they convinced us that Uncle Walter was the Voice of God and not just another liberal Democrat. We are just going back to the days when it wasn't necessary to make a pretense of being unbiased. Everyone is biased. Unbiased humans don't exist.

    The view of the Founders was that by mandating a free press, all sides would be able to peddle their POV in the marketplace of ideas and the best ideas would win over the public. Whether we have a truly free market in ideas or an oligopoly is a real question. Arguably it was worse in the days when there were only 3 TV networks and they were the main source for news, but that market was regulated in some ways (the "equal time rule"). But you can make an antitrust type argument that if there is no true open competition in a certain industry then it is appropriate for the government to intervene in order to restore a competitive marketplace. Certainly they should not be adding fuel to the fire by (partly) funding some of the offenders (but it's also true that government always played a part, for example by designating a paper as the official place to publish legal notices).

    OTOH, you could argue that the Internet is the ultimate free market - anyone can start a website or create a phone app. But anyone can start an online store also and yet Amazon accounts for 50% of all web commerce.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Unladen Swallow, @Anon, @AndrewR, @Reg Cæsar, @utu

    OTOH, you could argue that the Internet is the ultimate free market – anyone can start a website or create a phone app. But anyone can start an online store also and yet Amazon accounts for 50% of all web commerce.

    Yep, it’s just a big free market.

    You can’t share those views here. Get your own website.

    Ok.

    You can’t host that website here. Develop your own servers and webhosting software.

    Uhhh.. That seems like a lot of work but, OK.

    You can’t have that internet address. Create your own unaccountable monopoly that issues and controls all internet domains. Ummmm…

    Somehow, you’re still on the net? No funding for you. Create your own credit card and banking systems. Ummmm….

    There is no more free market on the internet.

    • Agree: Dissident
  73. @Jack D
    @AndrewR

    The Founders were quite familiar with a partisan press. In fact that was the main kind of press in those days. Some papers used to actually have the name of a party (the "Arkansas Democrat") in their name. The idea that newspapers should be neutral and print only "the facts" on their news pages is a relatively new concept. In fact news coverage was always biased - it was a successful snow job that they convinced us that Uncle Walter was the Voice of God and not just another liberal Democrat. We are just going back to the days when it wasn't necessary to make a pretense of being unbiased. Everyone is biased. Unbiased humans don't exist.

    The view of the Founders was that by mandating a free press, all sides would be able to peddle their POV in the marketplace of ideas and the best ideas would win over the public. Whether we have a truly free market in ideas or an oligopoly is a real question. Arguably it was worse in the days when there were only 3 TV networks and they were the main source for news, but that market was regulated in some ways (the "equal time rule"). But you can make an antitrust type argument that if there is no true open competition in a certain industry then it is appropriate for the government to intervene in order to restore a competitive marketplace. Certainly they should not be adding fuel to the fire by (partly) funding some of the offenders (but it's also true that government always played a part, for example by designating a paper as the official place to publish legal notices).

    OTOH, you could argue that the Internet is the ultimate free market - anyone can start a website or create a phone app. But anyone can start an online store also and yet Amazon accounts for 50% of all web commerce.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Unladen Swallow, @Anon, @AndrewR, @Reg Cæsar, @utu

    I never implied the Founders weren’t familiar with partisan press. But there wasn’t anything analogous to CNN/NYT/etc in terms of reach and influence in those days. And Twitter/Facebook have become our de facto public squares. When they act in biased ways, it’s equivalent to someone going into a public square in 1780 and physically muzzling/binding people sharing ideas they disagree with.

    The story about Hunter Biden being suppressed by Twitter, and the elite media refusing to even report even on the censorship and controversy shows how toxic they are.

    I’m not sure why you feel the need to point out that unbiased humans don’t exist. Yes, we are all biased. We are all also often tempted to commit immoral/illegal acts. Anyone who claims otherwise is a liar. But we still expect people not to steal, not to be violent except in defense, and to not act on their urges to bang their neighbor’s wife, dog or 13 year old daughter. It’s not asking much to expect people, particularly in the media, to strive for a lack of bias, even if attaining that unbiasedness is seldom possible in practice.

    • Agree: Redman
  74. @Achmed E. Newman
    @AndrewR

    Sorry, Andrew, that middle paragraph was too harsh. I just don't like being told we need a new Constitution. Perhaps we need a population that understands the existing one...

    What I mean was that change starts with you.

    Replies: @Louis Renault, @Rob McX, @AndrewR

    I second Rob’s comment. Import new people and you will need new laws and likely even new foundations for laws. We are already seeing how our enemies aren’t even bothering to value broad freedom of speech. If I had a dollar for every time I’ve seen someone say “hate speech isn’t free speech,” I could pay for a luxury vacation to Cozumel. And we all know those people all define “hate speech” as pretty much anything they disagree with.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @AndrewR

    Yes, I agree with the 1st paragraph of Mr. McX's comment, hence yours. That is what I was getting at. We already had too many people who weren't up to par in terms of "keeping this Republic", but why import people who aren't, at a much higher rate (probably 98% of them)?

    For all the people who want the Feral Gov't to regulate the media, I simply DISAGREE. Big time.

  75. NPR is like the school bully who demands the smaller smart people do their homework.

    https://www.baldingsworld.com/2020/10/22/report-on-biden-activities-with-china/

  76. Terence Samuel.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Altai

    I'm assuming he's gay. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

  77. @Achmed E. Newman
    @AndrewR

    Yes, they are openly, blatantly dishonest, Andrew. No, that's NOT criminal. No, we do NOT need new laws. What YOU need to do, Andrew is not support these people. That means don't click on their links, don't go to their websites, and probably the most important, don't pay money for them to feed you this openly, blatantly dishonest BS by subscribing to cable TV!

    It's up to you, Andrew. Don't put all your screw-ups over the years, and those of all the other Lyin' Press supporters, on the US Congress and the US Constitution.

    I see your finger pointing over there, Andrew, but you've got 3 more fingers pointing back at you, yeah.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uv5gj_Z1soA

    Replies: @Guy De Champlagne, @theMann, @ben tillman

    No, that won’t cut it. Conspiracies to restrain the information flow and mislead the public to its detriment should be illegal to the extent they are not currently. And video and audio media are not created by a “press”.

  78. @Rob McX
    @El Dato

    I know Ray Kroc's widow left $225m to NPR when she died in 2003.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Buffalo Joe, @The Wild Geese Howard

    Rob, that is so sad. Mrs. Kroc could have seeded the Reparations Fund and we would be ever so close to a better America. Actually, McDonalds probably contributes to the early deaths of more blacks than cops.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Buffalo Joe

    I’m boycotting so many restaurant chains and food companies that pretty soon I’m going to have to start raising chickens. planting a garden and canning and freezing the produce. Chicken is the best manure. I don’t think I could kill pretty bunny rabbits.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  79. @Art Deco
    @Guy De Champlagne

    or Jared Kushner mixing bailouts of his family’s finances with official foreign policy.

    Thanks for the latest from the Democrat's talking point mills. Always an education.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Hope Jared sees this, bro

  80. @Rob McX
    @El Dato

    I know Ray Kroc's widow left $225m to NPR when she died in 2003.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Buffalo Joe, @The Wild Geese Howard

    I see Ray Kroc’s widow and raise you MacKenzie Scott:

    MacKenzie Scott, ex-wife of Jeff Bezos, announces $1.7 billion in donations

    https://thehill.com/homenews/509429-mackenzie-scott-ex-wife-of-jeff-bezos-announces-17-billion-in-donations-to-charities

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Thanks. There's nothing deadlier than a clueless "philanthropist" with a billion dollars to dish out. I was going to say "a billion unearned dollars", but the guys who actually make the money are no wiser than the ex-wives who get their hands on it - witness Jack Dorsey's recent donation to Ibram X. Kendi.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @S. Anonyia
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    All that money, and she's still trite as hell. Why isn't she starting her own movie studio or publishing house? Apparently she has written a book, and based on the description/reviews it seems quite boring. No wonder he left her for that creepy/plastic looking reporter. At least she seems to have something of a personality.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

  81. @Neoconned
    I really enjoy NPRs classical music & jazz broadcasts......it would be nice if they were music only

    Replies: @Coemgen, @HammerJack, @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @Known Fact, @Dissident

    I really enjoy NPRs classical music & jazz broadcasts……it would be nice if they were music only

    Minnesota Public Radio gives you that option, with two stations. My car radio is set to the all-music one. Perfect for 5-speed FWD drives through leafy country backroads in the autumn.

    Actually, three. There was an independent classical station at St Olaf College which closed down and became a pop format, “The Current”. Which is now part of MPR. How ironic.

    They reach five surrounding states and two provinces, and are streamed online.

    As far as politics, MPR Classical recently fired a black DJ for getting political over the air. On the other hand, their site reposts a Ford Foundation op-ed by a black guy with the ridiculously Jewish name Aaron Dworkin, calling for US orchestras to devote 10% of their programming to ” Black and Latinx” composers.

    Come on, now… do they even devote 10% to American composers?

    https://www.classicalmpr.org/story/2020/10/20/aaron-dworkin-sound-of-silence

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Reg Cæsar

    '...a Ford Foundation op-ed by a black guy with the ridiculously Jewish name Aaron Dworkin, calling for US orchestras to devote 10% of their programming to ” Black and Latinx” composers...'


    '...His biological mother is of Irish descent and his biological father is African-American, while his adoptive family is Jewish...'

    Go figure. These non-black 'blacks' really get on my nerves. Obama, Colin Kapaernik...now this guy. I'm more black than they are. Say what you want about Al Sharpton et al, but at least they're actually black.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Newer cars usually have "HD radio" which allow stations to broadcast two (or more) digital streams in addition to their standard analog streams. For public radio stations it's common for them to have one "talk/news" stream that mirrors the analog stream and one "classical" digital only stream. Or they can broadcast jazz on one stream and classical on the other while the analog broadcast alternates between the two formats (classical by day and jazz by night) . These are free streams, not Sirius/XM which requires a subscription. However, older cars don't and most home stereos don't. For some reason, HD Radio in the home never caught on - such receivers exist but they are not common.

    OTOH, many newer home stereos have internet connectivity which allows you to play streams from radio stations all over the world (plus the commercial streaming services such as Spotify, Pandora, Amazon Music, etc.).

  82. @Jack D
    @AndrewR

    The Founders were quite familiar with a partisan press. In fact that was the main kind of press in those days. Some papers used to actually have the name of a party (the "Arkansas Democrat") in their name. The idea that newspapers should be neutral and print only "the facts" on their news pages is a relatively new concept. In fact news coverage was always biased - it was a successful snow job that they convinced us that Uncle Walter was the Voice of God and not just another liberal Democrat. We are just going back to the days when it wasn't necessary to make a pretense of being unbiased. Everyone is biased. Unbiased humans don't exist.

    The view of the Founders was that by mandating a free press, all sides would be able to peddle their POV in the marketplace of ideas and the best ideas would win over the public. Whether we have a truly free market in ideas or an oligopoly is a real question. Arguably it was worse in the days when there were only 3 TV networks and they were the main source for news, but that market was regulated in some ways (the "equal time rule"). But you can make an antitrust type argument that if there is no true open competition in a certain industry then it is appropriate for the government to intervene in order to restore a competitive marketplace. Certainly they should not be adding fuel to the fire by (partly) funding some of the offenders (but it's also true that government always played a part, for example by designating a paper as the official place to publish legal notices).

    OTOH, you could argue that the Internet is the ultimate free market - anyone can start a website or create a phone app. But anyone can start an online store also and yet Amazon accounts for 50% of all web commerce.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Unladen Swallow, @Anon, @AndrewR, @Reg Cæsar, @utu

    The idea that newspapers should be neutral and print only “the facts” on their news pages is a relatively new concept.

    And relatively American.

  83. Terence Samuel:

    Black with a Jewish name. Must of been a fan of Woopie Goldberg while growing up.

  84. @Rob McX
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I just don’t like being told we need a new Constitution. Perhaps we need a population that understands the existing one…
     
    It adds up to much the same thing. The population is being replaced with people for whom the Constitution can't work. It was written for white people, mostly of Northern European Protestant stock. Diversity has many consequences, some of which even the most astute observers couldn't predict. But one thing it unfailingly does is result in more laws, more refining and interfering with traditional interpretations of the Constitution. SCOTUS will keep wringing new meanings out of it to keep up with the requirements of an increasingly alien population.

    I agree with AndrewR's opinion that the state has to crack down on the media for their biased reporting and suppression of news unfavourable to their preferred candidate. It would be far better if there were dozens of big players in the Internet search and social media industry, some competing to expose what others wish to conceal. But this isn't happening. There's less diversity of opinion among those who control the flow of information than there was in the Moscow Politburo. People should start referring to Big Tech as Silicon Pravda.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    “But one thing it unfailingly does is result in more laws, more refining and interfering with traditional interpretations of the Constitution. SCOTUS will keep wringing new meanings out of it to keep up with the requirements of an increasingly alien population.”

    The problem is that those “white people, mostly of Northern European Protestant stock” created a Constitution modeled on their idea of Holy Scripture; unchangeable and without error. Of course, as conditions changed, it needed “interpretation” by the Sanhedrin — excuse me, Supreme Court — nine old guys dressed in black robes so you know they’re SERIOUS. Hence, increasingly convoluted and absurd “interpretations”. The inability to settle the slavery issue was another consequence, due to the absurdly difficult (deliberately so) amendment process: no slave state would vote to eliminate slavery, just as no state will vote to eliminate the Electoral College.

    Other nations…all other nations… take their Constitution as what the Germans call a Basic Law; basic, but just another law. They amend them all the time, write new ones when the old one proves unworkable — how many Republics is France up to now? In Sweden, the new government can rewrite the whole thing, as Olaf Palme did (then they JFK’d him).

    It’s another one of those things Americans are so proud of and think is essential, which no one else has and gets along without just fine, or better.

  85. @JimB
    The gatekeeper of what is news on NPR.

    http://www.adweek.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Terence-Samuel-CONTENT1-840x460.jpg

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    He looks like the sort of cartoon Negro you’d see in an issue of Instauration. (Or so I’ve been told…)

    • Replies: @JimB
    @James O'Meara


    He looks like the sort of cartoon Negro you’d see in an issue of Instauration. (Or so I’ve been told…)
     
    He looks like what he is: a simpleton.
  86. @Guy De Champlagne
    @Achmed E. Newman

    For thousands of years it was uncontroversial that when an industry caused problems you regulated it and then......the 1980s happened. The sheer scale of the trauma Reagan did to you people is really remarkable. A rabid hatred of the media combined only matched by the complete unwillingness to actually do anything about it. Sad!

    Replies: @Art Deco, @anon, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Achmed E. Newman

    The sheer scale of the trauma Reagan did to you people is really remarkable.

    The trauma was a business recession which lasted about 18 months. The rate at which goods and services were produced in this country declined by about 2% during those 18 months.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Art Deco

    Mr. Champlagne's trauma was when Mrs. Reagan just said no to Mr. Champlagne's psychedelic mushroom habit.

  87. @Neoconned
    I really enjoy NPRs classical music & jazz broadcasts......it would be nice if they were music only

    Replies: @Coemgen, @HammerJack, @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @Known Fact, @Dissident

    I’ve clicked on their music shows. Just yakety yak pompous liberals blathering about the music instead of just playing it.

  88. @Patriot
    @Patriot

    Referring to the previously mentioned NPR game (Post 26). Whenever we scored a Quadfecta or the Super Special Emmit Till 5 bonus points, both my wife and I would throw back the covers and jump wildly up and down on the bed laughing hysterically and screaming,"Yes, yes, yes!!!!"

    Again, it was a great way to wake up in the morning. It made the chore of getting out of bed fun.

    During the 1990's a typical NPR segment consisted of a Jewish NPR moderator interviewing a Jewish authority on something to do with Jews, such as a book or movie about the Holocaust or a modern (Jewish) artist, Sigmund Freud, or some Jewish lesbian feminist, etc. Hahahaha.

    Also, as a previous commenter noted, NPR will have "debates", but in fact both "debaters" are way on the Left. For example, they will interview 2 authorities about immigration, but one will be for absolutely unrestricted open borders, and the other will be for more-or-less unrestricted immigration, but for massive welfare aid for the sacred newcomers (housing, medical care, food stamps, etc.).

    Do they honestly think we don't notice the constant Marxist propaganda?

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @prime noticer

    “During the 1990’s a typical NPR segment consisted of a Jewish NPR moderator interviewing a Jewish authority on something to do with Jews, such as a book or movie about the Holocaust or a modern (Jewish) artist, Sigmund Freud, or some Jewish lesbian feminist, etc. Hahahaha.”

    I might date my personal awokening to an episode of the MacNeil Lehrer report sometime in the 80s-90s when I realized that they had two Jews “debating” whether “America should support Israel building more settlements” or “America should support Israel building not so many settlements”.

  89. @RichardTaylor
    The media is saying that what suburban moms really want is millions of illegals given amnesty followed by more felons let out of jail.

    They say this with a straight face. I know there are the god-awful moderate White women who go for this junk when it comes to virtue signaling, but I bet after a summer of rioting and increase in shootings, they've cooled their jets on the feel good stuff.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    The media is saying that what suburban moms really want is millions of illegals given amnesty followed by more felons let out of jail.

    They say this with a straight face. I know there are the god-awful moderate White women who go for this junk when it comes to virtue signaling, but I bet after a summer of rioting and increase in shootings, they’ve cooled their jets on the feel good stuff.

    One would think.

    But
    a) The mainstream/Democrat media just lies and lies and lies and women lap up the media.

    b) Trump/Republicans have to make the case about both the nonsense minoritarian “oppressed” blacks hunted by the police narrative and the Democrats destruction of the rule-of-law–and what it portends–with unmistakably visceral cuts-to-the-bone clarity. Have they?

    • Replies: @ic1000
    @AnotherDad

    You asked,


    b) Trump/Republicans have to make the case about both the nonsense minoritarian “oppressed” blacks hunted by the police narrative and the Democrats destruction of the rule-of-law–and what it portends–with unmistakably visceral cuts-to-the-bone clarity. Have they?
     
    At last night's debate, the segment on Race had the moderator asking questions like "How would you respond to the concerned African-American parents of teenagers who have to give 'The Talk' to their sons, living with the fear that their children will be stopped without cause by police and that at any moment they could be gunned down, just because they are black?"

    If there was any daylight between Biden's predictable position and Trump's, it was hard to see it.

    So there's your answer.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

  90. @Pat Kittle
    @Hypnotoad666


    The best way to describe NPR is polite, well-produced, and evil.
     
    Make that pretentious, smarmy, and evil.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @ben tillman

    “The Mellifluousness of Evil” — not Hannah Arendt

  91. @Coemgen
    @Neoconned

    NPR/PBS does put out some good stuff -but- I think it's only to try an hook rubes into being exposed to NPR/PBS propaganda.

    Prime example is Project Smoke which is wrong on so many levels for the true NPR/PBS audience (smoke? red meat? no leftist politics?) but it attracts normies who may get caught in one of NPR/PBS' bait-and-switch productions where they reel one in to believing the NPR/PBS propaganda.

    Replies: @Jack D

    I don’t know what it is like where you are, but where I live they have moved most of the “how to” and travel shows to the “Create” subchannel so that the main channel has more time to show political propaganda. I enjoy the Create channel because it is one of the few stations left that is relatively free from non-stop politics and Wokeness.

    My main objection to Raichlin is that he seems to burn everything he cooks black. A rich golden brown is nice but burning your food until it resembles charcoal is not in my book. Also there is a lot of product placement in his show for really expensive cooking rigs. I abide by the motto that it ain’t the cooker but the cook. Some of the greatest barbecue in the world has been produced in literally a hole in the ground (this is why it is called a barbecue “pit”).

    Still it is better than Food Network where all they seem to have nowadays are ridiculous phony cooking contests and the winner is predetermined to be whoever is highest on the diversity totem pole – you just know that that African Muslim woman with the hijab is going to beat the stale pale males with the sleeve tattoos.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Jack D

    15 years ago when they had the real cooking shows where someone cooked a simple meal in 30 minutes a lot of teens learned to cook from those shows. Come home from school, they’re hungry , fix a snack turn on the TV A cooking show featuring chicken and rice. There’s chicken and rice and onions, in the kitchen ! Pretty soon the kids were cooking dinner.

    The contest shows are the worst. Does anyone at all watch them?? No cooking instructions just ridiculous meals. And they must audition for looks as well as cooking. The contestants are the ugliest people who audition seem to be picked The prevalent obesity helps me keep my weight down. Really. One look at Barefoot Contessa was incentive to stop eating for the rest of the day.

    , @Coemgen
    @Jack D

    I'm in metro Boston and watch a lot of the WGBX Create channel and its sibling channels.

    Just took a look to see what's on WGBH (PBS) tonight:

    THE TALK: RACE IN AMERICA.

    Well, I guess they're in full attack mode now - working their shock troops up into a pre-election frenzy.

    , @GeneralRipper
    @Jack D

    Jack D, TV watcher...lol

  92. @Altai
    So what they're saying is Donald Trump's sons have a free hand to commit the same crimes Hunter has been discovered having done and for it not to be reported in the sensitive run-up to the election, as those things would be purely a distraction and contaminate American democracy.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Aardvark, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    That is not at all what they are saying. Anything scandalous about a Democrat party member or their relatives must by Democrat News Media Propaganda law, be swept under the rug and ignored.

    If Donald Trump Jr. had so much as received a box of Girl Scout cookies improperly, this must by Democrat News Media Propaganda law, be a one to three day news cycle with assorted “experts” to explain how wrong it was.

    This was the thing that attracted me to Trump was that when other Republicans cowed themselves to the press and had to act all meek and apologize, Trump pushed back. He called them out for the propaganda artists they are by calling them fake news. This hurt their feelings and when they tried to lash back by making up more fake news it just got worse.

    I think what is very telling is that there was an hour long program on Vice the other day that was described as something like “journalists review their coverage of Trump and the mistakes they made…”.

    Only problem is, even if they can come to admit they made mistakes covering Trump, they won’t stop screwing up.

  93. @Jack D
    @AndrewR

    The Founders were quite familiar with a partisan press. In fact that was the main kind of press in those days. Some papers used to actually have the name of a party (the "Arkansas Democrat") in their name. The idea that newspapers should be neutral and print only "the facts" on their news pages is a relatively new concept. In fact news coverage was always biased - it was a successful snow job that they convinced us that Uncle Walter was the Voice of God and not just another liberal Democrat. We are just going back to the days when it wasn't necessary to make a pretense of being unbiased. Everyone is biased. Unbiased humans don't exist.

    The view of the Founders was that by mandating a free press, all sides would be able to peddle their POV in the marketplace of ideas and the best ideas would win over the public. Whether we have a truly free market in ideas or an oligopoly is a real question. Arguably it was worse in the days when there were only 3 TV networks and they were the main source for news, but that market was regulated in some ways (the "equal time rule"). But you can make an antitrust type argument that if there is no true open competition in a certain industry then it is appropriate for the government to intervene in order to restore a competitive marketplace. Certainly they should not be adding fuel to the fire by (partly) funding some of the offenders (but it's also true that government always played a part, for example by designating a paper as the official place to publish legal notices).

    OTOH, you could argue that the Internet is the ultimate free market - anyone can start a website or create a phone app. But anyone can start an online store also and yet Amazon accounts for 50% of all web commerce.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Unladen Swallow, @Anon, @AndrewR, @Reg Cæsar, @utu

    “The idea that newspapers should be neutral and print only “the facts” on their news pages is a relatively new concept.” – This idea was a business decision to extend the coverage and increase sales.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @utu

    Yes, absolutely, and now papers have made the business decision that Wokeness sells best in their market. Or else, increasingly, newspapers are either a rich man's plaything (Bezos's Washington Post) or else run as "non-profits" (the Philadelphia Inquirer) so making a profit is no longer a consideration (which is just as well since they don't).

    Replies: @Charlotte

  94. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Rob McX

    I see Ray Kroc's widow and raise you MacKenzie Scott:

    MacKenzie Scott, ex-wife of Jeff Bezos, announces $1.7 billion in donations

    https://thehill.com/homenews/509429-mackenzie-scott-ex-wife-of-jeff-bezos-announces-17-billion-in-donations-to-charities

    Replies: @Rob McX, @S. Anonyia

    Thanks. There’s nothing deadlier than a clueless “philanthropist” with a billion dollars to dish out. I was going to say “a billion unearned dollars”, but the guys who actually make the money are no wiser than the ex-wives who get their hands on it – witness Jack Dorsey’s recent donation to Ibram X. Kendi.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Rob McX

    She deserves some small operational credit at Amazon.

    Was employee 2 and worked fulltime for 8-10 years or so in the 90s-00's which got cutthroat for internet companies at the end. Also kicked in her lifetime savings initially, they had met at a hedge fund company where both worked.

    So this was a woman with an active career through out her 20s and 30s who picked the right husband and went all in down to answering phones and playing receptionist.

  95. @Reg Cæsar
    @Neoconned


    I really enjoy NPRs classical music & jazz broadcasts……it would be nice if they were music only
     
    Minnesota Public Radio gives you that option, with two stations. My car radio is set to the all-music one. Perfect for 5-speed FWD drives through leafy country backroads in the autumn.

    Actually, three. There was an independent classical station at St Olaf College which closed down and became a pop format, "The Current". Which is now part of MPR. How ironic.

    They reach five surrounding states and two provinces, and are streamed online.

    As far as politics, MPR Classical recently fired a black DJ for getting political over the air. On the other hand, their site reposts a Ford Foundation op-ed by a black guy with the ridiculously Jewish name Aaron Dworkin, calling for US orchestras to devote 10% of their programming to " Black and Latinx" composers.

    Come on, now... do they even devote 10% to American composers?

    https://www.classicalmpr.org/story/2020/10/20/aaron-dworkin-sound-of-silence

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Jack D

    ‘…a Ford Foundation op-ed by a black guy with the ridiculously Jewish name Aaron Dworkin, calling for US orchestras to devote 10% of their programming to ” Black and Latinx” composers…’

    ‘…His biological mother is of Irish descent and his biological father is African-American, while his adoptive family is Jewish…’

    Go figure. These non-black ‘blacks’ really get on my nerves. Obama, Colin Kapaernik…now this guy. I’m more black than they are. Say what you want about Al Sharpton et al, but at least they’re actually black.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Colin Wright

    Al Sharpton's mentor was singer James Brown.

    You can't deny James Brown's authenticity.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Colin Wright

  96. @Buffalo Joe
    @Rob McX

    Rob, that is so sad. Mrs. Kroc could have seeded the Reparations Fund and we would be ever so close to a better America. Actually, McDonalds probably contributes to the early deaths of more blacks than cops.

    Replies: @Alden

    I’m boycotting so many restaurant chains and food companies that pretty soon I’m going to have to start raising chickens. planting a garden and canning and freezing the produce. Chicken is the best manure. I don’t think I could kill pretty bunny rabbits.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Alden

    Alden, did you mean chicken shit is the best manure? Bunnies are cute, chickens not so much and bunnies don't lay eggs, contrary to the Easter tradition. Stay safe.

  97. @Reg Cæsar
    @Neoconned


    I really enjoy NPRs classical music & jazz broadcasts……it would be nice if they were music only
     
    Minnesota Public Radio gives you that option, with two stations. My car radio is set to the all-music one. Perfect for 5-speed FWD drives through leafy country backroads in the autumn.

    Actually, three. There was an independent classical station at St Olaf College which closed down and became a pop format, "The Current". Which is now part of MPR. How ironic.

    They reach five surrounding states and two provinces, and are streamed online.

    As far as politics, MPR Classical recently fired a black DJ for getting political over the air. On the other hand, their site reposts a Ford Foundation op-ed by a black guy with the ridiculously Jewish name Aaron Dworkin, calling for US orchestras to devote 10% of their programming to " Black and Latinx" composers.

    Come on, now... do they even devote 10% to American composers?

    https://www.classicalmpr.org/story/2020/10/20/aaron-dworkin-sound-of-silence

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Jack D

    Newer cars usually have “HD radio” which allow stations to broadcast two (or more) digital streams in addition to their standard analog streams. For public radio stations it’s common for them to have one “talk/news” stream that mirrors the analog stream and one “classical” digital only stream. Or they can broadcast jazz on one stream and classical on the other while the analog broadcast alternates between the two formats (classical by day and jazz by night) . These are free streams, not Sirius/XM which requires a subscription. However, older cars don’t and most home stereos don’t. For some reason, HD Radio in the home never caught on – such receivers exist but they are not common.

    OTOH, many newer home stereos have internet connectivity which allows you to play streams from radio stations all over the world (plus the commercial streaming services such as Spotify, Pandora, Amazon Music, etc.).

  98. @utu
    @Jack D

    "The idea that newspapers should be neutral and print only “the facts” on their news pages is a relatively new concept." - This idea was a business decision to extend the coverage and increase sales.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Yes, absolutely, and now papers have made the business decision that Wokeness sells best in their market. Or else, increasingly, newspapers are either a rich man’s plaything (Bezos’s Washington Post) or else run as “non-profits” (the Philadelphia Inquirer) so making a profit is no longer a consideration (which is just as well since they don’t).

    • Replies: @Charlotte
    @Jack D


    now papers have made the business decision that Wokeness sells best in their market.
     
    Have they? I think wokeness has cost newspapers quite a few subscribers in more conservative parts of the country. Rod Dreher has written about his newsroom experiences with editors and colleagues who were happy to lose conservative readers through wokeness-they didn’t like the idea of those people reading their paper, anyway.
  99. @Neoconned
    I really enjoy NPRs classical music & jazz broadcasts......it would be nice if they were music only

    Replies: @Coemgen, @HammerJack, @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @Known Fact, @Dissident

    Most NPR member station are so clogged with talk and news that the window for classical or jazz is pretty tight. You want unfettered classical you need to find a station like WMNR or WDAV that is independent, listener-supported, maybe college-run but NOT beholden to NPR. These are small stations but thanks to the internet they now have worldwide followings.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Known Fact

    theclassicalstation.org streams world wide with no commercials or news, and just the occassional begging and pleading.

    Replies: @Known Fact

  100. @Pat Kittle
    @Hypnotoad666


    The best way to describe NPR is polite, well-produced, and evil.
     
    Make that pretentious, smarmy, and evil.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @ben tillman

    I was going to vote for Hypnotoad’s characterization, but he didn’t say “smarmy”, so you win.

  101. @Jack D
    @Coemgen

    I don't know what it is like where you are, but where I live they have moved most of the "how to" and travel shows to the "Create" subchannel so that the main channel has more time to show political propaganda. I enjoy the Create channel because it is one of the few stations left that is relatively free from non-stop politics and Wokeness.

    My main objection to Raichlin is that he seems to burn everything he cooks black. A rich golden brown is nice but burning your food until it resembles charcoal is not in my book. Also there is a lot of product placement in his show for really expensive cooking rigs. I abide by the motto that it ain't the cooker but the cook. Some of the greatest barbecue in the world has been produced in literally a hole in the ground (this is why it is called a barbecue "pit").

    Still it is better than Food Network where all they seem to have nowadays are ridiculous phony cooking contests and the winner is predetermined to be whoever is highest on the diversity totem pole - you just know that that African Muslim woman with the hijab is going to beat the stale pale males with the sleeve tattoos.

    Replies: @Alden, @Coemgen, @GeneralRipper

    15 years ago when they had the real cooking shows where someone cooked a simple meal in 30 minutes a lot of teens learned to cook from those shows. Come home from school, they’re hungry , fix a snack turn on the TV A cooking show featuring chicken and rice. There’s chicken and rice and onions, in the kitchen ! Pretty soon the kids were cooking dinner.

    The contest shows are the worst. Does anyone at all watch them?? No cooking instructions just ridiculous meals. And they must audition for looks as well as cooking. The contestants are the ugliest people who audition seem to be picked The prevalent obesity helps me keep my weight down. Really. One look at Barefoot Contessa was incentive to stop eating for the rest of the day.

  102. We can be sure that if it was Don Jr or Eric Trump’s hard drive, our “watchdog” media would say the same thing…lol

  103. @Patriot
    Hahaha. More lies from National Propaganda Radio.

    Wife and I used to play the NPR GAME for 10 min before we got out of bed each morning.

    1 point for each mention of a minority or "victim" (gay, lesbian, immigrant, transgender, woman, etc.) Score 1 point.

    1 pt for story about Climate change, electric cars, green energy, etc.

    1 pt for Republicans are bad or Democrats are good story.

    1 pt linking any Conservative or Republican to Hitler, Nazis White surpremism, racism, antisematism

    2 pts each mention of Holacaust/Nazis/Hitler. Why is this subject mentioned 10 times a day on NPR?

    3 pts. The coveted TRIFECTA -- 3 or more of the above in a single story.

    4 pts. The HIGHLY COVETED QUADFECTA, jamming 4 or more victims or Leftist ideas into a single story, such as a gay Jewish feminest immigrant who is fighting for BLM.

    5 pts. Special Bonus score for mention of EMMET TILL

    In 10 min of listening to NPR, we could always score 3 to 15 pts. It made waking up fun. Try it, yourself.

    Replies: @Patriot, @Known Fact, @Buffalo Joe

    From my last few long vacation drives with only NPR coming in on the radio — Bonus point for yet another lament about the ongoing national murder spree against trannies, or the specific observation that Trump has no “guardrails.”

    I will grudgingly add one positive — they ran a lot of good reporting from Hong Kong during those protests, mostly British news.

  104. @Jack D
    @Coemgen

    I don't know what it is like where you are, but where I live they have moved most of the "how to" and travel shows to the "Create" subchannel so that the main channel has more time to show political propaganda. I enjoy the Create channel because it is one of the few stations left that is relatively free from non-stop politics and Wokeness.

    My main objection to Raichlin is that he seems to burn everything he cooks black. A rich golden brown is nice but burning your food until it resembles charcoal is not in my book. Also there is a lot of product placement in his show for really expensive cooking rigs. I abide by the motto that it ain't the cooker but the cook. Some of the greatest barbecue in the world has been produced in literally a hole in the ground (this is why it is called a barbecue "pit").

    Still it is better than Food Network where all they seem to have nowadays are ridiculous phony cooking contests and the winner is predetermined to be whoever is highest on the diversity totem pole - you just know that that African Muslim woman with the hijab is going to beat the stale pale males with the sleeve tattoos.

    Replies: @Alden, @Coemgen, @GeneralRipper

    I’m in metro Boston and watch a lot of the WGBX Create channel and its sibling channels.

    Just took a look to see what’s on WGBH (PBS) tonight:

    THE TALK: RACE IN AMERICA.

    Well, I guess they’re in full attack mode now – working their shock troops up into a pre-election frenzy.

  105. @Stogumber
    Well, the Hunter Biden story IS a distraction. It distracts people from their task to vote against Trump.

    Replies: @Icy Blast, @Bill Jones

    Obviously, we’re not talking about a corruption scandal involving just Hunter Biden. We’re talking about a corruption scandal involving Hunter and Joe Biden! Busted! The corruption of the Democratic Party is staggering – almost beyond belief. In fact, millions of gullible and uninformed Americans cannot accept it. Decades of TV propaganda have succeeded in rendering them intellectually dead. Most Republican voters are in a similar state of mental decay. That’s why they still support the cause of empire.

    • Agree: GeneralRipper
  106. “All Things Considered” makes me laugh.

    They don’t even consider how overwhelmingly tribal All Things Considered is.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Pat Kittle

    One Thing to Consider is the fitting punishment for the composer of that theme music

  107. @Coemgen

    Your Tax Dollars at Work
     
    I thought the thread was going to be about the Mueller Special Counsel investigation which, according to Donald Trump in last night's debate, cost $48,000,000.

    Btw, Kamala Harris badgered Brett Kavanaugh, during his Supreme Court nomination hearings, to call for the FBI to investigate himself. Will she badger Joe Biden (and herself) to call for FBI investigations into her and Joe? It would give them a change to "prove" they are not corrupt politicians.

    I wonder how much Crossfire Hurricane, Mueller's Special Counsel, the impeachment, and the coronavirus pandemic have cost the U.S. taxpayer in total?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Morton's toes

    I am thinking I could have bought a house with what the virus taxes are going to sum to.

    • Agree: Coemgen
  108. Your Tax Dollars at Work

    Speaking of which, the Senate went into closed session today. No C-Span? No hidden mikes?

    Is Chuck E. making threats?

  109. Looks like he comes from Trinidad & Tobago.

    Why is it foreigners come to our country and take all the good Affirmative Action jobs away from our blacks?

    And why is it our blacks are so cool with that?

    Maybe Vanita Gupta can tell me.

  110. @Jack D
    @Coemgen

    I don't know what it is like where you are, but where I live they have moved most of the "how to" and travel shows to the "Create" subchannel so that the main channel has more time to show political propaganda. I enjoy the Create channel because it is one of the few stations left that is relatively free from non-stop politics and Wokeness.

    My main objection to Raichlin is that he seems to burn everything he cooks black. A rich golden brown is nice but burning your food until it resembles charcoal is not in my book. Also there is a lot of product placement in his show for really expensive cooking rigs. I abide by the motto that it ain't the cooker but the cook. Some of the greatest barbecue in the world has been produced in literally a hole in the ground (this is why it is called a barbecue "pit").

    Still it is better than Food Network where all they seem to have nowadays are ridiculous phony cooking contests and the winner is predetermined to be whoever is highest on the diversity totem pole - you just know that that African Muslim woman with the hijab is going to beat the stale pale males with the sleeve tattoos.

    Replies: @Alden, @Coemgen, @GeneralRipper

    Jack D, TV watcher…lol

  111. @eD
    @El Dato

    "Is NPR really financed with tax dollars (more than anybody else, that is?)"

    No, corporate funded. I think PBS gets some derisory federal funding for its childrens' programs, not sure about NPR.

    Actually the same foundations that are bringing you the COVID 19 panic bring you "public" broadcasting as well.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Jack D, @1BigJohnson

    >No, corporate funded. I think PBS gets some derisory federal funding for its childrens’ programs, not sure about NPR.

    Most of the public money goes to the “Corporation for Public Broadcasting,” which then buys programming from NPR, Inc. This arrangement lets NPR, Inc. claim that they only get [some small %] of their funding from the government.

  112. @Guy De Champlagne
    @Achmed E. Newman

    For thousands of years it was uncontroversial that when an industry caused problems you regulated it and then......the 1980s happened. The sheer scale of the trauma Reagan did to you people is really remarkable. A rabid hatred of the media combined only matched by the complete unwillingness to actually do anything about it. Sad!

    Replies: @Art Deco, @anon, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Achmed E. Newman

    For thousands of years it was uncontroversial that when an industry caused problems you regulated it

    Thousands? Really?

    Shill patrol not sending their best for sure.

    LOL!

  113. anon[122] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mike Zwick
    Does NPR not believe the story, or do they just not want to believe the story?

    Replies: @anon

    Does NPR not believe the story, or do they just not want to believe the story?

    They don’t want their listeners to even know about the story. They might start thinking!

    New shirt for NPR donors, coming to a pledge drive near you!

  114. @Altai
    https://media.npr.org/assets/artslife/books/2010/05/upperhouse/samuel_custom-f0e2a31101e3c4e6877c657492b429346fb47d32-s1400.jpg

    Terence Samuel.

    Replies: @black sea

    I’m assuming he’s gay. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

  115. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rob McX
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Thanks. There's nothing deadlier than a clueless "philanthropist" with a billion dollars to dish out. I was going to say "a billion unearned dollars", but the guys who actually make the money are no wiser than the ex-wives who get their hands on it - witness Jack Dorsey's recent donation to Ibram X. Kendi.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    She deserves some small operational credit at Amazon.

    Was employee 2 and worked fulltime for 8-10 years or so in the 90s-00’s which got cutthroat for internet companies at the end. Also kicked in her lifetime savings initially, they had met at a hedge fund company where both worked.

    So this was a woman with an active career through out her 20s and 30s who picked the right husband and went all in down to answering phones and playing receptionist.

    • Thanks: Rob McX
  116. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Unladen Swallow

    "The Press" and the media have always contained bias, or just bullshit. "The People" have always consumed it, because it keeps them entertained and tells them what to think.

    Here is a classic sermon about television, from the movie, Network:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQAzpV7GC0U

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

    No doubt, but they consciously began to spin things around thirty years ago, the 1988 Presidential election disheartened the news media, because it meant that the Democrats had not only lost three straight, but three straight landslides, as well as five out of the previous six presidential elections. Prior to that they really did try to prevent journalists from inserting their opinions into reporting. Joel Kotkin who a is libertarian-ish writer tells a story about when he was a junior reporter ( and a liberal ) he tried to insert a liberal opinion into a news story and his editor told him to take it out and that no one gave a shit about his politics, this is believe was in the late 70’s early 80’s time period and the paper was I believe the Washington Post. Hard to imagine that happening today.

  117. As someone said above government money comes through the CPB, which at one point was run by tucker Carlson’s father.

  118. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Rob McX

    I see Ray Kroc's widow and raise you MacKenzie Scott:

    MacKenzie Scott, ex-wife of Jeff Bezos, announces $1.7 billion in donations

    https://thehill.com/homenews/509429-mackenzie-scott-ex-wife-of-jeff-bezos-announces-17-billion-in-donations-to-charities

    Replies: @Rob McX, @S. Anonyia

    All that money, and she’s still trite as hell. Why isn’t she starting her own movie studio or publishing house? Apparently she has written a book, and based on the description/reviews it seems quite boring. No wonder he left her for that creepy/plastic looking reporter. At least she seems to have something of a personality.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @S. Anonyia


    All that money, and she’s still trite as hell.
     
    AWFLs are quite basic, to be sure.
  119. @Colin Wright
    @Reg Cæsar

    '...a Ford Foundation op-ed by a black guy with the ridiculously Jewish name Aaron Dworkin, calling for US orchestras to devote 10% of their programming to ” Black and Latinx” composers...'


    '...His biological mother is of Irish descent and his biological father is African-American, while his adoptive family is Jewish...'

    Go figure. These non-black 'blacks' really get on my nerves. Obama, Colin Kapaernik...now this guy. I'm more black than they are. Say what you want about Al Sharpton et al, but at least they're actually black.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Al Sharpton’s mentor was singer James Brown.

    You can’t deny James Brown’s authenticity.

    • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @Steve Sailer

    Smacking his wife with a lead pipe. Continuing to drive, drunk, at high speed, on his bare rims after the cops had shot off his tires? That sealed the deal for me. He's authentic all right.

    , @Colin Wright
    @Steve Sailer

    'Al Sharpton’s mentor was singer James Brown.

    You can’t deny James Brown’s authenticity.'

    Wouldn't dream of denying it.

    A good deal of my adolescence was spent with James Brown (entirely involuntarily, but spent nevertheless).

    I know my Negroes. These assholes ain't.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  120. @Guy De Champlagne
    To the media's sorta credit, they're also not terribly interested in all the business Trump continues to do in office or Jared Kushner mixing bailouts of his family's finances with official foreign policy. They hate Trump for what makes him different from opponents like Clinton and Biden and so don't focus on corruption, nepotism. or corporatism and instead focus on Trump being vaguely pro white and pro male. Unlike the commenters here who want to pretend Trump is aparagon of virtue and Biden is horribly corrupt

    Replies: @bomag, @Art Deco, @Anonymous, @J.Ross

    >pretend that Trump is a paragon of virtue
    Said literally no one ever.
    >Biden is
    Connected to child molestation, narcotics, and enabling our enemies to effect hostile takeovers of American military manufacturing, not in a broad globalist way but in a direct sale by which he personally profited. Peter Schweizer called him the most corrupt politician working.

    • Replies: @Guy De Champlagne
    @J.Ross

    Yes that is exactly what I meant by the commenters here having an exaggerated view of Biden's moral failings. Thank you.

  121. @Jack D
    @utu

    Yes, absolutely, and now papers have made the business decision that Wokeness sells best in their market. Or else, increasingly, newspapers are either a rich man's plaything (Bezos's Washington Post) or else run as "non-profits" (the Philadelphia Inquirer) so making a profit is no longer a consideration (which is just as well since they don't).

    Replies: @Charlotte

    now papers have made the business decision that Wokeness sells best in their market.

    Have they? I think wokeness has cost newspapers quite a few subscribers in more conservative parts of the country. Rod Dreher has written about his newsroom experiences with editors and colleagues who were happy to lose conservative readers through wokeness-they didn’t like the idea of those people reading their paper, anyway.

  122. @Patriot
    @Patriot

    Referring to the previously mentioned NPR game (Post 26). Whenever we scored a Quadfecta or the Super Special Emmit Till 5 bonus points, both my wife and I would throw back the covers and jump wildly up and down on the bed laughing hysterically and screaming,"Yes, yes, yes!!!!"

    Again, it was a great way to wake up in the morning. It made the chore of getting out of bed fun.

    During the 1990's a typical NPR segment consisted of a Jewish NPR moderator interviewing a Jewish authority on something to do with Jews, such as a book or movie about the Holocaust or a modern (Jewish) artist, Sigmund Freud, or some Jewish lesbian feminist, etc. Hahahaha.

    Also, as a previous commenter noted, NPR will have "debates", but in fact both "debaters" are way on the Left. For example, they will interview 2 authorities about immigration, but one will be for absolutely unrestricted open borders, and the other will be for more-or-less unrestricted immigration, but for massive welfare aid for the sacred newcomers (housing, medical care, food stamps, etc.).

    Do they honestly think we don't notice the constant Marxist propaganda?

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @prime noticer

    “During the 1990’s a typical NPR segment consisted of a Jewish NPR moderator interviewing a Jewish authority on something to do with Jews…”

    about the same time frame for me, with Terry Gross and Stale Air and all that. i wasn’t a big NPR listener or anything but i started to catch on. my mom was big on NPR and listened to it all the time so i heard it since the late 70s, early 80s.

    my mom is a good person and votes Republican and is race aware, but still picked up all kinds of kooky, stupid ideas from NPR over 40 years that she subjected us to now and then, especially the bad music. people who dislike africans, muslims, random hostile foreigners and the huge immigration wave still often don’t catch on to the jewish dimension behind it.

    towards the end of the Obama era, me and my dad were literally yelling at her, and yelling at the radio, whenever she would turn it on in the house.

    i got a little bit spooked 5 years ago or so when she started asking me about random shooters and shootings that NPR would report on, because she would say, isn’t that the stuff you believe in too? so i knew they had been rolling out Cultural Marxism and Critical Race Theory to their listeners by that point.

  123. @Steve Sailer
    @Colin Wright

    Al Sharpton's mentor was singer James Brown.

    You can't deny James Brown's authenticity.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Colin Wright

    Smacking his wife with a lead pipe. Continuing to drive, drunk, at high speed, on his bare rims after the cops had shot off his tires? That sealed the deal for me. He’s authentic all right.

  124. @AnotherDad
    @RichardTaylor


    The media is saying that what suburban moms really want is millions of illegals given amnesty followed by more felons let out of jail.

    They say this with a straight face. I know there are the god-awful moderate White women who go for this junk when it comes to virtue signaling, but I bet after a summer of rioting and increase in shootings, they’ve cooled their jets on the feel good stuff.
     
    One would think.

    But
    a) The mainstream/Democrat media just lies and lies and lies and women lap up the media.

    b) Trump/Republicans have to make the case about both the nonsense minoritarian "oppressed" blacks hunted by the police narrative and the Democrats destruction of the rule-of-law--and what it portends--with unmistakably visceral cuts-to-the-bone clarity. Have they?

    Replies: @ic1000

    You asked,

    b) Trump/Republicans have to make the case about both the nonsense minoritarian “oppressed” blacks hunted by the police narrative and the Democrats destruction of the rule-of-law–and what it portends–with unmistakably visceral cuts-to-the-bone clarity. Have they?

    At last night’s debate, the segment on Race had the moderator asking questions like “How would you respond to the concerned African-American parents of teenagers who have to give ‘The Talk’ to their sons, living with the fear that their children will be stopped without cause by police and that at any moment they could be gunned down, just because they are black?”

    If there was any daylight between Biden’s predictable position and Trump’s, it was hard to see it.

    So there’s your answer.

    • Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder
    @ic1000


    at any moment they could be gunned down, just because they are black
     
    People really believe this. Are the police really bad shots or something? There are tens of millions of targets if all it takes is skin color.

    This is exactly the same formulation as with the mass media narrative of "they only hate us because we're jews!"

    White people can be so cruel. And their endless hatreds, so unreasoning.
  125. @Pat Kittle
    "All Things Considered" makes me laugh.

    They don't even consider how overwhelmingly tribal All Things Considered is.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    One Thing to Consider is the fitting punishment for the composer of that theme music

  126. @Steve Sailer
    @Colin Wright

    Al Sharpton's mentor was singer James Brown.

    You can't deny James Brown's authenticity.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder, @Colin Wright

    ‘Al Sharpton’s mentor was singer James Brown.

    You can’t deny James Brown’s authenticity.’

    Wouldn’t dream of denying it.

    A good deal of my adolescence was spent with James Brown (entirely involuntarily, but spent nevertheless).

    I know my Negroes. These assholes ain’t.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Colin Wright


    I know my Negroes. These 🍑🍑 ain’t.
     
    "Oh, my goodness, oh, my soul..."
  127. The tweet in the OP links to an NPR newsletter, which in turn links to this NPR story by their media critic. It gives good insight into the mindset there (if any more is needed).

    Analysis: Questionable ‘N.Y. Post’ Scoop Driven By Ex-Hannity Producer And Giuliani
    October 17, 2020
    by David Folkenflik, NPR

    This week, the New York Post published a story based on what it says are emails — “smoking gun” emails, it calls them — sent by a Ukrainian business executive to the son of Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden. The story fits snugly into a narrative from President Trump and his allies that Hunter Biden’s zealous pursuit of business ties abroad also compromised the former vice president.

    Yet this was a story marked more by red flags than investigative rigor.

    To start, the emails have not been verified as authentic…

    The venue is also suspect…

    The context also screams for caution…

    With all these warning signs, other news organizations, including NPR, have held back…

    let’s talk about the origin of those emails… So, it’s not clear who brought [the laptop] in [to the repair shop].

    [MORE]

    And so on and so forth. Smug conclusion:

    None of that sound and fury requires the rest of the press to accept those claims as true. They shouldn’t. Not without additional reporting and verification.

    The New York Post story could someday be proven accurate, or largely right. Or perhaps what was published is a far cry from investigative journalism, but rather speculative partisan advocacy. A totem of our media moment.

    As Journalists, we mustn’t, ever!, discomfit our listeners by running stories that might someday be proven inaccurate, or partly wrong.

    Love the passive tense — As Journalists, we certainly won’t be chasing down leads on this story!

    At least these Journalists are consistent.

    The Clinton emails on Weiner’s laptop non-investigation
    The Steele Dossier
    Flynn being compromised by the Russians
    Russiagate
    Kavanaugh’s high school rape-party

    Now we know the reason why NPR and the other mainstream organs never covered these stories. Per Folkenflick, they were all ultimately proven inaccurate, or largely wrong.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @ic1000


    Or perhaps what was published is a far cry from investigative journalism, but rather speculative partisan advocacy. A totem of our media moment.
     
    Wow. The blatant hypocrisy is just off the charts.
  128. @ic1000
    @AnotherDad

    You asked,


    b) Trump/Republicans have to make the case about both the nonsense minoritarian “oppressed” blacks hunted by the police narrative and the Democrats destruction of the rule-of-law–and what it portends–with unmistakably visceral cuts-to-the-bone clarity. Have they?
     
    At last night's debate, the segment on Race had the moderator asking questions like "How would you respond to the concerned African-American parents of teenagers who have to give 'The Talk' to their sons, living with the fear that their children will be stopped without cause by police and that at any moment they could be gunned down, just because they are black?"

    If there was any daylight between Biden's predictable position and Trump's, it was hard to see it.

    So there's your answer.

    Replies: @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    at any moment they could be gunned down, just because they are black

    People really believe this. Are the police really bad shots or something? There are tens of millions of targets if all it takes is skin color.

    This is exactly the same formulation as with the mass media narrative of “they only hate us because we’re jews!”

    White people can be so cruel. And their endless hatreds, so unreasoning.

  129. @Patriot
    Hahaha. More lies from National Propaganda Radio.

    Wife and I used to play the NPR GAME for 10 min before we got out of bed each morning.

    1 point for each mention of a minority or "victim" (gay, lesbian, immigrant, transgender, woman, etc.) Score 1 point.

    1 pt for story about Climate change, electric cars, green energy, etc.

    1 pt for Republicans are bad or Democrats are good story.

    1 pt linking any Conservative or Republican to Hitler, Nazis White surpremism, racism, antisematism

    2 pts each mention of Holacaust/Nazis/Hitler. Why is this subject mentioned 10 times a day on NPR?

    3 pts. The coveted TRIFECTA -- 3 or more of the above in a single story.

    4 pts. The HIGHLY COVETED QUADFECTA, jamming 4 or more victims or Leftist ideas into a single story, such as a gay Jewish feminest immigrant who is fighting for BLM.

    5 pts. Special Bonus score for mention of EMMET TILL

    In 10 min of listening to NPR, we could always score 3 to 15 pts. It made waking up fun. Try it, yourself.

    Replies: @Patriot, @Known Fact, @Buffalo Joe

    Pat, ok I would like to try it .Where do you live and what is your wife’s name?

    • Replies: @Patriot
    @Buffalo Joe

    No, no, no!

    You gotta do it with your OWN wife in your OWN home or at the Motel 6. Really, anyplce with a bed and a radio will do.

    But, no, you can't come to my house. . . unless maybe you are female. Please post recent photo in any reply.

  130. @Guy De Champlagne
    @Achmed E. Newman

    For thousands of years it was uncontroversial that when an industry caused problems you regulated it and then......the 1980s happened. The sheer scale of the trauma Reagan did to you people is really remarkable. A rabid hatred of the media combined only matched by the complete unwillingness to actually do anything about it. Sad!

    Replies: @Art Deco, @anon, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Achmed E. Newman

    Guy De Champlagne says:
    January 8, 2020 at 10:24 am GMT • 100 Words
    Hopefully Sanders gets the nomination and wins.

    That was good Guy, we should be sorry that we didn’t get on board for our Glorious Soviet Future ™ in the 1980s like you wanted. And you think we are rabid. Open a GoFundMe to raise the money for your plane ticket to go to Venezuela. Promise to actually go to Venezuela and stay for at least a year, and be sure to take your hydrophobic self along for the ride. Then come back and explain your wonderful experiences there.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Guy De Champlagne
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    raise the money for your plane ticket to go to Venezuela.

    How about we compromise and you get me citizenship and a plane ticket to Norway? I'm much more into aryan protestant ethnostate socialism then catholic mestizo mishmash socialism.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_Human_Development_Index

  131. @Alden
    @Buffalo Joe

    I’m boycotting so many restaurant chains and food companies that pretty soon I’m going to have to start raising chickens. planting a garden and canning and freezing the produce. Chicken is the best manure. I don’t think I could kill pretty bunny rabbits.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Alden, did you mean chicken shit is the best manure? Bunnies are cute, chickens not so much and bunnies don’t lay eggs, contrary to the Easter tradition. Stay safe.

  132. @Known Fact
    @Neoconned

    Most NPR member station are so clogged with talk and news that the window for classical or jazz is pretty tight. You want unfettered classical you need to find a station like WMNR or WDAV that is independent, listener-supported, maybe college-run but NOT beholden to NPR. These are small stations but thanks to the internet they now have worldwide followings.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    theclassicalstation.org streams world wide with no commercials or news, and just the occassional begging and pleading.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Jim Don Bob

    There's also Classical24, which streams and also is picked up by radio stations to fill overnight hours or emergencies when the local host is snowed in or something. I like WMNR because the hosts are quirky volunteers who program their own shows, so you get a range of personalities and musical tastes -- and NO news or politics

  133. @AndrewR
    Even if the initial story, as reported by the Post, was all smoke (and I don't think it was), the reaction to it - specifically Twitter's reaction - has unquestionably been newsworthy.

    The dishonesty of the press strikes me as absolutely criminal. Everyone who runs these media organizations needs to be... in prison. If there's no legal basis for that, we need new laws. If there's no constitutional basis for that, we need a new constitution. I would like to think the Founding Fathers would never have imagined the extent to which "the free Press" would entirely become an unofficial propaganda ministry for the state and the oligarchs who run it.

    Replies: @Altai, @Achmed E. Newman, @Jack D, @Achmed E. Newman, @Kratoklastes

    I would like to think the Founding Fathers would never have imagined the extent to which “the free Press” would entirely become an unofficial propaganda ministry for the state and the oligarchs who run it.

    Jefferson understood the risks, which is why the language of the First Amendment explicitly enjoins Congress from making laws

    abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press

    He also understood that newspapers exist to promote their proprietors’ interests. Any public-information function that is served, is secondary to the proprietor’s interests.

    There are three pretty famous Jefferson references to newspapers:
    ① a society without government is preferable to a society without newspapers; and
    ② anyone whose sole source of information was newspapers, would have very biased understanding of the world; and
    ③ the man who doesn’t read newspapers has an informational advantage: he will hear of the great controversies by other means and will not be spoon-fed biased versions of events.

    Full quotations below the MORE.

    ② and ③ come from the same source: a letter from Jefferson to John Norvell of June 1807 – by which time Jefferson was already pretty unimpressed by the direction that things were headed. (Bear in mind that by then, the BlackRobes had claimed the non-existent right to strike down legislation: Marbury v Madison was in 1803).

    And he was clear from the late 1780s what ought to happen if despotism – of any type, including judicial – reared its head: this deserves to be above the fold…

    “what country before ever existed a century & half without a rebellion? & what country can preserve it’s liberties if their rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance? let them take arms. the remedy is to set them right as to facts, pardon & pacify them. what signify a few lives lost in a century or two? the tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots & tyrants. it is it’s natural manure.”
    Letter to William Smith, Nov 1787

    [MORE]

    Jefferson on the Press

    the basis of our governments being the opinion of the people, the very first object should be to keep that right[NB]; and were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter. but I should mean that every man should receive those papers & be capable of reading them. – Letter to Edward Carrington, January 1787

    [NB]: ‘right’ here is used in the sense of ‘correct’ or ‘aligned with the facts’, not as in a right.

    ~

    Nothing can now be believed which is seen in a newspaper. Truth itself becomes suspicious by being put into that polluted vehicle. The real extent of this state of misinformation is known only to those who are in situations to confront facts within their knolege with the lies of the day. I really look with commiseration over the great body of my fellow citizens, who, reading newspapers, live & die in the belief, that they have known something of what has been passing in the world in their time; whereas the accounts they have read in newspapers are just as true a history of any other period of the world as of the present, except that the real names of the day are affixed to their fables. General facts may indeed be collected from them, such as that Europe is now at war, that Bonaparte has been a successful warrior, that he has subjected a great portion of Europe to his will, &c., &c.; but no details can be relied on. I will add, that the man who never looks into a newspaper is better informed than he who reads them; inasmuch as he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. He who reads nothing will still learn the great facts, and the details are all false. – Jefferson to John Norvell, June 1807

    Note that this prefigures Michael Crichton’s “Murray Gell-Mann Amnesia Effect“, where even the educated give the (modern) press the benefit of the doubt, despite observing obvious, glaring errors in stories about which the educated have specific expertise.

    ~

    Jefferson was pretty clear in his view that Marbury had absolutely no constitutional basis.

    But the opinion which gives to the judges the right to decide what laws are constitutional and what not, not only for themselves in their own sphere of action but for the Legislature and Executive also in their spheres, would make the Judiciary a despotic branch.” — letter to Abigail Adams, September 1804

    ~

    He also had plenty to say on #FakeNews and foreign interference in domestic opinion…

    The British ministry have so long hired their gazetteers to repeat and model into every form lies about our being in anarchy, that the world has at length believed them, the English nation has believed them, the ministers themselves have come to believe them, & what is more wonderful, we have believed them ourselves“. – Letter to William Smith, Nov 1787.

    אֵין כָּל חָדָשׁ תַּחַת הַשָּׁמֶשׁ

    • Thanks: AndrewR, Dissident
  134. @Guy De Champlagne
    @Achmed E. Newman

    For thousands of years it was uncontroversial that when an industry caused problems you regulated it and then......the 1980s happened. The sheer scale of the trauma Reagan did to you people is really remarkable. A rabid hatred of the media combined only matched by the complete unwillingness to actually do anything about it. Sad!

    Replies: @Art Deco, @anon, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Achmed E. Newman

    For a couple of hundred years we had this thing called the US Constitution, with that Amendment I in it. The sheer stupidity of those who have thrown away something that gave people the best, most-limited government the world has ever seen is staggering. Dumbass!

  135. @Art Deco
    @Guy De Champlagne

    The sheer scale of the trauma Reagan did to you people is really remarkable.

    The trauma was a business recession which lasted about 18 months. The rate at which goods and services were produced in this country declined by about 2% during those 18 months.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Mr. Champlagne’s trauma was when Mrs. Reagan just said no to Mr. Champlagne’s psychedelic mushroom habit.

  136. @AndrewR
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I second Rob's comment. Import new people and you will need new laws and likely even new foundations for laws. We are already seeing how our enemies aren't even bothering to value broad freedom of speech. If I had a dollar for every time I've seen someone say "hate speech isn't free speech," I could pay for a luxury vacation to Cozumel. And we all know those people all define "hate speech" as pretty much anything they disagree with.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Yes, I agree with the 1st paragraph of Mr. McX’s comment, hence yours. That is what I was getting at. We already had too many people who weren’t up to par in terms of “keeping this Republic”, but why import people who aren’t, at a much higher rate (probably 98% of them)?

    For all the people who want the Feral Gov’t to regulate the media, I simply DISAGREE. Big time.

  137. @Buffalo Joe
    @Patriot

    Pat, ok I would like to try it .Where do you live and what is your wife's name?

    Replies: @Patriot

    No, no, no!

    You gotta do it with your OWN wife in your OWN home or at the Motel 6. Really, anyplce with a bed and a radio will do.

    But, no, you can’t come to my house. . . unless maybe you are female. Please post recent photo in any reply.

  138. @James O'Meara
    @JimB

    He looks like the sort of cartoon Negro you'd see in an issue of Instauration. (Or so I've been told...)

    Replies: @JimB

    He looks like the sort of cartoon Negro you’d see in an issue of Instauration. (Or so I’ve been told…)

    He looks like what he is: a simpleton.

  139. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Guy De Champlagne


    Guy De Champlagne says:
    January 8, 2020 at 10:24 am GMT • 100 Words
    Hopefully Sanders gets the nomination and wins.
     
    That was good Guy, we should be sorry that we didn't get on board for our Glorious Soviet Future (tm) in the 1980s like you wanted. And you think we are rabid. Open a GoFundMe to raise the money for your plane ticket to go to Venezuela. Promise to actually go to Venezuela and stay for at least a year, and be sure to take your hydrophobic self along for the ride. Then come back and explain your wonderful experiences there.

    Replies: @Guy De Champlagne

    raise the money for your plane ticket to go to Venezuela.

    How about we compromise and you get me citizenship and a plane ticket to Norway? I’m much more into aryan protestant ethnostate socialism then catholic mestizo mishmash socialism.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_Human_Development_Index

  140. @J.Ross
    @Guy De Champlagne

    >pretend that Trump is a paragon of virtue
    Said literally no one ever.
    >Biden is
    Connected to child molestation, narcotics, and enabling our enemies to effect hostile takeovers of American military manufacturing, not in a broad globalist way but in a direct sale by which he personally profited. Peter Schweizer called him the most corrupt politician working.

    Replies: @Guy De Champlagne

    Yes that is exactly what I meant by the commenters here having an exaggerated view of Biden’s moral failings. Thank you.

  141. @Colin Wright
    @Steve Sailer

    'Al Sharpton’s mentor was singer James Brown.

    You can’t deny James Brown’s authenticity.'

    Wouldn't dream of denying it.

    A good deal of my adolescence was spent with James Brown (entirely involuntarily, but spent nevertheless).

    I know my Negroes. These assholes ain't.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I know my Negroes. These 🍑🍑 ain’t.

    “Oh, my goodness, oh, my soul…”

  142. @El Dato
    Is NPR really financed with tax dollars (more than anybody else, that is?)

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @eD, @Rob McX, @res

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @res

    You have to drill down into the "station fees and dues" category because those stations in turn get part of their funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and other governmental sources.

  143. It’s the top story in foreign newspapers and people there think it’s a big deal.

    The tree of liberty is soooooo thirsty

  144. @Jim Don Bob
    @Known Fact

    theclassicalstation.org streams world wide with no commercials or news, and just the occassional begging and pleading.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    There’s also Classical24, which streams and also is picked up by radio stations to fill overnight hours or emergencies when the local host is snowed in or something. I like WMNR because the hosts are quirky volunteers who program their own shows, so you get a range of personalities and musical tastes — and NO news or politics

  145. The New York Post deserves a Pulitzer for exposing Joe Biden and his family of grifters for what they really are. Instead, the mainstream media imposes a media blackout for their preferred candidate. Sean Hannity estimates that Kristin Welker interrupted President Trump about thirty times while interrupting Biden only twice. Joe Biden switches positions more times than a chameleon changes colors but receives no challenges from the so-called journalists covering the election. If National Pinko Radio believes the Hunter Biden story is not worth it’s time then they cease pretending to be an objective news source. I saw a comment on another website that epitomizes the difference between Trump and Biden: “Trump earned his millions at a real job and Biden earned his as a corrupt pol” NPR and PBS should compete honestly in the real world with FOX, the WSJ, and Breitbart who receive no tax-payer support. NPR and PBS are the Joe Biden of media earning their millions dishonestly and corruptly from your pocketbook and mine.

  146. @res
    @El Dato

    https://www.npr.org/about-npr/178660742/public-radio-finances

    https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2019/12/20/npr-revenues-donut-chart-2019_custom-b801c4108cc69c881a705ab8b332588171cf60be-s1600-c85.png

    Replies: @Jack D

    You have to drill down into the “station fees and dues” category because those stations in turn get part of their funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and other governmental sources.

  147. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buffalo Joe

    Haha... and yet, he probably listens...

    Joe, I personally don't recommend to even the most leftist of drivers listening to NPR while going down the highway. Drowsiness-caused single-car accidents are no laughing matter. Neither do I recommend banjo bluegrass, as 4 tickets for 20-mph over the limit on windy mountain roads will require one to go all the way to the Turks and Caicos for another license. It starts to get expensive.

    Replies: @Escher

    Rock music has a similar effect, especially driving related songs like “Born to be Wild”.

  148. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Altai

    Off of your comment, here is a strange little glimpse into the minds of gamers.

    First: I'm not a gamer, I'm too square and a little too old, and I lack a gamer's sensibility, so I'm a total outsider to that industry. (The only game I like is "Portal", and it's only because I find the character of GLADYS, the chatty, mocking, evil mainframe computer who provides nasty running commentary, to be hilarious).

    This is a little outré, so bear with me. Ordinarily when I watch a movie on DVD, I don't bother with any of the "Special Features". But one time I was watching some dumb action film and it was boring, so I switched on the "commentary" track provided by one of the actors. It turned out the actor was very eccentric, so his comments on the film were irrelevant and weird and sort of oddly tedious, which I found funny.

    Flash forward to three months later. A friend of a friend runs a small computer-game development company, and he asked my friend who is a gaming pro to come help rewrite a story arc for an afternoon, and for clumsy social reasons this guy brought me along to keep him company, so I accidentally wound up sitting in on a game development session with about a dozen professional gaming nerds. I thought I would just keep my mouth shut and observe.

    In the course of the session, the actor's name came up who was so peculiar on the DVD. I couldn't help myself, so I made a very obscure joke about the odd nature of his commentary. What happened next sort of surprised me. EVERYBODY IN THE ROOM KNEW EXACTLY WHAT I WAS TALKING ABOUT. They all cracked up and started riffing on the premise, and for the rest of the afternoon, the whole story arc became about inside jokes about this actor. It was an obscure riff on an obscure riff on an obscure riff, but they were confident that their audience would know precisely what was meant.

    These people are total space aliens.

    Replies: @Lot

    “ These people are total space aliens.”

    Video game programming is the whitest and worst paid end of the programming profession. They do it for the love of gaming and get abused and overworked by their employers.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Lot

    That's exactly right. A lot of them would do the job for nothing if they had other sources of income.

  149. @Altai
    So what they're saying is Donald Trump's sons have a free hand to commit the same crimes Hunter has been discovered having done and for it not to be reported in the sensitive run-up to the election, as those things would be purely a distraction and contaminate American democracy.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Aardvark, @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    So what they’re saying is Donald Trump’s sons have a free hand to commit the same crimes Hunter has been discovered having done

    This comparison is specious.

    The untalented crack smoking pedophile of a sitting Vice President almost certainly leveraged his position as relative of the sitting Vice President to extract cash payments from foreign governmental entitities and moved a chunk of that money into the VPs accounts.

    It’s orders of magnitude FAR FAR worse that whet the Trump kids have done.

    Ivanka and Kushner are taking no salaries. Ivanka had her fashion business before Dad got into the Oval Office, and she exited her China fashion business but kept the trademarks and put together some new ones, largely to prevent knock offs while she was still in the White House, and, yes, to position her for a post White House fashion empire. Totally legitimate.

    Trump’s out of the day to day running of The Trump Organization, which is arguably moribund now, having sold off a bunch of properties. Yes, sovereign entities did participate in purchases, but again, totally legitimate and, frankly, transparent. They sold a penthouse to a Chinese lobbyist, who supposedly paid above market price, but you can make they argument that they actually fleeced HER, given how they’ve given China such a hard time.

    The only potentially “squirrely” deal was the buyout of Kushner’s 666 Fifth Avenue, where the Qatari government apparently put in some money through intermediaries, though they claimed they didn’t know anything about it. Yet the scuttlebutt in real estate circles is that Kushner barely broke even and mostly got out from under an albatross.

    So in other words, they shut down or sold stuff they already owned.

    Oh, and one last thing. Trump’s kids and his son-in-law actually have some business talent.

    Hunter brings knew meaning to the expression ne’er do well seeing as how he may be banging his underage niece in between tokes on the crack pipe.

  150. @Neoconned
    I really enjoy NPRs classical music & jazz broadcasts......it would be nice if they were music only

    Replies: @Coemgen, @HammerJack, @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @Known Fact, @Dissident

    I really enjoy NPRs classical music & jazz broadcasts……

    Marian MacPartland’s Piano Jazz* and Nancy Wilson’s Jazz Profiles were great NPR productions.
    (*At least up to a certain point; by the end of the show’s run MacPartland, sadly, was but a rather pathetic shadow of her once vivacious, witty, pert self.)

    There was also Jazz at Lincoln Center hosted by Wynton Marsalis.

    I used to listen to WBGO 88.3 FM the NPR-affiliate jazz station out of Newark, NJ.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Dissident

    MacPartland did Piano Jazz on the radio for over 30 years until she was 92. Even if during the last say 2 or 3 seasons she was no longer in top form (and she wasn't) she had a really good run.

    As we found out from RBG, it's hard to know when to quit. And quitting isn't always the best decision (for the person if not for the institution). Johnny Carson wanted to go out on the top of his game, and he did, but by many accounts his life after quitting was not a happy one. He spent a lot of time secretly submitting jokes to David Letterman. For some people, performing (judging, professoring, etc.) is all that they know and if you take that away from them they have nothing left. Leno and Seinfeld both developed car collecting hobbies, which was a good idea.

    Replies: @Dissident, @Anonymous, @Art Deco

  151. @ic1000
    The tweet in the OP links to an NPR newsletter, which in turn links to this NPR story by their media critic. It gives good insight into the mindset there (if any more is needed).

    Analysis: Questionable 'N.Y. Post' Scoop Driven By Ex-Hannity Producer And Giuliani
    October 17, 2020
    by David Folkenflik, NPR

    This week, the New York Post published a story based on what it says are emails — "smoking gun" emails, it calls them — sent by a Ukrainian business executive to the son of Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden. The story fits snugly into a narrative from President Trump and his allies that Hunter Biden's zealous pursuit of business ties abroad also compromised the former vice president.

    Yet this was a story marked more by red flags than investigative rigor.

    To start, the emails have not been verified as authentic...

    The venue is also suspect...

    The context also screams for caution...

    With all these warning signs, other news organizations, including NPR, have held back...

    let's talk about the origin of those emails... So, it's not clear who brought [the laptop] in [to the repair shop].
     

    And so on and so forth. Smug conclusion:

    None of that sound and fury requires the rest of the press to accept those claims as true. They shouldn't. Not without additional reporting and verification.

    The New York Post story could someday be proven accurate, or largely right. Or perhaps what was published is a far cry from investigative journalism, but rather speculative partisan advocacy. A totem of our media moment.
     
    As Journalists, we mustn't, ever!, discomfit our listeners by running stories that might someday be proven inaccurate, or partly wrong.

    Love the passive tense -- As Journalists, we certainly won't be chasing down leads on this story!

    At least these Journalists are consistent.

    The Clinton emails on Weiner's laptop non-investigation
    The Steele Dossier
    Flynn being compromised by the Russians
    Russiagate
    Kavanaugh's high school rape-party

    Now we know the reason why NPR and the other mainstream organs never covered these stories. Per Folkenflick, they were all ultimately proven inaccurate, or largely wrong.

    Replies: @Dissident

    Or perhaps what was published is a far cry from investigative journalism, but rather speculative partisan advocacy. A totem of our media moment.

    Wow. The blatant hypocrisy is just off the charts.

  152. @Stogumber
    Well, the Hunter Biden story IS a distraction. It distracts people from their task to vote against Trump.

    Replies: @Icy Blast, @Bill Jones

    Public Radio and Federal Funding

    Federal funding is essential to public radio’s service to the American public. Its continuation is critical for both stations and program producers, including NPR.

    Public radio stations receive annual grants directly from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) that make up an important part of a diverse revenue mix that includes listener support, corporate sponsorship and grants. Stations, in turn, draw on this mix of public and privately sourced revenue to pay NPR and other public radio producers for their programming

    From NPR’s annual financial report.

  153. @S. Anonyia
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    All that money, and she's still trite as hell. Why isn't she starting her own movie studio or publishing house? Apparently she has written a book, and based on the description/reviews it seems quite boring. No wonder he left her for that creepy/plastic looking reporter. At least she seems to have something of a personality.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    All that money, and she’s still trite as hell.

    AWFLs are quite basic, to be sure.

  154. @Dissident
    @Neoconned


    I really enjoy NPRs classical music & jazz broadcasts……
     
    Marian MacPartland's Piano Jazz* and Nancy Wilson's Jazz Profiles were great NPR productions.
    (*At least up to a certain point; by the end of the show's run MacPartland, sadly, was but a rather pathetic shadow of her once vivacious, witty, pert self.)

    There was also Jazz at Lincoln Center hosted by Wynton Marsalis.

    I used to listen to WBGO 88.3 FM the NPR-affiliate jazz station out of Newark, NJ.

    Replies: @Jack D

    MacPartland did Piano Jazz on the radio for over 30 years until she was 92. Even if during the last say 2 or 3 seasons she was no longer in top form (and she wasn’t) she had a really good run.

    As we found out from RBG, it’s hard to know when to quit. And quitting isn’t always the best decision (for the person if not for the institution). Johnny Carson wanted to go out on the top of his game, and he did, but by many accounts his life after quitting was not a happy one. He spent a lot of time secretly submitting jokes to David Letterman. For some people, performing (judging, professoring, etc.) is all that they know and if you take that away from them they have nothing left. Leno and Seinfeld both developed car collecting hobbies, which was a good idea.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    @Jack D


    MacPartland did Piano Jazz on the radio for over 30 years until she was 92. Even if during the last say 2 or 3 seasons she was no longer in top form (and she wasn’t) she had a really good run.
     
    True and the point is well-taken. I would not want to belittle or detract from the overwhelming majority of her career.

    Incidentally, the name is properly McPartland. My writing MacPartland was likely due to the name MacDonald being much fresher in my mind's imprint (and computer's clipboard) in the form of Heather MacDonald and Kevin MacDonald.


    As we found out from RBG, it’s hard to know when to quit.
     
    Is the recently deceased Ruth Bader-Ginsburg really a fitting example to cite here? Would anyone not consumed by narcissism or some other excessive, unhealthy, ultimately self-defeating drive have defiantly stayed-on in her position as long as she did?

    And quitting isn’t always the best decision (for the person if not for the institution)
     
    Certainly. Many people begin to decline right after they retire. Some, including the late King of Talk Radio Bob Grant, announce their retirement only to then return to work shortly afterward.
    , @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    "A man should have a hobby"

    , @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    but by many accounts his life after quitting was not a happy one.

    He wasn't a happy man when he was working, and he made others miserable.

    He was divorced 3x and refrained serving papers on wife no. 4 because it was just too embarrassing at that point. For all that, his 2d, 3d, and 4th wife had all of one child between them, and he's not the father of that one. He sired three children with his first wife; they're bereft of accomplishments and relied on their father for jobs and income. He died with all of one grandchild, a ba*tard whose sire had to be dragged kicking and screaming into court to be induced to provide even money. His life from 1962 until his death incorporated a string of broken friendships. His reaction to his mother's death was that he'd attend the funeral to assure himself that she was gone.

    The thing about dirt on Carson is that it isn't rumor. People he abused were willing to put their name on it in public fora. The heavy drinking, the verbal brutality when he had a snootful, the adulteries.

    The one good thing you could say about him is that he had a certain modesty and sense of public dignity (when he wasn't imbibing). Rather like Joe DiMaggio, another man who could be unpleasant in meatspace (but with a much smaller inventory of people he'd alienated for life).

  155. @Jack D
    @Dissident

    MacPartland did Piano Jazz on the radio for over 30 years until she was 92. Even if during the last say 2 or 3 seasons she was no longer in top form (and she wasn't) she had a really good run.

    As we found out from RBG, it's hard to know when to quit. And quitting isn't always the best decision (for the person if not for the institution). Johnny Carson wanted to go out on the top of his game, and he did, but by many accounts his life after quitting was not a happy one. He spent a lot of time secretly submitting jokes to David Letterman. For some people, performing (judging, professoring, etc.) is all that they know and if you take that away from them they have nothing left. Leno and Seinfeld both developed car collecting hobbies, which was a good idea.

    Replies: @Dissident, @Anonymous, @Art Deco

    MacPartland did Piano Jazz on the radio for over 30 years until she was 92. Even if during the last say 2 or 3 seasons she was no longer in top form (and she wasn’t) she had a really good run.

    True and the point is well-taken. I would not want to belittle or detract from the overwhelming majority of her career.

    Incidentally, the name is properly McPartland. My writing MacPartland was likely due to the name MacDonald being much fresher in my mind’s imprint (and computer’s clipboard) in the form of Heather MacDonald and Kevin MacDonald.

    As we found out from RBG, it’s hard to know when to quit.

    Is the recently deceased Ruth Bader-Ginsburg really a fitting example to cite here? Would anyone not consumed by narcissism or some other excessive, unhealthy, ultimately self-defeating drive have defiantly stayed-on in her position as long as she did?

    And quitting isn’t always the best decision (for the person if not for the institution)

    Certainly. Many people begin to decline right after they retire. Some, including the late King of Talk Radio Bob Grant, announce their retirement only to then return to work shortly afterward.

  156. @Lot
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “ These people are total space aliens.”

    Video game programming is the whitest and worst paid end of the programming profession. They do it for the love of gaming and get abused and overworked by their employers.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    That’s exactly right. A lot of them would do the job for nothing if they had other sources of income.

  157. @Jack D
    @Dissident

    MacPartland did Piano Jazz on the radio for over 30 years until she was 92. Even if during the last say 2 or 3 seasons she was no longer in top form (and she wasn't) she had a really good run.

    As we found out from RBG, it's hard to know when to quit. And quitting isn't always the best decision (for the person if not for the institution). Johnny Carson wanted to go out on the top of his game, and he did, but by many accounts his life after quitting was not a happy one. He spent a lot of time secretly submitting jokes to David Letterman. For some people, performing (judging, professoring, etc.) is all that they know and if you take that away from them they have nothing left. Leno and Seinfeld both developed car collecting hobbies, which was a good idea.

    Replies: @Dissident, @Anonymous, @Art Deco

    “A man should have a hobby”

  158. @Jack D
    @Dissident

    MacPartland did Piano Jazz on the radio for over 30 years until she was 92. Even if during the last say 2 or 3 seasons she was no longer in top form (and she wasn't) she had a really good run.

    As we found out from RBG, it's hard to know when to quit. And quitting isn't always the best decision (for the person if not for the institution). Johnny Carson wanted to go out on the top of his game, and he did, but by many accounts his life after quitting was not a happy one. He spent a lot of time secretly submitting jokes to David Letterman. For some people, performing (judging, professoring, etc.) is all that they know and if you take that away from them they have nothing left. Leno and Seinfeld both developed car collecting hobbies, which was a good idea.

    Replies: @Dissident, @Anonymous, @Art Deco

    but by many accounts his life after quitting was not a happy one.

    He wasn’t a happy man when he was working, and he made others miserable.

    He was divorced 3x and refrained serving papers on wife no. 4 because it was just too embarrassing at that point. For all that, his 2d, 3d, and 4th wife had all of one child between them, and he’s not the father of that one. He sired three children with his first wife; they’re bereft of accomplishments and relied on their father for jobs and income. He died with all of one grandchild, a ba*tard whose sire had to be dragged kicking and screaming into court to be induced to provide even money. His life from 1962 until his death incorporated a string of broken friendships. His reaction to his mother’s death was that he’d attend the funeral to assure himself that she was gone.

    The thing about dirt on Carson is that it isn’t rumor. People he abused were willing to put their name on it in public fora. The heavy drinking, the verbal brutality when he had a snootful, the adulteries.

    The one good thing you could say about him is that he had a certain modesty and sense of public dignity (when he wasn’t imbibing). Rather like Joe DiMaggio, another man who could be unpleasant in meatspace (but with a much smaller inventory of people he’d alienated for life).

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke

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