The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection$
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Yes, But My Lawn Would Look Fantastic
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • B
Show CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From CBS News:

A disastrous megaflood could bring more than 8 feet of water to parts of California, scientists say

BY LI COHEN

AUGUST 15, 2022 / 1:08 PM / CBS NEWS

Devastating wildfires and droughts are not the only natural catastrophes that California will continue to face. According to new research published on Friday, a disastrous megaflood could bring so much water to some areas of the state that it could completely drown entire stop signs on a neighborhood street.

There was a vast flood in California in 1862 that supposedly killed about one percent of the state’s population. It would probably be really famous if Mark Twain had arrived in time, but he didn’t get to California until a little later.

 
Hide 112 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. OverviewLyricsListenOther recordings
    Some say the end is near
    Some say we’ll see Armageddon soon
    I certainly hope we will
    I sure could use a vacation from this
    Bullshit three-ring
    Circus sideshow of
    Freaks
    Here in this hopeless fucking hole we call L.A.
    The only way to fix it is to flush it all away
    Any fucking time, any fucking day
    Learn to swim, I’ll see you down in Arizona bay
    Fret for your figure and
    Fret for your latte and
    Fret for your lawsuit and
    Fret for your hairpiece and
    Fret for your Prozac and
    Fret for your pilot and
    Fret for your contract and
    Fret for your car
    It’s a
    Bullshit three-ring
    Circus sideshow of
    Freaks
    Here in this hopeless fucking hole we call L.A.
    The only way to fix it is to flush it all away
    Any fucking time, any fucking day
    Learn to swim, I’ll see you down in Arizona bay
    Some say a comet will fall from the sky
    Followed by meteor showers and tidal waves
    Followed by fault lines that cannot sit still
    Followed by millions of dumbfounded dipshits
    And some say the end is near
    Some say we’ll see Armageddon soon
    I certainly hope we will
    I sure could use a vacation from this
    Stupid shit, silly shit, stupid shit
    One great big festering neon distraction
    I’ve a suggestion to keep you all occupied
    Learn to swim, learn to swim, learn to swim
    ‘Cause Mom’s gonna fix it all soon
    Mom’s comin’ ’round to put it back the way it ought to be
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Fuck L. Ron Hubbard and
    Fuck all his clones
    Fuck all these gun-toting
    Hip gangster wannabes
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Fuck retro anything
    Fuck your tattoos
    Fuck all you junkies and
    Fuck your short memories
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Yeah, fuck smiley glad-hands
    With hidden agendas
    Fuck these dysfunctional
    Insecure actresses
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    Learn to swim, learn to swim
    ‘Cause I’m praying for rain
    I’m praying for tidal waves
    I wanna see the ground give way
    I wanna watch it all go down
    Mom, please flush it all away
    I wanna see it go right in and down
    I wanna watch it go right in
    Watch you flush it all away
    Yeah, time to bring it down again
    Yeah, don’t just call me pessimist
    Try and read between the lines
    I can’t imagine why you wouldn’t
    Welcome any change, my friend
    I wanna see it come down
    Put it down
    Suck it down
    Flush it down

    • Troll: AnotherDad, Polistra
  2. Steve,
    Do many people around Los Angeles really have Astroturf lawns? What would happen to those and the neighborhoods if your deluge arrives? No soil absorption and instant runoff, so another Biblical event?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @LP5

    Both my neighbors have astroturf lawns. I don't know if they are at all porous. If not, yeah, there could be more runoff in a flood.

    Replies: @Muggles

    , @John Johnson
    @LP5

    Do many people around Los Angeles really have Astroturf lawns? What would happen to those and the neighborhoods if your deluge arrives? No soil absorption and instant runoff, so another Biblical event?

    The real grass they use doesn't absorb much water.

    It's this rough Bermuda grass that would be no different than astroturf in a rainstorm. In fact a rainstorm can kill the roots and wash away the soil.

    The backyards are probably a bigger problem. Flat patios that aren't designed to handle large amounts of water.

  3. When I was a kid, people talked about earthquakes in California a lot (with good reason – most of the state is an earthquake zone) but nowadays earthquakes are out of fashion because they can’t be blamed on “climate change”. I would bet \$ that the next big natural disaster in CA is more likely to be an earthquake than a megaflood. Just as megaflood hysteria is peaking in the media, something will happen to shake things up.

    numbers that will have massive implications for the Sacramento and San Joaquin River flood plains. These areas, Swain said, are the home of ancient flood deposits, as well as millions of Californians.

    Maybe it wasn’t such a hot idea to house millions of people (mostly new immigrants) on a flood plain?

    Last night, my daughter told me that she was temporarily renting an apt in SF while she is out there on a SV internship. I looked up the neighborhood (Cayuga Terrace) on the census maps and on Google streee view to see if it was reasonably safe. The area is mostly Asian and Hispanic. The retail shops tend toward taquerias and pupusarias but it looked safe enough – no bars on windows, the shops don’t have riot gates. The average little postwar row house in the neighborhood is \$1M plus. White people barely register anymore in most of SF – they are effectively extinct. The future is going to be Mexicans arguing with Asians.

    If appears as if these valleys flood every 150-200 years on average (the article says 5-7 floods per millennium) so if the last one was in the 1860s we are about due for a new one in the next 50 years or so. All the other floods were natural but this one will be due to “climate change”.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D


    ...nowadays earthquakes are out of fashion because they can’t be blamed on “climate change”
     
    Good point, Jack.

    They may yet find a way to pin the next big earthquake on The Climate Crisis™ * Greta is one smart cookie.

    .

    * Try to keep up with the terminology, please!!

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

    , @Kylie
    @Jack D

    "Maybe it wasn’t such a hot idea to house millions of people (mostly new immigrants) on a flood plain?"

    Why not?

    , @epebble
    @Jack D

    Lived in CA for fifteen years. Had no fear of either earthquakes or floods. But come every summer, the fires raging around us were truly frightening, what with a nice layer of fine ash on the front yard to serve as a ransom note that there, but for a few miles and the accident of wind direction, you too ...

    , @Alden
    @Jack D

    The Sacramento River Delta and the San Joaquin Valley just happen to be some of the primo agriculture lands in the world. That’s why people settled there. And the Sacramento River channels to snow melt from the mountains to the Bay.
    Delta river flood plains are where civilizations began. Ukraine along the rivers to the Black Sea. Ancient Egypt grew because of the Nile Delta. London and Paris are located along river deltas.

    Plus rivers offered transportation long before the wheel and draft animals. Plus fish for protein.

    That’s why pre humans and humans settled in flood plains Why farmers still do.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Jack D

    Just another example of how humans have regressed. In the old times whenever natural disasters happened it was common place to blame it on the Gods being angry with humans for their transgressions. To go against climate change is to go against the (woke) Gods.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Jack D


    nowadays earthquakes are out of fashion because they can’t be blamed on “climate change”.
     
    Rest assured, Jack, they're working on it:

    https://www.air-worldwide.com/blog/posts/2021/11/climate-change-may-influence-earthquakes/

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/oct/16/climate-change-triggers-earthquakes-tsunamis-volcanoes (Coming Soon: Climate Change Volcanoes!)

    The woke clerisy won't rest until every mishap is squarely on your shoulders for your eco-sins.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    , @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Jack D


    If appears as if these valleys flood every 150-200 years on average (the article says 5-7 floods per millennium) so if the last one was in the 1860s we are about due for a new one in the next 50 years or so. All the other floods were natural but this one will be due to “climate change”.
     
    We also don't seem to do big projects like dams or reservoirs, which would seem to be the kind of large scale engineering feat which could both be a prophylactic against catastrophic floods and mitigate California's frequent water shortages while generating low/zero emission hydroelectric power. Someone would probably find a bug with a minuscule difference in dots or stripes from the exact same bug three miles away and tie up any such project for ten years.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  4. Why do Southern Californians have Scottish-style lawns and not desert landscapes with decorative rocks and arranged scrub?

    • Replies: @ForeverCARealist
    @J.Ross

    Lawns, like agriculture, are good for absorbing air pollution. Desert landscaping can be very pretty, but it's also dusty, hot, and unusable for recreation.

    Fake lawns are coming in vogue here in Northern CA as well. I personally hate them. I'd rather the bark/mulch look with lots of perennials than the turf ugliness. My neighbor is putting in rocks (tons of them!) with desert plants. I find it silly since this isn't a desert and the plants are non-native.

    But as I've said many times, CA's bad governance and planning-- and water storage and allocation is a big one-- is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Dave from Oz, @JR Ewing, @Harry Baldwin

    , @Whereismyhandle
    @J.Ross

    natural landscaping is increasingly popular with bourgeois liberals in my part of california

    , @John Johnson
    @J.Ross

    Why do Southern Californians have Scottish-style lawns and not desert landscapes with decorative rocks and arranged scrub?

    Because it is LA.

    LA liberals can talk all day about how conservatives are the problem but they want their 2-3 car garage and green lawn.

    Not that conservatives are any better. San Diego Republicans also want their green lawns and golf courses.

    I really like the look of desert Xeriscaping. Most people don't even use their lawns. I get having one for the kids but most of those green front lawns are never used. Xeriscaping is the norm in Las Vegas.

    But even if everyone in California switched to Xeriscaping they would still have a water shortage. Too many people and they haven't developed new sources. The wealthy Democrats that run the state don't give an F. They would like more people to leave and don't care if they lose farmers. In their minds it would be getting rid of Trump voters and saving water. A two-fer.

    , @Alden
    @J.Ross

    1 Desert landscapes are very very ugly.

    2 The idiot environmentalists, liberals gardeners landscape designers and nurseries that sell plants are so incredibly ignorant they don’t realize that pretty 18 inch tall desert plants will be 10 feet tall in about 5 years. So in a few years the house is buried behind 10 feet tall bushes. It’s really bad in one story houses with wide eaves. The nurseries landscape designers totally live replacing grass lawns with desert landscapes because they can make a great deal of money digging up lawns and replacing them with desert landscapes. Profit rules. Even if the house disappears behind the 10 foot tall bushes.

    3 Cost it costs a lot of money to dig up a lawn and replace it with a desert landscape.

    4 Fire hazard those desert plants are loaded with flammable creosote resin and other explosive substances. In fact some of those fire hazard desert landscape bushes are on the County list of plants forbidden to be planted on residential lots because of the fire hazard.

    5 Lawns cost a lot of money and demand frequent mowing. A real burden if homeowner doesn’t have the money to pay a gardener or time to do it himself

    6 But at least lawns can be mowed and are not a fire hazard even in September when they are totally dry and yellow. Those desert bushes are a fire hazard.

    Replace the ugly high maintenance dried out grass with a ground cover such as pennyroyal which absolutely thrives in dry hot dusty S Ca summer’s. Don’t get an expensive desert landscape unless you are prepared to prune them down to the proper height in proportion to the height of the walls of your house a couple times a year. Height of the walls, not height including the roof.

    Main reason desert landscapes were a brief fad is cost. It’s very expensive to move 400 pound rocks to your yard. Plus the fire hazard. Plus the 18 inch plants becoming 6 foot wide 10-12 feet tall in a few years. Succulents are a good compromise.

    Replies: @Alden, @Sollipsist

    , @Anonymous
    @J.Ross

    Right, I'd expect the place to look like a Krazy Kat strip.

  5. @LP5
    Steve,
    Do many people around Los Angeles really have Astroturf lawns? What would happen to those and the neighborhoods if your deluge arrives? No soil absorption and instant runoff, so another Biblical event?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @John Johnson

    Both my neighbors have astroturf lawns. I don’t know if they are at all porous. If not, yeah, there could be more runoff in a flood.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Steve Sailer

    In the 8 feet of water type megaflood you referenced from the 19th century, there would be nothing but runoff.

    As one who saw about 3 feet of water in my front yard from Harvey a few years ago, such flooding isn't good for lawns much either.

    Depending on the type of grass, it can kill if standing water ponds very long. Also will ruin what you have on your first floor in your home. Eight feet would wash away billions in real estate there too.

    Heavy rains high up behind reservoirs would help your lawn but not in front of them.

    Of course if Cali spent its billions on desalinization plants instead of "high speed rail" that will likely never be built, their water problems could be solved.

    But no, the homeless zombies don't want to take slow buses up to the Streets of San Francisco. I guess they will need to take their own water bottles though.

  6. The histories written around California in the 1840s to 1870s make today’s natural disasters look tame. Maybe climate change is a good thing.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @The Alarmist

    Richard Henry Dana visited California by ship in the 1830s, then by train in the 1870s. He reported that the type of cold northeast wind that was a plague in the 1830s, blowing them once almost to Hawaii, had largely faded away. (It's still around, but not enough to have a name like the famous hot southwestern wind, the Santa Ana.)

    Replies: @Voltarde

  7. Natural disasters would not be as damaging and could have been handled a lot better if it hadn’t been for the man-made disaster that is now current-era California.

    Jack D. has it right. Do they even talk about the Big One, anymore? To me, the Big One was the overturning of Proposition 187 by a lefty judge.

    • Replies: @MGB
    @Achmed E. Newman

    i was stationed in CA in '89 for that quake. felt like an enormous train rolling through, plates falling off the shelves to the floor, the chow hall shaking. loss of electricity for a while, and cracks in foundations, but nothing like oakland/SF area. now i am in the NE waiting for the next 300 year earth quake event. if it were to happen i don't think NYC/Boston would fair as well as CA.

    Replies: @Sidewalk Meanderings

  8. @J.Ross
    Why do Southern Californians have Scottish-style lawns and not desert landscapes with decorative rocks and arranged scrub?

    Replies: @ForeverCARealist, @Whereismyhandle, @John Johnson, @Alden, @Anonymous

    Lawns, like agriculture, are good for absorbing air pollution. Desert landscaping can be very pretty, but it’s also dusty, hot, and unusable for recreation.

    Fake lawns are coming in vogue here in Northern CA as well. I personally hate them. I’d rather the bark/mulch look with lots of perennials than the turf ugliness. My neighbor is putting in rocks (tons of them!) with desert plants. I find it silly since this isn’t a desert and the plants are non-native.

    But as I’ve said many times, CA’s bad governance and planning– and water storage and allocation is a big one– is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @ForeverCARealist

    And if California drowns in an inland ocean, like the mystics, statistics, and climatologists say it will, I predict this crackerbox will still be standing, until I make my monthly payment. Still waking up in the mornings with shaking hands, trying to find a way to get Emmett out of the basement. Don't the clouds look angry through the trees, don't the trees look like crucified thieves. I was listening to the air conditioner humm ... it went humm ... but I still could hear the angry shouts from the basement.

    , @Dave from Oz
    @ForeverCARealist


    I’d rather the bark/mulch look with lots of perennials than the turf ugliness.
     
    Australian, here. Bark/mulch is a terrible idea in hot climates: it catches sparks.

    Replies: @SF, @ForeverCARealist, @HA

    , @JR Ewing
    @ForeverCARealist


    But as I’ve said many times, CA’s bad governance and planning– and water storage and allocation is a big one– is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.
     
    This is something that blows my mind.

    Up until 50 years ago, they were always planning for the future by building new infrastructure: freeways, dams, aqueducts, power plants. That stuff wasn't needed right that moment, but they knew it was going to be necessary.

    Now they can't build a damn thing and claim that what they have right now - which was sufficient 20-30 years ago, but not any more - is enough and everyone just needs to deal with it and not plan on any more growth... and yet the population keeps growing, even if net migration is way up.

    You go to California now and outside of the very wealthy enclaves scattered around the state, most of it looks third world with crumbling insufficient infrastructure, aged buildings, and people literally living in the streets. The difference is that the true third world wants to do something about it and improve itself. California does not. They can't even replace what they have, much less build new stuff.

    The fact that they couldn't even find the political will for a (mostly) PRIVATELY FUNDED desalination plant is quite telling. It's literally additive to their current water supply - it won't harm existing waterways or take up any new land - and there is a significantly vocal enough minority that is against that progress for it's own sake.

    And they've managed to rig the political system enough through their "jungle primary" to where real political change is impossible. Democrats control everything and democrats don't care about the nuts and bolts of civilization, they care about pet social causes. Kamala Harris's political career is the prime example of how that works out.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @ForeverCARealist, @AnotherDad, @Jimi, @Lurker

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @ForeverCARealist

    CA’s bad governance and planning ... is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.

    Rejecting sufficient signatures to cancel the recall effort of George Gascón also helps in that regard. BTW, rhetorical question: why are states so cavalier about signatures on mail-in ballots during regular elections, but hyper-skeptical about signatures on recall petitions?

  9. @Jack D
    When I was a kid, people talked about earthquakes in California a lot (with good reason - most of the state is an earthquake zone) but nowadays earthquakes are out of fashion because they can't be blamed on "climate change". I would bet $ that the next big natural disaster in CA is more likely to be an earthquake than a megaflood. Just as megaflood hysteria is peaking in the media, something will happen to shake things up.

    numbers that will have massive implications for the Sacramento and San Joaquin River flood plains. These areas, Swain said, are the home of ancient flood deposits, as well as millions of Californians.

     

    Maybe it wasn't such a hot idea to house millions of people (mostly new immigrants) on a flood plain?

    Last night, my daughter told me that she was temporarily renting an apt in SF while she is out there on a SV internship. I looked up the neighborhood (Cayuga Terrace) on the census maps and on Google streee view to see if it was reasonably safe. The area is mostly Asian and Hispanic. The retail shops tend toward taquerias and pupusarias but it looked safe enough - no bars on windows, the shops don't have riot gates. The average little postwar row house in the neighborhood is $1M plus. White people barely register anymore in most of SF - they are effectively extinct. The future is going to be Mexicans arguing with Asians.

    If appears as if these valleys flood every 150-200 years on average (the article says 5-7 floods per millennium) so if the last one was in the 1860s we are about due for a new one in the next 50 years or so. All the other floods were natural but this one will be due to "climate change".

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Kylie, @epebble, @Alden, @Hapalong Cassidy, @Almost Missouri, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    …nowadays earthquakes are out of fashion because they can’t be blamed on “climate change”

    Good point, Jack.

    They may yet find a way to pin the next big earthquake on The Climate Crisis™ * Greta is one smart cookie.

    .

    * Try to keep up with the terminology, please!!

    • LOL: Jim Christian
    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Greta is one smart cookie.
     
    I am afraid that the lamentable phenomenon of adults taking a 16-year-old child seriously has a lot less to do with any cleverness on her part and a lot more to do with good sense being replaced with sentimentality on theirs.

    Consider: How many non-PC-addled adults would take advice from a child in the course of everyday life? Not many, and that is because adults understand, if only instinctively, that children rarely understand how the world works.

    With age comes understanding. That is what adulthood is all about (or used to be about), and why old age was formerly revered in societies rather than regarded with contempt as it is today (because old people had seen it all before, and could advise younger people on how to avoid making the same foolish mistakes again).

    When an organisation like the UN starts taking directions on how to run the world from a 16-year-old, it is their way of indicating they do not deserve to be taken any more seriously than a 16-year-old.

    As Theodore Dalrymple observes, "Political correctness is often the attempt to make sentimentality socially obligatory or legally enforceable." The only reason Greta is taken seriously by adults in the West is because none of the adults in charge has the guts to tell Greta to sit down and shut up as they would with any other know-all 16-year-old who thinks she understands how the world works.
  10. @The Alarmist
    The histories written around California in the 1840s to 1870s make today’s natural disasters look tame. Maybe climate change is a good thing.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Richard Henry Dana visited California by ship in the 1830s, then by train in the 1870s. He reported that the type of cold northeast wind that was a plague in the 1830s, blowing them once almost to Hawaii, had largely faded away. (It’s still around, but not enough to have a name like the famous hot southwestern wind, the Santa Ana.)

    • Replies: @Voltarde
    @Steve Sailer

    Richard Henry Dana, a fine gentleman and the author of a great read!

    Two Years Before the Mast
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two_Years_Before_the_Mast

  11. OT for this thread – Steve, it looks like Stanford will start a white cornerback this fall!

  12. Fictional, speculative and alarmist journalism is fun!

    ‘An overabundance of cotton candy could cause massive tooth decay.’

    ‘Studying diligently could help you pass that monstrous math test.’

    ‘Shifting welfare payments from societal dregs to struggling married couples could subsidize a return to a more healthy society.’

    ‘Paying doctors more than basketball players could urge more children to study medicine.’

    ‘Watching more zombie movies could increase your chances of surviving the coming apocalypse.’

    …and so on. And each of the aforementioned are just as credible as the CBS News article referenced above.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Rob Lee

    ‘Paying doctors more than basketball players could urge more children to study medicine.’

    Don't really disagree with your general point but if you drew a Venn diagram of those who could be Doctors and those who could be basketball players you would have very little overlap outside of a couple of hundred Balkan and Baltic athletes and a couple of hundred American Whites. If your concerned medicine will miss out on their talents they can always switch in their mid 30s when their careers are over. Do you really want Kyrie ( flat earth) Irving dispensing medical advice?

    Replies: @John Johnson

  13. Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle used this disaster scenario in their excellent 1977 science fiction novel Lucifer’s Hammer. In the story, the San Joaquin Valley becomes an inland sea.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Anon7

    That is a stunningly, stunningly good novel, from a team that cranked out good novels together and separately; if you only try one make it the Hammer.

  14. There was a vast flood in California in 1862 that supposedly killed about one percent of the state’s population.

    And yet if it happened today they would call it unprecedented and blame it on “Climate Change”.

    A recent study blamed childhood obesity on Climate Change.

    Climate Change – the Devil of our modern World.

  15. The Red Scare girls imagine you have a glorious lawn

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Whereismyhandle

    Not lately.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Chrisnonymous, @Whereismyhandle, @J.Ross

  16. @J.Ross
    Why do Southern Californians have Scottish-style lawns and not desert landscapes with decorative rocks and arranged scrub?

    Replies: @ForeverCARealist, @Whereismyhandle, @John Johnson, @Alden, @Anonymous

    natural landscaping is increasingly popular with bourgeois liberals in my part of california

  17. @Whereismyhandle
    The Red Scare girls imagine you have a glorious lawn

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Not lately.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Steve Sailer

    It's raining in the UK for the first time in maybe 7 weeks - proper rain too, not torrential but enough to really soak the soil. But over those 7 weeks we've had a lot of high (for England) temperatures - 35-37c, mid-late 90s f. Driest summer since 1976 but way hotter.

    We did our best, put out water everywhere, but a lot of wild birds have died, the ground too hard to dig for worms and insects. Our garden's usually pretty noisy but not this summer.

    (Now of course the lawns will shoot up, we've not had to cut them in a month where in a normal summer it might be every 3-4 days)

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    Maybe it's just your improved eyesight!

    , @Whereismyhandle
    @Steve Sailer

    Can Anna go one day without bringing up Steve Sailer? She's speaking your meeting into existence.

    That's all she wants for her birthday

    , @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    Metaphor, Steve, metaphor: when a femoid enjoys the thought of your lawn or car, she is wistfully imagining your capacity for housework -- come to think of it, yeah, say it's all brown.

  18. Mark Twain probably would’ve turned out to have been the cause of the flood had he been in California. In his semi autobiographical book “Roughing It” he relates how he and a friend somehow ended up setting fire to much of the forest around lake Tahoe.

    • Replies: @DRDPHD
    @Anon

    Roughing it is one great read. A glimpse into real life albeit satirized on the western frontier. The “tin whistle” story of his encounter(s)with the prophet in Salt Lake City makes me smile just to think of it

    Thanks for reminding me of this great and seldom mentioned work

  19. Well, the headline in Southern California is more definitive.

    “Giant Megaflood is coming to California, and it will cost billions!”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Bill H.


    “Giant Megaflood is coming to California, and it will cost billions!”
     


    Don't forget Steve's tagline:

    Women and minorities hit hardest.

    In this case it will be true. White men make up about 17% of the population. There are about six million white men in California, just ahead of Pennsylvania's five million.

    Replies: @Alden, @Achmed E. Newman

  20. Steve….off topic:

    THEY MURDERED FREYA…..THOSE GODDAM BASTARDS!!!!…..GODDAM BASTARDS!!!!

    Freya…..RIP….

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Worse than Harambe, because Freya wasn't so much as potentially bothering anyone, and idiots who wanted to take selfies harassed and misguided her to ferality.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  21. @ForeverCARealist
    @J.Ross

    Lawns, like agriculture, are good for absorbing air pollution. Desert landscaping can be very pretty, but it's also dusty, hot, and unusable for recreation.

    Fake lawns are coming in vogue here in Northern CA as well. I personally hate them. I'd rather the bark/mulch look with lots of perennials than the turf ugliness. My neighbor is putting in rocks (tons of them!) with desert plants. I find it silly since this isn't a desert and the plants are non-native.

    But as I've said many times, CA's bad governance and planning-- and water storage and allocation is a big one-- is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Dave from Oz, @JR Ewing, @Harry Baldwin

    And if California drowns in an inland ocean, like the mystics, statistics, and climatologists say it will, I predict this crackerbox will still be standing, until I make my monthly payment. Still waking up in the mornings with shaking hands, trying to find a way to get Emmett out of the basement. Don’t the clouds look angry through the trees, don’t the trees look like crucified thieves. I was listening to the air conditioner humm … it went humm … but I still could hear the angry shouts from the basement.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  22. So Steve’s writing about lawns instead of George Gascon? Seems about right.

    The Gascon fraudulent recall vote count is a continuation of 2020 and a rehearsal for 2024, if a Republican gets anywhere near the big prize.

    • Agree: Alden
  23. @ForeverCARealist
    @J.Ross

    Lawns, like agriculture, are good for absorbing air pollution. Desert landscaping can be very pretty, but it's also dusty, hot, and unusable for recreation.

    Fake lawns are coming in vogue here in Northern CA as well. I personally hate them. I'd rather the bark/mulch look with lots of perennials than the turf ugliness. My neighbor is putting in rocks (tons of them!) with desert plants. I find it silly since this isn't a desert and the plants are non-native.

    But as I've said many times, CA's bad governance and planning-- and water storage and allocation is a big one-- is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Dave from Oz, @JR Ewing, @Harry Baldwin

    I’d rather the bark/mulch look with lots of perennials than the turf ugliness.

    Australian, here. Bark/mulch is a terrible idea in hot climates: it catches sparks.

    • Replies: @SF
    @Dave from Oz

    In California, most bark is somewhat fire resistant. Thick bark helps older trees survive fire.
    One of our worst fire disasters happened in the Berkeley hills where we had planted Australian trees.

    , @ForeverCARealist
    @Dave from Oz

    We don't really have fires in the burbs. Catching sparks is a nightmare for the rural areas, like the commenter mentioning Mark Twain's forest fire around Tahoe.

    But don't bark and mulch hold in the moisture?

    Replies: @Alden

    , @HA
    @Dave from Oz

    "Australian, here. Bark/mulch is a terrible idea in hot climates: it catches sparks."

    Your perspective is somewhat skewed. In fact, outside of your home continent, not everything in nature is designed to kill you.

    But when it comes to the eucalyptus trees which comprise the majority of Australian forests -- they literally explode:

    These hardy plants have delightfully scented, volatile oil in all parts of the plant... When the oils in the tree heat up, the plant releases flammable gas, which ignites into a fireball.
     

    Did I mention the fireball? And so, what did Californians do when it comes to eucalyptus trees? Apparently, they imported them in vast numbers -- can't get enough of them, apparently. Why I am not surprised by this? Oh yeah, it's because I read Sailer.

    By the early 1900s, thousands of acres of eucalypts were planted with the encouragement of the state government. It was hoped that they would provide a renewable source of timber for construction, furniture making and railroad ties.
     

    Replies: @Alden, @sb

  24. A lot of what uninformed people have been led to believe is fallout of “global climate change” is really the downstream effects of development and specifically the explosion of “impervious surface” in populated areas. My guess as well is that as the soil in Southern California bakes in the sun it becomes somewhat impervious.

    Environmentalists are claiming that the Chesapeake Bay is rising such that entire islands like Tangier Island flood regularly and will be underwater in decades due to “global climate change,” which would require a localized rise in the level of the Bay which is multiple times what the predicted rise in the sea level should be over the period in question. It’s far more likely that development and precipitous increases in impervious surface throughout the enormous Chesapeake Bay Watershed (which spans from Central New York State, the bulk of Central Pennsylvania, the Delmarva Peninsula, substantially all of Maryland’s Western shore, and Northern Virginia) has caused an increase in the volume of rainwater runoff collected at tributaries and dumped into the Bay. Every roof, driveway, parking lot, road, tennis court, etc. prohibits rainwater from recharging the ground underneath it, and redirects water to another destination downstream. Municipalities and developers have only recently begun engineering countermeasures like retention basis (circa 1990s) but those countermeasures are usually the least expensive means to mitigate stormwater runoff within the municipality and they’re of dubious effect if the question is “does this basin collect all stormwater runoff which would otherwise be held in the ground if this land was in an undeveloped state?” Think about all of the development in metro DC in the past twenty years or so, and how all of the roofs, etc. have likely redirected the stormwater into the Chesapeake.

    Add to this that waterfront property is at a premium, and natural wetlands with marsh grasses which hold excess water have been filled in and developed for generations. Every waterfront property on a bay or estuary is likely formerly marsh grass that was filled with sand and rock so that a home could be built. This is the case at the Jersey shore on barrier islands (which historically have formed and reformed after large storms) where you hear similar complaints about “global climate change,” while the old saltbox houses are being knocked down in favor of three level monstrosities which span nearly the entire building lot. The stormwater is just going where gravity takes it, but development has had substantial effects on its path and points of collection.

    • Thanks: kaganovitch
  25. @ForeverCARealist
    @J.Ross

    Lawns, like agriculture, are good for absorbing air pollution. Desert landscaping can be very pretty, but it's also dusty, hot, and unusable for recreation.

    Fake lawns are coming in vogue here in Northern CA as well. I personally hate them. I'd rather the bark/mulch look with lots of perennials than the turf ugliness. My neighbor is putting in rocks (tons of them!) with desert plants. I find it silly since this isn't a desert and the plants are non-native.

    But as I've said many times, CA's bad governance and planning-- and water storage and allocation is a big one-- is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Dave from Oz, @JR Ewing, @Harry Baldwin

    But as I’ve said many times, CA’s bad governance and planning– and water storage and allocation is a big one– is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.

    This is something that blows my mind.

    Up until 50 years ago, they were always planning for the future by building new infrastructure: freeways, dams, aqueducts, power plants. That stuff wasn’t needed right that moment, but they knew it was going to be necessary.

    Now they can’t build a damn thing and claim that what they have right now – which was sufficient 20-30 years ago, but not any more – is enough and everyone just needs to deal with it and not plan on any more growth… and yet the population keeps growing, even if net migration is way up.

    You go to California now and outside of the very wealthy enclaves scattered around the state, most of it looks third world with crumbling insufficient infrastructure, aged buildings, and people literally living in the streets. The difference is that the true third world wants to do something about it and improve itself. California does not. They can’t even replace what they have, much less build new stuff.

    The fact that they couldn’t even find the political will for a (mostly) PRIVATELY FUNDED desalination plant is quite telling. It’s literally additive to their current water supply – it won’t harm existing waterways or take up any new land – and there is a significantly vocal enough minority that is against that progress for it’s own sake.

    And they’ve managed to rig the political system enough through their “jungle primary” to where real political change is impossible. Democrats control everything and democrats don’t care about the nuts and bolts of civilization, they care about pet social causes. Kamala Harris’s political career is the prime example of how that works out.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @JR Ewing

    They can’t even replace what they have, much less build new stuff.

    Worse still, California will tear down existing hydroelectric dams and shut down nuclear plants despite the fact that the state already can't handle its energy requirements. It's the liberal death cult in action.

    https://www.mercurynews.com/2021/06/18/plan-to-raze-4-dams-on-california-oregon-line-clears-hurdle/

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired

    , @ForeverCARealist
    @JR Ewing

    I get your point, and I can't stand the enviros, but if CA really did attempt keeping up with water, electricity, roads, schools, law and order... well, the population would just continually grow and grow.

    What's been CA's growth since 1950? 30 million? The received wisdom is that it's currently falling, but I see no sign of it; in fact, the opposite.

    I watch the new neighborhoods constantly sprouting around me, thousands of new houses in the Sacramento area and up into the foothills, and I know they won't stop until there's some sort of outside force applied. Price? Water? Schools? homelessness? None of it seems to matter so far.

    , @AnotherDad
    @JR Ewing


    Up until 50 years ago, they were always planning for the future by building new infrastructure: freeways, dams, aqueducts, power plants. That stuff wasn’t needed right that moment, but they knew it was going to be necessary.

    Now they can’t build a damn thing and claim that what they have right now – which was sufficient 20-30 years ago, but not any more – is enough and everyone just needs to deal with it and not plan on any more growth… and yet the population keeps growing, even if net migration is way up.
     
    Spot on JR.

    When I was a kid America could--and did--build stuff. Now the lawyers and bureaucrats and "activists" keep it from building stuff. And when the politicians decide to push on through and build something anyway the costs are insane because the lawyers and bureaucrats and "activists" collect 90% of it.

    The great and the good do not want to build stuff, but to "limit growth".

    Except ... the one thing they refuse to do is limit immigration, which is the cause of *all* growth now in the United States. (Gen 1+2.)

    Must have immigration! Must have immigration! But building the infrastructure to handle an expanding population ... nah.
    , @Jimi
    @JR Ewing

    Not sure why, but in California 10 Republicans will run in an election and split the vote. The state party needs to start endorsing the electable candidate pushing the other candidates out of the ware.

    , @Lurker
    @JR Ewing

    Desalination plants - I've never looked into the details but it would seem the modern green/left hate, hate, HATE the very idea. Which means the elite hate the idea.

    I don't know why they claim to hate them but it seems to be a near-religious belief.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Ed Case

  26. So, if this happens soon enough, Steve will be blogging seaside?

  27. @Jack D
    When I was a kid, people talked about earthquakes in California a lot (with good reason - most of the state is an earthquake zone) but nowadays earthquakes are out of fashion because they can't be blamed on "climate change". I would bet $ that the next big natural disaster in CA is more likely to be an earthquake than a megaflood. Just as megaflood hysteria is peaking in the media, something will happen to shake things up.

    numbers that will have massive implications for the Sacramento and San Joaquin River flood plains. These areas, Swain said, are the home of ancient flood deposits, as well as millions of Californians.

     

    Maybe it wasn't such a hot idea to house millions of people (mostly new immigrants) on a flood plain?

    Last night, my daughter told me that she was temporarily renting an apt in SF while she is out there on a SV internship. I looked up the neighborhood (Cayuga Terrace) on the census maps and on Google streee view to see if it was reasonably safe. The area is mostly Asian and Hispanic. The retail shops tend toward taquerias and pupusarias but it looked safe enough - no bars on windows, the shops don't have riot gates. The average little postwar row house in the neighborhood is $1M plus. White people barely register anymore in most of SF - they are effectively extinct. The future is going to be Mexicans arguing with Asians.

    If appears as if these valleys flood every 150-200 years on average (the article says 5-7 floods per millennium) so if the last one was in the 1860s we are about due for a new one in the next 50 years or so. All the other floods were natural but this one will be due to "climate change".

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Kylie, @epebble, @Alden, @Hapalong Cassidy, @Almost Missouri, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    “Maybe it wasn’t such a hot idea to house millions of people (mostly new immigrants) on a flood plain?”

    Why not?

    • LOL: Polistra, bomag
  28. You never know abut the climate ….

    By the way- granny rocks.

  29. Every ballgame or horserace I turn on this summer seems to be in a rain delay, not to mention the floods in places such as Kentucky. But several hours north of NYC we are starved for rain much like LA, and my lawn looks like Nabisco Shredded Wheat.

    NYC typically gets about 46 inches of rain a year, while Los Angeles only gets 14 — and LA has now received less than that in the last two years combined.

  30. Best way to have a beautiful green pseudo lawn is to uproot all that grass in October November. Then go to a nursery and buy flats of penny royal, thyme camomile, baby tears and other plants that only grow about 2 inches high. Cut off the green top parts of some of the plants is you want to be a perfectionist. That is so that the roots will develop better and stronger over the winter.

    Scatter mixed plantings in full shade full sun whatever you have. Some plants will thrive in some places. If it’s a totally dry winter in S California water once a week. If the plants start dying or turning brown. Pennyroyal does beautifully in full sun and dry heat. This is important. Not all ground covers do well in different places. You might end up with a mixture of ground cover. Or maybe just one plant will thrive all over your kit. But you’ll probably end up with at least two maybe more ground cover plants.

    With a standard 25 by 100 lot it might take a couple years to achieve a beautiful green pseudo lawn. If you want to spend the money, but more flats of whatever plant grows best.

    In May you can start foliage feeding if you want. Liquid Fertilizer not fertilizer for flowers or fruit and vegetables but the kind for foliage. Teaspoon of liquid fertilizer to 2 quarts of water in a spray bottle. Squirt the mixture on the plants about once a week in the summer.

    You will soon have a beautiful always green pseudo lawn or ground cover. And you won’t ever have to mow it. Or really have to do anything with it after the first 8 months October November to July. Penny royal doesn’t grow in cold climates with snow. I’m pretty sure thyme and camomile can tolerate even a Canadian winter.

    So learn about your weather zone and about whatever plants you select. Does lawn really specify grass? I don’t know.

    Another way I like to use pennyroyal and other ground covers is around bushes and flower beds instead of bark or mulch. Big pots look better with ground cover around the plants instead of bark, mulch or bare dirt.

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
  31. @Jack D
    When I was a kid, people talked about earthquakes in California a lot (with good reason - most of the state is an earthquake zone) but nowadays earthquakes are out of fashion because they can't be blamed on "climate change". I would bet $ that the next big natural disaster in CA is more likely to be an earthquake than a megaflood. Just as megaflood hysteria is peaking in the media, something will happen to shake things up.

    numbers that will have massive implications for the Sacramento and San Joaquin River flood plains. These areas, Swain said, are the home of ancient flood deposits, as well as millions of Californians.

     

    Maybe it wasn't such a hot idea to house millions of people (mostly new immigrants) on a flood plain?

    Last night, my daughter told me that she was temporarily renting an apt in SF while she is out there on a SV internship. I looked up the neighborhood (Cayuga Terrace) on the census maps and on Google streee view to see if it was reasonably safe. The area is mostly Asian and Hispanic. The retail shops tend toward taquerias and pupusarias but it looked safe enough - no bars on windows, the shops don't have riot gates. The average little postwar row house in the neighborhood is $1M plus. White people barely register anymore in most of SF - they are effectively extinct. The future is going to be Mexicans arguing with Asians.

    If appears as if these valleys flood every 150-200 years on average (the article says 5-7 floods per millennium) so if the last one was in the 1860s we are about due for a new one in the next 50 years or so. All the other floods were natural but this one will be due to "climate change".

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Kylie, @epebble, @Alden, @Hapalong Cassidy, @Almost Missouri, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    Lived in CA for fifteen years. Had no fear of either earthquakes or floods. But come every summer, the fires raging around us were truly frightening, what with a nice layer of fine ash on the front yard to serve as a ransom note that there, but for a few miles and the accident of wind direction, you too …

  32. Negrolatrous White Conservatives scammed by Black woman.

  33. @Jack D
    When I was a kid, people talked about earthquakes in California a lot (with good reason - most of the state is an earthquake zone) but nowadays earthquakes are out of fashion because they can't be blamed on "climate change". I would bet $ that the next big natural disaster in CA is more likely to be an earthquake than a megaflood. Just as megaflood hysteria is peaking in the media, something will happen to shake things up.

    numbers that will have massive implications for the Sacramento and San Joaquin River flood plains. These areas, Swain said, are the home of ancient flood deposits, as well as millions of Californians.

     

    Maybe it wasn't such a hot idea to house millions of people (mostly new immigrants) on a flood plain?

    Last night, my daughter told me that she was temporarily renting an apt in SF while she is out there on a SV internship. I looked up the neighborhood (Cayuga Terrace) on the census maps and on Google streee view to see if it was reasonably safe. The area is mostly Asian and Hispanic. The retail shops tend toward taquerias and pupusarias but it looked safe enough - no bars on windows, the shops don't have riot gates. The average little postwar row house in the neighborhood is $1M plus. White people barely register anymore in most of SF - they are effectively extinct. The future is going to be Mexicans arguing with Asians.

    If appears as if these valleys flood every 150-200 years on average (the article says 5-7 floods per millennium) so if the last one was in the 1860s we are about due for a new one in the next 50 years or so. All the other floods were natural but this one will be due to "climate change".

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Kylie, @epebble, @Alden, @Hapalong Cassidy, @Almost Missouri, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    The Sacramento River Delta and the San Joaquin Valley just happen to be some of the primo agriculture lands in the world. That’s why people settled there. And the Sacramento River channels to snow melt from the mountains to the Bay.
    Delta river flood plains are where civilizations began. Ukraine along the rivers to the Black Sea. Ancient Egypt grew because of the Nile Delta. London and Paris are located along river deltas.

    Plus rivers offered transportation long before the wheel and draft animals. Plus fish for protein.

    That’s why pre humans and humans settled in flood plains Why farmers still do.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Alden

    Farming on fertile flood plains - excellent idea. Been done since the beginning of agriculture, as you say. Flood waters bring nutrients, replenish the soil.

    When the floods come, the farmer leaves his fields and comes back when the flood waters recede. No harm done.

    Building millions of houses in the middle of flood plains - not such a good idea. Houses get damaged in a flood a lot more than farm fields.

    Part of the problem is that we have a young country (and even then people did stupid things. The last big California flood was in the 1860s.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Flood_of_1862#Sacramento

    Even then Sacramento was badly damaged (underwater for 3 months) but then afterward it was rebuilt and everybody forgot what happened. The level of the city was raised 15 feet and new levees were built. So far they have worked but there hasn't been another 200 year flood again to test them.

    All over the middle east there are wadis, which are dry river beds. They are dry most of the time, but then on the rare occasions that it rains heavily, they become raging torrents. Most of us have seen the Los Angeles River from movie chase scenes. It's a wadi too. Most of the year it is completely dry or there is only a little stream going down the middle, but then when it rains it might as well be the Mississippi.

    https://nextcity.org/images/made/LA_LosAngelesRiver_920_626_80.jpg

    https://www.spl.usace.army.mil/Portals/17/Users/201/93/1993/141202-A-OV291-002_LA%20River.JPG?ver=2016-08-19-122838-503

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @International Jew

  34. @Achmed E. Newman
    Natural disasters would not be as damaging and could have been handled a lot better if it hadn't been for the man-made disaster that is now current-era California.

    Jack D. has it right. Do they even talk about the Big One, anymore? To me, the Big One was the overturning of Proposition 187 by a lefty judge.

    Replies: @MGB

    i was stationed in CA in ’89 for that quake. felt like an enormous train rolling through, plates falling off the shelves to the floor, the chow hall shaking. loss of electricity for a while, and cracks in foundations, but nothing like oakland/SF area. now i am in the NE waiting for the next 300 year earth quake event. if it were to happen i don’t think NYC/Boston would fair as well as CA.

    • Replies: @Sidewalk Meanderings
    @MGB

    The Northeast region and the East Coast have lots of unreinforced brick
    and masonry buildings built in the 19th and early 20th centuries which
    would collapse in a strong earthquake and bury thousands of people under
    their heavy weights. Photographs of the aftermath of the 1906 San Francisco
    earthquake show the Victorian houses built of redwood lumber still standing,
    while the brick and masonry buildings built downtown didn't resist the
    shaking so well and were reduced to rubble in the streets. One famous block
    of brick buildings that did survive the 1906 earthquake was actually built
    on a floating raft of redwood beams sunk into the mud when the bayshore
    location was filled in. There was a huge kerfuffle when Hugh Hefner bought
    the 1850s brick building on one corner of the block and tore it down to build
    his San Francisco Playboy Club, thus outraging the historical preservationists
    who wanted to save this rare surviving bit of 1850s history. I visited the new
    Playboy Club one time with a friend and it was boring, unlike the strip clubs
    springing up at the same time a few blocks north on Broadway. Herb Caen, the
    legendary columnist at the S.F. Chronicle, wittily remarked that the topless
    shoeshine stand across the street was more exciting than the Playboy Club.
    No wonder that the Club closed in a few years. Hefner should have consulted
    a feng shui specialist before tearing down that irreplaceable historical building!

  35. @Rob Lee
    Fictional, speculative and alarmist journalism is fun!

    'An overabundance of cotton candy could cause massive tooth decay.'

    'Studying diligently could help you pass that monstrous math test.'

    'Shifting welfare payments from societal dregs to struggling married couples could subsidize a return to a more healthy society.'

    'Paying doctors more than basketball players could urge more children to study medicine.'

    'Watching more zombie movies could increase your chances of surviving the coming apocalypse.'

    ...and so on. And each of the aforementioned are just as credible as the CBS News article referenced above.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    ‘Paying doctors more than basketball players could urge more children to study medicine.’

    Don’t really disagree with your general point but if you drew a Venn diagram of those who could be Doctors and those who could be basketball players you would have very little overlap outside of a couple of hundred Balkan and Baltic athletes and a couple of hundred American Whites. If your concerned medicine will miss out on their talents they can always switch in their mid 30s when their careers are over. Do you really want Kyrie ( flat earth) Irving dispensing medical advice?

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @kaganovitch

    Why would we pay doctors more?

    Makes more sense to tax professional athletes to lower their salaries.

    Not that I think the idea is sound.

    The med schools have more applicants than spaces. Yes the liberals fret about not enough Black applicants. I really don't care since they are happy to take away slots from White men for the sake of affirmative action. They don't believe in expanding degrees for all groups. They want fewer professional White men because on a subconscious level they really don't believe in equality.

  36. @ForeverCARealist
    @J.Ross

    Lawns, like agriculture, are good for absorbing air pollution. Desert landscaping can be very pretty, but it's also dusty, hot, and unusable for recreation.

    Fake lawns are coming in vogue here in Northern CA as well. I personally hate them. I'd rather the bark/mulch look with lots of perennials than the turf ugliness. My neighbor is putting in rocks (tons of them!) with desert plants. I find it silly since this isn't a desert and the plants are non-native.

    But as I've said many times, CA's bad governance and planning-- and water storage and allocation is a big one-- is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @Dave from Oz, @JR Ewing, @Harry Baldwin

    CA’s bad governance and planning … is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.

    Rejecting sufficient signatures to cancel the recall effort of George Gascón also helps in that regard. BTW, rhetorical question: why are states so cavalier about signatures on mail-in ballots during regular elections, but hyper-skeptical about signatures on recall petitions?

  37. @Steve Sailer
    @The Alarmist

    Richard Henry Dana visited California by ship in the 1830s, then by train in the 1870s. He reported that the type of cold northeast wind that was a plague in the 1830s, blowing them once almost to Hawaii, had largely faded away. (It's still around, but not enough to have a name like the famous hot southwestern wind, the Santa Ana.)

    Replies: @Voltarde

    Richard Henry Dana, a fine gentleman and the author of a great read!

    Two Years Before the Mast
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two_Years_Before_the_Mast

    • Agree: bomag
  38. @JR Ewing
    @ForeverCARealist


    But as I’ve said many times, CA’s bad governance and planning– and water storage and allocation is a big one– is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.
     
    This is something that blows my mind.

    Up until 50 years ago, they were always planning for the future by building new infrastructure: freeways, dams, aqueducts, power plants. That stuff wasn't needed right that moment, but they knew it was going to be necessary.

    Now they can't build a damn thing and claim that what they have right now - which was sufficient 20-30 years ago, but not any more - is enough and everyone just needs to deal with it and not plan on any more growth... and yet the population keeps growing, even if net migration is way up.

    You go to California now and outside of the very wealthy enclaves scattered around the state, most of it looks third world with crumbling insufficient infrastructure, aged buildings, and people literally living in the streets. The difference is that the true third world wants to do something about it and improve itself. California does not. They can't even replace what they have, much less build new stuff.

    The fact that they couldn't even find the political will for a (mostly) PRIVATELY FUNDED desalination plant is quite telling. It's literally additive to their current water supply - it won't harm existing waterways or take up any new land - and there is a significantly vocal enough minority that is against that progress for it's own sake.

    And they've managed to rig the political system enough through their "jungle primary" to where real political change is impossible. Democrats control everything and democrats don't care about the nuts and bolts of civilization, they care about pet social causes. Kamala Harris's political career is the prime example of how that works out.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @ForeverCARealist, @AnotherDad, @Jimi, @Lurker

    They can’t even replace what they have, much less build new stuff.

    Worse still, California will tear down existing hydroelectric dams and shut down nuclear plants despite the fact that the state already can’t handle its energy requirements. It’s the liberal death cult in action.

    https://www.mercurynews.com/2021/06/18/plan-to-raze-4-dams-on-california-oregon-line-clears-hurdle/

    • Replies: @Sick n' Tired
    @Harry Baldwin

    Arthur Haley wrote a fiction book called "Overload" which describes many of the issues California's electrical grid, power production, and consumtion, are going thru today, except his book was published in the late 70s. It's worth a read, with a few laughs that will make you shake your head.

    https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/overload_arthur-hailey/658009/item/2276071/?gclid=CjwKCAjw6fyXBhBgEiwAhhiZsgfB--mm4s_GWtbcAe7nvrFVuU8J2k0DfRyaR4Z0hh0qDQvLKdcDSxoCceoQAvD_BwE#idiq=2276071&edition=2169057

  39. @LP5
    Steve,
    Do many people around Los Angeles really have Astroturf lawns? What would happen to those and the neighborhoods if your deluge arrives? No soil absorption and instant runoff, so another Biblical event?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @John Johnson

    Do many people around Los Angeles really have Astroturf lawns? What would happen to those and the neighborhoods if your deluge arrives? No soil absorption and instant runoff, so another Biblical event?

    The real grass they use doesn’t absorb much water.

    It’s this rough Bermuda grass that would be no different than astroturf in a rainstorm. In fact a rainstorm can kill the roots and wash away the soil.

    The backyards are probably a bigger problem. Flat patios that aren’t designed to handle large amounts of water.

  40. @J.Ross
    Why do Southern Californians have Scottish-style lawns and not desert landscapes with decorative rocks and arranged scrub?

    Replies: @ForeverCARealist, @Whereismyhandle, @John Johnson, @Alden, @Anonymous

    Why do Southern Californians have Scottish-style lawns and not desert landscapes with decorative rocks and arranged scrub?

    Because it is LA.

    LA liberals can talk all day about how conservatives are the problem but they want their 2-3 car garage and green lawn.

    Not that conservatives are any better. San Diego Republicans also want their green lawns and golf courses.

    I really like the look of desert Xeriscaping. Most people don’t even use their lawns. I get having one for the kids but most of those green front lawns are never used. Xeriscaping is the norm in Las Vegas.

    But even if everyone in California switched to Xeriscaping they would still have a water shortage. Too many people and they haven’t developed new sources. The wealthy Democrats that run the state don’t give an F. They would like more people to leave and don’t care if they lose farmers. In their minds it would be getting rid of Trump voters and saving water. A two-fer.

  41. @Dave from Oz
    @ForeverCARealist


    I’d rather the bark/mulch look with lots of perennials than the turf ugliness.
     
    Australian, here. Bark/mulch is a terrible idea in hot climates: it catches sparks.

    Replies: @SF, @ForeverCARealist, @HA

    In California, most bark is somewhat fire resistant. Thick bark helps older trees survive fire.
    One of our worst fire disasters happened in the Berkeley hills where we had planted Australian trees.

  42. @Jack D
    When I was a kid, people talked about earthquakes in California a lot (with good reason - most of the state is an earthquake zone) but nowadays earthquakes are out of fashion because they can't be blamed on "climate change". I would bet $ that the next big natural disaster in CA is more likely to be an earthquake than a megaflood. Just as megaflood hysteria is peaking in the media, something will happen to shake things up.

    numbers that will have massive implications for the Sacramento and San Joaquin River flood plains. These areas, Swain said, are the home of ancient flood deposits, as well as millions of Californians.

     

    Maybe it wasn't such a hot idea to house millions of people (mostly new immigrants) on a flood plain?

    Last night, my daughter told me that she was temporarily renting an apt in SF while she is out there on a SV internship. I looked up the neighborhood (Cayuga Terrace) on the census maps and on Google streee view to see if it was reasonably safe. The area is mostly Asian and Hispanic. The retail shops tend toward taquerias and pupusarias but it looked safe enough - no bars on windows, the shops don't have riot gates. The average little postwar row house in the neighborhood is $1M plus. White people barely register anymore in most of SF - they are effectively extinct. The future is going to be Mexicans arguing with Asians.

    If appears as if these valleys flood every 150-200 years on average (the article says 5-7 floods per millennium) so if the last one was in the 1860s we are about due for a new one in the next 50 years or so. All the other floods were natural but this one will be due to "climate change".

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Kylie, @epebble, @Alden, @Hapalong Cassidy, @Almost Missouri, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    Just another example of how humans have regressed. In the old times whenever natural disasters happened it was common place to blame it on the Gods being angry with humans for their transgressions. To go against climate change is to go against the (woke) Gods.

    • Agree: Alden
  43. @Jack D
    When I was a kid, people talked about earthquakes in California a lot (with good reason - most of the state is an earthquake zone) but nowadays earthquakes are out of fashion because they can't be blamed on "climate change". I would bet $ that the next big natural disaster in CA is more likely to be an earthquake than a megaflood. Just as megaflood hysteria is peaking in the media, something will happen to shake things up.

    numbers that will have massive implications for the Sacramento and San Joaquin River flood plains. These areas, Swain said, are the home of ancient flood deposits, as well as millions of Californians.

     

    Maybe it wasn't such a hot idea to house millions of people (mostly new immigrants) on a flood plain?

    Last night, my daughter told me that she was temporarily renting an apt in SF while she is out there on a SV internship. I looked up the neighborhood (Cayuga Terrace) on the census maps and on Google streee view to see if it was reasonably safe. The area is mostly Asian and Hispanic. The retail shops tend toward taquerias and pupusarias but it looked safe enough - no bars on windows, the shops don't have riot gates. The average little postwar row house in the neighborhood is $1M plus. White people barely register anymore in most of SF - they are effectively extinct. The future is going to be Mexicans arguing with Asians.

    If appears as if these valleys flood every 150-200 years on average (the article says 5-7 floods per millennium) so if the last one was in the 1860s we are about due for a new one in the next 50 years or so. All the other floods were natural but this one will be due to "climate change".

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Kylie, @epebble, @Alden, @Hapalong Cassidy, @Almost Missouri, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    nowadays earthquakes are out of fashion because they can’t be blamed on “climate change”.

    Rest assured, Jack, they’re working on it:

    https://www.air-worldwide.com/blog/posts/2021/11/climate-change-may-influence-earthquakes/

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/oct/16/climate-change-triggers-earthquakes-tsunamis-volcanoes (Coming Soon: Climate Change Volcanoes!)

    The woke clerisy won’t rest until every mishap is squarely on your shoulders for your eco-sins.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Almost Missouri

    The motto of these people should be "The Sky Is Falling!"

  44. I’ve never seen stop signs under water — but I have seen Lakeshore (notice the name) Avenue in Oakland, Ca flooded to a couple of feet. That would have been at some point in the Seventies.

    I’m a global warming believer — but unusual climate events happen. When they do, it’s not always global warming. I’ve had accidents driving, and I’ve driven very drunk. Although driving drunk may well make it more likely I’ll have an accident, as it happens every accident I’ve had occurred while I was completely sober.

    …so if you want to be sure your daughter gets home safely, just prime me with a bottle of wine first.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Colin Wright


    I’ve had accidents driving, and I’ve driven very drunk. Although driving drunk may well make it more likely I’ll have an accident, as it happens every accident I’ve had occurred while I was completely sober.
     
    Are we talking several accidents, dozens, or hundreds?
  45. @Steve Sailer
    @LP5

    Both my neighbors have astroturf lawns. I don't know if they are at all porous. If not, yeah, there could be more runoff in a flood.

    Replies: @Muggles

    In the 8 feet of water type megaflood you referenced from the 19th century, there would be nothing but runoff.

    As one who saw about 3 feet of water in my front yard from Harvey a few years ago, such flooding isn’t good for lawns much either.

    Depending on the type of grass, it can kill if standing water ponds very long. Also will ruin what you have on your first floor in your home. Eight feet would wash away billions in real estate there too.

    Heavy rains high up behind reservoirs would help your lawn but not in front of them.

    Of course if Cali spent its billions on desalinization plants instead of “high speed rail” that will likely never be built, their water problems could be solved.

    But no, the homeless zombies don’t want to take slow buses up to the Streets of San Francisco. I guess they will need to take their own water bottles though.

  46. @Dave from Oz
    @ForeverCARealist


    I’d rather the bark/mulch look with lots of perennials than the turf ugliness.
     
    Australian, here. Bark/mulch is a terrible idea in hot climates: it catches sparks.

    Replies: @SF, @ForeverCARealist, @HA

    We don’t really have fires in the burbs. Catching sparks is a nightmare for the rural areas, like the commenter mentioning Mark Twain’s forest fire around Tahoe.

    But don’t bark and mulch hold in the moisture?

    • Replies: @Alden
    @ForeverCARealist

    Bark and mulch keep the moisture in the ground. The bark and mulch dry out and are somewhat of a fire hazard.

  47. @JR Ewing
    @ForeverCARealist


    But as I’ve said many times, CA’s bad governance and planning– and water storage and allocation is a big one– is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.
     
    This is something that blows my mind.

    Up until 50 years ago, they were always planning for the future by building new infrastructure: freeways, dams, aqueducts, power plants. That stuff wasn't needed right that moment, but they knew it was going to be necessary.

    Now they can't build a damn thing and claim that what they have right now - which was sufficient 20-30 years ago, but not any more - is enough and everyone just needs to deal with it and not plan on any more growth... and yet the population keeps growing, even if net migration is way up.

    You go to California now and outside of the very wealthy enclaves scattered around the state, most of it looks third world with crumbling insufficient infrastructure, aged buildings, and people literally living in the streets. The difference is that the true third world wants to do something about it and improve itself. California does not. They can't even replace what they have, much less build new stuff.

    The fact that they couldn't even find the political will for a (mostly) PRIVATELY FUNDED desalination plant is quite telling. It's literally additive to their current water supply - it won't harm existing waterways or take up any new land - and there is a significantly vocal enough minority that is against that progress for it's own sake.

    And they've managed to rig the political system enough through their "jungle primary" to where real political change is impossible. Democrats control everything and democrats don't care about the nuts and bolts of civilization, they care about pet social causes. Kamala Harris's political career is the prime example of how that works out.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @ForeverCARealist, @AnotherDad, @Jimi, @Lurker

    I get your point, and I can’t stand the enviros, but if CA really did attempt keeping up with water, electricity, roads, schools, law and order… well, the population would just continually grow and grow.

    What’s been CA’s growth since 1950? 30 million? The received wisdom is that it’s currently falling, but I see no sign of it; in fact, the opposite.

    I watch the new neighborhoods constantly sprouting around me, thousands of new houses in the Sacramento area and up into the foothills, and I know they won’t stop until there’s some sort of outside force applied. Price? Water? Schools? homelessness? None of it seems to matter so far.

  48. @J.Ross
    Why do Southern Californians have Scottish-style lawns and not desert landscapes with decorative rocks and arranged scrub?

    Replies: @ForeverCARealist, @Whereismyhandle, @John Johnson, @Alden, @Anonymous

    1 Desert landscapes are very very ugly.

    2 The idiot environmentalists, liberals gardeners landscape designers and nurseries that sell plants are so incredibly ignorant they don’t realize that pretty 18 inch tall desert plants will be 10 feet tall in about 5 years. So in a few years the house is buried behind 10 feet tall bushes. It’s really bad in one story houses with wide eaves. The nurseries landscape designers totally live replacing grass lawns with desert landscapes because they can make a great deal of money digging up lawns and replacing them with desert landscapes. Profit rules. Even if the house disappears behind the 10 foot tall bushes.

    3 Cost it costs a lot of money to dig up a lawn and replace it with a desert landscape.

    4 Fire hazard those desert plants are loaded with flammable creosote resin and other explosive substances. In fact some of those fire hazard desert landscape bushes are on the County list of plants forbidden to be planted on residential lots because of the fire hazard.

    5 Lawns cost a lot of money and demand frequent mowing. A real burden if homeowner doesn’t have the money to pay a gardener or time to do it himself

    6 But at least lawns can be mowed and are not a fire hazard even in September when they are totally dry and yellow. Those desert bushes are a fire hazard.

    Replace the ugly high maintenance dried out grass with a ground cover such as pennyroyal which absolutely thrives in dry hot dusty S Ca summer’s. Don’t get an expensive desert landscape unless you are prepared to prune them down to the proper height in proportion to the height of the walls of your house a couple times a year. Height of the walls, not height including the roof.

    Main reason desert landscapes were a brief fad is cost. It’s very expensive to move 400 pound rocks to your yard. Plus the fire hazard. Plus the 18 inch plants becoming 6 foot wide 10-12 feet tall in a few years. Succulents are a good compromise.

    • Thanks: J.Ross
    • Replies: @Alden
    @Alden

    Bromeliads bromeliads are perfect. There are many very pretty varieties and the stay low instead of growing huge and too large for the house. Also like bulbs they propagate themselves. Another plant that looks well and doesn’t need much water is the ornamental cabbages. Another bad thing about the desert bushes that grow so big is like ivy, rats love then. And establish big colonies in them. And then a neighbor calls a city or county inspector and you’re ordered to get rid of all your desert bushes because they harbor rats. And are a fire hazard.

    Good news re; rats in west Los Angeles. The coyotes that live in Bel Air Brentwood and the UCLA and Veterans Administration grounds seem to have killed off all the rats. And in my Bay Area neighborhood the mountain lion and coyotes wiped out the raccoons. Sometimes nature is good.

    , @Sollipsist
    @Alden

    Kudos to the author for being possibly the first to sound a warning about all the towering, fast-growing native flora so characteristic of the American Southwest. Along with the "rocks are a fire hazard" theory, this post is brimming with the kind of down-to-earth common sense wisdom we've all come to expect from Californians.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

  49. @Bill H.
    Well, the headline in Southern California is more definitive.

    "Giant Megaflood is coming to California, and it will cost billions!"

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    “Giant Megaflood is coming to California, and it will cost billions!”

    Don’t forget Steve’s tagline:

    Women and minorities hit hardest.

    In this case it will be true. White men make up about 17% of the population. There are about six million white men in California, just ahead of Pennsylvania’s five million.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Reg Cæsar

    White men only 17 percent? No wonder the state is in the condition it is. Still, remember it was the White man Sierra Club other environmentalists, governors and evil satanic liberals that were the prime movers behind destructive liberalism.

    Replies: @Polistra

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Reg Cæsar

    Aren't Hispanics a majority by now? They're going to have to change that tagline to Women and majorities hardest hit.

    Then, there's the headline from The Daily Stupid, issue 53327:

    Ike Turner Paroled - Women Hit Hardest

    (Thanks, Adam Smith!)

  50. @ForeverCARealist
    @Dave from Oz

    We don't really have fires in the burbs. Catching sparks is a nightmare for the rural areas, like the commenter mentioning Mark Twain's forest fire around Tahoe.

    But don't bark and mulch hold in the moisture?

    Replies: @Alden

    Bark and mulch keep the moisture in the ground. The bark and mulch dry out and are somewhat of a fire hazard.

  51. “Sin City” (Graham Parsons – Chris Hillman – Flying Burrito Brothers) (on YouTube)

    This old town is filled with sin
    It will swallow you in
    If you’ve got some money to burn
    Take it home right away
    You’ve got three years to pay
    But Satan is waiting his turn
    The scientists say
    It will all wash away
    But we don’t believe any more
    Cause we’ve got our recruits
    And our green mohair suits
    So please show your I.D. At the door
    This old earthquake’s gonna leave me in the poor house
    It seems like this whole town’s insane
    On the thirty-first floor a gold plated door
    Won’t keep out the Lord’s burning rain

  52. @Steve Sailer
    @Whereismyhandle

    Not lately.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Chrisnonymous, @Whereismyhandle, @J.Ross

    It’s raining in the UK for the first time in maybe 7 weeks – proper rain too, not torrential but enough to really soak the soil. But over those 7 weeks we’ve had a lot of high (for England) temperatures – 35-37c, mid-late 90s f. Driest summer since 1976 but way hotter.

    We did our best, put out water everywhere, but a lot of wild birds have died, the ground too hard to dig for worms and insects. Our garden’s usually pretty noisy but not this summer.

    (Now of course the lawns will shoot up, we’ve not had to cut them in a month where in a normal summer it might be every 3-4 days)

  53. A disastrous megaflood could bring more than 8 feet of water to parts of California, scientists say

    Not a problem unless you live in a valley …. ooops.

    Seriously California is dry. It has a Mediterranean (winter rain) climate (like here in the PNW) but most all the Pacific moisture there ends up in mountains as snowfall.

    Ballparking it (i may be off a couple inches here or there):
    San Diego 10″
    LA 15″
    Fresno 10″
    Sacramento 20″
    SF 25″

    You need the occasional good soaking dump. (Of course, all the nice green sprouty stuff … will then dry and burn a few years later.)

    The only issue is the joint is loaded up with people. Probably about 10-15 million more people then it would have if we’d had sane immigration policies.

  54. @JR Ewing
    @ForeverCARealist


    But as I’ve said many times, CA’s bad governance and planning– and water storage and allocation is a big one– is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.
     
    This is something that blows my mind.

    Up until 50 years ago, they were always planning for the future by building new infrastructure: freeways, dams, aqueducts, power plants. That stuff wasn't needed right that moment, but they knew it was going to be necessary.

    Now they can't build a damn thing and claim that what they have right now - which was sufficient 20-30 years ago, but not any more - is enough and everyone just needs to deal with it and not plan on any more growth... and yet the population keeps growing, even if net migration is way up.

    You go to California now and outside of the very wealthy enclaves scattered around the state, most of it looks third world with crumbling insufficient infrastructure, aged buildings, and people literally living in the streets. The difference is that the true third world wants to do something about it and improve itself. California does not. They can't even replace what they have, much less build new stuff.

    The fact that they couldn't even find the political will for a (mostly) PRIVATELY FUNDED desalination plant is quite telling. It's literally additive to their current water supply - it won't harm existing waterways or take up any new land - and there is a significantly vocal enough minority that is against that progress for it's own sake.

    And they've managed to rig the political system enough through their "jungle primary" to where real political change is impossible. Democrats control everything and democrats don't care about the nuts and bolts of civilization, they care about pet social causes. Kamala Harris's political career is the prime example of how that works out.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @ForeverCARealist, @AnotherDad, @Jimi, @Lurker

    Up until 50 years ago, they were always planning for the future by building new infrastructure: freeways, dams, aqueducts, power plants. That stuff wasn’t needed right that moment, but they knew it was going to be necessary.

    Now they can’t build a damn thing and claim that what they have right now – which was sufficient 20-30 years ago, but not any more – is enough and everyone just needs to deal with it and not plan on any more growth… and yet the population keeps growing, even if net migration is way up.

    Spot on JR.

    When I was a kid America could–and did–build stuff. Now the lawyers and bureaucrats and “activists” keep it from building stuff. And when the politicians decide to push on through and build something anyway the costs are insane because the lawyers and bureaucrats and “activists” collect 90% of it.

    The great and the good do not want to build stuff, but to “limit growth”.

    Except … the one thing they refuse to do is limit immigration, which is the cause of *all* growth now in the United States. (Gen 1+2.)

    Must have immigration! Must have immigration! But building the infrastructure to handle an expanding population … nah.

  55. @Alden
    @Jack D

    The Sacramento River Delta and the San Joaquin Valley just happen to be some of the primo agriculture lands in the world. That’s why people settled there. And the Sacramento River channels to snow melt from the mountains to the Bay.
    Delta river flood plains are where civilizations began. Ukraine along the rivers to the Black Sea. Ancient Egypt grew because of the Nile Delta. London and Paris are located along river deltas.

    Plus rivers offered transportation long before the wheel and draft animals. Plus fish for protein.

    That’s why pre humans and humans settled in flood plains Why farmers still do.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Farming on fertile flood plains – excellent idea. Been done since the beginning of agriculture, as you say. Flood waters bring nutrients, replenish the soil.

    When the floods come, the farmer leaves his fields and comes back when the flood waters recede. No harm done.

    Building millions of houses in the middle of flood plains – not such a good idea. Houses get damaged in a flood a lot more than farm fields.

    Part of the problem is that we have a young country (and even then people did stupid things. The last big California flood was in the 1860s.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Flood_of_1862#Sacramento

    Even then Sacramento was badly damaged (underwater for 3 months) but then afterward it was rebuilt and everybody forgot what happened. The level of the city was raised 15 feet and new levees were built. So far they have worked but there hasn’t been another 200 year flood again to test them.

    All over the middle east there are wadis, which are dry river beds. They are dry most of the time, but then on the rare occasions that it rains heavily, they become raging torrents. Most of us have seen the Los Angeles River from movie chase scenes. It’s a wadi too. Most of the year it is completely dry or there is only a little stream going down the middle, but then when it rains it might as well be the Mississippi.

    https://www.spl.usace.army.mil/Portals/17/Users/201/93/1993/141202-A-OV291-002_LA%20River.JPG?ver=2016-08-19-122838-503

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    Farming on fertile flood plains – excellent idea. Been done since the beginning of agriculture, as you say. Flood waters bring nutrients, replenish the soil. When the floods come, the farmer leaves his fields and comes back when the flood waters recede. No harm done.

    Building millions of houses in the middle of flood plains – not such a good idea. Houses get damaged in a flood a lot more than farm fields.
     

    Exactly, bottom land is for farming (or preserves, parks, golf courses), not for development.

    And yeah, we're a young country and we put towns and cities along rivers without a historic understand of flood likeyhood. But if you find them flooding ... then do not rebuild them in the same place. Move them up, back, away.

    Common sense is not really that hard. It's amazing how little of it we practice.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @International Jew
    @Jack D

    What protects Sacramento from floods happens to protect the nice college town of Davis from Sacramento — a 2-mile-wide flood diversion zone. As a result, Sac's cancerous sprawl can go north, east and south but not west toward Davis. Limits crime too as West Sac is pretty nasty but there's only one road across that flood zone.

  56. @Reg Cæsar
    @Bill H.


    “Giant Megaflood is coming to California, and it will cost billions!”
     


    Don't forget Steve's tagline:

    Women and minorities hit hardest.

    In this case it will be true. White men make up about 17% of the population. There are about six million white men in California, just ahead of Pennsylvania's five million.

    Replies: @Alden, @Achmed E. Newman

    White men only 17 percent? No wonder the state is in the condition it is. Still, remember it was the White man Sierra Club other environmentalists, governors and evil satanic liberals that were the prime movers behind destructive liberalism.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Alden

    One can just feel you working your way up to your next psychotic MEN OF UNZ post.

    Replies: @Alden

  57. @Almost Missouri
    @Jack D


    nowadays earthquakes are out of fashion because they can’t be blamed on “climate change”.
     
    Rest assured, Jack, they're working on it:

    https://www.air-worldwide.com/blog/posts/2021/11/climate-change-may-influence-earthquakes/

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/oct/16/climate-change-triggers-earthquakes-tsunamis-volcanoes (Coming Soon: Climate Change Volcanoes!)

    The woke clerisy won't rest until every mishap is squarely on your shoulders for your eco-sins.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    The motto of these people should be “The Sky Is Falling!”

  58. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D


    ...nowadays earthquakes are out of fashion because they can’t be blamed on “climate change”
     
    Good point, Jack.

    They may yet find a way to pin the next big earthquake on The Climate Crisis™ * Greta is one smart cookie.

    .

    * Try to keep up with the terminology, please!!

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

    Greta is one smart cookie.

    I am afraid that the lamentable phenomenon of adults taking a 16-year-old child seriously has a lot less to do with any cleverness on her part and a lot more to do with good sense being replaced with sentimentality on theirs.

    Consider: How many non-PC-addled adults would take advice from a child in the course of everyday life? Not many, and that is because adults understand, if only instinctively, that children rarely understand how the world works.

    With age comes understanding. That is what adulthood is all about (or used to be about), and why old age was formerly revered in societies rather than regarded with contempt as it is today (because old people had seen it all before, and could advise younger people on how to avoid making the same foolish mistakes again).

    When an organisation like the UN starts taking directions on how to run the world from a 16-year-old, it is their way of indicating they do not deserve to be taken any more seriously than a 16-year-old.

    As Theodore Dalrymple observes, “Political correctness is often the attempt to make sentimentality socially obligatory or legally enforceable.” The only reason Greta is taken seriously by adults in the West is because none of the adults in charge has the guts to tell Greta to sit down and shut up as they would with any other know-all 16-year-old who thinks she understands how the world works.

  59. @Alden
    @J.Ross

    1 Desert landscapes are very very ugly.

    2 The idiot environmentalists, liberals gardeners landscape designers and nurseries that sell plants are so incredibly ignorant they don’t realize that pretty 18 inch tall desert plants will be 10 feet tall in about 5 years. So in a few years the house is buried behind 10 feet tall bushes. It’s really bad in one story houses with wide eaves. The nurseries landscape designers totally live replacing grass lawns with desert landscapes because they can make a great deal of money digging up lawns and replacing them with desert landscapes. Profit rules. Even if the house disappears behind the 10 foot tall bushes.

    3 Cost it costs a lot of money to dig up a lawn and replace it with a desert landscape.

    4 Fire hazard those desert plants are loaded with flammable creosote resin and other explosive substances. In fact some of those fire hazard desert landscape bushes are on the County list of plants forbidden to be planted on residential lots because of the fire hazard.

    5 Lawns cost a lot of money and demand frequent mowing. A real burden if homeowner doesn’t have the money to pay a gardener or time to do it himself

    6 But at least lawns can be mowed and are not a fire hazard even in September when they are totally dry and yellow. Those desert bushes are a fire hazard.

    Replace the ugly high maintenance dried out grass with a ground cover such as pennyroyal which absolutely thrives in dry hot dusty S Ca summer’s. Don’t get an expensive desert landscape unless you are prepared to prune them down to the proper height in proportion to the height of the walls of your house a couple times a year. Height of the walls, not height including the roof.

    Main reason desert landscapes were a brief fad is cost. It’s very expensive to move 400 pound rocks to your yard. Plus the fire hazard. Plus the 18 inch plants becoming 6 foot wide 10-12 feet tall in a few years. Succulents are a good compromise.

    Replies: @Alden, @Sollipsist

    Bromeliads bromeliads are perfect. There are many very pretty varieties and the stay low instead of growing huge and too large for the house. Also like bulbs they propagate themselves. Another plant that looks well and doesn’t need much water is the ornamental cabbages. Another bad thing about the desert bushes that grow so big is like ivy, rats love then. And establish big colonies in them. And then a neighbor calls a city or county inspector and you’re ordered to get rid of all your desert bushes because they harbor rats. And are a fire hazard.

    Good news re; rats in west Los Angeles. The coyotes that live in Bel Air Brentwood and the UCLA and Veterans Administration grounds seem to have killed off all the rats. And in my Bay Area neighborhood the mountain lion and coyotes wiped out the raccoons. Sometimes nature is good.

  60. @War for Blair Mountain
    Steve….off topic:

    THEY MURDERED FREYA…..THOSE GODDAM BASTARDS!!!!…..GODDAM BASTARDS!!!!

    Freya…..RIP….

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Worse than Harambe, because Freya wasn’t so much as potentially bothering anyone, and idiots who wanted to take selfies harassed and misguided her to ferality.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @J.Ross

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11115815/Norwegian-official-ordered-killing-Freya-walrus-received-death-threats-UK-US.html

    Replies: @J.Ross

  61. @Steve Sailer
    @Whereismyhandle

    Not lately.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Chrisnonymous, @Whereismyhandle, @J.Ross

    Maybe it’s just your improved eyesight!

  62. @MGB
    @Achmed E. Newman

    i was stationed in CA in '89 for that quake. felt like an enormous train rolling through, plates falling off the shelves to the floor, the chow hall shaking. loss of electricity for a while, and cracks in foundations, but nothing like oakland/SF area. now i am in the NE waiting for the next 300 year earth quake event. if it were to happen i don't think NYC/Boston would fair as well as CA.

    Replies: @Sidewalk Meanderings

    The Northeast region and the East Coast have lots of unreinforced brick
    and masonry buildings built in the 19th and early 20th centuries which
    would collapse in a strong earthquake and bury thousands of people under
    their heavy weights. Photographs of the aftermath of the 1906 San Francisco
    earthquake show the Victorian houses built of redwood lumber still standing,
    while the brick and masonry buildings built downtown didn’t resist the
    shaking so well and were reduced to rubble in the streets. One famous block
    of brick buildings that did survive the 1906 earthquake was actually built
    on a floating raft of redwood beams sunk into the mud when the bayshore
    location was filled in. There was a huge kerfuffle when Hugh Hefner bought
    the 1850s brick building on one corner of the block and tore it down to build
    his San Francisco Playboy Club, thus outraging the historical preservationists
    who wanted to save this rare surviving bit of 1850s history. I visited the new
    Playboy Club one time with a friend and it was boring, unlike the strip clubs
    springing up at the same time a few blocks north on Broadway. Herb Caen, the
    legendary columnist at the S.F. Chronicle, wittily remarked that the topless
    shoeshine stand across the street was more exciting than the Playboy Club.
    No wonder that the Club closed in a few years. Hefner should have consulted
    a feng shui specialist before tearing down that irreplaceable historical building!

  63. @kaganovitch
    @Rob Lee

    ‘Paying doctors more than basketball players could urge more children to study medicine.’

    Don't really disagree with your general point but if you drew a Venn diagram of those who could be Doctors and those who could be basketball players you would have very little overlap outside of a couple of hundred Balkan and Baltic athletes and a couple of hundred American Whites. If your concerned medicine will miss out on their talents they can always switch in their mid 30s when their careers are over. Do you really want Kyrie ( flat earth) Irving dispensing medical advice?

    Replies: @John Johnson

    Why would we pay doctors more?

    Makes more sense to tax professional athletes to lower their salaries.

    Not that I think the idea is sound.

    The med schools have more applicants than spaces. Yes the liberals fret about not enough Black applicants. I really don’t care since they are happy to take away slots from White men for the sake of affirmative action. They don’t believe in expanding degrees for all groups. They want fewer professional White men because on a subconscious level they really don’t believe in equality.

  64. “it could completely drown entire stop signs on a neighborhood street. ”

    How does one drown a stop sign? Perhaps submerge would have been a better word?

  65. Can we assume that the racist flood will disproportionately affect people of color?

  66. What we need here in Arizona is a flood that will kill only Californians but magically leave everyone else untouched (except for maybe the illegal aliens).

    • Replies: @G. Poulin
    @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.

    If the Arizonians smear the word "MAGA" over their doorposts just before the flood, I think that will do the trick.

  67. @Dave from Oz
    @ForeverCARealist


    I’d rather the bark/mulch look with lots of perennials than the turf ugliness.
     
    Australian, here. Bark/mulch is a terrible idea in hot climates: it catches sparks.

    Replies: @SF, @ForeverCARealist, @HA

    “Australian, here. Bark/mulch is a terrible idea in hot climates: it catches sparks.”

    Your perspective is somewhat skewed. In fact, outside of your home continent, not everything in nature is designed to kill you.

    But when it comes to the eucalyptus trees which comprise the majority of Australian forests — they literally explode:

    These hardy plants have delightfully scented, volatile oil in all parts of the plant… When the oils in the tree heat up, the plant releases flammable gas, which ignites into a fireball.

    Did I mention the fireball? And so, what did Californians do when it comes to eucalyptus trees? Apparently, they imported them in vast numbers — can’t get enough of them, apparently. Why I am not surprised by this? Oh yeah, it’s because I read Sailer.

    By the early 1900s, thousands of acres of eucalypts were planted with the encouragement of the state government. It was hoped that they would provide a renewable source of timber for construction, furniture making and railroad ties.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @HA

    Bringing Eucalyptus trees to California around 1900 was one of the dumbest ever things environmentalists and nature lovers ever did.

    Yes they are inflammable worse than dried out Christmas trees. But they are also poisonous. The bark wood leaves and seeds poison other plants. Including trees. Eucalyptus destroys other trees. Plus their roots and the tiny little thread size roots are able to suck up every bit of water and nutrition in the area. Kills even weeds wild wheat and scrub grass.

    Marin County Ca has lots of original redwood forests. And lots of eucalyptus trees that are advancing on the other trees. Drive the narrow back roads west of Mill Valley. It was all redwoods and oaks at one time. Then the nature lovers brought in eucalyptus. I drove through a forest fire there a long time ago. The eucalyptus groves were all on fire. The redwood groves not on fire. Even though the 2 different groves were next to each other.

    I’ve never seen a mixed grove or woods with eucalyptus trees mixed with other trees. Because they kill the other trees. Also contribute to erosion and dust . Because they kill all the weeds and plants whose roots hold the soil in place.

    Importing Eucalyptus trees seemed like a good idea at the time.

    A relative who survived the 2017 Napa fire said you could hear the Eucalyptus trees just exploding. Which of course spreads the fire.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Achmed E. Newman

    , @sb
    @HA

    You people are being so unkind about our friendly and cuddly Aussie flora and fauna that it makes me want to reciprocate in kind .
    Pine plantations ( pinus radiata ) in Australia are an ecological desert and a serious fire hazard .
    Many years ago people also had the bright idea of growing Californian redwoods as a timber tree . The thing is that they are so slow growing to be unsuitable for commercial timber and again are an ecological no go zone .
    I've admired eucalyptus trees around the world ( we call them gum trees )and recall some fine specimens at the university grounds at Berkeley .

    So there!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  68. @JR Ewing
    @ForeverCARealist


    But as I’ve said many times, CA’s bad governance and planning– and water storage and allocation is a big one– is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.
     
    This is something that blows my mind.

    Up until 50 years ago, they were always planning for the future by building new infrastructure: freeways, dams, aqueducts, power plants. That stuff wasn't needed right that moment, but they knew it was going to be necessary.

    Now they can't build a damn thing and claim that what they have right now - which was sufficient 20-30 years ago, but not any more - is enough and everyone just needs to deal with it and not plan on any more growth... and yet the population keeps growing, even if net migration is way up.

    You go to California now and outside of the very wealthy enclaves scattered around the state, most of it looks third world with crumbling insufficient infrastructure, aged buildings, and people literally living in the streets. The difference is that the true third world wants to do something about it and improve itself. California does not. They can't even replace what they have, much less build new stuff.

    The fact that they couldn't even find the political will for a (mostly) PRIVATELY FUNDED desalination plant is quite telling. It's literally additive to their current water supply - it won't harm existing waterways or take up any new land - and there is a significantly vocal enough minority that is against that progress for it's own sake.

    And they've managed to rig the political system enough through their "jungle primary" to where real political change is impossible. Democrats control everything and democrats don't care about the nuts and bolts of civilization, they care about pet social causes. Kamala Harris's political career is the prime example of how that works out.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @ForeverCARealist, @AnotherDad, @Jimi, @Lurker

    Not sure why, but in California 10 Republicans will run in an election and split the vote. The state party needs to start endorsing the electable candidate pushing the other candidates out of the ware.

  69. @Steve Sailer
    @Whereismyhandle

    Not lately.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Chrisnonymous, @Whereismyhandle, @J.Ross

    Can Anna go one day without bringing up Steve Sailer? She’s speaking your meeting into existence.

    That’s all she wants for her birthday

  70. @Steve Sailer
    @Whereismyhandle

    Not lately.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Chrisnonymous, @Whereismyhandle, @J.Ross

    Metaphor, Steve, metaphor: when a femoid enjoys the thought of your lawn or car, she is wistfully imagining your capacity for housework — come to think of it, yeah, say it’s all brown.

  71. @Jack D
    @Alden

    Farming on fertile flood plains - excellent idea. Been done since the beginning of agriculture, as you say. Flood waters bring nutrients, replenish the soil.

    When the floods come, the farmer leaves his fields and comes back when the flood waters recede. No harm done.

    Building millions of houses in the middle of flood plains - not such a good idea. Houses get damaged in a flood a lot more than farm fields.

    Part of the problem is that we have a young country (and even then people did stupid things. The last big California flood was in the 1860s.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Flood_of_1862#Sacramento

    Even then Sacramento was badly damaged (underwater for 3 months) but then afterward it was rebuilt and everybody forgot what happened. The level of the city was raised 15 feet and new levees were built. So far they have worked but there hasn't been another 200 year flood again to test them.

    All over the middle east there are wadis, which are dry river beds. They are dry most of the time, but then on the rare occasions that it rains heavily, they become raging torrents. Most of us have seen the Los Angeles River from movie chase scenes. It's a wadi too. Most of the year it is completely dry or there is only a little stream going down the middle, but then when it rains it might as well be the Mississippi.

    https://nextcity.org/images/made/LA_LosAngelesRiver_920_626_80.jpg

    https://www.spl.usace.army.mil/Portals/17/Users/201/93/1993/141202-A-OV291-002_LA%20River.JPG?ver=2016-08-19-122838-503

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @International Jew

    Farming on fertile flood plains – excellent idea. Been done since the beginning of agriculture, as you say. Flood waters bring nutrients, replenish the soil. When the floods come, the farmer leaves his fields and comes back when the flood waters recede. No harm done.

    Building millions of houses in the middle of flood plains – not such a good idea. Houses get damaged in a flood a lot more than farm fields.

    Exactly, bottom land is for farming (or preserves, parks, golf courses), not for development.

    And yeah, we’re a young country and we put towns and cities along rivers without a historic understand of flood likeyhood. But if you find them flooding … then do not rebuild them in the same place. Move them up, back, away.

    Common sense is not really that hard. It’s amazing how little of it we practice.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @AnotherDad

    London Paris Strasbourg entire country of Netherlands Chicago many of the most important and crowded cities in the world are built on flood plains.

    The liberals want to close down the farms because raising food cotton flax and other useful things is bad for the environment. Might as well house the entire population of China India and Latin America in the river and delta valleys of California. That seems to be the agreement between the governments of the USA California China and Latin America.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

  72. @Anon7
    Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle used this disaster scenario in their excellent 1977 science fiction novel Lucifer's Hammer. In the story, the San Joaquin Valley becomes an inland sea.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    That is a stunningly, stunningly good novel, from a team that cranked out good novels together and separately; if you only try one make it the Hammer.

  73. @J.Ross
    Why do Southern Californians have Scottish-style lawns and not desert landscapes with decorative rocks and arranged scrub?

    Replies: @ForeverCARealist, @Whereismyhandle, @John Johnson, @Alden, @Anonymous

    Right, I’d expect the place to look like a Krazy Kat strip.

  74. @HA
    @Dave from Oz

    "Australian, here. Bark/mulch is a terrible idea in hot climates: it catches sparks."

    Your perspective is somewhat skewed. In fact, outside of your home continent, not everything in nature is designed to kill you.

    But when it comes to the eucalyptus trees which comprise the majority of Australian forests -- they literally explode:

    These hardy plants have delightfully scented, volatile oil in all parts of the plant... When the oils in the tree heat up, the plant releases flammable gas, which ignites into a fireball.
     

    Did I mention the fireball? And so, what did Californians do when it comes to eucalyptus trees? Apparently, they imported them in vast numbers -- can't get enough of them, apparently. Why I am not surprised by this? Oh yeah, it's because I read Sailer.

    By the early 1900s, thousands of acres of eucalypts were planted with the encouragement of the state government. It was hoped that they would provide a renewable source of timber for construction, furniture making and railroad ties.
     

    Replies: @Alden, @sb

    Bringing Eucalyptus trees to California around 1900 was one of the dumbest ever things environmentalists and nature lovers ever did.

    Yes they are inflammable worse than dried out Christmas trees. But they are also poisonous. The bark wood leaves and seeds poison other plants. Including trees. Eucalyptus destroys other trees. Plus their roots and the tiny little thread size roots are able to suck up every bit of water and nutrition in the area. Kills even weeds wild wheat and scrub grass.

    Marin County Ca has lots of original redwood forests. And lots of eucalyptus trees that are advancing on the other trees. Drive the narrow back roads west of Mill Valley. It was all redwoods and oaks at one time. Then the nature lovers brought in eucalyptus. I drove through a forest fire there a long time ago. The eucalyptus groves were all on fire. The redwood groves not on fire. Even though the 2 different groves were next to each other.

    I’ve never seen a mixed grove or woods with eucalyptus trees mixed with other trees. Because they kill the other trees. Also contribute to erosion and dust . Because they kill all the weeds and plants whose roots hold the soil in place.

    Importing Eucalyptus trees seemed like a good idea at the time.

    A relative who survived the 2017 Napa fire said you could hear the Eucalyptus trees just exploding. Which of course spreads the fire.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Alden

    Eucalyptus trees look elegant for about 20 years, then they get ugly. And they are no good for the underbrush. And they are no good for lumber.

    I'm told that in Australia there are other gum trees much better than the ones brought to California.

    Replies: @Alden, @Lurker

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Alden

    Like with Magnolia trees, the leave have a lot of oil in them that burns like crazy. They smell great, though! (The Eucalyptus trees, that is.)

  75. @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    Farming on fertile flood plains – excellent idea. Been done since the beginning of agriculture, as you say. Flood waters bring nutrients, replenish the soil. When the floods come, the farmer leaves his fields and comes back when the flood waters recede. No harm done.

    Building millions of houses in the middle of flood plains – not such a good idea. Houses get damaged in a flood a lot more than farm fields.
     

    Exactly, bottom land is for farming (or preserves, parks, golf courses), not for development.

    And yeah, we're a young country and we put towns and cities along rivers without a historic understand of flood likeyhood. But if you find them flooding ... then do not rebuild them in the same place. Move them up, back, away.

    Common sense is not really that hard. It's amazing how little of it we practice.

    Replies: @Alden

    London Paris Strasbourg entire country of Netherlands Chicago many of the most important and crowded cities in the world are built on flood plains.

    The liberals want to close down the farms because raising food cotton flax and other useful things is bad for the environment. Might as well house the entire population of China India and Latin America in the river and delta valleys of California. That seems to be the agreement between the governments of the USA California China and Latin America.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Alden


    London Paris Strasbourg entire country of Netherlands Chicago many of the most important and crowded cities in the world are built on flood plains.
     
    Matter of degree.

    People need water to survive. And civilization basically == agriculture+trade. So most cities are along rivers or at natural harbors. (Modern exceptions, Las Vegas--highway rest stop--tell the tale.)

    But if someplace was truly in a flood plain and flooded routinely, then people tended to leave it for someplace on the river with better protection.

    My point is that
    a) flooding of modern development is hugely expensive
    b) easy to work this stuff out and do the necessary

    For example, London has the sea gates to protect against high tide+big rainfall.

    You get something like Katrina ... do not rebuild the below sea level territory (ex. 9th ward). Make it into parks, golf courses, etc. and it serves as flood buffer. Likewise the bottom land around river towns that flood. After a flood, only the necessary--here's the grain terminal--stays. But you have a wide bottom of parks and open space that can flood and move the development up/back. Don't spend $$$ to rebuild in place.

    You can protect a lot of town flooding by having farm fields upstream/downstream that flood easily. Have a wide corridor the Mississippi/tributaries that are farms that are low diked--don't flood every year but will flood in a big event--so when you get the 50 year flood you have a huge wide area that floods--relatively harmlessly--and mitigates the absolute height of the flood in towns.

    In most places, not very hard to make choice that give you pretty solid resiliency against even 100--maybe even 500--year events.

  76. @Alden
    @HA

    Bringing Eucalyptus trees to California around 1900 was one of the dumbest ever things environmentalists and nature lovers ever did.

    Yes they are inflammable worse than dried out Christmas trees. But they are also poisonous. The bark wood leaves and seeds poison other plants. Including trees. Eucalyptus destroys other trees. Plus their roots and the tiny little thread size roots are able to suck up every bit of water and nutrition in the area. Kills even weeds wild wheat and scrub grass.

    Marin County Ca has lots of original redwood forests. And lots of eucalyptus trees that are advancing on the other trees. Drive the narrow back roads west of Mill Valley. It was all redwoods and oaks at one time. Then the nature lovers brought in eucalyptus. I drove through a forest fire there a long time ago. The eucalyptus groves were all on fire. The redwood groves not on fire. Even though the 2 different groves were next to each other.

    I’ve never seen a mixed grove or woods with eucalyptus trees mixed with other trees. Because they kill the other trees. Also contribute to erosion and dust . Because they kill all the weeds and plants whose roots hold the soil in place.

    Importing Eucalyptus trees seemed like a good idea at the time.

    A relative who survived the 2017 Napa fire said you could hear the Eucalyptus trees just exploding. Which of course spreads the fire.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Achmed E. Newman

    Eucalyptus trees look elegant for about 20 years, then they get ugly. And they are no good for the underbrush. And they are no good for lumber.

    I’m told that in Australia there are other gum trees much better than the ones brought to California.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Steve Sailer

    Ever seen a Tamarisk tree? They are beautiful. Look somewhat like willow trees. And a desert tree. They do very well in S California And don’t kill other trees and plants.

    , @Lurker
    @Steve Sailer

    Wouldn't it be a good idea to gradually cut them all down and replace them with something else?

  77. @Reg Cæsar
    @Bill H.


    “Giant Megaflood is coming to California, and it will cost billions!”
     


    Don't forget Steve's tagline:

    Women and minorities hit hardest.

    In this case it will be true. White men make up about 17% of the population. There are about six million white men in California, just ahead of Pennsylvania's five million.

    Replies: @Alden, @Achmed E. Newman

    Aren’t Hispanics a majority by now? They’re going to have to change that tagline to Women and majorities hardest hit.

    Then, there’s the headline from The Daily Stupid, issue 53327:

    Ike Turner Paroled – Women Hit Hardest

    (Thanks, Adam Smith!)

  78. @Alden
    @HA

    Bringing Eucalyptus trees to California around 1900 was one of the dumbest ever things environmentalists and nature lovers ever did.

    Yes they are inflammable worse than dried out Christmas trees. But they are also poisonous. The bark wood leaves and seeds poison other plants. Including trees. Eucalyptus destroys other trees. Plus their roots and the tiny little thread size roots are able to suck up every bit of water and nutrition in the area. Kills even weeds wild wheat and scrub grass.

    Marin County Ca has lots of original redwood forests. And lots of eucalyptus trees that are advancing on the other trees. Drive the narrow back roads west of Mill Valley. It was all redwoods and oaks at one time. Then the nature lovers brought in eucalyptus. I drove through a forest fire there a long time ago. The eucalyptus groves were all on fire. The redwood groves not on fire. Even though the 2 different groves were next to each other.

    I’ve never seen a mixed grove or woods with eucalyptus trees mixed with other trees. Because they kill the other trees. Also contribute to erosion and dust . Because they kill all the weeds and plants whose roots hold the soil in place.

    Importing Eucalyptus trees seemed like a good idea at the time.

    A relative who survived the 2017 Napa fire said you could hear the Eucalyptus trees just exploding. Which of course spreads the fire.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Achmed E. Newman

    Like with Magnolia trees, the leave have a lot of oil in them that burns like crazy. They smell great, though! (The Eucalyptus trees, that is.)

  79. @Steve Sailer
    @Alden

    Eucalyptus trees look elegant for about 20 years, then they get ugly. And they are no good for the underbrush. And they are no good for lumber.

    I'm told that in Australia there are other gum trees much better than the ones brought to California.

    Replies: @Alden, @Lurker

    Ever seen a Tamarisk tree? They are beautiful. Look somewhat like willow trees. And a desert tree. They do very well in S California And don’t kill other trees and plants.

  80. @Colin Wright
    I've never seen stop signs under water -- but I have seen Lakeshore (notice the name) Avenue in Oakland, Ca flooded to a couple of feet. That would have been at some point in the Seventies.

    I'm a global warming believer -- but unusual climate events happen. When they do, it's not always global warming. I've had accidents driving, and I've driven very drunk. Although driving drunk may well make it more likely I'll have an accident, as it happens every accident I've had occurred while I was completely sober.

    ...so if you want to be sure your daughter gets home safely, just prime me with a bottle of wine first.

    Replies: @Polistra

    I’ve had accidents driving, and I’ve driven very drunk. Although driving drunk may well make it more likely I’ll have an accident, as it happens every accident I’ve had occurred while I was completely sober.

    Are we talking several accidents, dozens, or hundreds?

  81. @Alden
    @Reg Cæsar

    White men only 17 percent? No wonder the state is in the condition it is. Still, remember it was the White man Sierra Club other environmentalists, governors and evil satanic liberals that were the prime movers behind destructive liberalism.

    Replies: @Polistra

    One can just feel you working your way up to your next psychotic MEN OF UNZ post.

    • LOL: John Johnson
    • Replies: @Alden
    @Polistra

    It took a few years. But since I followed Steve Sailor to UNZ it’s no longer used by the pervy old codgers to defend sex with 12 year old girls.
    If the pervs only knew what teen girls think of them.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  82. @Jack D
    @Alden

    Farming on fertile flood plains - excellent idea. Been done since the beginning of agriculture, as you say. Flood waters bring nutrients, replenish the soil.

    When the floods come, the farmer leaves his fields and comes back when the flood waters recede. No harm done.

    Building millions of houses in the middle of flood plains - not such a good idea. Houses get damaged in a flood a lot more than farm fields.

    Part of the problem is that we have a young country (and even then people did stupid things. The last big California flood was in the 1860s.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Flood_of_1862#Sacramento

    Even then Sacramento was badly damaged (underwater for 3 months) but then afterward it was rebuilt and everybody forgot what happened. The level of the city was raised 15 feet and new levees were built. So far they have worked but there hasn't been another 200 year flood again to test them.

    All over the middle east there are wadis, which are dry river beds. They are dry most of the time, but then on the rare occasions that it rains heavily, they become raging torrents. Most of us have seen the Los Angeles River from movie chase scenes. It's a wadi too. Most of the year it is completely dry or there is only a little stream going down the middle, but then when it rains it might as well be the Mississippi.

    https://nextcity.org/images/made/LA_LosAngelesRiver_920_626_80.jpg

    https://www.spl.usace.army.mil/Portals/17/Users/201/93/1993/141202-A-OV291-002_LA%20River.JPG?ver=2016-08-19-122838-503

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @International Jew

    What protects Sacramento from floods happens to protect the nice college town of Davis from Sacramento — a 2-mile-wide flood diversion zone. As a result, Sac’s cancerous sprawl can go north, east and south but not west toward Davis. Limits crime too as West Sac is pretty nasty but there’s only one road across that flood zone.

  83. The NY Times published a big scare piece on this a couple days ago. The CBS News thing here is probably a ripple of that.

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2022/08/12/climate/california-rain-storm.html

  84. OT if anyone cares. Liz Cheney lost to her Trump endorsed opponent Hageman.

    Steve, what’s the controversy about the Saudi Arabia golf tournament?

  85. @JR Ewing
    @ForeverCARealist


    But as I’ve said many times, CA’s bad governance and planning– and water storage and allocation is a big one– is a a mechanism to avoid having 100 million people (or more) trying to live here.
     
    This is something that blows my mind.

    Up until 50 years ago, they were always planning for the future by building new infrastructure: freeways, dams, aqueducts, power plants. That stuff wasn't needed right that moment, but they knew it was going to be necessary.

    Now they can't build a damn thing and claim that what they have right now - which was sufficient 20-30 years ago, but not any more - is enough and everyone just needs to deal with it and not plan on any more growth... and yet the population keeps growing, even if net migration is way up.

    You go to California now and outside of the very wealthy enclaves scattered around the state, most of it looks third world with crumbling insufficient infrastructure, aged buildings, and people literally living in the streets. The difference is that the true third world wants to do something about it and improve itself. California does not. They can't even replace what they have, much less build new stuff.

    The fact that they couldn't even find the political will for a (mostly) PRIVATELY FUNDED desalination plant is quite telling. It's literally additive to their current water supply - it won't harm existing waterways or take up any new land - and there is a significantly vocal enough minority that is against that progress for it's own sake.

    And they've managed to rig the political system enough through their "jungle primary" to where real political change is impossible. Democrats control everything and democrats don't care about the nuts and bolts of civilization, they care about pet social causes. Kamala Harris's political career is the prime example of how that works out.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @ForeverCARealist, @AnotherDad, @Jimi, @Lurker

    Desalination plants – I’ve never looked into the details but it would seem the modern green/left hate, hate, HATE the very idea. Which means the elite hate the idea.

    I don’t know why they claim to hate them but it seems to be a near-religious belief.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Lurker

    It offends the leftist driven environmentalism that seeks to subdue Western society and especially White men.

    White people need to have fewer or no children and take short showers. That pleases the leftist. Creating freshwater from saltwater is offensive.

    , @Ed Case
    @Lurker

    Depends if it's needed or not.
    Queensland built one that was never used and eventually dismantled, Victoria built one that wasn't used either, but since it was a Public/Private endeavour, the Public gets to pay the private scamsters $500 mil/year to keep it maintained in case it's ever needed.
    A gold mine for Right Wing Aussie Unions.
    California's Desal Plant is needed, so the right wing Intelligence funded Green groups will never let it happen.

  86. @Steve Sailer
    @Alden

    Eucalyptus trees look elegant for about 20 years, then they get ugly. And they are no good for the underbrush. And they are no good for lumber.

    I'm told that in Australia there are other gum trees much better than the ones brought to California.

    Replies: @Alden, @Lurker

    Wouldn’t it be a good idea to gradually cut them all down and replace them with something else?

  87. @Lurker
    @JR Ewing

    Desalination plants - I've never looked into the details but it would seem the modern green/left hate, hate, HATE the very idea. Which means the elite hate the idea.

    I don't know why they claim to hate them but it seems to be a near-religious belief.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Ed Case

    It offends the leftist driven environmentalism that seeks to subdue Western society and especially White men.

    White people need to have fewer or no children and take short showers. That pleases the leftist. Creating freshwater from saltwater is offensive.

  88. @HA
    @Dave from Oz

    "Australian, here. Bark/mulch is a terrible idea in hot climates: it catches sparks."

    Your perspective is somewhat skewed. In fact, outside of your home continent, not everything in nature is designed to kill you.

    But when it comes to the eucalyptus trees which comprise the majority of Australian forests -- they literally explode:

    These hardy plants have delightfully scented, volatile oil in all parts of the plant... When the oils in the tree heat up, the plant releases flammable gas, which ignites into a fireball.
     

    Did I mention the fireball? And so, what did Californians do when it comes to eucalyptus trees? Apparently, they imported them in vast numbers -- can't get enough of them, apparently. Why I am not surprised by this? Oh yeah, it's because I read Sailer.

    By the early 1900s, thousands of acres of eucalypts were planted with the encouragement of the state government. It was hoped that they would provide a renewable source of timber for construction, furniture making and railroad ties.
     

    Replies: @Alden, @sb

    You people are being so unkind about our friendly and cuddly Aussie flora and fauna that it makes me want to reciprocate in kind .
    Pine plantations ( pinus radiata ) in Australia are an ecological desert and a serious fire hazard .
    Many years ago people also had the bright idea of growing Californian redwoods as a timber tree . The thing is that they are so slow growing to be unsuitable for commercial timber and again are an ecological no go zone .
    I’ve admired eucalyptus trees around the world ( we call them gum trees )and recall some fine specimens at the university grounds at Berkeley .

    So there!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @sb

    The eucalyptus forest at UC San Diego was elegant-looking when I visited in 1978 but a shaggy mess in 2016.

    Californians of the Jack London Era picked the wrong Australian gum trees to import.

    Replies: @Ralph L

  89. @J.Ross
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Worse than Harambe, because Freya wasn't so much as potentially bothering anyone, and idiots who wanted to take selfies harassed and misguided her to ferality.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @YetAnotherAnon

    There's another story out of Norway I was going to OT and never got to: Shoddy, recently clabbered-together bridges, which used laminate wood and existing foundations to replace old bridges, have collapsed. Apparently they are from the same contractor, who built a total of eleven, and the logic of using wood instead of concrete is greenhouse gas environmental nonsense. Norway is not a country where civil engineering projects normally collapse. The firm has female architects but its web site is careful to not specify anything.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  90. @sb
    @HA

    You people are being so unkind about our friendly and cuddly Aussie flora and fauna that it makes me want to reciprocate in kind .
    Pine plantations ( pinus radiata ) in Australia are an ecological desert and a serious fire hazard .
    Many years ago people also had the bright idea of growing Californian redwoods as a timber tree . The thing is that they are so slow growing to be unsuitable for commercial timber and again are an ecological no go zone .
    I've admired eucalyptus trees around the world ( we call them gum trees )and recall some fine specimens at the university grounds at Berkeley .

    So there!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The eucalyptus forest at UC San Diego was elegant-looking when I visited in 1978 but a shaggy mess in 2016.

    Californians of the Jack London Era picked the wrong Australian gum trees to import.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Steve Sailer

    They forgot to bring koalas for pruning.

  91. @Lurker
    @JR Ewing

    Desalination plants - I've never looked into the details but it would seem the modern green/left hate, hate, HATE the very idea. Which means the elite hate the idea.

    I don't know why they claim to hate them but it seems to be a near-religious belief.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Ed Case

    Depends if it’s needed or not.
    Queensland built one that was never used and eventually dismantled, Victoria built one that wasn’t used either, but since it was a Public/Private endeavour, the Public gets to pay the private scamsters \$500 mil/year to keep it maintained in case it’s ever needed.
    A gold mine for Right Wing Aussie Unions.
    California’s Desal Plant is needed, so the right wing Intelligence funded Green groups will never let it happen.

  92. @YetAnotherAnon
    @J.Ross

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11115815/Norwegian-official-ordered-killing-Freya-walrus-received-death-threats-UK-US.html

    Replies: @J.Ross

    There’s another story out of Norway I was going to OT and never got to: Shoddy, recently clabbered-together bridges, which used laminate wood and existing foundations to replace old bridges, have collapsed. Apparently they are from the same contractor, who built a total of eleven, and the logic of using wood instead of concrete is greenhouse gas environmental nonsense. Norway is not a country where civil engineering projects normally collapse. The firm has female architects but its web site is careful to not specify anything.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @J.Ross

    Your story reminds me of this one, out of a beach town in the South, Mr. Ross. The big deal now is to use recycled material. For the base of playgrounds, that rubbery mixture is a great idea, IMO. At the beach, boardwalks are often made out of recycled plastic planks, as you may well know. They used to be pressure-treated wood.

    Now, once the sun beats down for 10 or 15 years, these things are going to degrade too, just as wood does (more from rot due to rain in the latter case, I'd guess). The summertime sun is a mean sun-of-a-bitch. So now, instead of small piece of wood that will just blend in as organic parts of the sand, you will have small plastic particles in the sand. How green is THAT?

    I wanted to bring this up to one of the oh-so-treehugging group I was with there one time. However, I they were scientists, and I was just along for the ride on that trip, so I refrained from opening my pie-hole.

    Replies: @epebble

  93. @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.
    What we need here in Arizona is a flood that will kill only Californians but magically leave everyone else untouched (except for maybe the illegal aliens).

    Replies: @G. Poulin

    If the Arizonians smear the word “MAGA” over their doorposts just before the flood, I think that will do the trick.

  94. I’ll believe this megaflood crap when rich people start vacating their waterfront properties to buy deep inland and Malibu real estate becomes cheaper than Oakland. Until then, it’s all B.S. and you know it.

    • Replies: @Whereismyhandle
    @BB753

    Money talks and BS walks.

    Never heard of a SINGLE rich "climate change" propagandist who's left their coastal property.

  95. @J.Ross
    @YetAnotherAnon

    There's another story out of Norway I was going to OT and never got to: Shoddy, recently clabbered-together bridges, which used laminate wood and existing foundations to replace old bridges, have collapsed. Apparently they are from the same contractor, who built a total of eleven, and the logic of using wood instead of concrete is greenhouse gas environmental nonsense. Norway is not a country where civil engineering projects normally collapse. The firm has female architects but its web site is careful to not specify anything.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Your story reminds me of this one, out of a beach town in the South, Mr. Ross. The big deal now is to use recycled material. For the base of playgrounds, that rubbery mixture is a great idea, IMO. At the beach, boardwalks are often made out of recycled plastic planks, as you may well know. They used to be pressure-treated wood.

    Now, once the sun beats down for 10 or 15 years, these things are going to degrade too, just as wood does (more from rot due to rain in the latter case, I’d guess). The summertime sun is a mean sun-of-a-bitch. So now, instead of small piece of wood that will just blend in as organic parts of the sand, you will have small plastic particles in the sand. How green is THAT?

    I wanted to bring this up to one of the oh-so-treehugging group I was with there one time. However, I they were scientists, and I was just along for the ride on that trip, so I refrained from opening my pie-hole.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Achmed E. Newman

    small plastic particles in the sand. How green is THAT?

    Don't worry too much. Polypropylene breaks down with UV. Certain polymers are longer lasting, but they are not rocks. An easy way to remember is most plastics we use come from petroleum, an organic product - actually fossil - dead body of an organism. Most plastics will eventually end up as CO2 and H2O.

    https://www.servicethread.com/blog/the-uv-resistance-of-polypropylene-and-polyester-explained

  96. An asteroid the size of Oklahoma could hit LA.

    California could cleave off into the Pacific.

    ‘Could’ does a lot of delightful work.

  97. There is a rule in emergency planning that says is some place has been hit with a disaster such as a hurricane, then it will be hit again. The Galveston Hurricane of 1900 killed 10,000 but the risk was ignored because the local weather service guys were convinced that a hurricane could not hit Galveston.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Guest007

    In planning for floods and other events, there is a concept of the X-year storm. A 100 year event means that there is a 1 in 100 (1%) probability of that event happening in any given year. Now if a megaflood like that of 1862 is a thousand year flood then the chances are pretty good that we won't see another one in our lifetime but if it is more like a 100 or 200 year flood then it becomes much more likely. Pretty much every place on earth has been under water at one time or another but how long ago and how often makes a big difference.

    Assessing probabilities is as much an art as a science, especially in the US where many places were thinly settled by people with system of recording weather only for the last 150 years or so, so that it can be hard to know what the history is, and especially when you start to assume that "climate change" is going to increase historic probabilities. You can imagine that people with various vested interests (and this does not exclude so called "scientists") would have an incentive to overstate or understate probabilities depending on where their interests lie - in other words to lie to you.

    American planning tends to be geared around 100 year events but for example I think in the Netherlands they do flood planning for 1,000 year events. OTOH, you could say that it is a waste of $ to build expensive defenses against an event with only a 1/10th of 1% probability in any year but OTOH such an even can cause massive loss of life and property so maybe it is worth it. The Japanese tsunami of 2011 was maybe a 500 to 1000 year event but when it happened the probability was 100% and the damage was huge so they are probably sorry that they did not prepare more.

  98. @Polistra
    @Alden

    One can just feel you working your way up to your next psychotic MEN OF UNZ post.

    Replies: @Alden

    It took a few years. But since I followed Steve Sailor to UNZ it’s no longer used by the pervy old codgers to defend sex with 12 year old girls.
    If the pervs only knew what teen girls think of them.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Alden


    It took a few years.
     
    They said it would take 2 weeks to flatten the perv!

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/post_1674A.jpg

    How's that suit your front lawn? Grass or rocks, I think it's fantastic!

  99. @BB753
    I'll believe this megaflood crap when rich people start vacating their waterfront properties to buy deep inland and Malibu real estate becomes cheaper than Oakland. Until then, it's all B.S. and you know it.

    Replies: @Whereismyhandle

    Money talks and BS walks.

    Never heard of a SINGLE rich “climate change” propagandist who’s left their coastal property.

  100. @Jack D
    When I was a kid, people talked about earthquakes in California a lot (with good reason - most of the state is an earthquake zone) but nowadays earthquakes are out of fashion because they can't be blamed on "climate change". I would bet $ that the next big natural disaster in CA is more likely to be an earthquake than a megaflood. Just as megaflood hysteria is peaking in the media, something will happen to shake things up.

    numbers that will have massive implications for the Sacramento and San Joaquin River flood plains. These areas, Swain said, are the home of ancient flood deposits, as well as millions of Californians.

     

    Maybe it wasn't such a hot idea to house millions of people (mostly new immigrants) on a flood plain?

    Last night, my daughter told me that she was temporarily renting an apt in SF while she is out there on a SV internship. I looked up the neighborhood (Cayuga Terrace) on the census maps and on Google streee view to see if it was reasonably safe. The area is mostly Asian and Hispanic. The retail shops tend toward taquerias and pupusarias but it looked safe enough - no bars on windows, the shops don't have riot gates. The average little postwar row house in the neighborhood is $1M plus. White people barely register anymore in most of SF - they are effectively extinct. The future is going to be Mexicans arguing with Asians.

    If appears as if these valleys flood every 150-200 years on average (the article says 5-7 floods per millennium) so if the last one was in the 1860s we are about due for a new one in the next 50 years or so. All the other floods were natural but this one will be due to "climate change".

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Kylie, @epebble, @Alden, @Hapalong Cassidy, @Almost Missouri, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    If appears as if these valleys flood every 150-200 years on average (the article says 5-7 floods per millennium) so if the last one was in the 1860s we are about due for a new one in the next 50 years or so. All the other floods were natural but this one will be due to “climate change”.

    We also don’t seem to do big projects like dams or reservoirs, which would seem to be the kind of large scale engineering feat which could both be a prophylactic against catastrophic floods and mitigate California’s frequent water shortages while generating low/zero emission hydroelectric power. Someone would probably find a bug with a minuscule difference in dots or stripes from the exact same bug three miles away and tie up any such project for ten years.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)


    Someone would probably find a bug with a minuscule difference in dots or stripes from the exact same bug three miles away and tie up any such project for ten years.
     
    If only we could apply this to immigration policy.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  101. @Guest007
    There is a rule in emergency planning that says is some place has been hit with a disaster such as a hurricane, then it will be hit again. The Galveston Hurricane of 1900 killed 10,000 but the risk was ignored because the local weather service guys were convinced that a hurricane could not hit Galveston.

    Replies: @Jack D

    In planning for floods and other events, there is a concept of the X-year storm. A 100 year event means that there is a 1 in 100 (1%) probability of that event happening in any given year. Now if a megaflood like that of 1862 is a thousand year flood then the chances are pretty good that we won’t see another one in our lifetime but if it is more like a 100 or 200 year flood then it becomes much more likely. Pretty much every place on earth has been under water at one time or another but how long ago and how often makes a big difference.

    Assessing probabilities is as much an art as a science, especially in the US where many places were thinly settled by people with system of recording weather only for the last 150 years or so, so that it can be hard to know what the history is, and especially when you start to assume that “climate change” is going to increase historic probabilities. You can imagine that people with various vested interests (and this does not exclude so called “scientists”) would have an incentive to overstate or understate probabilities depending on where their interests lie – in other words to lie to you.

    American planning tends to be geared around 100 year events but for example I think in the Netherlands they do flood planning for 1,000 year events. OTOH, you could say that it is a waste of \$ to build expensive defenses against an event with only a 1/10th of 1% probability in any year but OTOH such an even can cause massive loss of life and property so maybe it is worth it. The Japanese tsunami of 2011 was maybe a 500 to 1000 year event but when it happened the probability was 100% and the damage was huge so they are probably sorry that they did not prepare more.

  102. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Jack D


    If appears as if these valleys flood every 150-200 years on average (the article says 5-7 floods per millennium) so if the last one was in the 1860s we are about due for a new one in the next 50 years or so. All the other floods were natural but this one will be due to “climate change”.
     
    We also don't seem to do big projects like dams or reservoirs, which would seem to be the kind of large scale engineering feat which could both be a prophylactic against catastrophic floods and mitigate California's frequent water shortages while generating low/zero emission hydroelectric power. Someone would probably find a bug with a minuscule difference in dots or stripes from the exact same bug three miles away and tie up any such project for ten years.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Someone would probably find a bug with a minuscule difference in dots or stripes from the exact same bug three miles away and tie up any such project for ten years.

    If only we could apply this to immigration policy.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    Haha, yes. Lefties love the 'precautionary principle' when it comes to industrial development but are curiously unwilling to apply it to immigration.

  103. @Steve Sailer
    @sb

    The eucalyptus forest at UC San Diego was elegant-looking when I visited in 1978 but a shaggy mess in 2016.

    Californians of the Jack London Era picked the wrong Australian gum trees to import.

    Replies: @Ralph L

    They forgot to bring koalas for pruning.

  104. @Alden
    @Polistra

    It took a few years. But since I followed Steve Sailor to UNZ it’s no longer used by the pervy old codgers to defend sex with 12 year old girls.
    If the pervs only knew what teen girls think of them.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    It took a few years.

    They said it would take 2 weeks to flatten the perv!

    How’s that suit your front lawn? Grass or rocks, I think it’s fantastic!

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  105. @Alden
    @AnotherDad

    London Paris Strasbourg entire country of Netherlands Chicago many of the most important and crowded cities in the world are built on flood plains.

    The liberals want to close down the farms because raising food cotton flax and other useful things is bad for the environment. Might as well house the entire population of China India and Latin America in the river and delta valleys of California. That seems to be the agreement between the governments of the USA California China and Latin America.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    London Paris Strasbourg entire country of Netherlands Chicago many of the most important and crowded cities in the world are built on flood plains.

    Matter of degree.

    People need water to survive. And civilization basically == agriculture+trade. So most cities are along rivers or at natural harbors. (Modern exceptions, Las Vegas–highway rest stop–tell the tale.)

    But if someplace was truly in a flood plain and flooded routinely, then people tended to leave it for someplace on the river with better protection.

    My point is that
    a) flooding of modern development is hugely expensive
    b) easy to work this stuff out and do the necessary

    For example, London has the sea gates to protect against high tide+big rainfall.

    You get something like Katrina … do not rebuild the below sea level territory (ex. 9th ward). Make it into parks, golf courses, etc. and it serves as flood buffer. Likewise the bottom land around river towns that flood. After a flood, only the necessary–here’s the grain terminal–stays. But you have a wide bottom of parks and open space that can flood and move the development up/back. Don’t spend \$\$\$ to rebuild in place.

    You can protect a lot of town flooding by having farm fields upstream/downstream that flood easily. Have a wide corridor the Mississippi/tributaries that are farms that are low diked–don’t flood every year but will flood in a big event–so when you get the 50 year flood you have a huge wide area that floods–relatively harmlessly–and mitigates the absolute height of the flood in towns.

    In most places, not very hard to make choice that give you pretty solid resiliency against even 100–maybe even 500–year events.

  106. @Reg Cæsar
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)


    Someone would probably find a bug with a minuscule difference in dots or stripes from the exact same bug three miles away and tie up any such project for ten years.
     
    If only we could apply this to immigration policy.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Haha, yes. Lefties love the ‘precautionary principle’ when it comes to industrial development but are curiously unwilling to apply it to immigration.

  107. @Alden
    @J.Ross

    1 Desert landscapes are very very ugly.

    2 The idiot environmentalists, liberals gardeners landscape designers and nurseries that sell plants are so incredibly ignorant they don’t realize that pretty 18 inch tall desert plants will be 10 feet tall in about 5 years. So in a few years the house is buried behind 10 feet tall bushes. It’s really bad in one story houses with wide eaves. The nurseries landscape designers totally live replacing grass lawns with desert landscapes because they can make a great deal of money digging up lawns and replacing them with desert landscapes. Profit rules. Even if the house disappears behind the 10 foot tall bushes.

    3 Cost it costs a lot of money to dig up a lawn and replace it with a desert landscape.

    4 Fire hazard those desert plants are loaded with flammable creosote resin and other explosive substances. In fact some of those fire hazard desert landscape bushes are on the County list of plants forbidden to be planted on residential lots because of the fire hazard.

    5 Lawns cost a lot of money and demand frequent mowing. A real burden if homeowner doesn’t have the money to pay a gardener or time to do it himself

    6 But at least lawns can be mowed and are not a fire hazard even in September when they are totally dry and yellow. Those desert bushes are a fire hazard.

    Replace the ugly high maintenance dried out grass with a ground cover such as pennyroyal which absolutely thrives in dry hot dusty S Ca summer’s. Don’t get an expensive desert landscape unless you are prepared to prune them down to the proper height in proportion to the height of the walls of your house a couple times a year. Height of the walls, not height including the roof.

    Main reason desert landscapes were a brief fad is cost. It’s very expensive to move 400 pound rocks to your yard. Plus the fire hazard. Plus the 18 inch plants becoming 6 foot wide 10-12 feet tall in a few years. Succulents are a good compromise.

    Replies: @Alden, @Sollipsist

    Kudos to the author for being possibly the first to sound a warning about all the towering, fast-growing native flora so characteristic of the American Southwest. Along with the “rocks are a fire hazard” theory, this post is brimming with the kind of down-to-earth common sense wisdom we’ve all come to expect from Californians.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Sollipsist

    Along with the “rocks are a fire hazard” theory,

    I know nothing at all of the subject but you misread that. Alden wasn't claiming the rocks were the fire hazard here.

    Replies: @Sollipsist

  108. @Anon
    Mark Twain probably would’ve turned out to have been the cause of the flood had he been in California. In his semi autobiographical book “Roughing It” he relates how he and a friend somehow ended up setting fire to much of the forest around lake Tahoe.

    Replies: @DRDPHD

    Roughing it is one great read. A glimpse into real life albeit satirized on the western frontier. The “tin whistle” story of his encounter(s)with the prophet in Salt Lake City makes me smile just to think of it

    Thanks for reminding me of this great and seldom mentioned work

  109. @Sollipsist
    @Alden

    Kudos to the author for being possibly the first to sound a warning about all the towering, fast-growing native flora so characteristic of the American Southwest. Along with the "rocks are a fire hazard" theory, this post is brimming with the kind of down-to-earth common sense wisdom we've all come to expect from Californians.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    Along with the “rocks are a fire hazard” theory,

    I know nothing at all of the subject but you misread that. Alden wasn’t claiming the rocks were the fire hazard here.

    • Replies: @Sollipsist
    @kaganovitch

    Fair enough. I was exaggerating for effect, satirizing the commenter for his half-understood cherry-picked examples that he used to support his bias. My response was only as grounded in reality as his comment, and that's probably the wrong approach.

  110. @Harry Baldwin
    @JR Ewing

    They can’t even replace what they have, much less build new stuff.

    Worse still, California will tear down existing hydroelectric dams and shut down nuclear plants despite the fact that the state already can't handle its energy requirements. It's the liberal death cult in action.

    https://www.mercurynews.com/2021/06/18/plan-to-raze-4-dams-on-california-oregon-line-clears-hurdle/

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired

    Arthur Haley wrote a fiction book called “Overload” which describes many of the issues California’s electrical grid, power production, and consumtion, are going thru today, except his book was published in the late 70s. It’s worth a read, with a few laughs that will make you shake your head.

    https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/overload_arthur-hailey/658009/item/2276071/?gclid=CjwKCAjw6fyXBhBgEiwAhhiZsgfB--mm4s_GWtbcAe7nvrFVuU8J2k0DfRyaR4Z0hh0qDQvLKdcDSxoCceoQAvD_BwE#idiq=2276071&edition=2169057

  111. @Achmed E. Newman
    @J.Ross

    Your story reminds me of this one, out of a beach town in the South, Mr. Ross. The big deal now is to use recycled material. For the base of playgrounds, that rubbery mixture is a great idea, IMO. At the beach, boardwalks are often made out of recycled plastic planks, as you may well know. They used to be pressure-treated wood.

    Now, once the sun beats down for 10 or 15 years, these things are going to degrade too, just as wood does (more from rot due to rain in the latter case, I'd guess). The summertime sun is a mean sun-of-a-bitch. So now, instead of small piece of wood that will just blend in as organic parts of the sand, you will have small plastic particles in the sand. How green is THAT?

    I wanted to bring this up to one of the oh-so-treehugging group I was with there one time. However, I they were scientists, and I was just along for the ride on that trip, so I refrained from opening my pie-hole.

    Replies: @epebble

    small plastic particles in the sand. How green is THAT?

    Don’t worry too much. Polypropylene breaks down with UV. Certain polymers are longer lasting, but they are not rocks. An easy way to remember is most plastics we use come from petroleum, an organic product – actually fossil – dead body of an organism. Most plastics will eventually end up as CO2 and H2O.

    https://www.servicethread.com/blog/the-uv-resistance-of-polypropylene-and-polyester-explained

  112. @kaganovitch
    @Sollipsist

    Along with the “rocks are a fire hazard” theory,

    I know nothing at all of the subject but you misread that. Alden wasn't claiming the rocks were the fire hazard here.

    Replies: @Sollipsist

    Fair enough. I was exaggerating for effect, satirizing the commenter for his half-understood cherry-picked examples that he used to support his bias. My response was only as grounded in reality as his comment, and that’s probably the wrong approach.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
How America was neoconned into World War IV
Analyzing the History of a Controversial Movement