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Yale Art History Department to Stop Teaching Famous Intro Course Because White Men Painted Too Many Great Pictures
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From the Yale Daily News:

Art History Department to scrap survey course
MARGARET HEDEMAN & MATT KRISTOFFERSEN 12:31 AM, JAN 24, 2020

Yale will stop teaching a storied introductory survey course in art history, citing the impossibility of adequately covering the entire field — and its varied cultural backgrounds — in one course.

Decades old and once taught by famous Yale professors like Vincent Scully, “Introduction to Art History: Renaissance to the Present” was once touted to be one of Yale College’s quintessential classes. But this change is the latest response to student uneasiness over an idealized Western “canon” — a product of an overwhelmingly white, straight, European and male cadre of artists.

Straight? Leonardo, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Sargent, Hockney, etc etc …

This spring, the final rendition of the course will seek to question the idea of Western art itself — a marked difference from the course’s focus at its inception. Art history department chair and the course’s instructor Tim Barringer told the News that he plans to demonstrate that a class about the history of art does not just mean Western art. Rather, when there are so many other regions, genres and traditions — all “equally deserving of study” — putting European art on a pedestal is “problematic,” he said.

… While concerns about the class’s singular focus in Western art has led to its cancellation, student enrollment in Barringer’s course skyrocketed this semester after the department’s plan was announced. Over 400 students shopped the class last week, though the course is capped at 300 due to constraints in the number of sections that the YUAG can host. …

According to Barringer, the class will still cover Western art chronologically from 1300 to the present and hopscotch across European art movements under the roof of the Yale University Art Gallery. Students in sections will still examine objects directly from Yale’s vast collections.

In his syllabus note to potential students on Canvas, an online course management tool, Barringer wrote that the emphasis would be placed on the relationship between European art and other world traditions. The class will also consider art in relation to “questions of gender, class and ‘race’” and discuss its involvement with Western capitalism, Barringer wrote. Its relationship with climate change will be a “key theme,” he wrote.

Dali’s “The Persistence of Climate Change”

Now that’s funny.

Barringer has also focused attention on the course’s written assignments. He said that he will invite students to write an essay nominating a work of art that has been left out of the course’s curriculum or its textbook.

Like the changes to the course itself, this essay is designed to challenge long-held views of art history.

“I’m really looking forward to seeing what works the students come up with to counteract or undermine my own narratives,” he wrote.

Michelangelo’s “The Last Climate Change”

Hopefully, Women of Color will nominate their own selfies entitled “Me and My Hair.”

… “My biggest critique of the decision is that it’s a disservice to undergrads,” Mahlon Sorensen ’22 said. “If you get rid of that one, all-encompassing course, then to understand the Western canon of art, students are going to have to take multiple art history courses. Which is all well and good for the art history major, but it sucks for the rest of us, which, I would say, make up the vast majority of the people who are taking [HSAR 115].”

The decision to get rid of this survey art history course resembles the English Department’s move to “decolonize” its degree requirements in 2017. At the time, the department made a sequence titled “Major English Poets” optional for majors.

For years, the Directed Studies program — a six-credit sequence for first-year students focusing on philosophy, literature and political philosophy — has also fielded criticisms about its exclusive focus on the Western canon.

Caspar David Friedrich’s “The Sea of Climate Change”

The fundamental problem is that Western man came up with more ideas worth studying than any other identity group.

After such knowledge, what forgiveness?

 
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  1. ‘The fundamental problem is that Western man came up with more ideas worth studying than any other identity group.’

    Hear, hear.

    West. Number one.

    China. Quite right. Always a major center of civilization.

    Rest of Asia. Yes, dearest.

    Black Africa. You’re kidding.

  2. Dali’s “The Persistence of Climate Change”…. LOL, that was good.

    • Agree: Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @Old Prude
    , @Harry Baldwin
  3. Anon[247] • Disclaimer says:

    Next up: French language classes will be replaced with classes where the students simultaneously learn French and Hausa.

    • Replies: @Jim bob Lassiter
  4. New Haven just got even crappier than it already was.

  5. Johnny789 says:

    I feel cheated that Vin Scully never shared what must have been a treasure trove of anecdotes from the world of Western Art during Dodgers games.

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk, Desiderius
    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
  6. I am counting the days until the inevitable start of a new Dark Ages. Coming soon, to a neighborhood near you…

  7. Goldman Sachs CEO David M. Solomon has announced that the firm will no longer sponsor IPOs from companies which don’t have enough women & POCs on their boards

    https://www.rt.com/op-ed/479116-goldman-sachs-boardroom-social-justice/

    This ultimatum was delivered with a straight face by the bank’s CEO David Solomon to an audience of head-nodding social justice warriors masquerading as the billionaire and millionaire capitalists of this world on their annual, self-congratulatory festival of money-bathing in Davos, where they plot and scheme to tell the rest of us how we should live our lives.

  8. Andy says:

    putting European art on a pedestal is “problematic”

    See, since it is difficult to say it is undeserved (the western tradition in art, going back to ancient Greece up to the first half of the 20th century is unparalleled in terms of its craft and its depth – I’m not very enthusiastic about western art after World War II), it is rather considered “problematic”

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  9. Dan Smith says:

    I used to feel bad I wasn’t accepted at an Ivy League school (Harvard.) Not any more.

  10. For years, the Directed Studies program — a six-credit sequence for first-year students focusing on philosophy, literature and political philosophy — has also fielded criticisms about its exclusive focus on the Western canon.

    This is flat-out untrue. That is, the criticisms–which were, indeed, endless and strident–were unfounded. The Directed Studies program since its founding included the work of many non-western writers and thinkers. But it was never enough. Sort of like how Beyonce must win all the awards, else you are racist, you racists.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  11. Steve king is still waiting to hear about these subgroups that contributed more. So hopefully Yale’s got that list.

  12. anonymous[192] • Disclaimer says:

    Does anyone here know Fuentes and his gang personally?

    I don’t understand why they aren’t promoting Ron’s AP series heavily. I see Ron as well-connected, media savvy, independently rich, and conscientious.

    Plus he’s Jewish and has written on a number of racial topics with a wide variety of conclusions, so none of the usual smears would stick. People will be far less hesitant to read and discuss articles like his written by a Jew than a non-Jew.

    And, he’s completely discredited the ADL and is baiting them into a giant MSM fight. Any attention they give him would be entirely welcomed and handled well by someone with experience in these matters.

    Am I missing something?

    • LOL: IHTG
    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  13. So now Yale is going to dump Rembrandt and Vermeer and Gainsborough and Van Gogh in favor of Jean-Michel Basquiat and Judy Chicago. Will they agonize over including Keith Haring, since he was white — or place him at the very top of the new Hartford art pantheon since he was gay and died of AIDS?

    And what will become of Yale’s vast art collection? Will it be burnt in a colossal bonfire while transgender members of the faculty, dozens of them, twerk to gangsta rap blasting from loudspeakers?

  14. Anonymous[145] • Disclaimer says:

    Straight? Leonardo…

    Da Vinci has to be the only supposedly gay man in history who spent loads of time doing mechanical drawings.

    Mechanical drawings!

    Methinks this guy was not a poof in the modern sense. Not at all.

    • Replies: @Duke84
  15. @Enemy of Earth

    IMHO, the new Dark Ages have already begun.

    I’m still trying to decide, though, when was our new Sack of Rome moment.

    1968?

    1945?

    1917?

    1861?

    1781*?

    .

    .

    .

    *Immanuel Kant publishes Critique of Pure Reason.

  16. @Enemy of Earth

    IMHO, the new Dark Ages have already begun.

    I’m still trying to decide, though, when was our new Sack of Rome moment.

    1968?

    1945?

    1917?

    1861?

    1781*?

    .

    .

    .

    *Immanuel Kant publishes Critique of Pure Reason.

  17. vinny says:

    William Goldman was way ahead:

    “Ever heard of Plato, Aristotle, Socrates?..
    Morons!”

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  18. … the final rendition of the course will seek to question the idea of Western art itself …
    … he plans to demonstrate that a class about the history of art does not just mean Western art. …
    … there are so many other regions, genres and traditions — all “equally deserving of study”…
    … concerns about the class’s singular focus in Western art has led to its cancellation…

    One wonders whether this implacable new relativism will also apply to, say, Chinese cultural studies? Japanese? Hindu? Muslim? Persian? Arabic? African? Latin American? Women’s Studies? LGBTQP whatevers?

    Eh, something tells me all this ignore-my-subject-everything-else-is-equally-important BS will only apply to traditional Western studies. All other cultural studies will remain mysteriously unscathed by this absurdly self-contradictory critique.

    Why is that?

  19. Back when I was a student in the last millennium, if we didn’t like the syllabus, we took a different course. Things are so much more complicated now.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  20. Anon[120] • Disclaimer says:

    This is just destructive vandalism, like the Taliban blowing up ancient sites.

    Why not start a new course on African art or world art? The answer is probably that these courses already exist. So the motive here is:

    — Destroying the European oriented course

    — Hijacking the audience of the more popular course

    — Obtaining a new platform from which to hector white students

    The irony is that by insisting that African art be studied side by side with European art, the primitive lameness of the African art will be brought into focus. “Don’t they sell these at Pier One Imports? I bought one, but it says Made in China, not Africa.”

    • Agree: West Reanimator, Hail
  21. MBlanc46 says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Kant, who provided the philosophical foundations of empirical realism, is the instigator of the Dark Ages?

  22. Andy says:
    @Almost Missouri

    I think 1914 and the wholly unnecessary First World War was Western Civilization ultimately successful suicide attempt

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Anon
  23. @vinny

    William Golding’s magnum opus is more apposite to the phenomenon here.

  24. Hail says: • Website
    @Almost Missouri

    True Conservative Jonah Goldberg would say the collapse dates to a little before lunchtime on June 15, 2015: At that time, a racist, sexist celebrity with fascist tendencies named Donald Trump said “Mexico is not sending its best;” the beginning of the end for Western civilization. Goldberg proves it.

  25. A potential problem here is that art history majors often end up working in art museums or auction houses where it is assumed that they will come in knowing the Western canon. Unless the museum-going and art-buying public has changed its tastes along with these academics, those grads will have a lot of catching up to do.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Autochthon
  26. Dube says:

    If Yale so properly withdraws the course, it should also withdraw the credits.

  27. @Andy

    The thing about Jesus is He’s never been good about staying dead.

    • Replies: @Timmy75
  28. Allen says:

    Straight? Leonardo, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Sargent, Hockney, etc etc …

    I’m not an expert on Michelangelo but my understanding is that, while his writings indicate he experienced same-sex attraction, there is no evidence he actually had same-sex relationships (or any sexual relationships for that matter). He was also a devout Catholic and his biographer Condivi stated that he embraced monk-like chastity. We’ll never know of course, but it’s unlikely Michelangelo would appreciate being used as an example of “LGBT artists” (leaving aside the fact that the LGBT category would have been incomprehensible to everyone in the Renaissance).

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @nebulafox
    , @Dumbo
  29. @John Pepple

    Then they should have chosen a real University instead of the New Haven Mental Hospital.

    • Replies: @John Pepple
  30. @Almost Missouri

    Well-chosen and sobering timeline, AM.

    I’d pick 1917. Although the rot was deep by that point, it might still have been mitigated, if not excised. But not after.

    Even the 20th century’s prodigious, heart-breaking sacrifices of blood and lives could not redeem the culture. We must pray for and await revival.

    • Agree: kaganovitch
    • Replies: @Desiderius
  31. After such knowledge, what forgiveness?

    His mercy is from everlasting to everlasting. You turn your nose up on that you shouldn’t be surprised to end up fucked.

  32. Anon[355] • Disclaimer says:
    @Andy

    I think 1914 and the wholly unnecessary First World War was Western Civilization ultimately successful suicide attempt

    They were trying to destroy the Prussians, Europe’s demonstrably best people. They had prior been trying since Rome encountered them as the “barbarians” 1.5+ millenia prior.

    After WWII, they finished them off by murdering / transferring away the civilian population and literally giving Russia their central city hat is now Kaliningrad (which they still hold today deep in NATO territory as the Russia fake-news scaremongers magically ignore that detail).

    Meaning that the Russophobia is fake and Russia and the West are likely still allied against Prussian types in their own populations. Russia in the West used the same pincer move in WWI and II against the Germans, and are still up to their old tricks with their problems populations today (who are the suburban and rural conservatives).

  33. Rahan says:

    The new Middle Ages kicked off circa 2001, it was just subtle at first.

    Now it’s becoming increasingly obvious:

    1. The world’s economic and military potential is once more in “global convergence”;
    2. major strides in the sciences have stopped, and now it’s mostly about fiddling with details and hoping for a “God factor” (AI);
    3. the slave underclasses have taken over the military and the state institutions;
    4. the pleb are taught to hate those who made this civilization possible in the first place;
    5. cults and magic schools are mushrooming; witches and warlocks and exorcists are back in business;
    6. the fate of civilization again hangs on one “wise emperor” being able to put off the long night for a generation, or not being able to do that.
    7. The infrastructure is crumbling
    8. Engineering feats from 30 years ago are now suddenly impossible
    9. Degenerate sexual practices are so widespread, you can shop for “urethral sounding rods”, “chastity cock cages”, “fisting dildo”, and “gimp masks” on Amazon.
    https://www.amazon.com/Master-Series-Chastity-Penis-Cage/dp/B008WEO0WK
    https://www.amazon.com/SurgicalOnline-Dilator-Sounds-Single-Instrument/dp/B07H2LKBKK/ref=zg_bs_8297452011_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=ZDESS6QF993S5NMN8CDY
    https://www.amazon.com/Sex-Toys-Online-Store-DJ0261-01/dp/B001ZRUUGQ
    10. Young men and boys are encourages to become castrated catamites through public opinion, through law, and through highly effective hypnotic programs. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLz8WfE5bbB5YP2BoaNssjsHMQWb-azwiH

    And it’s not happening spontaneously. It’s being directed, and it is our duty to our descendants, or anybody in the future, really, to document the process in as many ways as possible.

    Otherwise this will just keep happening and happening, one civilizational cycle after another—the alien parasites will hijack society on all levels, set into motion widespread behavior and mentality modification programs, dismantle all protective spontaneous social institutions, and crush the resulting naked individual, even directly subjugating his mind.

    Of course we all hope this can be stopped now before it’s too late, but either way—documenting this process is a must. It’s a duty to the concept of civilization.

    • Agree: Lol just lol
  34. syonredux says:

    The decision to get rid of this survey art history course resembles the English Department’s move to “decolonize” its degree requirements in 2017. At the time, the department made a sequence titled “Major English Poets” optional for majors.

    After all, why should an English major have to read stale , pale males like Milton and Pope?

  35. @Desiderius

    Oh for pete’s sakes, it’s a line from TS Eliot. Steve is quoting “Gerontion”.

    An old man being read to by a boy. Sheesh.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Desiderius
  36. Maybe they’ll stop teaching history altogether when they discover that Karl Marx was a white man.

  37. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:

    This doesn’t bother me one bit.

    There have been art courses all through the 20th century, but look at the result. Total junk all around.

    The hell with art school and hell with colleges trying to teach arts and culture. Besides, most students sign up for that stuff as requirement and don’t really care.

    Art lovers will always exist and they will seek out their own thing. Indeed, art would probably be better off IF all colleges stopped teaching it. Especially with the internet, art lovers can find anything and study what they want to study.

    Handing over authority of arts and culture to institutions headed by ideologues, lunatics, and retards was never gonna be good for art.

    People need a change of mind. Education is a life long pursuit of things that interests you, and you have a lifetime to learn. The notion that you’re SO EDUCATED because you took some course over a few yrs in college is nonsense. It once made sense when most people were rural and had no access to books and stuff unless they went to a city or college. Now, that’s no longer the problem.

    Also, something is lost in the classroom even when the professor is well-meaning and good teacher. Something about art dies when it’s treated like a frog to dissect.

    One reason why Rock was so great in the 60s was it was totally independent of any SCHOOL.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  38. Rather, when there are so many other regions, genres and traditions — all “equally deserving of study”

  39. black sea says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Anatomically correct, I presume.

  40. @Mr McKenna

    In a similar vein, one of the NYC tabloids denounced the one Hall of Fame voter who didn’t vote for Derek Jeter. Never mind that until a couple of years ago, no inductee have ever been a unanimous pick.

    • Replies: @David In TN
  41. @MBlanc46

    There’s a reason Catholics should have been banned in this country. Anything gets called part of The Enlightenment, it’s bad automatically.

  42. When can we quit pretending Yale is a great university?

  43. @anonymous

    “People will be far less hesitant to read and discuss articles like his written by a Jew than a non-Jew.”

    That’s what you think. If they want to discredit a Jew, they don’t mention that he’s a Jew. “Mr. Stix, a well-known white nationalist…”

  44. Whenever you hear or read “Yale University,” think instead, “Jerelyn Luther University.”

    • Replies: @Ragno
  45. Anon[120] • Disclaimer says:

    Over at Harvard Math 55 looks pretty unwoke to me. Maybe it’s about time to decolonize it by devoting time to study of the Ishango bone.

    • Replies: @Cortes
  46. When friends and relatives ask me why I’m voting for Donald Trump again I just show them stuff like this. It’s really the only way I can say FU to these folks. You can’t even study art without getting racial crap, gay and transgender rights, and now climate change (climate change?!) shoved down your throat. If I can see these types of folks cry once every four years, that’s something.

    Of course, if rich conservatives bothered creating their own universities instead of funding Ivies, things wouldn’t be this bleak. At the very least, conservatives need to create good online courses for every subject.

  47. Old Prude says:
    @Logical Meme

    I LOL the “Me and My Hair” selfie. I missed the Dali title. Thanks for pointing it out.

  48. Cortes says:
    @Anon

    Ishango was cultural appropriation.

    African women looked after their hair AND invented mathematics:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lebombo_bone

  49. @MBlanc46

    Today all empirical realist cultures nosedive into oblivion.

    Coincidence?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @MBlanc46
  50. Putting European Art on a pedestal is Problematic. For a full explanation as to why, see your African American Studies Instructor.

  51. I wrote about white men standing on top as visual artists: https://www.eurocanadian.ca/2017/10/european-males-greatest-visual-artists.html

    And many other articles about superlative achievements of European males in all human endeavors.

  52. Spangel says:

    Fascinating that they consider teaching a course on questioning the concept of western art rather than simply teaching a world art course.

    While it may be that the west came up with more ideas worth studying than other civilizations, this is least obvious in the arts. The Far East, Middle East, ancient world etc produced thousands of fine art pieces we could study.

    • Agree: Lol just lol
  53. @Johnny789

    Vin Scully and the art of the grocery list . . .

  54. @Allen

    The greats weren’t wasting their time chasing tail or attending Nationals games.

  55. @Reg Cæsar

    Gives a whole new meaning to the term, peckerwood.

  56. Hear, Hear! It’s time to dump Rembrant, Picasso, Ernst and Michelangelo and replace it with REAL art. Namely graffiti and african masks. After all it’s a known fact that Picasso straight out copied African sculptures. The detailed craftsmanship that goes into building huts made of straw and mud eclipses the banality of gothic cathedrals and complex city systems (yawn).

    Yes its time to take the Spanish bull by the horns and bring in the amazing work of artists we have not yet heard of.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  57. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Yes, and Eliot’s point (among the myriad within any great poetry), as is my own, is to indict the faithless impotence of you and yours.

    https://modernamericanpoetry.org/criticism/grover-smith-gerontion

  58. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Knew I should have used third person. The you isn’t Steve, he hasn’t turned his nose up, it’s the clowns at Yale.

  59. George says:

    (Super non European artist) Ai Weiwei on his new life in Britain: ‘People are at least polite. In Germany, they weren’t’

    Devastated by his time in Germany, which he regards as still Nazi, the artist has moved. As he unveils a powerful virtual reality artwork, he talks about needing a monster to fight – and why he’d like to be a barber

    https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2020/jan/21/ai-weiwei-on-his-new-life-in-britain-germany-virtual-reality-film

    Diversity is strength until the top tier foreigners get fed up and leave, which is easy for them, good for Ai. Asian food is probably better in the UK.

    While on the subject of food in Germany, top tier Hamburg restaurant Jellyfish closes after owner’s passion is gone due to attacks by … What’s the point in living in a country that is losing it’s top chefs.

    “My passion has gone”
    The Hamburg star restaurant Jellyfish closes after four attacks in a month. His owner explains why he doesn’t want to continue after nine years.

    “Meine Leidenschaft ist erloschen”
    https://www.zeit.de/hamburg/2019-05/sternerestaurant-jellyfish-hauke-neubecker-vandalismus-einbruch-schliessung

  60. Paul says:

    Yale should not be hypocritical and should quit teaching science because too many great scientists were White men.

  61. Incredible.

    If I’m hiring today, a degree from any of the Ivies is an absolute, automatic no-hire disqualifier. Really, a degree from any post-secondary institution would trigger profound skepticism.

    I’d hire bright kids out of high school and let them learn on the job. Yale grads? Well, I guess we can always use another barista.

    Yeeeeesh.

  62. Ragno says:
    @Enemy of Earth

    Check your watch, EofE: we’re knee-deep in it right now.

  63. Ragno says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    A/k/a the poster child for today’s bullshit revolutionary: foul-mouthed rich kid with no other way to validate herself than by spitting out her silver spoon prior to savaging her betters.

    Correction: as Jerelyn is the child of AA lottery winners, make that “her white betters”.

  64. @Logical Meme

    Dali’s “The Persistence of Climate Change”…. LOL, that was good.

    Agree. It even has the melting clocks indicating global extinction in 11 years. (It was 12 last year, so I’m trying to stay accurate.)

  65. @Faraday's Bobcat

    Mencken famously defined Puritanism as “The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy.”

    SJWism might be defined as “The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be thinking independently.”

    Mencken had this covered as well, of course: “The most dangerous man to any government is the man who is able to think things out for himself, without regard to the prevailing superstitions and taboos.”

    • Replies: @Prester John
    , @Desiderius
  66. this is just more parasitism on behalf of the Negro. I can’t wait until the makers secede from the takers. Sheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeet–wherez mah EBT?

  67. That picture is actually entitled Das_Eismeer (= the frozen sea) also called also called The Wreck of Hope and depicts a ship exploring the Northwest Passage, but frozen in.

    It was originally exhibited in 1824 under the title An Idealized Scene of an Arctic Sea, with a Wrecked Ship on the Heaped Masses of Ice.

    When I was a teenager I liked Friedrich’s paintings a lot, but they are more art exhibition stuff than home decor.

    There is a 3-dimensional sculptural representation of this painting next to the Oslo Opera House in Norway, which is a bit of a tourist attraction.

    • Thanks: Desiderius
  68. @Almost Missouri

    Today all empirical realist cultures nosedive into oblivion.

    Coincidence?

    Ahh, Kant wanted to show what empiricism means – and what it does not mean. He thought that religious belief is different from stating that something is true and prove it empirically.

    To sum this up: Kant was not against religion – even though he held, that religious truths can’t be proven (= it is the nature of religious truths, that they have to be believed).

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  69. Well, I’ll be! And all this time I thought that Buonarotti was “bi” but evidently he was a full-bore swishola.

    But a genius nevertheless.

  70. He said that he will invite students to write an essay nominating a work of art that has been left out of the course’s curriculum or its textbook.

    The trouble is that the vast majority of undergraduates would not be capable of nominating a significant work of art that has not been recognized.

    Courses of this kind ought to be designed to give beginner-level art viewers some ideas about how experts look at works of art, and what makes them great.

    Obviously you can’t totally understand a work of art without understanding something of the history of the society that produced it, and what the role of art was in that society and who viewed art in that society, and where it was displayed, and so on.

    Anyway, if I was to rise to the challenge I would nominate this painting, which is of Boar Lane, Leeds, England and is interesting because it is just at the intersection of photography and painting and reminds us that our great grandparents had none of the everyday comforts and technology that we have today, had pollution everywhere, and yet led complex lives and built for posterity.

    It is also interesting because you can see the same scene today and take your own photo of it in half a minute.

    https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2725451

  71. @Harry Baldwin

    He was right of course. On the other hand, ya don’t wanna have too many–as they used to call ’em in Germany “Freidenker”–“free thinkers”. Too unsettling…conjuring up visions of anarchists at worst or, at best, folks who just won’t do what their told by Our Betters.

    So-called “free societies” have one thing in common with totalitarian/authoritarian societies: To get along you’d damn well better go along!

  72. As Taleb writes in Antifragile, whoever has no past has no future. As my Israeli friend rephrased it: “a tree without roots cannot grow.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  73. @Jonathan Mason

    The artist, John Atkinson Grimshaw, like George Orwell (and my grandmother) 50 years later, died of tuberculosis.

  74. @Harry Baldwin

    Dissenting view:


  75. Uncircumcised preoperative transsexual wearing wig by Michael Angelx.

  76. Duke84 says:
    @Anonymous

    It seems that Da Vinci was almost completely celibate.

  77. @Jonathan Mason

    What a splendid work. Thanks for sharing it.

    My guess though is that the guy who made that painting, bless his heart, was a LOT more interested in different kinds of light than he was in space, or place. See the contemporary work of Dan Witz, for example.

  78. @Enemy of Earth

    Start??

    We’ve been in a ‘Dark Ages’ since 1914 at the very least.

    P.S. The term ‘Dark Ages’ refers to a period of mass movement of peoples when government sucked, the art was ugly and nothing worthwhile was written or built. Though in all honesty the period wasn’t that bad for the contemporary inhabitants; barbarians roaming about and sacking things was infinitely preferable to slave-driven latifundia owned by a one-percenter oligarch cadre.

  79. notsaying says:

    Maybe there is still hope. There was one voice of reason here and the writers of the story actually included the voice of a naysayer:

    “… “My biggest critique of the decision is that it’s a disservice to undergrads,” Mahlon Sorensen ’22 said. “If you get rid of that one, all-encompassing course, then to understand the Western canon of art, students are going to have to take multiple art history courses. Which is all well and good for the art history major, but it sucks for the rest of us, which, I would say, make up the vast majority of the people who are taking [HSAR 115].”

    This analysis is absolutely correct and the speaker (I don’t know if “Mahlon” is a man or a woman) is very good at self-expression for someone who was just a teenager yesterday.

    I myself never took any fine art survey courses when I was in college — none were offered for nonmajors — and have always wished that I had.

  80. @Desiderius

    Unfortunately, the entire field is heading in the same direction that Yale is. My wife is a professor of art history, and this is what she insists is happening. Her department is doing a search to fill a position, and all the job applicants talk this way. You’d have to go to a place like Hillsdale, I guess, to get something sensible.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  81. Anon[407] • Disclaimer says:

    I noticed from an article about this that for the very last class of Trad White Greats, enrollment has shot up by 100 students. There’s definitely interest in it. My suspicion is that the class will now be a 200-level class, not 100, and those who will be taking it will be art majors, not SJWers just passing through trying to ‘get some culture.’ At a 200-level sophomore level class, the class may be harder and more intense, and generally, you aren’t allowed to take a 200 level or up course unless you’ve taken a 100 level.

    Interestingly enough, a lot of blacks tend to flunk out their first year of college, so they’re unlikely to encounter it and won’t be around to complain about its whiteness. The profs won’t have to put up being harassed by the worst and dumbest of the SJWs anymore. I think the whole thing is a ploy on the part of Yale to keep it more for the ‘elite’ and suaver students who will go on to work for art museums and places like Christie’s or Sothebys, and who will be expected to have social connections to the super-rich class of buyers and donors. Yes, I think Yale has just Country-Clubbed the art course, and the hoi polloi are being deliberately steered away from it so they don’t get in.

    I think it’s a way of Yale saying, “You don’t like white culture? Okay, we’ll hide it from it and keep it for ourselves.”

    One thing that supports this point of view is that Yale shows all its 100-level courses online on its website (including tons of ethnic garbage), but in Art History at least, they don’t show anything about its 200-level-and-up courses. They’re trying to hide what they teach from the public.

  82. @Dan Smith

    I had an argument with a fellow elite college graduate recently. She maintained that whatever their faults, elite colleges were still the place to get the best education. I demurred, and to be ornery, said I thought one could do better at any good program in a Big Ten state school and save a bundle of money too, which has been my go-to argument on this subject for a couple of decades, but now I wonder if even that is true. Certainly, my encounters with recent college grads suggests that modern college is a anti-education process.

    Anyhow, it is hard to top, or gainsay, this 15 year old gem from The Atlantic (back when it wasn’t gay clickbait):

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2005/01/lost-in-the-meritocracy/303672/

    Successful elite college applicant Walter Kirn lays bare the reality of “elite” “education” simply, honestly, devastatingly.

  83. nebulafox says:
    @Allen

    For the overwhelming majority of human history, people had better things to base their identity around than who they had sex with.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  84. Ian Smith says:

    This really is depressing. Not just that the course is cancelled, but that so many people would rather throw a temper tantrum than learn about beauty and accomplishment.
    Part of the protest is ressentiment over stale pale male accomplishment, part of it is the future commissars of diversity and inclusiveness are adding to their resumes. How dreary.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  85. Dumbo says:
    @Allen

    From those Renaissance masters, I think the only one about whom there is some (scant) evidence of having sex with other men was Caravaggio (and even then, his main companion appears to have been a female prostitute).

    I’m not convinced about Botticelli, Michelangelo or Leonardo; yes, they never married at a time in which it was usual, but it does not mean necessarily that they were having sex with men. Great artists can be a weird bunch.

  86. Anonymous[480] • Disclaimer says:

    Strange. We keep getting promised that we need diversity so that we can have multiculturalism, yet all we ever get told is all the parts of our culture we can no longer have, because they are offensive to someone. Multiculturalism becomes Noculturalism.

    Why not just leave the Western art class alone and create similar classes for African art and Native American art and Asian art and see if anyone is interested enough – •without• making them mandatory – to bother to take them?

    None of this really matters much, anyway. Most of these students are just there prepping for careers in the hedge fund industry.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  87. If true, it means yet another blow to these institutions’ reputations in the long haul, which is great.

    SJWs infested, and they thought the university reputations would last forever, thus insuring that the asinine commie ideas would forever be held as genius.

    It turns out, however, that a university’s reputation is built on its output. When the output degrades the institution’s respect degrades.

    This is why you need to stop commies from coming in the door. Better to turn away 10 perfect applicants than let in 1 commie. Because this is the result: decay and rot.

  88. @Nicholas Stix

    The Baseball HOF never gave anyone a unanimous vote for decades and decades. Joe DiMaggio didn’t even make the HOF in his first year of eligibility.

    Over time, when a black player didn’t make the HOF unanimously, the “racism” charges started. Hank Aaron got the ball rolling on that one.

  89. @Anon

    It used to be, back in the old days (and I’m only a Gen X-er), that kids who were Yale or Harvard material mostly already got their broad liberal-arts college education in high school, and college was used for more specific things.

    The idea of waiting to take an introductory survey course in Western art until college is laughable to me; I got my introduction to all that in sophomore year of high school, taught by two well-known painters, who then made us do copies of French and Italian originals. I never took a survey course in Russian or British novelists at university; you were expected to read that stuff on your own, on the IRT at six in the morning. If you aren’t busy devouring Dostoevski and Turgenev, or comparing J-L David to Manet, on your own free time at age 15, then why on earth do you think you deserve to go to Yale in the first place?

    Now you kids with your blip-blop or your frip-frop, or whatever it is you call it… Get off my lawn!

    (He was a very selfish giant.)

    • Agree: Autochthon
  90. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ian Smith

    This really is depressing. Not just that the course is cancelled, but that so many people would rather throw a temper tantrum than learn about beauty and accomplishment.

    No, it’s liberating. Art should belong to the people, not to institutions. Who cares about Yale?

    Just search for ‘art’ on the internet, and you can get all sorts of great stuff. This mentality of relying on institutions is so passe. Sure, we still need institutions to teach stuff like electrical engineering and advanced chemistry — we can’t have our own labs — , but learning about humanities can be done by just about anyone. Same with writing. I recall reading that the career path for most Germans in the 19th century and early 20th century was working in a book store. They didn’t have fancy writing courses back then. This culture produced Thomas Mann and Hermann Hesse.

    People around the world can create their own online community of art appreciation. Who cares what Yale does? Now, some would say elite colleges set the standard for all of us. No longer. The reigning ideology of elite institutions is globo-homo. The elite’s idea of culture is HAMILTON the musical. It’s pathetic. So, let the elites drop high culture and the like. We will take it and create a separate community that appreciates that stuff.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Ian Smith
  91. Anonymous[269] • Disclaimer says:
    @nebulafox

    For the overwhelming majority of human history, people had better things to base their identity around than who they had sex with.

    Because people didn’t have a choice. There are strict cultural rules regarding sex, and the great majority of people mated people within the community.

    But now, there is choice. A man or woman in any part of the world can travel to another part of the world and have sex with whomever. As sex becomes more a matter of individual choice, it’s come to matter far more in terms of one’s identity.

    It began in a big way in America. What did it mean to be a White American? It meant the choice of white Americans to mate with other whites of different ethnicity. It wasn’t just about law of citizenship but the mixing of blood. And then, miscegenation became a part of American identity. One’s children’s identity is impacted by whom one has sex with. When whites mate with Jews or blacks, the kids will likely be Jewish or black.

    Now, homo identity is trickier because there’s no continuity in homo identity. Most homos are not children of homos, and even if homo do have children, the likelihood is the kids will be straight.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  92. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @TomSchmidt

    As Taleb writes in Antifragile, whoever has no past has no future. As my Israeli friend rephrased it: “a tree without roots cannot grow.”

    Traditional China was like tree with roots but no leaves. Modern West is like a tree with leaves but no roots. Latter is worse off in the long run because whereas roots can eventually grow leaves with proper water and sun, a rootless tree will lose all the leaves.

    How much does a culture gain via filtering or irrigation from another culture? Via filtering or irrigation, the culture takes what is useful and good of the other culture while rejecting what is dubious and dangerous. Still, filtering and irrigation are impossible unless the other culture exists. Modern China may be making progress by taking some good things from the West while rejecting some bad things, but it wouldn’t be happening if the West is there to lead the way. Being the first-place civilization has its advantages, and the West has been at the forefront for several centuries. But it also comes with dangers because the leader of the pack is the first one to go over the edge while those in the back may notice the folly and pull back. China as the follower can filter and irrigate for the positive things in the West, but is progress in China possible without the West as leader?

    The West also gained by filtering/irrigating for something in the Near East. Powerful visions and big ideas but without taking the whole baggage, much of which was crazy and burdensome. The West seems to lack the prophetic power that had to be supplied by the Near East. White Europeans failed to produce anyone like Moses(even if fictional), Zoroaster, Jesus, Paul, Muhammad. But if Muslims and Byzantine Christians totally fell under the burdensome sway of prophecy, Western Christians did not as they maintained spheres independent of religion.

    The difference between Whites and Jews is whites were essentially crypto-pagan pluralists who filtered and adopted monotheist prophecy whereas Jews were essentially mono-prophetists who filtered and adopted elements of pagan pluralism that resurfaced in the West with Renaissance and especially in the 19th century with rise of romanticism.
    So, even though both peoples are combination of both mono-ism and poly-ism, they are crucially different in that they have different cores. It’s like a rationalist who adopts spiritualism is only superficially similar to a spiritualist who adopts rationalism. While both use a combination of rationalism and spiritualism, the former makes spiritualism serve rationalism whereas the latter makes rationalism serve spiritualism. A mono-mind is more sure of itself and more centric than a poly-mind. Notice that when Zuckerberg’s sister goes on and on about Western Culture, it is ultimately to make all of it revolve around “Is it good for Jews?”

    Christianity for the West wasn’t so much the sun as the brightest star in the sky. In contrast, Judaism was the sun for Jews.

  93. @John Pepple

    Be serious: The overwhelming majority of people who major in art history go on to become baristas or sell insurance. The happy few who do wind up managing museums and such are 1) politically connected cronies accepting sinecures (e.g., the nephew of the gallery’s richest benefactor) or 2) people with advanced degrees or experience well beyond the rudimentary knowledge one might gain in an introductory course; often, they are both of these things, but the first qualification is more important than the second.

    Notice also that even the article acknowledges those who actually want to learn anything can still do so by taking multiple courses more focused on actual art, so even a schlub whose undergraduate degree had a major in art history will not be harmed by the infantilisation of this single course.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Art Deco
  94. @Anonymous

    After such knowledge, what forgiveness?

    The question posed by the Old Testament, answered by the New, and now forgotten by what passes for Yale College. Pierpont and Edwards would probably be surprised it lasted this long, but not how it finally reached its end in this vale of tears.

    Truth dies in Darkness.

  95. @Anonymous

    Why not just leave the Western art class alone and create similar classes for African art and Native American art and Asian art and see if anyone is interested enough – •without• making them mandatory – to bother to take them?

    The specialists can’t handle the competition from the generalists. They’re drunk on the Pierian Spring. The main internal pressure against survey courses has nothing to do with ideology.

  96. @Autochthon

    This course is not for art history majors, it’s for everybody else who wants to take a one semester course on the history of Western art over the last 600 years, which is a reasonable thing to expect to get out of your Yale education.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  97. @John Pepple

    field

    That’s what happens when you let yourself get unDisciplined.

  98. Timmy75 says:
    @Desiderius

    “…and then there was this time that I got SO hammered, I woke up three days later in some cave.”

  99. @Desiderius

    Everybody should know Der Mond ist aufgegangen by the unsurpassably humble Matthias Claudius – – – Was sind wir Menschenkinder/ Doch eitel arme Sünder und / Wissen gar nicht viel – We human childs/ Being self-centered sinners too / Don’t know much at all…

    My guess would be: The reason that there is no better English translation is, that there was no need for one before this prove-business (= science) got big. – Kant dug this (Goethe too – and quite easily and elegantly so, and that’s just one more reason, why he was being read as the less earnest one – and therefor the less reliable one, which is wrong, but I ‘d hold that’s how he was (and still is) read) – ahh: Kant dug this scientific Changing of the Guards as a fundamental change in our way of life/thinking, and that’s why there is a world before him, and one after him: He dug modernity’s center of gravity.

    One of the magical lines in The Critique of Pure Reason (quoted from memory and typed as such in English) : As I’ve explained, there just is no way to prove the existence of God. And that’s why I (= I = Kant) still wait for the one who would show up and prove that there is a God.

    Uhh – I want to look it up – just a second – now I’ve found another one of these magical Kantian distinctions: “No, the conviction, that is debated here is not a l o g i c a l , but a m o r a l conviction, and since it is as such rooted in subjective reasons, I dare not even say i t i s morally sure, that there is a God etc; but rather I a m morally convinced (=sure, DK) etc.”

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  100. @Steve Sailer

    I entirely understand and agree; I read your post and the excerpts you included – I don’t think John Pepple did, though.

    I also think, though, that the Germ Theory of Disease has the even better point: if you need some stuffed shirt on the faculty at Yale University to tell you basic things about Botticelli and Hogarth, you and Yale University deserve each other.

    The intelligent among us (the sort who may have belonged at Yale University once upon a time, before it became a parody of a university) knew about this stuff before we finished high school. Universities are properly for more sophisticated studies. Equity (of outcome) became the sine qua non of education sometime in the second half of the twentieth century; equality (of opportunity) in that century’s first half identified geniuses raised on farms who went on to put men on the moon. The inverted (perverted, really) elevation of the one above the other has given us both a Yale University in which students must be spoon-fed basic knowledge about basic knowledge now being denied even that basic knowledge, in favour of nonsense about so-called racial grievances.

    People like the Germ Theory and I just shrug: our children, if they bother getting degrees at all, will get degrees in engineering or medicine or something similar from Kettering University or Carnegie Mellon University or someplace similar, then go on to order their coffee from the people who got degrees in art history – whether at Yale University or Modesto Junior College.

    Oh, plenty of the ones with degrees in art history (or anything else) from Yale University will go on to positions they are completely unqualified for (president of the F.U.S.A., editor-in-chief of the New York Times, etc.) due to the self-referential cycle of cronyism and incestual hiring which make degrees from such universities Veblen goods, signaling membership among the chosen, like so many handbags from Louis Vitton let bouncers in Manhattan know who should or should not be admitted to trendy nightclubs – but the rentier assholes, like the poor, we will always have with us.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Desiderius
  101. This spring, the final rendition of the course will seek to question the idea of Western art itself

    I thought that extreme rendition was a bad thing. Live and learn.

  102. Anonymous[129] • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon

    Both you and The Germ Theory are promoting a popular meme about higher education in the past that just isn’t true.

    Basic and introductory survey courses like this have long been the norm at Yale and other universities, both for specialists intending to major in the particular subject, and as electives or part of a broader lib arts requirement.

    And undergrad students in the past were not as highly knowledgeable as The Germ Theory suggests. Places like Yale served in large part as finishing schools for the elite. George W. Bush was not an atypical student in that era. Dubya certainly didn’t devour British and Russian literature or acquire extensive knowledge of Western Art at Philips Andover before matriculating at Yale.

    In general, there might have been greater cultural literacy – recognizing important names, dates, and so on – but this didn’t imply extensive knowledge that obviated the need for survey courses. It was relatively superficial, although obviously better than what we have now.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  103. @Anonymous

    Right. I took an art history survey course (from 1400 AD onward) my last semester at Rice U. It was a good thing to study.

    A general problem for education is that globalization increases the amount of stuff you _ought_ to cover. For example, the College Board can’t figure out what to do with the World History Advanced Placement test (there is also European History and American History), which has grown immensely in subject matter since I took it 44 years ago.

    First, there’s 44 years more history. Second, there is a lot more about places like India and Korea that have a lot of Indian and Korean students who take the AP test. Third, there is pre-history that wasn’t even known in 1976, like pre-Inca Peruvian cultures.

    So the College Board wanted to make World History into a two year course, but school don’t want to do that.

    But there is too much subject matter for a single AP test to fairly test.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    , @Art Deco
  104. @Autochthon

    That’s nice. More cynical than thou is kinda getting played out tho.

    There was once a time where it was recognized that Alexander’s instruction from Aristotle was crucial to his success – not as a professional philosopher but as a leader of men. The genesis of this type of course was in such thinking and we’re poorer for having leaders who are no longer required to at minimum jump through such hoops (likewise required chapel attendance).

    Both were required of me at an age before I could appreciate either. The former at a public school of all places. Such discipline was in retrospect a priceless gift.

  105. @Dieter Kief

    Heh, I had just been thinking about how the role (the hypostasis* from the Hebrews passage) of faith (pistis) in morality is akin to axioms in logic. In both cases trying to prove them misses the point.

    * – wealth of connotations, but most straightforward is simply understanding (hypo = under, stasis self explanatory)

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  106. @Desiderius

    most straightforward is simply understanding (hypo = under, stasis self-explanatory)

    I
    Understanding does not work without  – – – high and low. – And if you look at that the other way round you find: Hierarchies are an integral part of the ability to understand. Cf. Daniel Everett’s observations – you can have a society with hardly any hierarchies (=without God) – but there you don’t grasp too much.****.

    II
    He who understands in the English version is the one who accepts, that he is located lower than his subject – he accepts a hierarchy (and God represents this structure in Christianity). (That is the Kantian trace = the systematical point, which the late Foucault, debating with Habermas, finally turned into a Kantian, even though he had been a methodical anarchist almost all his life).

    III

    That measuring is crucial for Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason – and furthermore the architecture of his thinking is an insight, Erasmus von Rotterdam had not had yet when he traveled into the Black Forest to have a look at the witches and what people did about them. – In the societal context of the growing importance of the sciences, it made a big difference, to know what can be measured and thus be proven and what not. Erasmus too would have been better equipped mentally to confront the witch-problem after Kant. Not least because Kant’s distinctions enable us to sort out pseudo-measurements.

    IV

    That logic is something that makes use of the formal system which is used to make use of measurements (= mathematics etc.) caused confusion because it took some time and effort to develop a clear understanding of such conundrums. But this Kantian leap forward enabled enabled us us to see something quite simple as soon we stood on the shoulders of Kant ff. – logic is basically a formal system and as such (and as all formal systems of at least some complexity (cf. Gödel)) not as distinct as – a measurement. To measure something is the core of scientific reliability, and this quality of scientific reliability can not be reached by purely formal means – unless those formal systems are plain out primitive (if formal systems lack contradictions (zones of uncertainty), this indicates that they are of no use as formal systems – Hans Magnus Enzensberger put that Gödel-aspect this way: A formal system without contradictions is insufficient).
     
    V

    **** In the end, Everett sacrificed his Christian God, because he did not understand the hermeneutic aspect of this concept of God. To put it differently: That there are human tribes, which can live decent lives without our biblical God does not prove, that there is no need for God at all. – It shows that there is at least one tribe, the Piiahia, which could do well without the Christian concept of God. – It might well be, that the Christian concept of God co-evolved with our cognitive abilities. The Pirahas might be the link, which now enables us to state, that animals live without the explicit knowledge of God – but not without the explicit knowledge of “ball”, “Judy”, “lace” etc..***** 

    ***** cf.the utterly charming Welche Tiere Und Warum Das Himmelreich Erlangen Können – Neue Theologische Studien – by Eckhard Henscheid, Stuttgart 1995

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  107. @Steve Sailer

    The Fury

    She sees, how everything is becoming more,

    squanderingly more, simply everything,

    we too; how it grows, above our heads;

    (…)

    She alone stays, calm
    the Fury of Disappearance.

    (Hans Magnus Enzensberger in The Fury of Disappearance, Frankfurt, 1980.

    GWF Hegel, Phenomenology:
     
    No positive deed can produce common liberty; for the deed, all that can be accomplished is the negative deed; she is just the Fury of Disappearance. – In the chapter VI, BIII of the Phenomenology about the French Revolution, titled The Absolute Deed and Liberty.

  108. Ron69 says:

    Leticia Olalia Morales of 15501 Pasadena Ave #H Tustin .ca 92780 submitted fake documents and bribed to obtain a tourist and work visa.she now has a green card applying for citizenship and ss benefits

  109. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Andy

    I’m not very enthusiastic about western art after World War II

    Western art pretty much ends in 1914.

    Of course some might argue that western civilisation pretty much ended in 1914.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    , @Art Deco
    , @Andy
  110. Art Deco says:
    @Steve Sailer

    When I took world history, it was a light survey of the four world civilizations and the ancestors of the West. There wasn’t much text on isolates like the pre-Columbian civilzations and our teachers skipped over what text their was. You don’t need two years. You need to set priorities. There aren’t any more world civilizations than there were forty years ago. Developments in archaeological research will alter bits of the master narrative, but past a certain point in the development of that narrative, they’re not going to make it more verbose.

  111. @Dieter Kief

    How much better off we’d be if abstraction were considered properly low (cf. Tillich’s ground of being for instance) rather than high and thus the capacity for it/inclination toward it much less likely to get conflated with mere status striving.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  112. Art Deco says:
    @Autochthon

    The overwhelming majority of people who major in art history go on to become baristas or sell insurance.

    Don’t think so. IIRC, there are only about 2,000 degrees in art history awarded each year in the U.S.

  113. Dr. Dre says:

    The art history survey course that almost everyone took at our Seven Sisters college back in the 1960s was the most favorite, non-required course there was at the school. It showcased the professors in each area (Egyptian, Classical Greek, Early Christian and Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic architecture etc.). I took it freshman yr, followed by a 200 level course on Northern Painting my sophomore yr and dropped my poli-sci major for Art History. There was no single textbook for any of the courses. You were to look and look some more at works of art; compare and contrast works by artists’ early and late works, by subject matter, study the patronage of various artists, i. e. the Church or royal patronage, and what that led to stylistically, etc.

    The one class I could not fit in to my schedule was the one on Connoisseurship of Drawings, taught by an older gentleman from NYC who would visit the campus for a seminar one evening a week. That would include looking up close at drawings, etchings, prints by famous artists (Rembrandt, for example) so you could learn to identify — and value $$ — certain markers in early or late prints, or those by students of the great man. Practice makes perfect, or at least making fewer errors in the marketplace.

    To say that the study of Art History is worthless is a big mistake. Developing one’s “eye” will serve you and the institution, museum or school, or art gallery that you lead. Imagine yourself in charge of repairing Notre Dame in Paris after the fire gutted the roof a couple of months ago. Where to start? Let’s hope this work will be conducted by someone fully knowledgeable and sensitive to the great age and history of the structure, as well as its artistic merit. Priceless.

  114. @dfordoom

    Otto Dix, Adolf Dietrich, Wassily Kandinsky, August Sander, Willy Ronis, Ansel Adams, Georgia O’Keeffe, Salvador Dali, René Magritte, Richard Serra, Gerhard Richter, Pablo Picasso, Hans Hartung, Le Corbusier, Joseph Beuys, Donald Judd, Peter Zumthor (Therme Vals!), James Turrell, Daido Moriyama, David Czupryn, Cornelia Schleime, Robert Crumb, Shawn Tan.

  115. Art Deco says:
    @dfordoom

    Western art pretty much ends in 1914.

    For reasons which need not concern us, I went to the commencement of Maryland Institute College of Art a few years back. Whoever ranks art schools ranks MICA number nine in the U.S.. I’m told the digital work they had on display was worth looking at. I just had a gander of the conventional material their students put up in their final exhibit. I think in their graduate class of 400-odd, they had about two kids who could paint worth sh!t.

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
  116. @Desiderius

    How much better off we’d be if abstraction were considered properly low (cf. Tillich’s ground of being for instance)

    Novalis spoke about the abstractions and numbers as misleading forces in a quite otherworldly-perfect and opium-tinged (or more accurate: opium-soaked) poem. Perfect 70ies zeitgeist, by the way, maybe just not aggressive enough to spin off a big Novalis-revival.
    Paul Tillich had the same idea. Nothing wrong with having such ideas at all, they are just a little weeny bit outdated by now, methinks.
    In other words – there is no single way/method, to force this abstraction-problem to go away.
    This is Marx’s insight: Capitalism has its merits (it turns all the old and overcome customs and techniques and buildings etc. – into VAPOR!). Or Max Weber’s point: Rationality (= abstraction – right?) has its merits too. It is of no use, to attack modernity full frontal. – That’s what Heinrich von Kleist hinted at in his quite brilliant Marionattentheater-essay: The direct way to paradise is closed – we moderns will not get rid of our rationality ever. We have to travel the side roads, so to speak and hope to find our way into redemption on them.
    On an extremely abstract level, there exists now a pretty simple solution to all this – the Habermasian way: Let people speak their minds and accept, that they are not necessarily on the utmost rational side (= accept even (!) religious aspects of present problems/ conflicts, as long as people are willing to articulate their religiously motivated positions in proper worldly terms/ arguments).
    The rest is Freud// Haidt/Lukianoff: Everybody tends to argue irrationally – meaning: Theologians and proponents of a more based discourse and those studying the works of Kant and Wittgenstein and Habermas too….
    What I like so much about the Unz Review is, hat this debate is in all unrestricted liberty possible. And if you ask me how this will all play out – I’m optimistic, as long as really conflicting positions can be debated in public spaces. 

    Wenn nicht mehr Zahlen und Figuren / Novalis

    Wenn nicht mehr Zahlen und Figuren
    Sind Schlüssel aller Kreaturen
    Wenn die, so singen oder küssen,
    Mehr als die Tiefgelehrten wissen,
    Wenn sich die Welt ins freye Leben
    Und in die Welt wird zurück begeben,
    Wenn dann sich wieder Licht und Schatten
    Zu ächter Klarheit werden gatten,
    Und man in Mährchen und Gedichten
    Erkennt die wahren Weltgeschichten,
    Dann fliegt vor Einem geheimen Wort
    Das ganze verkehrte Wesen fort.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  117. @Art Deco

    Prestige art schools stopped teaching traditional drawing skills after the Abstract Expressionism boom. That’s rather like music schools not teaching basic music theory.

    Vocational schools that trained illustrators retained traditional drawing classes. One can find free PDF versions of Andrew Loomis online pretty easily.

    No one teaches freehand perspective anymore, though.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  118. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Only Human

    Hear, Hear! It’s time to dump Rembrant, Picasso, Ernst and Michelangelo and replace it with REAL art.

    Dumping Picasso and Ernst would actually be a very good idea. Dumping the entirety of modernist art would be an even better idea.

    Western modernist art and literature from the beginning of the 20th century represents a sustained and vicious attack on the foundations of western civilisation. It’s time that modernist trash like Picasso was consigned to the junk heap.

  119. @Art Deco

    I don’t think many art history majors go on to do *anything*. It is a classic Mrs. Degree feeder pipeline. I know 2 art history degree holders, both genuinely engaging and smart, both stay at home moms

  120. @Dr. Dre

    “The art history survey course that almost everyone took at our Seven Sisters college back in the 1960s was the most favorite, non-required course there was at the school.“
    Agreed (although 35 years later)
    The unspoken but well-understood story there is that eg Math professors by and large are dolts. The best and brightest weren’t teaching undergrads, if teaching at all. If you were really good at math, you could be a Wall Street Quant, and Actuary etc. A math prof was something of a failure for the option-set of math jobs.
    But Poetry teacher? Art History teacher? The people in those spots had the optimal outcome for that vocational pipeline. They were the “winners” of Art History. And, without exception, they were WAY more engaging and amazing. It’s infectious being in a classroom headed by brilliance

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  121. @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    And art history experts with salesman’s personalities can make a lot of money being art dealers. I read about a guy with an Art History Ph.D. who is more or less Leonardo DiCaprio’s personal art acquisitions advisor. It sounded like a pretty kick-ass yacht-intensive life.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  122. @Dieter Kief

    No, rationality isn’t abstraction, it’s the method of moving from abstract to concrete, and back. Reason (logos) after all being another name for the Word made Flesh, and on the third day Word again.

    I’m sure there are five cummings poems at least to answer Novalis but this little Dickinson leaps to mind:

    Surgeons must be very careful
    When they take the knife!
    Underneath their fine incisions
    Stirs the Culprit – Life!

    It’s not the abstraction of Modernity that is the problem, as if Plato were Modern, it’s the preference of the Modern for taking a sling and five easy pieces to the Giants who preceded them rather than standing on their shoulders.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  123. @Jane Plain

    No one teaches freehand perspective anymore, though.

    Had a packed Adult Ed class 2005ish that wasn’t half bad. You can get most anything you want, the problem is lining up the wants with what matters.

  124. I did as well; you can still take it here and there – but it should be taught as a requirement in art schools. It’s all theory now, i.e., bullshit.

  125. @Desiderius

    No, rationality isn’t abstraction 

     

    Yes, it is not necessarily so. But quite often people act as if that would be the case, and that is my problem.
    Rationality can be quite self-serving at times – that’s when Weber’s iron cage of obedience comes into play as a signature metaphor for modernity. Factory workers. Piece-wages. The masses at the desks of the modern institutions.

    Frankly, if you don’t mind, I see no way to sperate modernity (and reason) from rationality & abstractions. Numbers are abstractions. Laws are abstractions. Logic is abstract. And that is the point of the New Kantianism: To understand, that these distinctions exist and have become quite powerful over the course of time. That’s why Heidegger and Marcuse are half-right and even Lukacs maybe 1/5th right: Because the nomological and the ethical (and religious) and the esthetical spheres are now co-existing – and the goal is rather to balance them against one another than to let (one or two of them) dominate.

    Didn’t know those Dickinson lines. They are nice and all.
     
     A Dickinson/ cummings/ Novalis close reading could be quite interesting. Nicholson Baker tried something like that but did not quite succeed (The anthologist/ Traveling Sprinkler). He seems to have fallen off of the Spinning wheel of fortune & grace lately.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  126. @Dieter Kief

    Not just balance, but harmony, where the sum is greater than the parts. That’s Arnold’s sweet reasonableness of Jesus – with the role of Reason (logos) being the happy marriage of the abstract and the concrete, ideal and real, God and man, Heaven and Earth, etc…

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  127. @Desiderius

    Sigh!

    Home is something that shines in one’s childhood but where nobody ever was, if not in his heart.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  128. Andy says:
    @dfordoom

    There were some western artists after WW1 worth seeing: Dali, Magritte, Escher, Miro, Chagall

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @dfordoom
  129. @Dieter Kief

    Nice line.

    Well, I’m here, very much at home, now.

    Off to change a diaper and have a laugh.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  130. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Andy

    There were some western artists after WW1 worth seeing: Dali, Magritte, Escher, Miro, Chagall

    I’l give you Magritte and Escher. Dali was an amusing charlatan. Miro was just more modernist trash. Chagall was mediocre.

    There were a few very good surrealists. Paul Delvaux for example (a much better artist than the gimmicky Dai). And de Chirico.

    Surrealism was the only worthwhile modernist school and it was really just a further development of the 19th century Symbolist school. Surrealism was worthwhile because it rejected most of the idiotic tenets of modernism.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  131. Ian Smith says:
    @Anonymous

    I kind of see your point, but that’s not what’s going on here. K-12 humanities education is nothing but Jim Crow, slavery, the Holocaust, etc. Universities, for all their reputation, at least helped to expose the youth to something other than that. You just know that they are going to require an ethnic grievance class instead.

  132. @dfordoom

    Oh Escher? – And A. Paul Weber then?

    Dali’s Steinway with the golden little Lenins jumpin’ out of the keys – ? His young women in the apron at the window, looking out at the sea?

  133. @Desiderius

    Nice line.

    “Der Mensch lebt noch überall in der Vorgeschichte, ja alles und jedes steht noch vor Erschaffung der Welt, als einer rechten. Die wirkliche Genesis ist nicht am Anfang, sondern am Ende, und sie beginnt erst anzufangen, wenn Gesellschaft und Dasein radikal werden, das heißt sich an der Wurzel fassen. Die Wurzel der Geschichte aber ist der arbeitende, schaffende, die Gegebenheiten umbildende und überholende Mensch. Hat er sich erfaßt und das Seine ohne Entäußerung und Entfremdung in realer Demokratie begründet, so entsteht in der Welt etwas, das allen in die Kindheit scheint und worin noch niemand war: Heimat.” (Ernst Bloch, Das Prinzip Hoffnung, S. 1628)  

    “Man still lives everywhere in the prehistory, so everything and anything is before the creation of the world as a right one. The real Genesis is not at the beginning but at the end, and it only begins when society and existence become radical, that is, when the take hold of the root. But the root of history is the working, creating, transforming and overtaking person. If he has grasped himself and founded his own in real democracy without extraversion and alienation, something arises in the world that shines in everyone’s childhood but where nobody has ever been : home. ” (PH 1628)

    I think, that that’s the – quite utopian – core of Habermas’ This Too A History Of Philosophy. His main thought – – – or burdon, really – – – being, that any religious content of any meaning should (at least: be tried) to be transferred into a wordly discourse, just as – – – – Theodor W. Adorno once claimed.

  134. MBlanc46 says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Probably coincidence. What has brought the West low, I should think, is loss of belief in ourselves, probably due to the World Wars and the Great Depression. In addition, there have been people who do not wish us well who have been undermining our culture for decades. I suppose that you could argue that the World Wars wouldn’t have been so terrible without the technology that resulted from scientific method, and the Great Depression couldn’t have occurred absent the complex economic system made possible by realistic analysis. If you buy that, you have to eschew modernity and go back to an age when everyone lived hand to mouth, and most children didn’t live to adulthood.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  135. dfordoom says: • Website
    @MBlanc46

    I suppose that you could argue that the World Wars wouldn’t have been so terrible without the technology that resulted from scientific method, and the Great Depression couldn’t have occurred absent the complex economic system made possible by realistic analysis. If you buy that, you have to eschew modernity and go back to an age when everyone lived hand to mouth, and most children didn’t live to adulthood.

    That is the problem. Industrialisation, urbanisation, technology, all come at a high price but we’re stuck with them because the price of giving up those things would be even higher.

    We needed to look at the things that, on balance, are net positives. Industrialisation, urbanisation and technology are obviously net positives. Capitalism, at least in its current form, may well be a net negative. The jury is still out on liberalism but its recent track record is very poor.

  136. MEH 0910 says:

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