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From the Wall Street Journal:

Japanese Lawyers’ Problem: Too Few Cases

A government-engineered boom in lawyers ends badly, with low crime and falling bankruptcies

By Mitsuru Obe
April 3, 2016 4:11 a.m. ET

TOKYO—Japan is struggling with an unlikely problem: Its people aren’t litigious enough.

Fifteen years ago, the nation kicked off a plan to double the number of lawyers. Officials thought they could breathe dynamism into society by mimicking the Western legal system, where courts are more involved in settling issues such as consumer safety and corporate malfeasance.

But Japan’s new lawyers have failed to make a winning argument for why they are needed. The number of regular civil cases filed each year hasn’t budged in a decade. With crime near a record low and bankruptcies plunging, many lawyers are pleading poverty. …

Mr. Sakano said the overhaul ignored cultural differences with the U.S., whose law schools served as a model.

“A system that works in a heterogeneous society like the U.S. may not necessarily be suited to Japan,” he said. “Japanese have shown preference for more informal means of resolving disputes, such as through private negotiation mainly between the parties involved.”

 
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  1. I think we all know the Journal’s favored solution to that crisis. Yes, you guessed it correctly, it’s mass immigration.

    • Replies: @fitzGetty
    @reiner Tor

    ... open the gates ! ... don't be like Vienna - open the gates ... !

  2. The more I learn about Japan the more I love it.

    • Replies: @whorefinder
    @God Emperor Putin

    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.

    Replies: @Anonym, @(((Owen))), @spandrell, @fitzGetty, @cucksworth

    , @White Guy In Japan
    @God Emperor Putin

    Japan is horrible. Trains are clean and on time. Clear sign of fascism. The streets are clean and graffiti-free. Obviously racist.

    I could go on and on. This place is a nightmare. Stay away.

  3. >>Mr. Sakano said the overhaul ignored cultural differences with the U.S., whose law schools served as a model.<<

    Are we not the world's No. 1 troublemaker or what?

    I got an idea, – well, it's something that the NY Times has probably already thought up – import millions of immigrants, with untold grievances, resentments and criminal proclivities. That will surely kick start the lawyering business.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    @Daniel H

    NYT prescription for America: beat your head against the wall because it will feel good when you stop.

  4. Francis Fukuyama wrote about how high trust societies like Japan are less litigious in his book “Trust”, I believe.

  5. @God Emperor Putin
    The more I learn about Japan the more I love it.

    Replies: @whorefinder, @White Guy In Japan

    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.

    • Agree: Sarah Toga
    • Replies: @Anonym
    @whorefinder

    Britain is no longer British and no longer has her empire, thanks to Churchill. Germany and Italy are well on their way to being mystery meat nations though, so there is that.

    Replies: @Old fogey

    , @(((Owen)))
    @whorefinder


    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.
     

    Russia is still mostly Russian.

    Britain is no longer Britain.

    Germany is no longer Germany.

    China is still China.

    France is about to be no longer France.

    Italy is still pretty much Italy, but looks unlikely to remain so.

    Poland is very Polish, for as long as it lasts.

    So it's a mixed bag. Some apparent winners are still together, as are some losers. And many apparent losers turned out to win the peace decisively. But not all. And there was no reasonable way to predict how it all would turn out.

    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn't yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization. Laughably now, we still thought communism was the great challenge to civilization back then. Turned out that communism was actually a prophylactic; the nations that suffered under it were the most resistant to slow motion genocide by mass immigration. Those of us that avoided it will soon envy those that were strengthened by the experience: At least they will have nations to leave their children.

    Replies: @syonredux, @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin, @Frau Katze, @fitzGetty, @Mr. Anon, @Massimo Heitor, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    , @spandrell
    @whorefinder

    I think the Japanese believe Japan has changed more since 1945 than the USA has, demographics apart.

    , @fitzGetty
    @whorefinder

    ...and great Germania ? ...

    , @cucksworth
    @whorefinder

    why was Patton all like "we defeated the wrong enemy!" right before his mysterious death?

  6. @Daniel H
    >>Mr. Sakano said the overhaul ignored cultural differences with the U.S., whose law schools served as a model.<<

    Are we not the world's No. 1 troublemaker or what?

    I got an idea, - well, it's something that the NY Times has probably already thought up - import millions of immigrants, with untold grievances, resentments and criminal proclivities. That will surely kick start the lawyering business.

    Replies: @Ivy

    NYT prescription for America: beat your head against the wall because it will feel good when you stop.

  7. O/T: From a Bank of America research analysts’ report (via ZeroHedge):

    Of the 1,041 stores expected set to open [in the USA] in 2017, 80%, or 810, belong to the one retail chain that focuses exclusively on America’s poorest, i.e., Dollar General…. Of the nearly 7,800 net new stores opened [in the USA] since 2008 per BofA’s sampled data, a whopping 76%, or 5,396, were Dollar General stores.

    So 80% of the new stores in our country are dollar stores. Wait, wasn’t the result of globalism supposed to be that Americans would all became highly paid knowledge workers like investment bankers and software engineers?

    So if that’s the case, who’s doing the shopping at all these dollar stores?

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Achilles


    So if that’s the case, who’s doing the shopping at all these dollar stores?
     
    Why, none other than Juan and Juanita Gonzalez - the new-and-improved 2017-ified incarnations of John and Jane Doe. Can't you feel the vibrancy oozing into your pores?

    A few months ago, a dollar-store chain opened up a new outlet in an 11,000-ish-square-foot freestanding building on a major thoroughfare that had been home to a camera shop*. The building is bordered by a parking lot for a fast-food hamburger joint on the north and is directly adjacent to a small (four-store) strip mall on the south.

    The main parking lot has ten spaces running along the front (west-facing) side of the building. There are maybe four or five more spaces in the back.

    (The back alley is so narrow that the owners of the dollar store had to carve a second door in the front wall to make room for a delivery entrance.)

    There are at least a dozen spaces running along the north side of the building, but they're reserved for consumers of cowflesh.

    When the building housed a camera shop, it was rare to see more than two or three cars parked in the front at any given time.

    Now that the dollar store is there, both the front and rear parking lots are constantly full. Unwary customers who've trod onto other stores' turf have had their cars towed.

    (The manager at the fast-food joint runs a pretty tight ship. He once caught me pouring a refill into a cup I'd bought the day before. I threw myself at his mercy and atoned by buying a new cup.)

    A few years ago, a new Trader Joe's outlet opened on the site of a shuttered bookstore. On opening day, the supermarket-sized crowd soon overwhelmed the bookstore-sized parking lot. All hell broke loose when desperate TJ's customers tried parking at the (large) neighboring strip mall. Dozens of cars were towed in a matter of hours.

    An older lady I know - a widowed woman of means who works in the real-estate business - parked at the strip mall, spent a thousand dollars at the mall's jewelry store, spent several hundred dollars at the mall's clothing boutique, walked over to TJ's, did some shopping, and walked back to her parking space to find her car gone.

    You might ask how I came to know the particulars of this story ... well, I had the misfortune of running into this woman at a restaurant the day after it happened. I was eating lunch alone, so she invited herself to join me. She spent half an hour subjecting me to an exhaustive recounting of her ordeal. I had to manufacture plenty of sympathy.

    Truthfully, I did feel sorry for her. (At first, she thought her car had been stolen.) I felt even sorrier for the strip-mall patrons who *hadn't* gone to TJ's who still had their cars towed.

    Naturally, the managers of the mall didn't give a hoot that they were screwing over some of their own customers.

    Not that it matters, but I might mention that, over the years, this woman has spent tens of thousands of dollars at that one jewelry store alone. (She patronizes a number of such stores, and has spent sizable sums at all of them.) The owner must struggle to contain his glee when he sees her buzzing at the door.

    Why so many women feel a compulsive need to hoard obscenely-overpriced shiny rocks, I shall never know.

    *Interestingly, the camera shop did not go out of business - it moved to a smaller location in a nearby strip mall.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Achilles

    Yes, but this has to be taken in light of the collapse in brick and mortar businesses that are moving online. Nobody goes to Amazon for dollar store items.

    Replies: @Achilles

    , @oddsbodkins
    @Achilles

    That's because of Amazon. You can't use Amazon if your orders are stolen off your doorstep, so they don't compete with the dollar store.

    , @Triumph104
    @Achilles

    O/T:

    Personally, I don't consider Dollar General to be a dollar store. Price-wise, it is like a drug store, without the pharmacy. I don't understand why people shop there. Here in the Southwest, in addition to Dollar Generals, we have 99 Cent Only stores where the majority of the products are actually 99 cents, although there are a few higher priced items.

    As for the knowledge economy, Mark Zuckerberg just called for universal basic income.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    , @EdwardM
    @Achilles

    To be fair, the 80% figure only represents the percentage of new stores to be opened by Dollar General among the 33 retail chains in B of A's sample. These 33 chains might be representative of American retail in some vague way, but I find it hard to extrapolate the 80% to the population as a whole.

    Dollar General seems like an outlier -- which is of course a legitimate story, but the Zero Hedge headline is fake news. If it said "Dollar Stores Account For 80% Of All New Store Openings In The US," that would make a bit more sense but would still be taking the study findings too far.

    , @Forbes
    @Achilles


    So if that’s the case, who’s doing the shopping at all these dollar stores?
     
    The 10s of millions whose jobs were out-sourced and off-shored. The 10s of millions who don't live in the Acela corridor or Silicon Valley/SF/LA. The 10s of millions of working age adults not counted in the workforce--who have the time, and need, to shop for low prices. The 10s of millions who voted for Trump.
  8. Joke from the ”80s when Japan was growing in the US auto market:

    “When DC issues new auto regulations, Japanese companies hire 200 new engineers; US companies hire 200 new lawyers.”

  9. Ironically, the US had a similar problem during the recession: too many liberal arts majors decided to wait out the recession by going to law school and becoming lawyers, leading to a glut, lousy career prospects, and often significant non-dischargeable personal debt (recessions also lead to a decrease in demand for most legal fields, both over the short and long-term). At least (from the perspective of lawyers) the US is, fundamentally, much further ahead than Japan in being a litigious, legalistic, atomized society.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Thomas

    There is no need to use the past tense. The problem continues, and it long predates the recession.

    Heck, I see Khan has even written about the ongoing scam to enrich bankers, academic administrators, and the management of the firms right here.

    ("Pay no attention to that bimodal distribution of salaries behind the curtain," urge the lenders and the deans of admissions....)

  10. Hey I’ve seen the documentaries. Godzilla barges in every few years and destroys at least half the population of Tokyo. How else will Japan replace all the people they’ve lost?

  11. “A system that works in a heterogeneous society like the U.S. may not necessarily be suited to Japan,”

    bored identity’s Final Conclusion:

    Shysterism Thrives Only in Babel-Towering Environment.

    All bored identity needs is 10.000 Khmer Rouge EnthuAsiasts and Time Machine….so he can go back in the past ….and get rid of, you know…Hitler, Hirohito, and Mussolini.

    Does bored identity go on Kickstarter, or Go Fund Me for this?

  12. @whorefinder
    @God Emperor Putin

    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.

    Replies: @Anonym, @(((Owen))), @spandrell, @fitzGetty, @cucksworth

    Britain is no longer British and no longer has her empire, thanks to Churchill. Germany and Italy are well on their way to being mystery meat nations though, so there is that.

    • Replies: @Old fogey
    @Anonym

    I don't think you can blame Churchill for the loss of Britain's empire. That was Roosevelt's doing as he pushed for the end of British rule in the sub-continent.

    Replies: @Anonym

  13. @Thomas
    Ironically, the US had a similar problem during the recession: too many liberal arts majors decided to wait out the recession by going to law school and becoming lawyers, leading to a glut, lousy career prospects, and often significant non-dischargeable personal debt (recessions also lead to a decrease in demand for most legal fields, both over the short and long-term). At least (from the perspective of lawyers) the US is, fundamentally, much further ahead than Japan in being a litigious, legalistic, atomized society.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    There is no need to use the past tense. The problem continues, and it long predates the recession.

    Heck, I see Khan has even written about the ongoing scam to enrich bankers, academic administrators, and the management of the firms right here.

    (“Pay no attention to that bimodal distribution of salaries behind the curtain,” urge the lenders and the deans of admissions….)

  14. An influx of a couple of hundred of God’s Chosen People into Japan would fix the problem.

  15. @whorefinder
    @God Emperor Putin

    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.

    Replies: @Anonym, @(((Owen))), @spandrell, @fitzGetty, @cucksworth

    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.

    Russia is still mostly Russian.

    Britain is no longer Britain.

    Germany is no longer Germany.

    China is still China.

    France is about to be no longer France.

    Italy is still pretty much Italy, but looks unlikely to remain so.

    Poland is very Polish, for as long as it lasts.

    So it’s a mixed bag. Some apparent winners are still together, as are some losers. And many apparent losers turned out to win the peace decisively. But not all. And there was no reasonable way to predict how it all would turn out.

    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn’t yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization. Laughably now, we still thought communism was the great challenge to civilization back then. Turned out that communism was actually a prophylactic; the nations that suffered under it were the most resistant to slow motion genocide by mass immigration. Those of us that avoided it will soon envy those that were strengthened by the experience: At least they will have nations to leave their children.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @(((Owen)))


    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn’t yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization.
     
    Anyone living in the USA in 1989 with half a brain should have been able to see the threat posed by Mestizo/Amerind immigration.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @David Allan coe, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anonymous Nephew

    , @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin
    @(((Owen)))

    Unfortunately Russia is less Russian than Britain is British. I guess the cold war ruined most of its enthusiastic participants.

    Replies: @carol

    , @Frau Katze
    @(((Owen)))

    I just saw an article about how anarchists in Greece are pitching in to help immigrants. NYT, I think it was.

    I recall that the West was pleased after WW II that Greece didn't fall under the USSR.

    Better that it had!

    They still have wannabe Commies, since they never experienced the real thing.

    This explains why those southern tier countries don't have any much in the way of anti-immigrant parties, perhaps. The far left is too strong.

    Greece had Golden Dawn, but they were so overtly neo-Nazi that I think the Greek government shut them down. I never hear about them anymore.

    Northern Italy has anti-immigrant party. The Five Star Party isn't anti-immigrant (the leader is married to an Iranian). They seem far more popular than the Northern League.

    Spain and Portugal: if they have such parties, I haven't heard of them.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Vasilis

    , @fitzGetty
    @(((Owen)))

    ... the way is clear for the grim sharia law in old Nippon ... fun and games to come ...

    , @Mr. Anon
    @(((Owen)))

    Poland will probably not remain polish, not if it remains part of the EU.

    One conclusion that could be drawn from your list is that democratic neo-liberalism is far more destructive to a nations' traditional culture even than communism is.

    , @Massimo Heitor
    @(((Owen)))


    Italy is still pretty much Italy, but looks unlikely to remain so.

     

    I was just in Italy. I could see lots of Chinese and thousands of very African looking Africans which was new and not at all normal Italy. There were lots of Chinese tourists but also lots of Chinese residents that spoke fluent perfect Italian.

    Italy still felt very Italian, at least the parts that I went to. The tourist hot spots all speak English, but most locals speak only Italian. A few white Italians expressed horror over Trump and the hostility towards Mexicans but where quite agreeable when I explained. Most Trump supporters bear no animosity towards Mexicans or anyone else, but everyone on the globe still doesn't have some innate right to live in the US. Some Italians also said that the media is very heavy handed biased. They also said the mafia is still very active although very behind the scenes.

    Anecdotally, just walking around cities, there were lots of younger children that were overwhelmingly white ethnic Italians speaking Italian. I trust the official birth rate stats more, but from casual observation there were Italian kids everywhere.


    The Five Star Party isn’t anti-immigrant (the leader is married to an Iranian).
     
    Trump, Bannon, Steve Sailer, and NumbersUSA are not "anti-immigrant", they want selective immigration policy that is designed to benefit the host nation, like what Canada has.

    Beppe Grillo is totally in that camp and wants to cut immigration from Africa and even deport many already there.

    Most Iranians are ethnically Persian, which is mostly European white. That's actually closer to immigrating an ethnic French or German or Swedish person and it's not controversial.

    The mass influx of poor Africans is obviously unpopular with the ethnic Italians. Some said that Renzi planned to help Africans pass through to the rest of Europe, but bordering nations like France and Austria closed their borders with Italy, sealing the African migrants in Italy. France may have voted against LePen and be publicly against "populism", but they definitely blocked African migrants from entering France.

    Italy has major economic problems, the young ethnic Italians can't find decent jobs. Even high skilled Italians with college education are working in food service or driving cabs. Or they wise up and get out of Italy. Large low skill immigration makes that much worse. Large numbers of Africans were aggressively pushing street trinkets absolutely everywhere I went. I went to a quiet beach town, Africans were pushing junk. I ate at a fancy restaurant in Florence, some African actually came into the restaurant and tried to sell me stuff at my table.

    Italy is absolutely trying to stop the tide of incoming Africans. Conceptually, it's easy, just stop using the Navy to bring Africans to Italy. You can still rescue Africans from drowning and drop them back off in their country of departure. They aren't owed residency in Italy.

    Even in Africa, there is mass intra-Africa migration where people are leaving more rural lifestyles and moving to cities. Unfortunately many Africans are living in slum conditions in the cities of Africa, but they seem to choose that over their previous agrarian lifestyles.

    Replies: @Frau Katze, @AnotherDad

    , @AnotherDad
    @(((Owen)))

    Disagree on your 1989. Afterall, the amnesty was in 1986, so people had already known there was a critical problem back before then--early 80s. The specific Mexican problem wasn't showing up in a lot of places yet, but it was a recognized large public policy problem.

    Likewise the problem of immigrant communities in Europe was already in existence. Going on 30 years has just made the situation several times worse so that it's now in everyone's face. But that doesn't stop the globalist happy talkers from spewing their same old nonsense.

    , @AnotherDad
    @(((Owen)))



    So it’s a mixed bag. Some apparent winners are still together, as are some losers. And many apparent losers turned out to win the peace decisively. But not all. And there was no reasonable way to predict how it all would turn out.
     
    (((Owen))). Pretty much agree with this.

    But my one thought would be if you look not at just nominal victors, but a winners and losers in terms of death, destruction they received, then the losers definitely seem to have come out better.

    Big population/destruction losers: Poland, Russia, China, Germany, Japan, Vietnam, Baltics seem to have come out smelling much better than those who skated through in better shape France, Italy, UK, most of Western Europe or who suffered little beyond modest military causualties--US, Canada, Australia.

    Germany is the "loser" outlier here, but I think it was in better shape than the UK and France until the recent Merkel madness in one fell swoop doomed it to civil war or eventual death.


    Of course, as someone else noted, the simple parsimonious explanation is swallowing neoliberal --Soros style "Open Societies"--globalism, is the virus of destruction.
  16. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Fifteen years ago, the nation kicked off a plan to double the number of lawyers. [Japanese] Officials thought they could breathe dynamism into society by mimicking the Western legal system, where courts are more involved in settling issues such as consumer safety and corporate malfeasance.

    Huh? What, in the 1990’s, would convince Japanese officials that any deficit of “dynamism” in their society would be cured by more litigation, involving more lawyers? Seriously, for what problems are “more lawsuits” the cure?

    Everybody in the West knows that lawyers are parasitical agents of stasis, not dynamism. Jarndyce and Jarndyce, anyone?

    There must be something to this story which we haven’t been told.

    • Replies: @TBA
    @Anonymous

    Cargo cult policy.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @spandrell
    @Anonymous

    Japan had a bar exam, which didn't ask for any qualifications. You could take the exam as a primary school grad, studying on your own, and if you passed, you were a laywer.

    After the reform to produce more lawyers, the government made a requirement to attend law schools, which were built by many universities, and charged very high tuition. They also hired bureaucrats as professor, advisors and other lucrative revolving door stuff.

    That's the story nobody will tell. It was a transparent plot to get cash for government bureaucrats and their cronies, at the expense of aspiring lawyers.

    Replies: @res, @Truth

  17. @(((Owen)))
    @whorefinder


    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.
     

    Russia is still mostly Russian.

    Britain is no longer Britain.

    Germany is no longer Germany.

    China is still China.

    France is about to be no longer France.

    Italy is still pretty much Italy, but looks unlikely to remain so.

    Poland is very Polish, for as long as it lasts.

    So it's a mixed bag. Some apparent winners are still together, as are some losers. And many apparent losers turned out to win the peace decisively. But not all. And there was no reasonable way to predict how it all would turn out.

    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn't yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization. Laughably now, we still thought communism was the great challenge to civilization back then. Turned out that communism was actually a prophylactic; the nations that suffered under it were the most resistant to slow motion genocide by mass immigration. Those of us that avoided it will soon envy those that were strengthened by the experience: At least they will have nations to leave their children.

    Replies: @syonredux, @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin, @Frau Katze, @fitzGetty, @Mr. Anon, @Massimo Heitor, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn’t yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization.

    Anyone living in the USA in 1989 with half a brain should have been able to see the threat posed by Mestizo/Amerind immigration.

    • Replies: @(((Owen)))
    @syonredux

    In 1989 there was no modern internet news. We had fresh harsh rules to prosecute employers of illegals. We'd just given an amnesty that Reagan and Bush had promised would end the trouble. Quotas for chain migration were less than half what they are now.

    There was no way to know, short of extensive Freedom Of Information Act and library research that Bush and Reagan had cucked the whole nation back then. Now by 1993 or maybe even 1992 it was just starting to be visible to people paying close attention. But for 1989 your claim is ridiculous.

    Replies: @bomag, @Peterike, @meh, @Charles Pewitt, @syonredux, @Achmed E. Newman

    , @David Allan coe
    @syonredux

    It was actually the immigration act of 1990 which caused the most harm to our future demographics....the 1990 Act created the Diversity Lottery, ended the English requirement for naturalization. Created the h1b visa program, and increased legal immigration by 100%

    From 1969 - 1989 the United States admitted 11 million legal immigrants. From 1990 - 2010 the U.S. admitted 22 million Legal immigrants.

    Without the 1990 Immigration act, immigration per year would have been under 650,000 per year instead of 1,250,000 per year.

    Replies: @Ed, @AnotherDad

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @syonredux

    I'm old enough to remember the 60s and 70s. "Immigrant" was mostly British engineers fleeing their homeland's nationalized industries. France was pretty moribund at the time, so there were some Frenchmen as well. A girl in my elementary school had an upper-caste Mexican father who worked a white collar job.

    In the 80s, Meso-American immigrants were still mostly invisible and concentrated along the border States. By the mid-90s I can remember people saying, "Hmm, this could be a problem," but everybody seemed convinced that ARE ECONOMY needed them. After 2000, it ceased to be a topic of polite conversation other than on the Internet.

    Replies: @3g4me

    , @Anonymous Nephew
    @syonredux

    In 1989 I had to use my very rusty Spanish to get by in a Chicago suburb - couldn't believe the number of Mexicans there, Spanish billboards, Spanish radio/TV - so it's not as if it was just a phenomenon of the South-West states back then.

  18. Fifteen years ago, the nation kicked off a plan to double the number of lawyers. [Japanese] Officials thought they could breathe dynamism into society by mimicking the Western legal system, where courts are more involved in settling issues such as consumer safety and corporate malfeasance.

    Huh? What, in the 1990’s, could have persuaded Japanese officials that the cure for any deficit of “dynamism” is more lawsuits, involving more lawyers?

    Everyone in the West knows that lawyers are parasitical agents of stasis, not dynamism. Jarndyce and Jarndyce, anyone?

    There must be something in this story which we haven’t been told.

    • Agree: (((Owen)))
    • Replies: @Horzabky
    @Veracitor

    Here in France, I heard people say things which I can paraphrase thus: "France has too few lawyers, compared with the USA. The USA is a more advanced society than France, and it has more lawyers. Therefore France must have more lawyers, in order to become more advanced, like the USA is."

    It was doubly idiotic, of course.

    First, the USA isn't more "advanced" (avancé) than France, it is just bigger. The average French citizen lives three years longer than the average American, thanks to a public health system which is both cheaper and more efficient. He is also less likely to be obese, and five times less likely to be in jail.

    Second, the USA is a great nation in spite of its lawyers, not because of them.

    I guess that the Japanese made the same double error as the French.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Bitfu, @Cloudbuster, @Romanian, @Coemgen

    , @David
    @Veracitor

    Way back in 1996 and 97, a reinsurance company was losing its executive bonus pool in the satellite insurance business. When its stance towards settling in-orbit losses became more combative, the Japanese reinsureds usually agreed to "meet in the middle." I felt bad watching it for everyone could see that they were being cheated and simply didn't have a social mechanism to deal with it. London sued and won every time.

    If that dynamic were taking place in many areas, I can see why Japan would feel the need to get some lawyers.

  19. @syonredux
    @(((Owen)))


    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn’t yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization.
     
    Anyone living in the USA in 1989 with half a brain should have been able to see the threat posed by Mestizo/Amerind immigration.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @David Allan coe, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anonymous Nephew

    In 1989 there was no modern internet news. We had fresh harsh rules to prosecute employers of illegals. We’d just given an amnesty that Reagan and Bush had promised would end the trouble. Quotas for chain migration were less than half what they are now.

    There was no way to know, short of extensive Freedom Of Information Act and library research that Bush and Reagan had cucked the whole nation back then. Now by 1993 or maybe even 1992 it was just starting to be visible to people paying close attention. But for 1989 your claim is ridiculous.

    • Agree: Barnard
    • Replies: @bomag
    @(((Owen)))


    There was no way to know... that Bush and Reagan had cucked the whole nation back then
     
    I certainly recall concerns; I was starting a Soldier of Fortune article in 1980 entitled "Brown Tide Swamps Southern US" when someone looked over my shoulder and tsked tsked at such a non-progressive sentiment.

    I lived in farming country, and the floodgates were opened in the "80s. Before, there were formal guest worker programs, and farmers made some effort to hire locals. Now they openly hired illegals and bragged about it. By the mid eighties, there was enough concern that Congress felt compelled to offer up some legislation, but the 1986 amnesty made things worse and the slide was on.
    , @Peterike
    @(((Owen)))

    "Now by 1993 or maybe even 1992 it was just starting to be visible to people paying close attention. But for 1989 your claim is ridiculous."

    In New York it was completely obvious that Puerto Rican immigration was a lot of trouble in the 1960s. "West Side Story" and all that. I was just a kid and I knew it was a huge mistake.

    Replies: @prole

    , @meh
    @(((Owen)))

    I can assure you, I was alive and aware of the problem in the 1980s. Plenty of people were sounding the alarm back then; it is your claim that "no one could have known" back then that is ridiculous.

    Yes, you might have had to read certain "forbidden" or subversive publications or listen to certain "disreputable" radio shows or other sources of underground news, but the facts were out there in the 1980s if you were paying attention.

    Enough people knew back in the 1980s such that it became necessary for TPTB to turn up the volume on the pro-immigration propaganda to shout them down and drown them out.

    I distinctly remember people accusing Reagan of selling us down the river with the amnesty, at the time. Enough people knew back then; everyone else should have known but they preferred to stick their heads in the sand and to trust people that they had no sane reason to trust.

    , @Charles Pewitt
    @(((Owen)))

    Mass legal immigration and illegal immigration were obvious problems to anybody living near Los Angeles or New York by the 1970s. There were many other parts of the United States undergoing foreigner infestation at that time too. You would have had to have been blind or willfully ignorant not to see that mass immigration was pouring into the United States in the 1970s.

    Reagan and Bush killed the Republican Party in California by allowing mass immigration to continue. The ill effects of the 1965 Immigration Act were plain to see. Treasonous puppet scum politicians Reagan and Bush did the bidding of their masters. The 1986 amnesty for illegal alien invaders was an act of treason carried out by Reagan and Bush.

    Young people should understand that it was clear by the 1970s that mass immigration was destroying the United States. The globalizers wanted to destroy the United States using mass immigration, and it was clear to honest observers by the 1970s.

    Replies: @Lot

    , @syonredux
    @(((Owen)))


    We had fresh harsh rules to prosecute employers of illegals. We’d just given an amnesty that Reagan and Bush had promised would end the trouble.
     
    Which were never enforced....

    Quotas for chain migration were less than half what they are now.
     
    Still too high....

    There was no way to know, short of extensive Freedom Of Information Act and library research that Bush and Reagan had cucked the whole nation back then.
     
    Yes, there was. I can remember my grandfather fulminating about it in the late '80s....
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @(((Owen)))

    I think the main point you could get out of the replies to this post, Owen, is that it was location dependent. I had personal knowledge that the Mexican invasion was already a big deal in the middle- 1980's in southern California. Everyone knew that Miami was a foreign zone (yeah, Cubans, not Mexicans, I know) back in the early 80's. We had Mexicans as farm labor in the late 1970's in my area that is no where near the Mexican border. Lastly, I wasn't there, but I would guess at least people in southern and west TX, much of New Mexico and southern Arizona already knew there was a problem way, way before your 1992-1993 date.

    So, it was location, location, location back then, but the problem has been everywhere since going back at least 20 years, and, as you said, we can get information off the internet.

  20. @Achilles
    O/T: From a Bank of America research analysts' report (via ZeroHedge):

    Of the 1,041 stores expected set to open [in the USA] in 2017, 80%, or 810, belong to the one retail chain that focuses exclusively on America's poorest, i.e., Dollar General.... Of the nearly 7,800 net new stores opened [in the USA] since 2008 per BofA's sampled data, a whopping 76%, or 5,396, were Dollar General stores.
     
    So 80% of the new stores in our country are dollar stores. Wait, wasn't the result of globalism supposed to be that Americans would all became highly paid knowledge workers like investment bankers and software engineers?

    So if that's the case, who's doing the shopping at all these dollar stores?

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Chrisnonymous, @oddsbodkins, @Triumph104, @EdwardM, @Forbes

    So if that’s the case, who’s doing the shopping at all these dollar stores?

    Why, none other than Juan and Juanita Gonzalez – the new-and-improved 2017-ified incarnations of John and Jane Doe. Can’t you feel the vibrancy oozing into your pores?

    A few months ago, a dollar-store chain opened up a new outlet in an 11,000-ish-square-foot freestanding building on a major thoroughfare that had been home to a camera shop*. The building is bordered by a parking lot for a fast-food hamburger joint on the north and is directly adjacent to a small (four-store) strip mall on the south.

    The main parking lot has ten spaces running along the front (west-facing) side of the building. There are maybe four or five more spaces in the back.

    (The back alley is so narrow that the owners of the dollar store had to carve a second door in the front wall to make room for a delivery entrance.)

    There are at least a dozen spaces running along the north side of the building, but they’re reserved for consumers of cowflesh.

    When the building housed a camera shop, it was rare to see more than two or three cars parked in the front at any given time.

    Now that the dollar store is there, both the front and rear parking lots are constantly full. Unwary customers who’ve trod onto other stores’ turf have had their cars towed.

    (The manager at the fast-food joint runs a pretty tight ship. He once caught me pouring a refill into a cup I’d bought the day before. I threw myself at his mercy and atoned by buying a new cup.)

    A few years ago, a new Trader Joe’s outlet opened on the site of a shuttered bookstore. On opening day, the supermarket-sized crowd soon overwhelmed the bookstore-sized parking lot. All hell broke loose when desperate TJ’s customers tried parking at the (large) neighboring strip mall. Dozens of cars were towed in a matter of hours.

    An older lady I know – a widowed woman of means who works in the real-estate business – parked at the strip mall, spent a thousand dollars at the mall’s jewelry store, spent several hundred dollars at the mall’s clothing boutique, walked over to TJ’s, did some shopping, and walked back to her parking space to find her car gone.

    You might ask how I came to know the particulars of this story … well, I had the misfortune of running into this woman at a restaurant the day after it happened. I was eating lunch alone, so she invited herself to join me. She spent half an hour subjecting me to an exhaustive recounting of her ordeal. I had to manufacture plenty of sympathy.

    Truthfully, I did feel sorry for her. (At first, she thought her car had been stolen.) I felt even sorrier for the strip-mall patrons who *hadn’t* gone to TJ’s who still had their cars towed.

    Naturally, the managers of the mall didn’t give a hoot that they were screwing over some of their own customers.

    Not that it matters, but I might mention that, over the years, this woman has spent tens of thousands of dollars at that one jewelry store alone. (She patronizes a number of such stores, and has spent sizable sums at all of them.) The owner must struggle to contain his glee when he sees her buzzing at the door.

    Why so many women feel a compulsive need to hoard obscenely-overpriced shiny rocks, I shall never know.

    *Interestingly, the camera shop did not go out of business – it moved to a smaller location in a nearby strip mall.

  21. @Veracitor

    Fifteen years ago, the nation kicked off a plan to double the number of lawyers. [Japanese] Officials thought they could breathe dynamism into society by mimicking the Western legal system, where courts are more involved in settling issues such as consumer safety and corporate malfeasance.
     
    Huh? What, in the 1990's, could have persuaded Japanese officials that the cure for any deficit of "dynamism" is more lawsuits, involving more lawyers?

    Everyone in the West knows that lawyers are parasitical agents of stasis, not dynamism. Jarndyce and Jarndyce, anyone?

    There must be something in this story which we haven't been told.

    Replies: @Horzabky, @David

    Here in France, I heard people say things which I can paraphrase thus: “France has too few lawyers, compared with the USA. The USA is a more advanced society than France, and it has more lawyers. Therefore France must have more lawyers, in order to become more advanced, like the USA is.”

    It was doubly idiotic, of course.

    First, the USA isn’t more “advanced” (avancé) than France, it is just bigger. The average French citizen lives three years longer than the average American, thanks to a public health system which is both cheaper and more efficient. He is also less likely to be obese, and five times less likely to be in jail.

    Second, the USA is a great nation in spite of its lawyers, not because of them.

    I guess that the Japanese made the same double error as the French.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    @Horzabky

    "thanks to a public health system which is both cheaper and more efficient": no doubt its public health system is far superior. But I can't imagine that there's any good evidence that it explains the longer lives.

    Replies: @El Dato

    , @Bitfu
    @Horzabky

    What's the French word for 'strawman'? If there isn't one, how about the French phrasing of 'convoluted syllogism'?

    Because nobody--paraphrase or not--is saying anything along the lines of:

    “France has too few lawyers, compared with the USA. The USA is a more advanced society than France, and it has more lawyers. Therefore France must have more lawyers, in order to become more advanced, like the USA is.”

    Replies: @tomv

    , @Cloudbuster
    @Horzabky

    The average French citizen lives three years longer than the average American, thanks to a public health system which is both cheaper and more efficient.

    Very many of the markers associated with longevity have to do with genetics and lifestyle choices, not the efficacy of the healthcare system. If you look at medical outcomes for which medical science can directly affec the outcome -- cancer survivability, survival after a heart attack, etc., the U.S. has better outcomes than most nations.

    , @Romanian
    @Horzabky

    I think it's magical thinking. Over here, what you hear about is US schools and investment in education.

    , @Coemgen
  22. “Japanese have shown preference for more informal means of resolving disputes, such as through private negotiation mainly between the parties involved.”
    This is terrible! those stupid Japs need to get up to speed. Coin clipping, usury and rat-faced lawyers is where it’s at. 🙂

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Paul Walker - Most beautiful man ever...


    This is terrible! those stupid Japs need to get up to speed. Coin clipping, usury and rat-faced lawyers is where it’s at.
     
    Maybe the Japanese have got some fast ambulances over there, doing that drifting and shit. Fast and furious - leave the trial lawyers in the dust.

    BTW, Paul, if you are the most beautiful, how about some .jpegs? I heard you got a purty mouth ....

  23. • Replies: @ANON
    @jim jones

    This explains fairly neatly why the MSM in this country has for years been in a full-court press to depict Japan as a moribund, regressing society. The quality of life is so high there and immigration virtually non-existent.

  24. Problem: If Japanese lawyers think things look bleak now, they need to drink some sake and realize that their business prospects will be even bleaker (for lawyers) in the future; the population is declining and Japan is adopting robot technology. Robots have a stubborn tendency to not sue each other.

    Possible solution: Japanese lawyers need to talk to more of the US lefty judges and learn how to sue the government for mass immigration. It will be a great work program (for lawyers).

    Problem: Japanese stubbornly refuse to adopt white guilt and Japan hasn’t yet flooded the country with other races who want to continue the flood the country to build up their tribe. Consequently, it will be harder to convince Japanese government officials that they need to adopt the lawyer friendly practice of cultural genocide.

    Possible solution 2: Import a large number of Jews. They will find a way to work to the top in a few decades and then will start working on cultural genocide of Japan.

    Problem: Jews tend to only want to live in white countries or Israel even though they want to turn white countries into majority non white with Jews at the top.

    Solution: don’t try and copy anything from white countries because it will likely be the wrong move.

    • LOL: bomag
  25. @(((Owen)))
    @whorefinder


    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.
     

    Russia is still mostly Russian.

    Britain is no longer Britain.

    Germany is no longer Germany.

    China is still China.

    France is about to be no longer France.

    Italy is still pretty much Italy, but looks unlikely to remain so.

    Poland is very Polish, for as long as it lasts.

    So it's a mixed bag. Some apparent winners are still together, as are some losers. And many apparent losers turned out to win the peace decisively. But not all. And there was no reasonable way to predict how it all would turn out.

    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn't yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization. Laughably now, we still thought communism was the great challenge to civilization back then. Turned out that communism was actually a prophylactic; the nations that suffered under it were the most resistant to slow motion genocide by mass immigration. Those of us that avoided it will soon envy those that were strengthened by the experience: At least they will have nations to leave their children.

    Replies: @syonredux, @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin, @Frau Katze, @fitzGetty, @Mr. Anon, @Massimo Heitor, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    Unfortunately Russia is less Russian than Britain is British. I guess the cold war ruined most of its enthusiastic participants.

    • Replies: @carol
    @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin

    Yes I read that Moscow was full up of southern migrants from the 'stans who come to do the menial labor and live in the basement of the old apt buildings built for the apparatchiks.

    Sounds creepy to me.

  26. I’m in Japan now and have noticed the propaganda coming from the US to increase immigration to “solve the aging problem.” I expect something similar led the Japanese to think more lawyers would be a good thing.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @toomuch

    I think spandrell has probably sized the situation up correctly. If you want to read more about Japan's bureaucratic self-enrichment schemes, "Dogs and Demons" by Alex Kerr has an explanation.

    One nuance that spandrell didn't mention, however, is that having an academic hurdle in a profession is a component of politicizing the profession. I met a legal researcher here whose life's work is studying SCOTUS to try to figure out how to turn the Japanese court system into a political weapon to force more liberalization on the country. He was not a loner either. Establishing academic control over the legal profession is going to create a lot more opportunities for scholarship trending in that direction.

    Replies: @spandrell

  27. Anonymous [AKA "von Steiermark"] says:

    The Japanese can be some strange people sometimes. They have managed to get things completely backwards in this case!

    To think, lawyers causing dynamism. Hah!

    • Replies: @EdwardM
    @Anonymous

    I don't know, in theory a properly functioning tort system -- based on common law, common sense, and a belief in the values of individualism and individual liberty -- is necessary for capitalism and serves useful in making the market more efficient. Similarly, transparency in business transactions and dispute resolution mechanisms, even if the terms are complex, should level the playing field in the market.

    Somehow the U.S. legal system has run amok, due primarily to too much government (too many laws, too many levels of courts, too many student loans, etc.), institutionalized corruption of the bar, and stupid civil juries that have bought into the demonization of the evil private sector in the media and feminization of the culture (i.e., making decisions based on emotion).

    Is there a middle ground between the U.S. excess and the undeveloped system in Japan? What's the civil law system like in the U.K.?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  28. @Veracitor

    Fifteen years ago, the nation kicked off a plan to double the number of lawyers. [Japanese] Officials thought they could breathe dynamism into society by mimicking the Western legal system, where courts are more involved in settling issues such as consumer safety and corporate malfeasance.
     
    Huh? What, in the 1990's, could have persuaded Japanese officials that the cure for any deficit of "dynamism" is more lawsuits, involving more lawyers?

    Everyone in the West knows that lawyers are parasitical agents of stasis, not dynamism. Jarndyce and Jarndyce, anyone?

    There must be something in this story which we haven't been told.

    Replies: @Horzabky, @David

    Way back in 1996 and 97, a reinsurance company was losing its executive bonus pool in the satellite insurance business. When its stance towards settling in-orbit losses became more combative, the Japanese reinsureds usually agreed to “meet in the middle.” I felt bad watching it for everyone could see that they were being cheated and simply didn’t have a social mechanism to deal with it. London sued and won every time.

    If that dynamic were taking place in many areas, I can see why Japan would feel the need to get some lawyers.

  29. @syonredux
    @(((Owen)))


    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn’t yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization.
     
    Anyone living in the USA in 1989 with half a brain should have been able to see the threat posed by Mestizo/Amerind immigration.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @David Allan coe, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anonymous Nephew

    It was actually the immigration act of 1990 which caused the most harm to our future demographics….the 1990 Act created the Diversity Lottery, ended the English requirement for naturalization. Created the h1b visa program, and increased legal immigration by 100%

    From 1969 – 1989 the United States admitted 11 million legal immigrants. From 1990 – 2010 the U.S. admitted 22 million Legal immigrants.

    Without the 1990 Immigration act, immigration per year would have been under 650,000 per year instead of 1,250,000 per year.

    • Agree: (((Owen)))
    • Replies: @Ed
    @David Allan coe

    I noticed a similar pattern in terms of UK immigration. The initial liberalization didn't yield as many immigrants as later waves. The largest group Indians was at around 200k or so and many were a result of the expulsion of Uganda Indians. African immigration to the UK was under 100k up through the 90s.

    Replies: @IHTG, @Romanian, @unpc downunder

    , @AnotherDad
    @David Allan coe


    It was actually the immigration act of 1990 which caused the most harm to our future demographics….
     
    There's a number of people who keep trotting this out. It's simplistic.

    The 1990 Act was indeed terrible but it is particularly terrible operating on the demographics put in place by the 1965 Act.

    Migration--like other demographic factors--is non-linear. It's exponential. Your nation isn't suddenly changed the moment the globalists sneak through their "we are the world" immigration policy. Anymore than you're immediately coughing and sneezing when you pickup the influenza virus. The virus has to grow. For the first years people can think, nothing has changed. Ergo the vile traitorous schemers suffer no consequences. A few years in ... "oh, hey there's some foreigners running a restaurant." Then a couple generations later your nation is infected, probably terminally.

    This is particular true for countries like the US with a chain migration policy. Yeah, the 1990 Act made everything worse by jacking up the growth rate. But this recent infection dates to 1965. That's when the globalists gave America the plague.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @prole

  30. @Anonymous

    Fifteen years ago, the nation kicked off a plan to double the number of lawyers. [Japanese] Officials thought they could breathe dynamism into society by mimicking the Western legal system, where courts are more involved in settling issues such as consumer safety and corporate malfeasance.
     
    Huh? What, in the 1990's, would convince Japanese officials that any deficit of "dynamism" in their society would be cured by more litigation, involving more lawyers? Seriously, for what problems are "more lawsuits" the cure?

    Everybody in the West knows that lawyers are parasitical agents of stasis, not dynamism. Jarndyce and Jarndyce, anyone?

    There must be something to this story which we haven't been told.

    Replies: @TBA, @spandrell

    Cargo cult policy.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @TBA


    Cargo cult policy.
     
    That's good.
  31. @whorefinder
    @God Emperor Putin

    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.

    Replies: @Anonym, @(((Owen))), @spandrell, @fitzGetty, @cucksworth

    I think the Japanese believe Japan has changed more since 1945 than the USA has, demographics apart.

  32. @Anonymous

    Fifteen years ago, the nation kicked off a plan to double the number of lawyers. [Japanese] Officials thought they could breathe dynamism into society by mimicking the Western legal system, where courts are more involved in settling issues such as consumer safety and corporate malfeasance.
     
    Huh? What, in the 1990's, would convince Japanese officials that any deficit of "dynamism" in their society would be cured by more litigation, involving more lawyers? Seriously, for what problems are "more lawsuits" the cure?

    Everybody in the West knows that lawyers are parasitical agents of stasis, not dynamism. Jarndyce and Jarndyce, anyone?

    There must be something to this story which we haven't been told.

    Replies: @TBA, @spandrell

    Japan had a bar exam, which didn’t ask for any qualifications. You could take the exam as a primary school grad, studying on your own, and if you passed, you were a laywer.

    After the reform to produce more lawyers, the government made a requirement to attend law schools, which were built by many universities, and charged very high tuition. They also hired bureaucrats as professor, advisors and other lucrative revolving door stuff.

    That’s the story nobody will tell. It was a transparent plot to get cash for government bureaucrats and their cronies, at the expense of aspiring lawyers.

    • Agree: Triumph104
    • Replies: @res
    @spandrell


    That’s the story nobody will tell. It was a transparent plot to get cash for government bureaucrats and their cronies, at the expense of aspiring lawyers.
     
    That was enlightening. Thanks.
    , @Truth
    @spandrell


    Japan had a bar exam, which didn’t ask for any qualifications. You could take the exam as a primary school grad, studying on your own, and if you passed, you were a laywer.

     

    Yeah, the pass rate was also %2 so if this many law school grads are failing the exam, how many laymen do you think were going to pass?

    http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/think_the_bar_exam_is_tough_be_thankful_you_dont_live_in_japan/

    Replies: @spandrell

  33. The Japanese must have been desperate to risk copying one of the worst aspects of American society.

    I recently had to deal with an American corporate lawyer: once again I concluded that stereotypes often contain much truth.

    • Replies: @Old fogey
    @dearieme

    Stereotypes are always true; that is why they become stereotypes.

  34. While the cultural tendency to avoid direct confrontation undoubtedly plays a part, I think government bureaucrats, being bureaucrats, missed the forest for the trees (thankfully!).

    What Japan forgot to do was pass numerous laws giving standing for anyone to sue companies for nearly any reason.

  35. @Horzabky
    @Veracitor

    Here in France, I heard people say things which I can paraphrase thus: "France has too few lawyers, compared with the USA. The USA is a more advanced society than France, and it has more lawyers. Therefore France must have more lawyers, in order to become more advanced, like the USA is."

    It was doubly idiotic, of course.

    First, the USA isn't more "advanced" (avancé) than France, it is just bigger. The average French citizen lives three years longer than the average American, thanks to a public health system which is both cheaper and more efficient. He is also less likely to be obese, and five times less likely to be in jail.

    Second, the USA is a great nation in spite of its lawyers, not because of them.

    I guess that the Japanese made the same double error as the French.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Bitfu, @Cloudbuster, @Romanian, @Coemgen

    “thanks to a public health system which is both cheaper and more efficient”: no doubt its public health system is far superior. But I can’t imagine that there’s any good evidence that it explains the longer lives.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @dearieme

    I can assure you that the french "public health system" is an inefficient, frightening, bureaucratic, overworked omnishambles.

    Don't get caught up in it unless absolutely necessary or if you consider life-shortening activities something to aspire to.

    Replies: @for-the-record

  36. A relative recently visited Germany and was enthusiastic about a program where schoolkids are forced to spend 2 nights in Dachau. He said a number of the kids don’t make it past the first night. His enthusiasm for this abuse made me wish I had chosen my family more carefully. Germany is abolishing itself. the Japanese would never subject their children to such enormities.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @watson79

    Is this really a thing?

    There seem to be only half-day seminars max:

    https://www.kz-gedenkstaette-dachau.de/halfday_seminars.html

    Meanwhile, if you really want to stay in Dachau a couple of days:

    https://www.preiswert-uebernachten.de/hotel-pensionen/dachau/5227

    Replies: @Flip

    , @flyingtiger
    @watson79

    That is true. Japanese children should stay in Nanking for a day. Or reenact the Bataan death march.

  37. @(((Owen)))
    @whorefinder


    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.
     

    Russia is still mostly Russian.

    Britain is no longer Britain.

    Germany is no longer Germany.

    China is still China.

    France is about to be no longer France.

    Italy is still pretty much Italy, but looks unlikely to remain so.

    Poland is very Polish, for as long as it lasts.

    So it's a mixed bag. Some apparent winners are still together, as are some losers. And many apparent losers turned out to win the peace decisively. But not all. And there was no reasonable way to predict how it all would turn out.

    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn't yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization. Laughably now, we still thought communism was the great challenge to civilization back then. Turned out that communism was actually a prophylactic; the nations that suffered under it were the most resistant to slow motion genocide by mass immigration. Those of us that avoided it will soon envy those that were strengthened by the experience: At least they will have nations to leave their children.

    Replies: @syonredux, @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin, @Frau Katze, @fitzGetty, @Mr. Anon, @Massimo Heitor, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    I just saw an article about how anarchists in Greece are pitching in to help immigrants. NYT, I think it was.

    I recall that the West was pleased after WW II that Greece didn’t fall under the USSR.

    Better that it had!

    They still have wannabe Commies, since they never experienced the real thing.

    This explains why those southern tier countries don’t have any much in the way of anti-immigrant parties, perhaps. The far left is too strong.

    Greece had Golden Dawn, but they were so overtly neo-Nazi that I think the Greek government shut them down. I never hear about them anymore.

    Northern Italy has anti-immigrant party. The Five Star Party isn’t anti-immigrant (the leader is married to an Iranian). They seem far more popular than the Northern League.

    Spain and Portugal: if they have such parties, I haven’t heard of them.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Frau Katze

    Although vocal and pampered by the mainly leftist national press, anarchists in Greece have always been an insignificant force. Once their hairline starts receding by 30, they go back to mom, which sets the pace for the rest of their days.

    The core of the current Greek government is made up of hardcore far leftists whose thirst for power was so great that they formed a quasi-alliance with some pseudo-right wing populists to form a government. Together, they bend the knee to the Germans, and they dare not follow any of their far leftist policies they originally campaigned for.

    Golden Dawn is very much alive, with 7% in the latest polls. You just don't hear about them because govt and press have decided to ignore them, thinking they will fizzle out. But even though the core members are ardent neo-Nazis, they have steady support because they're the only ones that are actively anti-immigrant.

    One reason you don't see big anti-immigrant political movements, at least in Greece, is that there hasn't been any big increase in the immigrant population, because the country is broke. Of all the recent immigrants/refugees/whatever that have come to Greece since 2015, only 50,000-100,000 remain, and the government's unofficial policy is to cram them in small camps, so that they dissuade their kin back home/in Turkey from crossing the border.

    Replies: @Frau Katze

    , @Vasilis
    @Frau Katze

    Most immigrants to Europe do not want to stay in Greece because the level of benefits extended to them for the protracted process of "job seeking" is nearly nil. Greece never had a welfare state in the German sense of the term, so Greece never was a preferred destination for third world immigrants. There are two groups of immigrants who have thrived in Greece:
    1. Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi farm workers, who do backbreaking farm labor for low wages and who have been mostly unaffected by the crisis. These people mostly do not assimilate.
    2. Workers from the Balkans in farm and industry jobs, who are more demanding and who have mostly gone back home. However some of these people do assimilate.
    So you see Greece has an important lesson to offer the rest of Europe, if you don't want a flood of immigrants from the third world, stop subsidizing them to stay and they will leave.

    On a humanitarian level incoming immigrants are assisted not only by anarchist groups, but also by the Church, the Boy Scouts and even by charities run by the wives of billionaire shipowners. All of these however do not offer lifetime welfare benefits, only emergency assistance.

    Golden Dawn is still around and under trial, but they are nazis and that places a limit on their appeal at 7%. They are trying to run an anti-immigrant platform, but that only works if you have immigrants...

    Greece experienced anti-communist dictatorships during the cold war, so the Communists were made to look sincere freedom fighters! Of course after the collapse of the Soviet Union everyone knows that Communism does not work, which is why a hard core leftist party can ally itself with breakaway Christian Democrats to form a government and base its policy on active NATO participation and on seeking foreign private investment. Actually Greek - American relations have never been better since 1945 and this was true under Obama as it is under Trump.

    My dear Frau Katze, reality is always more complicated than any theory you may have.

    Replies: @Frau Katze

  38. @(((Owen)))
    @syonredux

    In 1989 there was no modern internet news. We had fresh harsh rules to prosecute employers of illegals. We'd just given an amnesty that Reagan and Bush had promised would end the trouble. Quotas for chain migration were less than half what they are now.

    There was no way to know, short of extensive Freedom Of Information Act and library research that Bush and Reagan had cucked the whole nation back then. Now by 1993 or maybe even 1992 it was just starting to be visible to people paying close attention. But for 1989 your claim is ridiculous.

    Replies: @bomag, @Peterike, @meh, @Charles Pewitt, @syonredux, @Achmed E. Newman

    There was no way to know… that Bush and Reagan had cucked the whole nation back then

    I certainly recall concerns; I was starting a Soldier of Fortune article in 1980 entitled “Brown Tide Swamps Southern US” when someone looked over my shoulder and tsked tsked at such a non-progressive sentiment.

    I lived in farming country, and the floodgates were opened in the “80s. Before, there were formal guest worker programs, and farmers made some effort to hire locals. Now they openly hired illegals and bragged about it. By the mid eighties, there was enough concern that Congress felt compelled to offer up some legislation, but the 1986 amnesty made things worse and the slide was on.

  39. Japan has no white men. Since white commit most crime that means lawyers do not have much work to do in he absence of white men

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Tiny Duck

    Joking apart, I imagine there is much dampening of legislative enthusiasm by the Japanese life attitude of keeping a low profile and not unduly rocking the boat, as well as by societal control performed by the tatooed gentlemen.

    Replies: @bomag

    , @prole
    @Tiny Duck

    Only because semites, north Africans and hispanics are classified as white in American crime statistics.

    Replies: @Tiny Duck

    , @Ed
    @Tiny Duck

    True. Which means there aren't pathetic white guys like yourself that preach cultural suicide.

    Replies: @Tiny Duck

    , @Faraday's Bobcat
    @Tiny Duck

    Indeed. What your mom and I did last night is still a crime in some states.

    , @Daniel Chieh
    @Tiny Duck

    I actually think there's more white men in Japan than other NAMs.

  40. Moshe says:

    Without backgeound knowledge that article could just as easilly be talking about Jordan and otger tribal societies where, likely for somewhat different reasons, precisely the same is true.

    There are nations with a full dinctioning legal system with areas entirely free of police and legal intervention unless there’s a high likelihood of a Hatfields and McCoy type war about to begin or where a villager has gotten into a violent beef with a civilian and the civilian lived to tell the tale to the authorities.

  41. @watson79
    A relative recently visited Germany and was enthusiastic about a program where schoolkids are forced to spend 2 nights in Dachau. He said a number of the kids don't make it past the first night. His enthusiasm for this abuse made me wish I had chosen my family more carefully. Germany is abolishing itself. the Japanese would never subject their children to such enormities.

    Replies: @El Dato, @flyingtiger

    Is this really a thing?

    There seem to be only half-day seminars max:

    https://www.kz-gedenkstaette-dachau.de/halfday_seminars.html

    Meanwhile, if you really want to stay in Dachau a couple of days:

    https://www.preiswert-uebernachten.de/hotel-pensionen/dachau/5227

    • Replies: @Flip
    @El Dato

    Well, according to Holocaust historians, there were no death camps on German soil. Dachau was only for holding prisoners and forced labor.

  42. @dearieme
    @Horzabky

    "thanks to a public health system which is both cheaper and more efficient": no doubt its public health system is far superior. But I can't imagine that there's any good evidence that it explains the longer lives.

    Replies: @El Dato

    I can assure you that the french “public health system” is an inefficient, frightening, bureaucratic, overworked omnishambles.

    Don’t get caught up in it unless absolutely necessary or if you consider life-shortening activities something to aspire to.

    • Replies: @for-the-record
    @El Dato


    I can assure you that the french “public health system” is an inefficient, frightening, bureaucratic, overworked omnishambles.
     
    That is absolute rubbish. I lived in France for 15 years (1995-2010) and if there is a better system in the world (andI have lived in 8 countries as an adult) I am not aware of it.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic

  43. @Tiny Duck
    Japan has no white men. Since white commit most crime that means lawyers do not have much work to do in he absence of white men

    Replies: @El Dato, @prole, @Ed, @Faraday's Bobcat, @Daniel Chieh

    Joking apart, I imagine there is much dampening of legislative enthusiasm by the Japanese life attitude of keeping a low profile and not unduly rocking the boat, as well as by societal control performed by the tatooed gentlemen.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @El Dato

    I recall a radio talk show program back in the 1990's discussing the US penchant for litigation. A lawyer guest discussed Japan, saying that conflicts were generally settled by the concerned persons having a meeting, and the damaged party received a small, token award; with the aggrieved going away feeling totally ripped off.

    Count that as a price to be paid, and it looks like they are getting a better deal than we are.

  44. There are day-to-day matters which even the most law abiding people fall prey to, such as traffic offences, dealing with home insurance, etc. Surely, Japan has millions of rules, regulations, and pieces of legislation on the books. Someone has to have a hand in drafting these things.

    In addition, Japanese firms must ensure that their business practices abide by international rules while also negotiating often complex international trade deals.

    My point is that every advanced society has an actual need for lawyers who do not necessarily represent a parasitical class. Shakespeare’s character in Henry VI wanted to kill all the lawyers because he was seeking a state of anarchy.

    • Replies: @res
    @Canadian Observer


    My point is that every advanced society has an actual need for lawyers who do not necessarily represent a parasitical class.
     
    Yes. The question is whether Japan had enough lawyers before to accomplish this. Do you think Japan is lacking in lawyers?
  45. @God Emperor Putin
    The more I learn about Japan the more I love it.

    Replies: @whorefinder, @White Guy In Japan

    Japan is horrible. Trains are clean and on time. Clear sign of fascism. The streets are clean and graffiti-free. Obviously racist.

    I could go on and on. This place is a nightmare. Stay away.

  46. @Tiny Duck
    Japan has no white men. Since white commit most crime that means lawyers do not have much work to do in he absence of white men

    Replies: @El Dato, @prole, @Ed, @Faraday's Bobcat, @Daniel Chieh

    Only because semites, north Africans and hispanics are classified as white in American crime statistics.

    • Replies: @Tiny Duck
    @prole

    Guess what? The stats disagree with you

    All People of Color agree with and guess what? Demographics are destiny

  47. @Horzabky
    @Veracitor

    Here in France, I heard people say things which I can paraphrase thus: "France has too few lawyers, compared with the USA. The USA is a more advanced society than France, and it has more lawyers. Therefore France must have more lawyers, in order to become more advanced, like the USA is."

    It was doubly idiotic, of course.

    First, the USA isn't more "advanced" (avancé) than France, it is just bigger. The average French citizen lives three years longer than the average American, thanks to a public health system which is both cheaper and more efficient. He is also less likely to be obese, and five times less likely to be in jail.

    Second, the USA is a great nation in spite of its lawyers, not because of them.

    I guess that the Japanese made the same double error as the French.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Bitfu, @Cloudbuster, @Romanian, @Coemgen

    What’s the French word for ‘strawman’? If there isn’t one, how about the French phrasing of ‘convoluted syllogism’?

    Because nobody–paraphrase or not–is saying anything along the lines of:

    “France has too few lawyers, compared with the USA. The USA is a more advanced society than France, and it has more lawyers. Therefore France must have more lawyers, in order to become more advanced, like the USA is.”

    • Replies: @tomv
    @Bitfu

    What's English for "shooting from the hip"? Oh...

    Since you apparently don't know French, I don't see how you can contradict Horzabky's assertion that "Here in France, I heard people say things ..."

    It may or may not be true (I believe it is, although I have no idea how prevalently such things are said), but you have nothing to add to the discussion. No points for effort.

  48. Ed says:
    @David Allan coe
    @syonredux

    It was actually the immigration act of 1990 which caused the most harm to our future demographics....the 1990 Act created the Diversity Lottery, ended the English requirement for naturalization. Created the h1b visa program, and increased legal immigration by 100%

    From 1969 - 1989 the United States admitted 11 million legal immigrants. From 1990 - 2010 the U.S. admitted 22 million Legal immigrants.

    Without the 1990 Immigration act, immigration per year would have been under 650,000 per year instead of 1,250,000 per year.

    Replies: @Ed, @AnotherDad

    I noticed a similar pattern in terms of UK immigration. The initial liberalization didn’t yield as many immigrants as later waves. The largest group Indians was at around 200k or so and many were a result of the expulsion of Uganda Indians. African immigration to the UK was under 100k up through the 90s.

    • Replies: @IHTG
    @Ed

    Which puts the lie to the extensive alt-right mythology surrounding the 1965 Immigration Act.

    Replies: @Lurker, @Mr. Anon

    , @Romanian
    @Ed

    That's because every new immigrant creates conditions for having more immigrants, especially of the same ethnicity, nationality, religion. Communities become better established, immigrant needs are more visible and catered to, more specific infrastructure (immigrant employment, like ethnic restaurants and community services, specific education), more local information regarding various issues which reduces the informational asymmetries that would deter some of the people from moving etc etc. And they also wear down the resistance to dispossession of the population, up to a certain point where resistance explodes into reaction.

    Replies: @res

    , @unpc downunder
    @Ed

    There seems to be a pretty strong link between free trade, financialisation and increased immigration to the West. The wealthy FIRE cities attract immigrants to do service jobs for increasingly wealthy upper class whites, while the high property prices drive the working class whites away. And then of course there is the decline of manufacturing and peasant farming in Africa, South America and the Middle East, which provides a strong push factor.

    Free trade dogma is based on blank slate thinking. Force Africans to compete with the Chinese and the Africans won't up their game, they will give up and come to Europe and America.

  49. @Tiny Duck
    Japan has no white men. Since white commit most crime that means lawyers do not have much work to do in he absence of white men

    Replies: @El Dato, @prole, @Ed, @Faraday's Bobcat, @Daniel Chieh

    True. Which means there aren’t pathetic white guys like yourself that preach cultural suicide.

    • Replies: @Tiny Duck
    @Ed

    How does it feel? Knowing that you don't matter and will die seeing white girls bear Children of Color, that all your heroes will have their statues torn down, that all your kinds achievemnets will be stricken and replaced from the history books

    Replies: @Pericles, @White Guy In Japan, @Anon, @biz, @Joe Walker

  50. The problem is the Japanese tried ‘supply side’ economics, create more lawyers and their services will be taken up. Say’s law is a fraud I tell ya. What they need is ‘demand side’ economics, more laws. They also need more administrative courts. Administrative law, that’s the key.

    http://www.investopedia.com/terms/s/says-law.asp

    (Disregard the drop down ad for 10 best penny stocks)

  51. Phil Knight’s book Shoe Dog is basically a long story of how a) his Japanese lenders were always there for him, no matter how bad his cash flow situation was and b) how his US lenders literally called the FBI when he kited one check. The Japanese lenders came in and took over the Nike account and simply shook their head at the stupidity of the Wells Fargo bankers, losing a massive account over one bad check.

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    @bjdubbs

    When Nike was privately owned, it nearly collapsed several times for lack of cash. The accounting was in such a mess that factory workers' payroll checks were bouncing. Phil Knight was bailed out with a loan from a nearby factory worker.


    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/nikes-phil-knight-tells-you-how-to-make-25-billion-2016-05-11

  52. @El Dato
    @Tiny Duck

    Joking apart, I imagine there is much dampening of legislative enthusiasm by the Japanese life attitude of keeping a low profile and not unduly rocking the boat, as well as by societal control performed by the tatooed gentlemen.

    Replies: @bomag

    I recall a radio talk show program back in the 1990’s discussing the US penchant for litigation. A lawyer guest discussed Japan, saying that conflicts were generally settled by the concerned persons having a meeting, and the damaged party received a small, token award; with the aggrieved going away feeling totally ripped off.

    Count that as a price to be paid, and it looks like they are getting a better deal than we are.

  53. @El Dato
    @dearieme

    I can assure you that the french "public health system" is an inefficient, frightening, bureaucratic, overworked omnishambles.

    Don't get caught up in it unless absolutely necessary or if you consider life-shortening activities something to aspire to.

    Replies: @for-the-record

    I can assure you that the french “public health system” is an inefficient, frightening, bureaucratic, overworked omnishambles.

    That is absolute rubbish. I lived in France for 15 years (1995-2010) and if there is a better system in the world (andI have lived in 8 countries as an adult) I am not aware of it.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @for-the-record

    I agree. The French health system, of which the public health system is a subset, is good. It's one of the reasons my family will probably relocate more-or-less permanently to France.

    There are financial problems with the systems and almost all French people who can afford it supplement the public system with private insurance (mutuelle). But it's much, much less expensive than the United States.

    Replies: @for-the-record

  54. @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin
    @(((Owen)))

    Unfortunately Russia is less Russian than Britain is British. I guess the cold war ruined most of its enthusiastic participants.

    Replies: @carol

    Yes I read that Moscow was full up of southern migrants from the ‘stans who come to do the menial labor and live in the basement of the old apt buildings built for the apparatchiks.

    Sounds creepy to me.

  55. This is really an argument for Breakages Limited:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breakages,_Limited

    It really comes down to creating more social problems in a society so as to create more employment opportunities in the “justice system”. Its unusually to see these sorts of arguments made so nakedly.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @eD

    That's a terrible argument. It would be better to create make-work jobs without creating extra social problems.

    But it calls to mind Bonfire of the Vanities, where the assistant district attorneys would watch the prison cans disgorge that day's crop of cases and call it the chow line or something like that, because that was what fed the system that employed them.

  56. @(((Owen)))
    @syonredux

    In 1989 there was no modern internet news. We had fresh harsh rules to prosecute employers of illegals. We'd just given an amnesty that Reagan and Bush had promised would end the trouble. Quotas for chain migration were less than half what they are now.

    There was no way to know, short of extensive Freedom Of Information Act and library research that Bush and Reagan had cucked the whole nation back then. Now by 1993 or maybe even 1992 it was just starting to be visible to people paying close attention. But for 1989 your claim is ridiculous.

    Replies: @bomag, @Peterike, @meh, @Charles Pewitt, @syonredux, @Achmed E. Newman

    “Now by 1993 or maybe even 1992 it was just starting to be visible to people paying close attention. But for 1989 your claim is ridiculous.”

    In New York it was completely obvious that Puerto Rican immigration was a lot of trouble in the 1960s. “West Side Story” and all that. I was just a kid and I knew it was a huge mistake.

    • Replies: @prole
    @Peterike

    Puerto Ricans are not immigrants, they are born US citizens...

    Replies: @ANON

  57. Fifteen years ago, the nation kicked off a plan to double the number of lawyers.

    I can’t even.

  58. @Achilles
    O/T: From a Bank of America research analysts' report (via ZeroHedge):

    Of the 1,041 stores expected set to open [in the USA] in 2017, 80%, or 810, belong to the one retail chain that focuses exclusively on America's poorest, i.e., Dollar General.... Of the nearly 7,800 net new stores opened [in the USA] since 2008 per BofA's sampled data, a whopping 76%, or 5,396, were Dollar General stores.
     
    So 80% of the new stores in our country are dollar stores. Wait, wasn't the result of globalism supposed to be that Americans would all became highly paid knowledge workers like investment bankers and software engineers?

    So if that's the case, who's doing the shopping at all these dollar stores?

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Chrisnonymous, @oddsbodkins, @Triumph104, @EdwardM, @Forbes

    Yes, but this has to be taken in light of the collapse in brick and mortar businesses that are moving online. Nobody goes to Amazon for dollar store items.

    • Replies: @Achilles
    @Chrisnonymous


    Yes, but this has to be taken in light of the collapse in brick and mortar businesses that are moving online. Nobody goes to Amazon for dollar store items.
     
    Yes, certainly the move to online shopping is a huge factor affecting this. Yet there seems to be more to it than that.

    While dollar stores thrive, malls are dying. The same BofA analysts' report I quoted cites an expected decrease in the mall space in net new stores primarily due to the closing of department store anchors.

    But not all malls are dying. Luxury malls are doing fine, even flourishing. And why not? People have always enjoyed going shopping. When people go online to shop, there is likely something specific they have in mind to get. But often, or at least it used to be this way, people would spend time in a shopping mall even without having a shopping list because it was fun for them to shop.

    So as high-end malls and low-end dollar stores thrive, middle class malls die.

    Part of this undoubtedly is simply the shrinking of the American middle class due to open-borders trade and immigration.

    But part of this may be that middle class shoppers would spend time in middle class malls if the malls were an enjoyable experience.

    Consider movies as a similar phenomenon. While there are dvds and blu rays and Netflix and other ways to watch movies at home, people will go out to see movies in a theater if there is something enjoyable on offer.

    I wonder whether 'diversity' is part of the reason for declining traffic in middle-class malls, and why shoppers seem not to be enjoying the middle-class mall experience. Obviously this is not a topic that would be addressed in the mainstream media or the establishment academia, unless it can be approached through the angle of white racism.

    But one would think this is something that could be addressed statistically through an analysis of middle-class mall location, local economic trends and change in local ethnic mix.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  59. @prole
    @Tiny Duck

    Only because semites, north Africans and hispanics are classified as white in American crime statistics.

    Replies: @Tiny Duck

    Guess what? The stats disagree with you

    All People of Color agree with and guess what? Demographics are destiny

  60. @syonredux
    @(((Owen)))


    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn’t yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization.
     
    Anyone living in the USA in 1989 with half a brain should have been able to see the threat posed by Mestizo/Amerind immigration.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @David Allan coe, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anonymous Nephew

    I’m old enough to remember the 60s and 70s. “Immigrant” was mostly British engineers fleeing their homeland’s nationalized industries. France was pretty moribund at the time, so there were some Frenchmen as well. A girl in my elementary school had an upper-caste Mexican father who worked a white collar job.

    In the 80s, Meso-American immigrants were still mostly invisible and concentrated along the border States. By the mid-90s I can remember people saying, “Hmm, this could be a problem,” but everybody seemed convinced that ARE ECONOMY needed them. After 2000, it ceased to be a topic of polite conversation other than on the Internet.

    • Agree: prole
    • Replies: @3g4me
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    @46 The Anti-Gnostic: I, too, remember the '60s and '70s. I also clearly recall the mid '80s (I was overseas during the early part of the decade) and wondering why DC and No. VA were full of Latin Americans catcalling women and committing crimes and generally hanging around the streets. They were suddenly everywhere. FWIW, though, I also recall an Indian woman in a sari in my grad school classes, an uncommon enough sight at the time to be intriguing . Then I went overseas again, and when next I returned for more than a few months, my country was gone.

    There were numerous signs of immigrant invasion in the '80s for anyone who cared to look. When I was in elementary school in the '60s, the only foreign language offered was French. I wanted to study Spanish instead because it was more exotic. Be careful what you wish for.

  61. @Ed
    @Tiny Duck

    True. Which means there aren't pathetic white guys like yourself that preach cultural suicide.

    Replies: @Tiny Duck

    How does it feel? Knowing that you don’t matter and will die seeing white girls bear Children of Color, that all your heroes will have their statues torn down, that all your kinds achievemnets will be stricken and replaced from the history books

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Tiny Duck

    And the history books will be misspelled. That's the worst part.

    , @White Guy In Japan
    @Tiny Duck

    How does it feel going to the park with your wife's son Tyrone?

    , @Anon
    @Tiny Duck

    Duck if you are right the Future Quote will be "What is a Book?"

    , @biz
    @Tiny Duck

    Uh oh, TD, you've fallen behind the times. Nowadays according to the truly wokest people of color and their wokest white allies, these white women bearing children of color it is no longer a good thing but an act of genocide against black America:
    Interracial Marriage is Destroying Black America

    Please do try to keep up. Off to re-education camp for you!

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh

    , @Joe Walker
    @Tiny Duck

    Someone has been watching too many Planet of the Apes movies.

  62. In the 90s I went to a top 5 law school, several classmates were Japanese lawyers there to get an LLM so they could take a US bar as well.

    The issue back then, from what I could tell talking to them, was you get programmed into a track in the law school/intern portion, and can’t really skip to new areas to fill in or transition.

    Personal injury is really hard from what they said. I know this partly from being stationed there, but in injury cases the company makes a payment just to say they are sorry it happened, and medical care is more of a right there than an expensive payment likeit is the US. Not a lot of reason to sue.

  63. @spandrell
    @Anonymous

    Japan had a bar exam, which didn't ask for any qualifications. You could take the exam as a primary school grad, studying on your own, and if you passed, you were a laywer.

    After the reform to produce more lawyers, the government made a requirement to attend law schools, which were built by many universities, and charged very high tuition. They also hired bureaucrats as professor, advisors and other lucrative revolving door stuff.

    That's the story nobody will tell. It was a transparent plot to get cash for government bureaucrats and their cronies, at the expense of aspiring lawyers.

    Replies: @res, @Truth

    That’s the story nobody will tell. It was a transparent plot to get cash for government bureaucrats and their cronies, at the expense of aspiring lawyers.

    That was enlightening. Thanks.

  64. meh says:
    @(((Owen)))
    @syonredux

    In 1989 there was no modern internet news. We had fresh harsh rules to prosecute employers of illegals. We'd just given an amnesty that Reagan and Bush had promised would end the trouble. Quotas for chain migration were less than half what they are now.

    There was no way to know, short of extensive Freedom Of Information Act and library research that Bush and Reagan had cucked the whole nation back then. Now by 1993 or maybe even 1992 it was just starting to be visible to people paying close attention. But for 1989 your claim is ridiculous.

    Replies: @bomag, @Peterike, @meh, @Charles Pewitt, @syonredux, @Achmed E. Newman

    I can assure you, I was alive and aware of the problem in the 1980s. Plenty of people were sounding the alarm back then; it is your claim that “no one could have known” back then that is ridiculous.

    Yes, you might have had to read certain “forbidden” or subversive publications or listen to certain “disreputable” radio shows or other sources of underground news, but the facts were out there in the 1980s if you were paying attention.

    Enough people knew back in the 1980s such that it became necessary for TPTB to turn up the volume on the pro-immigration propaganda to shout them down and drown them out.

    I distinctly remember people accusing Reagan of selling us down the river with the amnesty, at the time. Enough people knew back then; everyone else should have known but they preferred to stick their heads in the sand and to trust people that they had no sane reason to trust.

  65. @Canadian Observer
    There are day-to-day matters which even the most law abiding people fall prey to, such as traffic offences, dealing with home insurance, etc. Surely, Japan has millions of rules, regulations, and pieces of legislation on the books. Someone has to have a hand in drafting these things.

    In addition, Japanese firms must ensure that their business practices abide by international rules while also negotiating often complex international trade deals.

    My point is that every advanced society has an actual need for lawyers who do not necessarily represent a parasitical class. Shakespeare's character in Henry VI wanted to kill all the lawyers because he was seeking a state of anarchy.

    Replies: @res

    My point is that every advanced society has an actual need for lawyers who do not necessarily represent a parasitical class.

    Yes. The question is whether Japan had enough lawyers before to accomplish this. Do you think Japan is lacking in lawyers?

  66. @Horzabky
    @Veracitor

    Here in France, I heard people say things which I can paraphrase thus: "France has too few lawyers, compared with the USA. The USA is a more advanced society than France, and it has more lawyers. Therefore France must have more lawyers, in order to become more advanced, like the USA is."

    It was doubly idiotic, of course.

    First, the USA isn't more "advanced" (avancé) than France, it is just bigger. The average French citizen lives three years longer than the average American, thanks to a public health system which is both cheaper and more efficient. He is also less likely to be obese, and five times less likely to be in jail.

    Second, the USA is a great nation in spite of its lawyers, not because of them.

    I guess that the Japanese made the same double error as the French.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Bitfu, @Cloudbuster, @Romanian, @Coemgen

    The average French citizen lives three years longer than the average American, thanks to a public health system which is both cheaper and more efficient.

    Very many of the markers associated with longevity have to do with genetics and lifestyle choices, not the efficacy of the healthcare system. If you look at medical outcomes for which medical science can directly affec the outcome — cancer survivability, survival after a heart attack, etc., the U.S. has better outcomes than most nations.

    • Agree: Kevin C.
  67. res says:

    Japan’s Lawyers Need More Crime and Bankruptcies

    Of course. Don’t you know crime and the ensuing path through the criminal justice system and on into the prison industrial complex increase GDP?!

    Japan also needs needs more riots and destruction. Those increase GDP as well, right? Maybe we could send them all of the BLM “protesters” to help?

    After that they can start digging and immediately filling in holes.

    • Replies: @Buck Turgidson
    @res

    Japan is far too functional, happy, crime-free, traditional, harmonious, quiet, clean, and pleasant for the western liberal SJWs and media. The latter loves misery, crime, shootings, something anything to hate, destruction, filth (everywhere except their property and 'hood of course), and constant agitation and complaints vs. the established order. It also helps them sell papers and attract viewers they think.

    Maybe they have given up on the latter, though. Their sales and viewership are undeniably in the toilet and their numbers are, to be honest, as low as Wolf Blitzer's. Sad.

    Replies: @Kevin C.

  68. @toomuch
    I'm in Japan now and have noticed the propaganda coming from the US to increase immigration to "solve the aging problem." I expect something similar led the Japanese to think more lawyers would be a good thing.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    I think spandrell has probably sized the situation up correctly. If you want to read more about Japan’s bureaucratic self-enrichment schemes, “Dogs and Demons” by Alex Kerr has an explanation.

    One nuance that spandrell didn’t mention, however, is that having an academic hurdle in a profession is a component of politicizing the profession. I met a legal researcher here whose life’s work is studying SCOTUS to try to figure out how to turn the Japanese court system into a political weapon to force more liberalization on the country. He was not a loner either. Establishing academic control over the legal profession is going to create a lot more opportunities for scholarship trending in that direction.

    • Replies: @spandrell
    @Chrisnonymous

    The Japanese Lawyer's federation has long been a communist stronghold, and law scholars across the country have always been reddest than Mao Zedong's underwear. I don't think the bar exam reforms are going to change that at all.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  69. Anonymous [AKA "Some Greek from Greece"] says:
    @Frau Katze
    @(((Owen)))

    I just saw an article about how anarchists in Greece are pitching in to help immigrants. NYT, I think it was.

    I recall that the West was pleased after WW II that Greece didn't fall under the USSR.

    Better that it had!

    They still have wannabe Commies, since they never experienced the real thing.

    This explains why those southern tier countries don't have any much in the way of anti-immigrant parties, perhaps. The far left is too strong.

    Greece had Golden Dawn, but they were so overtly neo-Nazi that I think the Greek government shut them down. I never hear about them anymore.

    Northern Italy has anti-immigrant party. The Five Star Party isn't anti-immigrant (the leader is married to an Iranian). They seem far more popular than the Northern League.

    Spain and Portugal: if they have such parties, I haven't heard of them.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Vasilis

    Although vocal and pampered by the mainly leftist national press, anarchists in Greece have always been an insignificant force. Once their hairline starts receding by 30, they go back to mom, which sets the pace for the rest of their days.

    The core of the current Greek government is made up of hardcore far leftists whose thirst for power was so great that they formed a quasi-alliance with some pseudo-right wing populists to form a government. Together, they bend the knee to the Germans, and they dare not follow any of their far leftist policies they originally campaigned for.

    Golden Dawn is very much alive, with 7% in the latest polls. You just don’t hear about them because govt and press have decided to ignore them, thinking they will fizzle out. But even though the core members are ardent neo-Nazis, they have steady support because they’re the only ones that are actively anti-immigrant.

    One reason you don’t see big anti-immigrant political movements, at least in Greece, is that there hasn’t been any big increase in the immigrant population, because the country is broke. Of all the recent immigrants/refugees/whatever that have come to Greece since 2015, only 50,000-100,000 remain, and the government’s unofficial policy is to cram them in small camps, so that they dissuade their kin back home/in Turkey from crossing the border.

    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    @Anonymous

    Well, that's encouraging. Thanks for the info.

  70. @Ed
    @David Allan coe

    I noticed a similar pattern in terms of UK immigration. The initial liberalization didn't yield as many immigrants as later waves. The largest group Indians was at around 200k or so and many were a result of the expulsion of Uganda Indians. African immigration to the UK was under 100k up through the 90s.

    Replies: @IHTG, @Romanian, @unpc downunder

    Which puts the lie to the extensive alt-right mythology surrounding the 1965 Immigration Act.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @IHTG

    What?!

    To unleash mass-immigration you need to dismantle the legal controls.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @IHTG


    Which puts the lie to the extensive alt-right mythology surrounding the 1965 Immigration Act.
     
    No, it doesn't, nor is it a mythology. The 1990 bill was also bad, but it was Hart-Celler that was the beginning of the replacement of the existing american population. It resulted in immigrant numbers that were too high, and it put in place the mechanism of chain-migration.

    To say it was unimportant to current immigration levels is kind of like saying that the dollars you put into a 401k thirty years ago are less important than the dollars you put in last week.
  71. @Horzabky
    @Veracitor

    Here in France, I heard people say things which I can paraphrase thus: "France has too few lawyers, compared with the USA. The USA is a more advanced society than France, and it has more lawyers. Therefore France must have more lawyers, in order to become more advanced, like the USA is."

    It was doubly idiotic, of course.

    First, the USA isn't more "advanced" (avancé) than France, it is just bigger. The average French citizen lives three years longer than the average American, thanks to a public health system which is both cheaper and more efficient. He is also less likely to be obese, and five times less likely to be in jail.

    Second, the USA is a great nation in spite of its lawyers, not because of them.

    I guess that the Japanese made the same double error as the French.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Bitfu, @Cloudbuster, @Romanian, @Coemgen

    I think it’s magical thinking. Over here, what you hear about is US schools and investment in education.

  72. @Ed
    @David Allan coe

    I noticed a similar pattern in terms of UK immigration. The initial liberalization didn't yield as many immigrants as later waves. The largest group Indians was at around 200k or so and many were a result of the expulsion of Uganda Indians. African immigration to the UK was under 100k up through the 90s.

    Replies: @IHTG, @Romanian, @unpc downunder

    That’s because every new immigrant creates conditions for having more immigrants, especially of the same ethnicity, nationality, religion. Communities become better established, immigrant needs are more visible and catered to, more specific infrastructure (immigrant employment, like ethnic restaurants and community services, specific education), more local information regarding various issues which reduces the informational asymmetries that would deter some of the people from moving etc etc. And they also wear down the resistance to dispossession of the population, up to a certain point where resistance explodes into reaction.

    • Replies: @res
    @Romanian

    Nothing like some positive feedback to create instability.

    As https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Positive_feedback says: "Positive feedback tends to cause system instability."

  73. The article notes the fact that Japan is a highly homogeneous society and that Japan is able to avoid many of the problems experienced in the more diverse U.S. This is further evidence of what Robert Putnam found from his research of the changes in U.S. demographics over the last 40 years, and as he reported in his book “Bowling Alone”. Diversity is not good for social cohesion or social capital.

  74. @Achilles
    O/T: From a Bank of America research analysts' report (via ZeroHedge):

    Of the 1,041 stores expected set to open [in the USA] in 2017, 80%, or 810, belong to the one retail chain that focuses exclusively on America's poorest, i.e., Dollar General.... Of the nearly 7,800 net new stores opened [in the USA] since 2008 per BofA's sampled data, a whopping 76%, or 5,396, were Dollar General stores.
     
    So 80% of the new stores in our country are dollar stores. Wait, wasn't the result of globalism supposed to be that Americans would all became highly paid knowledge workers like investment bankers and software engineers?

    So if that's the case, who's doing the shopping at all these dollar stores?

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Chrisnonymous, @oddsbodkins, @Triumph104, @EdwardM, @Forbes

    That’s because of Amazon. You can’t use Amazon if your orders are stolen off your doorstep, so they don’t compete with the dollar store.

  75. Homogeneity and Peace are boring; Diversity and War really are much more exciting.

    May we live in Diverse Interesting times…

  76. @Romanian
    @Ed

    That's because every new immigrant creates conditions for having more immigrants, especially of the same ethnicity, nationality, religion. Communities become better established, immigrant needs are more visible and catered to, more specific infrastructure (immigrant employment, like ethnic restaurants and community services, specific education), more local information regarding various issues which reduces the informational asymmetries that would deter some of the people from moving etc etc. And they also wear down the resistance to dispossession of the population, up to a certain point where resistance explodes into reaction.

    Replies: @res

    Nothing like some positive feedback to create instability.

    As https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Positive_feedback says: “Positive feedback tends to cause system instability.”

  77. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @syonredux

    I'm old enough to remember the 60s and 70s. "Immigrant" was mostly British engineers fleeing their homeland's nationalized industries. France was pretty moribund at the time, so there were some Frenchmen as well. A girl in my elementary school had an upper-caste Mexican father who worked a white collar job.

    In the 80s, Meso-American immigrants were still mostly invisible and concentrated along the border States. By the mid-90s I can remember people saying, "Hmm, this could be a problem," but everybody seemed convinced that ARE ECONOMY needed them. After 2000, it ceased to be a topic of polite conversation other than on the Internet.

    Replies: @3g4me

    @46 The Anti-Gnostic: I, too, remember the ’60s and ’70s. I also clearly recall the mid ’80s (I was overseas during the early part of the decade) and wondering why DC and No. VA were full of Latin Americans catcalling women and committing crimes and generally hanging around the streets. They were suddenly everywhere. FWIW, though, I also recall an Indian woman in a sari in my grad school classes, an uncommon enough sight at the time to be intriguing . Then I went overseas again, and when next I returned for more than a few months, my country was gone.

    There were numerous signs of immigrant invasion in the ’80s for anyone who cared to look. When I was in elementary school in the ’60s, the only foreign language offered was French. I wanted to study Spanish instead because it was more exotic. Be careful what you wish for.

  78. @reiner Tor
    I think we all know the Journal's favored solution to that crisis. Yes, you guessed it correctly, it's mass immigration.

    Replies: @fitzGetty

    … open the gates ! … don’t be like Vienna – open the gates … !

  79. Only because semites, north Africans and hispanics are classified as white in American crime statistics.

    You’ve accepted a false premise (yes, sometimes I read his comments, but I never reply to them, not since I broke him, many months ago). Blacks commit the most crime. That, and their myriad other dysfunctions, are so thoroughgoing that they can’t even be relied upon to keep proper statistics. By any intelligent standard, that means the evaluation of their criminality defaults to “more than populations that keep decent statistics.” Giving Blacks the benefit of the doubt in absence of proper record keeping is stupid (not that you’ve done that, but that’s where the conversation inevitably goes when leftists are involved).

  80. @whorefinder
    @God Emperor Putin

    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.

    Replies: @Anonym, @(((Owen))), @spandrell, @fitzGetty, @cucksworth

    …and great Germania ? …

  81. It disgusts me to think that the litigious nature of our society might have been manufactured. How truly corrupt and malevolent.

    • Replies: @Thea
    @Anonymous

    The incredible level of litigation combined with dictatorship by judges in American is really an important topic worthy of research.

    In the 1960s there was a push to get homosexuals and their enablers into law schools in mass numbers. The no fault divorce laws beginning in 1969 were largely unasked for and disliked by the public but pushed through state legislatures funded by attorneys who saw dollar signs.

    There is more and worse but yes is was manufactured.

  82. @Tiny Duck
    Japan has no white men. Since white commit most crime that means lawyers do not have much work to do in he absence of white men

    Replies: @El Dato, @prole, @Ed, @Faraday's Bobcat, @Daniel Chieh

    Indeed. What your mom and I did last night is still a crime in some states.

  83. @res

    Japan's Lawyers Need More Crime and Bankruptcies
     
    Of course. Don't you know crime and the ensuing path through the criminal justice system and on into the prison industrial complex increase GDP?!

    Japan also needs needs more riots and destruction. Those increase GDP as well, right? Maybe we could send them all of the BLM "protesters" to help?

    After that they can start digging and immediately filling in holes.

    Replies: @Buck Turgidson

    Japan is far too functional, happy, crime-free, traditional, harmonious, quiet, clean, and pleasant for the western liberal SJWs and media. The latter loves misery, crime, shootings, something anything to hate, destruction, filth (everywhere except their property and ‘hood of course), and constant agitation and complaints vs. the established order. It also helps them sell papers and attract viewers they think.

    Maybe they have given up on the latter, though. Their sales and viewership are undeniably in the toilet and their numbers are, to be honest, as low as Wolf Blitzer’s. Sad.

    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    @Buck Turgidson


    Japan is far too functional, happy, crime-free, traditional, harmonious, quiet, clean, and pleasant for the western liberal SJWs and media. The latter loves misery, crime, shootings, something anything to hate, destruction, filth (everywhere except their property and ‘hood of course), and constant agitation and complaints vs. the established order.
     
    At the heart of every "egalitarian" ideology and movement lies envy. Here, I mean in the older sense, as distinct from mere covetousness, "envy" as not merely wanting what someone else has, but resenting them for having it. This latter is as readily satified by the other losing the object of envy as by the envious gaining it. And since it is easier to destroy than to create, we see in history that the envious "levelers" of every stripe generally end up doing far more to tear down the higher and better than they do to elevate the lower.
  84. @(((Owen)))
    @whorefinder


    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.
     

    Russia is still mostly Russian.

    Britain is no longer Britain.

    Germany is no longer Germany.

    China is still China.

    France is about to be no longer France.

    Italy is still pretty much Italy, but looks unlikely to remain so.

    Poland is very Polish, for as long as it lasts.

    So it's a mixed bag. Some apparent winners are still together, as are some losers. And many apparent losers turned out to win the peace decisively. But not all. And there was no reasonable way to predict how it all would turn out.

    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn't yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization. Laughably now, we still thought communism was the great challenge to civilization back then. Turned out that communism was actually a prophylactic; the nations that suffered under it were the most resistant to slow motion genocide by mass immigration. Those of us that avoided it will soon envy those that were strengthened by the experience: At least they will have nations to leave their children.

    Replies: @syonredux, @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin, @Frau Katze, @fitzGetty, @Mr. Anon, @Massimo Heitor, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    … the way is clear for the grim sharia law in old Nippon … fun and games to come …

  85. More importantly, how are the obstetricians doing?

  86. @Horzabky
    @Veracitor

    Here in France, I heard people say things which I can paraphrase thus: "France has too few lawyers, compared with the USA. The USA is a more advanced society than France, and it has more lawyers. Therefore France must have more lawyers, in order to become more advanced, like the USA is."

    It was doubly idiotic, of course.

    First, the USA isn't more "advanced" (avancé) than France, it is just bigger. The average French citizen lives three years longer than the average American, thanks to a public health system which is both cheaper and more efficient. He is also less likely to be obese, and five times less likely to be in jail.

    Second, the USA is a great nation in spite of its lawyers, not because of them.

    I guess that the Japanese made the same double error as the French.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Bitfu, @Cloudbuster, @Romanian, @Coemgen

  87. @Achilles
    O/T: From a Bank of America research analysts' report (via ZeroHedge):

    Of the 1,041 stores expected set to open [in the USA] in 2017, 80%, or 810, belong to the one retail chain that focuses exclusively on America's poorest, i.e., Dollar General.... Of the nearly 7,800 net new stores opened [in the USA] since 2008 per BofA's sampled data, a whopping 76%, or 5,396, were Dollar General stores.
     
    So 80% of the new stores in our country are dollar stores. Wait, wasn't the result of globalism supposed to be that Americans would all became highly paid knowledge workers like investment bankers and software engineers?

    So if that's the case, who's doing the shopping at all these dollar stores?

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Chrisnonymous, @oddsbodkins, @Triumph104, @EdwardM, @Forbes

    O/T:

    Personally, I don’t consider Dollar General to be a dollar store. Price-wise, it is like a drug store, without the pharmacy. I don’t understand why people shop there. Here in the Southwest, in addition to Dollar Generals, we have 99 Cent Only stores where the majority of the products are actually 99 cents, although there are a few higher priced items.

    As for the knowledge economy, Mark Zuckerberg just called for universal basic income.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Triumph104

    Triumph, to quote a lady I heard interviewed on a local talk show, she shops there because...." you don't have to get dressed up like you do to shop at Walmart."

    Replies: @Ivy

  88. @spandrell
    @Anonymous

    Japan had a bar exam, which didn't ask for any qualifications. You could take the exam as a primary school grad, studying on your own, and if you passed, you were a laywer.

    After the reform to produce more lawyers, the government made a requirement to attend law schools, which were built by many universities, and charged very high tuition. They also hired bureaucrats as professor, advisors and other lucrative revolving door stuff.

    That's the story nobody will tell. It was a transparent plot to get cash for government bureaucrats and their cronies, at the expense of aspiring lawyers.

    Replies: @res, @Truth

    Japan had a bar exam, which didn’t ask for any qualifications. You could take the exam as a primary school grad, studying on your own, and if you passed, you were a laywer.

    Yeah, the pass rate was also %2 so if this many law school grads are failing the exam, how many laymen do you think were going to pass?

    http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/think_the_bar_exam_is_tough_be_thankful_you_dont_live_in_japan/

    • Replies: @spandrell
    @Truth

    If you weren't a disgusting troll I might even answer to you.

    Replies: @Truth

  89. White men, that sounds like an invitation, Japan’s law industry needs your “cultural vibrancy.” I’d immigrate tomorrow.

  90. @whorefinder
    @God Emperor Putin

    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.

    Replies: @Anonym, @(((Owen))), @spandrell, @fitzGetty, @cucksworth

    why was Patton all like “we defeated the wrong enemy!” right before his mysterious death?

  91. @(((Owen)))
    @whorefinder


    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.
     

    Russia is still mostly Russian.

    Britain is no longer Britain.

    Germany is no longer Germany.

    China is still China.

    France is about to be no longer France.

    Italy is still pretty much Italy, but looks unlikely to remain so.

    Poland is very Polish, for as long as it lasts.

    So it's a mixed bag. Some apparent winners are still together, as are some losers. And many apparent losers turned out to win the peace decisively. But not all. And there was no reasonable way to predict how it all would turn out.

    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn't yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization. Laughably now, we still thought communism was the great challenge to civilization back then. Turned out that communism was actually a prophylactic; the nations that suffered under it were the most resistant to slow motion genocide by mass immigration. Those of us that avoided it will soon envy those that were strengthened by the experience: At least they will have nations to leave their children.

    Replies: @syonredux, @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin, @Frau Katze, @fitzGetty, @Mr. Anon, @Massimo Heitor, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    Poland will probably not remain polish, not if it remains part of the EU.

    One conclusion that could be drawn from your list is that democratic neo-liberalism is far more destructive to a nations’ traditional culture even than communism is.

    • Agree: Frau Katze
  92. @TBA
    @Anonymous

    Cargo cult policy.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Cargo cult policy.

    That’s good.

  93. @(((Owen)))
    @syonredux

    In 1989 there was no modern internet news. We had fresh harsh rules to prosecute employers of illegals. We'd just given an amnesty that Reagan and Bush had promised would end the trouble. Quotas for chain migration were less than half what they are now.

    There was no way to know, short of extensive Freedom Of Information Act and library research that Bush and Reagan had cucked the whole nation back then. Now by 1993 or maybe even 1992 it was just starting to be visible to people paying close attention. But for 1989 your claim is ridiculous.

    Replies: @bomag, @Peterike, @meh, @Charles Pewitt, @syonredux, @Achmed E. Newman

    Mass legal immigration and illegal immigration were obvious problems to anybody living near Los Angeles or New York by the 1970s. There were many other parts of the United States undergoing foreigner infestation at that time too. You would have had to have been blind or willfully ignorant not to see that mass immigration was pouring into the United States in the 1970s.

    Reagan and Bush killed the Republican Party in California by allowing mass immigration to continue. The ill effects of the 1965 Immigration Act were plain to see. Treasonous puppet scum politicians Reagan and Bush did the bidding of their masters. The 1986 amnesty for illegal alien invaders was an act of treason carried out by Reagan and Bush.

    Young people should understand that it was clear by the 1970s that mass immigration was destroying the United States. The globalizers wanted to destroy the United States using mass immigration, and it was clear to honest observers by the 1970s.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @Charles Pewitt


    Mass legal immigration and illegal immigration were obvious problems to anybody living near Los Angeles or New York by the 1970s.
     
    In rust belt, change the 1970's to 2010's. I went K-12 in the 80's and 90's without a single student in any of my schools who was not white, black, or a mix of white and black. There were a tiny number of Asian business owners, but I don't think I met a hispanic until I got to college.

    Now there are random central americans (thinner, shorter, and darker than Mexicans) plus refugee resettlement agencies seeding Africans and Arabs all over the place.

    Replies: @Frau Katze

  94. @eD
    This is really an argument for Breakages Limited:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breakages,_Limited

    It really comes down to creating more social problems in a society so as to create more employment opportunities in the "justice system". Its unusually to see these sorts of arguments made so nakedly.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    That’s a terrible argument. It would be better to create make-work jobs without creating extra social problems.

    But it calls to mind Bonfire of the Vanities, where the assistant district attorneys would watch the prison cans disgorge that day’s crop of cases and call it the chow line or something like that, because that was what fed the system that employed them.

  95. Lot says:

    Trump State Department to rape-ugee resettlement agencies: full speed ahead!

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/26/us/politics/united-states-refugees-trump.html

    Despite repeated efforts by President Trump to curtail refugee resettlements, the State Department this week quietly lifted the department’s restriction on the number of refugees allowed to enter the United States.

    The result could be a near doubling of refugees entering the country, from about 830 people a week in the first three weeks of this month to well over 1,500 people per week by next month, according to refugee advocates. Tens of thousands of refugees are waiting to come to the United States.

    The State Department’s decision was conveyed in an email on Thursday to the private agencies in countries around the world that help refugees manage the nearly two-year application process needed to enter the United States.

    In her email, Jennifer L. Smith, a department official, wrote that the refugee groups could begin bringing people to the United States “unconstrained by the weekly quotas that were in place.”

    Refugee groups now predict that entries into the United States could increase so rapidly that the total number of refugees admitted by Sept. 30, the end of the fiscal year, could exceed 70,000. That is well below the 84,994 refugees admitted in fiscal year 2016, but not by nearly as much as many advocates had feared.

    Ann Corcoran:

    https://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/2017/05/27/stunning-news-trump-state-department-opens-the-flood-gates-refugee-admissions-will-explode-in-coming-weeks/

    Trump’s first year in office will see more refugee resettlement than 5 out of 8 years when Obama was president and and 6 out of 8 years GWB was president.

    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    @Lot


    Despite repeated efforts by President Trump to curtail refugee resettlements, the State Department this week quietly lifted the department’s restriction on the number of refugees allowed to enter the United States.
     
    How is it not clear to people by now who is really in charge in DC?
    , @Mr. Anon
    @Lot

    Thanks for the heads-up.

  96. @Triumph104
    @Achilles

    O/T:

    Personally, I don't consider Dollar General to be a dollar store. Price-wise, it is like a drug store, without the pharmacy. I don't understand why people shop there. Here in the Southwest, in addition to Dollar Generals, we have 99 Cent Only stores where the majority of the products are actually 99 cents, although there are a few higher priced items.

    As for the knowledge economy, Mark Zuckerberg just called for universal basic income.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Triumph, to quote a lady I heard interviewed on a local talk show, she shops there because….” you don’t have to get dressed up like you do to shop at Walmart.”

    • LOL: Triumph104
    • Replies: @Ivy
    @Buffalo Joe

    My guess is that dollar store shoppers are significantly thinner than Walmart shoppers, and no motorized scooter chairs are involved.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  97. @for-the-record
    @El Dato


    I can assure you that the french “public health system” is an inefficient, frightening, bureaucratic, overworked omnishambles.
     
    That is absolute rubbish. I lived in France for 15 years (1995-2010) and if there is a better system in the world (andI have lived in 8 countries as an adult) I am not aware of it.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic

    I agree. The French health system, of which the public health system is a subset, is good. It’s one of the reasons my family will probably relocate more-or-less permanently to France.

    There are financial problems with the systems and almost all French people who can afford it supplement the public system with private insurance (mutuelle). But it’s much, much less expensive than the United States.

    • Replies: @for-the-record
    @Diversity Heretic

    almost all French people who can afford it supplement the public system with private insurance (mutuelle)

    We could have afforded a mutuelle but chose not to, instead paying supplementary charges for "private" care when necessary that were entirely reasonable, and always being covered by the state system against large expenses. I never could understand why so many felt it was necessary to pay for mutuelles to cover them for routine expenses such as glasses.

    By the way, I live in Portugal now where the state system is far less attractive than in France. But private care (partly covered by the state system) is again reasonably priced, and I can see a top-flight orthopedist or cardiologist with little wait for €55 (which will effectively be reduced to approx. €40 after a small refund from Segurança Social and tax deduction). And the same amount pays for a complete annual check-up including all blood tests.

  98. Lot says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    @(((Owen)))

    Mass legal immigration and illegal immigration were obvious problems to anybody living near Los Angeles or New York by the 1970s. There were many other parts of the United States undergoing foreigner infestation at that time too. You would have had to have been blind or willfully ignorant not to see that mass immigration was pouring into the United States in the 1970s.

    Reagan and Bush killed the Republican Party in California by allowing mass immigration to continue. The ill effects of the 1965 Immigration Act were plain to see. Treasonous puppet scum politicians Reagan and Bush did the bidding of their masters. The 1986 amnesty for illegal alien invaders was an act of treason carried out by Reagan and Bush.

    Young people should understand that it was clear by the 1970s that mass immigration was destroying the United States. The globalizers wanted to destroy the United States using mass immigration, and it was clear to honest observers by the 1970s.

    Replies: @Lot

    Mass legal immigration and illegal immigration were obvious problems to anybody living near Los Angeles or New York by the 1970s.

    In rust belt, change the 1970’s to 2010’s. I went K-12 in the 80’s and 90’s without a single student in any of my schools who was not white, black, or a mix of white and black. There were a tiny number of Asian business owners, but I don’t think I met a hispanic until I got to college.

    Now there are random central americans (thinner, shorter, and darker than Mexicans) plus refugee resettlement agencies seeding Africans and Arabs all over the place.

    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    @Lot

    Until the Internet, we knew local conditions only. For me, Victoria, BC. I knew about Chinese and Sikhs only. But very few came to Vancouver Island. My experience with Chinese growing up in BC was positive, seemed to be good immigrants. I still think one could do far worse.

    The MSM never reported on immigration unless it was forced to.

    Post 9/11 I began to dig around. It was stunned to learn that Europe was full of Muslims. I'd never been there, and no MSM like say, Newsweek, thought it was something it should mention.

    Clearly I wouldn't have foggiest about the southern US either. I knew that there were amnesties (that was reported). But I didn't know how they were working out as immigrants. No bad reports from the MSM.

    9/11 changed everything for me. Then I did go digging. (It also coincided with my kids growing up and leaving home, so I had more time to dig, despite a full time job. Single parenting doesn't leave much spare time.)

  99. @Buffalo Joe
    @Triumph104

    Triumph, to quote a lady I heard interviewed on a local talk show, she shops there because...." you don't have to get dressed up like you do to shop at Walmart."

    Replies: @Ivy

    My guess is that dollar store shoppers are significantly thinner than Walmart shoppers, and no motorized scooter chairs are involved.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Ivy

    Ivy, how did the motorized cart riders shop before the stores provided the lift?

    Replies: @Ivy

  100. I’ve written a lot on this. In brief: the problem of the US is not too many lawyers, it’s bad laws and bad judges. Japan has had too few lawyers because lawyers like being able to charge high fees, but big business applied pressure and increased the number, because lawyers are indeed productive if they’re doing things like helping write contracts, do merger deals, handle patent licensing, issue new stocks and bonds, etc.

    “Lowering the Bar to Raise Up the Bar: Licensing Difficulty and Attorney Quality in Japan,” with J. Mark Ramseyer. Journal of Japanese Studies, 41(1): 113-142 (2015). Under certain circumstance, a relaxation in occupational licensing standards can increase the quality of those who enter the industry. The effect turns on the opportunity costs of preparing for the licensing examination: making the test easier can increase the quality of those passing if it lowers the opportunity costs enough to increase the number of those willing to go to the trouble of taking the test. We explore the theoretical circumstances under which this can occur and the actual effect of the relaxation of the difficulty of the bar exam in Japan from 1992 to 2011. http://rasmusen.org/papers/barpass-ram-ras.pdf.

    “Are Americans More Litigious? Some Quantitative Evidence” (with J. Mark Ramseyer). An American Illness , edited by Frank Buckley, http://buckleysmix.com/american-illness-4/ Yale University Press (2013). Many observers suggest that American citizens sue more readily than citizens elsewhere, and that American judges shape society more powerfully than judges elsewhere. We examine the problems involved in exploring these questions quantitatively. The data themselves indicate that American law’s notoriety does not result from how we handle routine disputes. Instead, it results from the peculiar and dysfunctional way American courts handle particular legal doctrines like class actions. pdf ( http://www.rasmusen.org/published/litigation-ramseyer-rasmusen.pdf).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Eric Rasmusen

    because lawyers are indeed productive if they’re doing things like helping write contracts, do merger deals, handle patent licensing, issue new stocks and bonds, etc.

    A lot of lawyers are basically computer programmers for contracts. For example, they try to anticipate possibilities and write if-then-else statements into contracts to deal with contingencies.

  101. tomv says:
    @Bitfu
    @Horzabky

    What's the French word for 'strawman'? If there isn't one, how about the French phrasing of 'convoluted syllogism'?

    Because nobody--paraphrase or not--is saying anything along the lines of:

    “France has too few lawyers, compared with the USA. The USA is a more advanced society than France, and it has more lawyers. Therefore France must have more lawyers, in order to become more advanced, like the USA is.”

    Replies: @tomv

    What’s English for “shooting from the hip”? Oh…

    Since you apparently don’t know French, I don’t see how you can contradict Horzabky’s assertion that “Here in France, I heard people say things …”

    It may or may not be true (I believe it is, although I have no idea how prevalently such things are said), but you have nothing to add to the discussion. No points for effort.

  102. @Achilles
    O/T: From a Bank of America research analysts' report (via ZeroHedge):

    Of the 1,041 stores expected set to open [in the USA] in 2017, 80%, or 810, belong to the one retail chain that focuses exclusively on America's poorest, i.e., Dollar General.... Of the nearly 7,800 net new stores opened [in the USA] since 2008 per BofA's sampled data, a whopping 76%, or 5,396, were Dollar General stores.
     
    So 80% of the new stores in our country are dollar stores. Wait, wasn't the result of globalism supposed to be that Americans would all became highly paid knowledge workers like investment bankers and software engineers?

    So if that's the case, who's doing the shopping at all these dollar stores?

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Chrisnonymous, @oddsbodkins, @Triumph104, @EdwardM, @Forbes

    To be fair, the 80% figure only represents the percentage of new stores to be opened by Dollar General among the 33 retail chains in B of A’s sample. These 33 chains might be representative of American retail in some vague way, but I find it hard to extrapolate the 80% to the population as a whole.

    Dollar General seems like an outlier — which is of course a legitimate story, but the Zero Hedge headline is fake news. If it said “Dollar Stores Account For 80% Of All New Store Openings In The US,” that would make a bit more sense but would still be taking the study findings too far.

  103. Thea says:
    @Anonymous
    It disgusts me to think that the litigious nature of our society might have been manufactured. How truly corrupt and malevolent.

    Replies: @Thea

    The incredible level of litigation combined with dictatorship by judges in American is really an important topic worthy of research.

    In the 1960s there was a push to get homosexuals and their enablers into law schools in mass numbers. The no fault divorce laws beginning in 1969 were largely unasked for and disliked by the public but pushed through state legislatures funded by attorneys who saw dollar signs.

    There is more and worse but yes is was manufactured.

  104. @Truth
    @spandrell


    Japan had a bar exam, which didn’t ask for any qualifications. You could take the exam as a primary school grad, studying on your own, and if you passed, you were a laywer.

     

    Yeah, the pass rate was also %2 so if this many law school grads are failing the exam, how many laymen do you think were going to pass?

    http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/think_the_bar_exam_is_tough_be_thankful_you_dont_live_in_japan/

    Replies: @spandrell

    If you weren’t a disgusting troll I might even answer to you.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @spandrell

    Yeah, or:

    B; If I wasn't correct.

  105. @Tiny Duck
    @Ed

    How does it feel? Knowing that you don't matter and will die seeing white girls bear Children of Color, that all your heroes will have their statues torn down, that all your kinds achievemnets will be stricken and replaced from the history books

    Replies: @Pericles, @White Guy In Japan, @Anon, @biz, @Joe Walker

    And the history books will be misspelled. That’s the worst part.

  106. @Chrisnonymous
    @toomuch

    I think spandrell has probably sized the situation up correctly. If you want to read more about Japan's bureaucratic self-enrichment schemes, "Dogs and Demons" by Alex Kerr has an explanation.

    One nuance that spandrell didn't mention, however, is that having an academic hurdle in a profession is a component of politicizing the profession. I met a legal researcher here whose life's work is studying SCOTUS to try to figure out how to turn the Japanese court system into a political weapon to force more liberalization on the country. He was not a loner either. Establishing academic control over the legal profession is going to create a lot more opportunities for scholarship trending in that direction.

    Replies: @spandrell

    The Japanese Lawyer’s federation has long been a communist stronghold, and law scholars across the country have always been reddest than Mao Zedong’s underwear. I don’t think the bar exam reforms are going to change that at all.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @spandrell

    That's not what I meant. The guy I referred to is currently overseas doing research. He has the freedom to do that because of his position. The establishment of more law schools and more academic positions will proliferate the number of people who can engage in this kind of scholarship/political agitation. Since, as you say, the lawyers are red, we can expect the academics and their work to be as well.

  107. @watson79
    A relative recently visited Germany and was enthusiastic about a program where schoolkids are forced to spend 2 nights in Dachau. He said a number of the kids don't make it past the first night. His enthusiasm for this abuse made me wish I had chosen my family more carefully. Germany is abolishing itself. the Japanese would never subject their children to such enormities.

    Replies: @El Dato, @flyingtiger

    That is true. Japanese children should stay in Nanking for a day. Or reenact the Bataan death march.

  108. @Peterike
    @(((Owen)))

    "Now by 1993 or maybe even 1992 it was just starting to be visible to people paying close attention. But for 1989 your claim is ridiculous."

    In New York it was completely obvious that Puerto Rican immigration was a lot of trouble in the 1960s. "West Side Story" and all that. I was just a kid and I knew it was a huge mistake.

    Replies: @prole

    Puerto Ricans are not immigrants, they are born US citizens…

    • Replies: @ANON
    @prole

    Technically, and somewhat trivially, you are of course correct. Everyone here knows that. But the fact is 1) an unfortunate relic of America's imperialist past as well as 2) quite relevant to the issues of ethnic hegemony (and not coincidentally strife) being played out on the national stage these past fifty years.

    Puerto Rico should be given its independence yesterday, and this was true 50 years ago as well.

    Replies: @Old fogey

  109. @Achilles
    O/T: From a Bank of America research analysts' report (via ZeroHedge):

    Of the 1,041 stores expected set to open [in the USA] in 2017, 80%, or 810, belong to the one retail chain that focuses exclusively on America's poorest, i.e., Dollar General.... Of the nearly 7,800 net new stores opened [in the USA] since 2008 per BofA's sampled data, a whopping 76%, or 5,396, were Dollar General stores.
     
    So 80% of the new stores in our country are dollar stores. Wait, wasn't the result of globalism supposed to be that Americans would all became highly paid knowledge workers like investment bankers and software engineers?

    So if that's the case, who's doing the shopping at all these dollar stores?

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Chrisnonymous, @oddsbodkins, @Triumph104, @EdwardM, @Forbes

    So if that’s the case, who’s doing the shopping at all these dollar stores?

    The 10s of millions whose jobs were out-sourced and off-shored. The 10s of millions who don’t live in the Acela corridor or Silicon Valley/SF/LA. The 10s of millions of working age adults not counted in the workforce–who have the time, and need, to shop for low prices. The 10s of millions who voted for Trump.

  110. @Chrisnonymous
    @Achilles

    Yes, but this has to be taken in light of the collapse in brick and mortar businesses that are moving online. Nobody goes to Amazon for dollar store items.

    Replies: @Achilles

    Yes, but this has to be taken in light of the collapse in brick and mortar businesses that are moving online. Nobody goes to Amazon for dollar store items.

    Yes, certainly the move to online shopping is a huge factor affecting this. Yet there seems to be more to it than that.

    While dollar stores thrive, malls are dying. The same BofA analysts’ report I quoted cites an expected decrease in the mall space in net new stores primarily due to the closing of department store anchors.

    But not all malls are dying. Luxury malls are doing fine, even flourishing. And why not? People have always enjoyed going shopping. When people go online to shop, there is likely something specific they have in mind to get. But often, or at least it used to be this way, people would spend time in a shopping mall even without having a shopping list because it was fun for them to shop.

    So as high-end malls and low-end dollar stores thrive, middle class malls die.

    Part of this undoubtedly is simply the shrinking of the American middle class due to open-borders trade and immigration.

    But part of this may be that middle class shoppers would spend time in middle class malls if the malls were an enjoyable experience.

    Consider movies as a similar phenomenon. While there are dvds and blu rays and Netflix and other ways to watch movies at home, people will go out to see movies in a theater if there is something enjoyable on offer.

    I wonder whether ‘diversity’ is part of the reason for declining traffic in middle-class malls, and why shoppers seem not to be enjoying the middle-class mall experience. Obviously this is not a topic that would be addressed in the mainstream media or the establishment academia, unless it can be approached through the angle of white racism.

    But one would think this is something that could be addressed statistically through an analysis of middle-class mall location, local economic trends and change in local ethnic mix.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Achilles

    I hate to blame everything on the Internet, but I think there is truth in it. What you say about the entertainment factor of malls is true, but that may also be part of what the Internet killed. Consider another entertainment industry that the Internet killed--magazine publishing. I think, in the past, both malls and magazines were ways for people to connect with a larger world. When I was a kid, I liked Legos and books, and I definitely had a sense that there were a lot of both "out there". How to find them? Go to the mall. Now I can just go online whenever I want to see something. In junior high school, the Ralph Lauren outlet in our mall was an education in what my betters wore. Etc. You see my point.

    In keeping with the broader theme of this post, I'll point out that another way in which Japan is strange is that people still seem to go to malls just to stroll, browse, spend time with family and friends.

    Replies: @üeljang

  111. @Tiny Duck
    @Ed

    How does it feel? Knowing that you don't matter and will die seeing white girls bear Children of Color, that all your heroes will have their statues torn down, that all your kinds achievemnets will be stricken and replaced from the history books

    Replies: @Pericles, @White Guy In Japan, @Anon, @biz, @Joe Walker

    How does it feel going to the park with your wife’s son Tyrone?

  112. @Buck Turgidson
    @res

    Japan is far too functional, happy, crime-free, traditional, harmonious, quiet, clean, and pleasant for the western liberal SJWs and media. The latter loves misery, crime, shootings, something anything to hate, destruction, filth (everywhere except their property and 'hood of course), and constant agitation and complaints vs. the established order. It also helps them sell papers and attract viewers they think.

    Maybe they have given up on the latter, though. Their sales and viewership are undeniably in the toilet and their numbers are, to be honest, as low as Wolf Blitzer's. Sad.

    Replies: @Kevin C.

    Japan is far too functional, happy, crime-free, traditional, harmonious, quiet, clean, and pleasant for the western liberal SJWs and media. The latter loves misery, crime, shootings, something anything to hate, destruction, filth (everywhere except their property and ‘hood of course), and constant agitation and complaints vs. the established order.

    At the heart of every “egalitarian” ideology and movement lies envy. Here, I mean in the older sense, as distinct from mere covetousness, “envy” as not merely wanting what someone else has, but resenting them for having it. This latter is as readily satified by the other losing the object of envy as by the envious gaining it. And since it is easier to destroy than to create, we see in history that the envious “levelers” of every stripe generally end up doing far more to tear down the higher and better than they do to elevate the lower.

  113. @bjdubbs
    Phil Knight's book Shoe Dog is basically a long story of how a) his Japanese lenders were always there for him, no matter how bad his cash flow situation was and b) how his US lenders literally called the FBI when he kited one check. The Japanese lenders came in and took over the Nike account and simply shook their head at the stupidity of the Wells Fargo bankers, losing a massive account over one bad check.

    Replies: @Triumph104

    When Nike was privately owned, it nearly collapsed several times for lack of cash. The accounting was in such a mess that factory workers’ payroll checks were bouncing. Phil Knight was bailed out with a loan from a nearby factory worker.

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/nikes-phil-knight-tells-you-how-to-make-25-billion-2016-05-11

  114. @Lot
    Trump State Department to rape-ugee resettlement agencies: full speed ahead!

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/26/us/politics/united-states-refugees-trump.html

    Despite repeated efforts by President Trump to curtail refugee resettlements, the State Department this week quietly lifted the department’s restriction on the number of refugees allowed to enter the United States.

    The result could be a near doubling of refugees entering the country, from about 830 people a week in the first three weeks of this month to well over 1,500 people per week by next month, according to refugee advocates. Tens of thousands of refugees are waiting to come to the United States.

    The State Department’s decision was conveyed in an email on Thursday to the private agencies in countries around the world that help refugees manage the nearly two-year application process needed to enter the United States.

    In her email, Jennifer L. Smith, a department official, wrote that the refugee groups could begin bringing people to the United States “unconstrained by the weekly quotas that were in place.”

    Refugee groups now predict that entries into the United States could increase so rapidly that the total number of refugees admitted by Sept. 30, the end of the fiscal year, could exceed 70,000. That is well below the 84,994 refugees admitted in fiscal year 2016, but not by nearly as much as many advocates had feared.
     
    Ann Corcoran:

    https://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/2017/05/27/stunning-news-trump-state-department-opens-the-flood-gates-refugee-admissions-will-explode-in-coming-weeks/

    Trump's first year in office will see more refugee resettlement than 5 out of 8 years when Obama was president and and 6 out of 8 years GWB was president.

    Replies: @Kevin C., @Mr. Anon

    Despite repeated efforts by President Trump to curtail refugee resettlements, the State Department this week quietly lifted the department’s restriction on the number of refugees allowed to enter the United States.

    How is it not clear to people by now who is really in charge in DC?

  115. @Diversity Heretic
    @for-the-record

    I agree. The French health system, of which the public health system is a subset, is good. It's one of the reasons my family will probably relocate more-or-less permanently to France.

    There are financial problems with the systems and almost all French people who can afford it supplement the public system with private insurance (mutuelle). But it's much, much less expensive than the United States.

    Replies: @for-the-record

    almost all French people who can afford it supplement the public system with private insurance (mutuelle)

    We could have afforded a mutuelle but chose not to, instead paying supplementary charges for “private” care when necessary that were entirely reasonable, and always being covered by the state system against large expenses. I never could understand why so many felt it was necessary to pay for mutuelles to cover them for routine expenses such as glasses.

    By the way, I live in Portugal now where the state system is far less attractive than in France. But private care (partly covered by the state system) is again reasonably priced, and I can see a top-flight orthopedist or cardiologist with little wait for €55 (which will effectively be reduced to approx. €40 after a small refund from Segurança Social and tax deduction). And the same amount pays for a complete annual check-up including all blood tests.

  116. @Anonymous
    @Frau Katze

    Although vocal and pampered by the mainly leftist national press, anarchists in Greece have always been an insignificant force. Once their hairline starts receding by 30, they go back to mom, which sets the pace for the rest of their days.

    The core of the current Greek government is made up of hardcore far leftists whose thirst for power was so great that they formed a quasi-alliance with some pseudo-right wing populists to form a government. Together, they bend the knee to the Germans, and they dare not follow any of their far leftist policies they originally campaigned for.

    Golden Dawn is very much alive, with 7% in the latest polls. You just don't hear about them because govt and press have decided to ignore them, thinking they will fizzle out. But even though the core members are ardent neo-Nazis, they have steady support because they're the only ones that are actively anti-immigrant.

    One reason you don't see big anti-immigrant political movements, at least in Greece, is that there hasn't been any big increase in the immigrant population, because the country is broke. Of all the recent immigrants/refugees/whatever that have come to Greece since 2015, only 50,000-100,000 remain, and the government's unofficial policy is to cram them in small camps, so that they dissuade their kin back home/in Turkey from crossing the border.

    Replies: @Frau Katze

    Well, that’s encouraging. Thanks for the info.

  117. @Tiny Duck
    @Ed

    How does it feel? Knowing that you don't matter and will die seeing white girls bear Children of Color, that all your heroes will have their statues torn down, that all your kinds achievemnets will be stricken and replaced from the history books

    Replies: @Pericles, @White Guy In Japan, @Anon, @biz, @Joe Walker

    Duck if you are right the Future Quote will be “What is a Book?”

  118. @El Dato
    @watson79

    Is this really a thing?

    There seem to be only half-day seminars max:

    https://www.kz-gedenkstaette-dachau.de/halfday_seminars.html

    Meanwhile, if you really want to stay in Dachau a couple of days:

    https://www.preiswert-uebernachten.de/hotel-pensionen/dachau/5227

    Replies: @Flip

    Well, according to Holocaust historians, there were no death camps on German soil. Dachau was only for holding prisoners and forced labor.

  119. @Frau Katze
    @(((Owen)))

    I just saw an article about how anarchists in Greece are pitching in to help immigrants. NYT, I think it was.

    I recall that the West was pleased after WW II that Greece didn't fall under the USSR.

    Better that it had!

    They still have wannabe Commies, since they never experienced the real thing.

    This explains why those southern tier countries don't have any much in the way of anti-immigrant parties, perhaps. The far left is too strong.

    Greece had Golden Dawn, but they were so overtly neo-Nazi that I think the Greek government shut them down. I never hear about them anymore.

    Northern Italy has anti-immigrant party. The Five Star Party isn't anti-immigrant (the leader is married to an Iranian). They seem far more popular than the Northern League.

    Spain and Portugal: if they have such parties, I haven't heard of them.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Vasilis

    Most immigrants to Europe do not want to stay in Greece because the level of benefits extended to them for the protracted process of “job seeking” is nearly nil. Greece never had a welfare state in the German sense of the term, so Greece never was a preferred destination for third world immigrants. There are two groups of immigrants who have thrived in Greece:
    1. Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi farm workers, who do backbreaking farm labor for low wages and who have been mostly unaffected by the crisis. These people mostly do not assimilate.
    2. Workers from the Balkans in farm and industry jobs, who are more demanding and who have mostly gone back home. However some of these people do assimilate.
    So you see Greece has an important lesson to offer the rest of Europe, if you don’t want a flood of immigrants from the third world, stop subsidizing them to stay and they will leave.

    On a humanitarian level incoming immigrants are assisted not only by anarchist groups, but also by the Church, the Boy Scouts and even by charities run by the wives of billionaire shipowners. All of these however do not offer lifetime welfare benefits, only emergency assistance.

    Golden Dawn is still around and under trial, but they are nazis and that places a limit on their appeal at 7%. They are trying to run an anti-immigrant platform, but that only works if you have immigrants…

    Greece experienced anti-communist dictatorships during the cold war, so the Communists were made to look sincere freedom fighters! Of course after the collapse of the Soviet Union everyone knows that Communism does not work, which is why a hard core leftist party can ally itself with breakaway Christian Democrats to form a government and base its policy on active NATO participation and on seeking foreign private investment. Actually Greek – American relations have never been better since 1945 and this was true under Obama as it is under Trump.

    My dear Frau Katze, reality is always more complicated than any theory you may have.

    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    @Vasilis

    Yes reality is more complicated. Good to hear from who know the place. Otherwise one is reduced to try to figure it out from biased MSM reports.

    Thanks for the info.

    Yep, the immigrants are looking prosperity. That's why they head north.

    Eventually even there will collapse under the sheer volume. Even Sweden started running out of money and had to accept fewer.

  120. @(((Owen)))
    @whorefinder


    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.
     

    Russia is still mostly Russian.

    Britain is no longer Britain.

    Germany is no longer Germany.

    China is still China.

    France is about to be no longer France.

    Italy is still pretty much Italy, but looks unlikely to remain so.

    Poland is very Polish, for as long as it lasts.

    So it's a mixed bag. Some apparent winners are still together, as are some losers. And many apparent losers turned out to win the peace decisively. But not all. And there was no reasonable way to predict how it all would turn out.

    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn't yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization. Laughably now, we still thought communism was the great challenge to civilization back then. Turned out that communism was actually a prophylactic; the nations that suffered under it were the most resistant to slow motion genocide by mass immigration. Those of us that avoided it will soon envy those that were strengthened by the experience: At least they will have nations to leave their children.

    Replies: @syonredux, @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin, @Frau Katze, @fitzGetty, @Mr. Anon, @Massimo Heitor, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    Italy is still pretty much Italy, but looks unlikely to remain so.

    I was just in Italy. I could see lots of Chinese and thousands of very African looking Africans which was new and not at all normal Italy. There were lots of Chinese tourists but also lots of Chinese residents that spoke fluent perfect Italian.

    Italy still felt very Italian, at least the parts that I went to. The tourist hot spots all speak English, but most locals speak only Italian. A few white Italians expressed horror over Trump and the hostility towards Mexicans but where quite agreeable when I explained. Most Trump supporters bear no animosity towards Mexicans or anyone else, but everyone on the globe still doesn’t have some innate right to live in the US. Some Italians also said that the media is very heavy handed biased. They also said the mafia is still very active although very behind the scenes.

    Anecdotally, just walking around cities, there were lots of younger children that were overwhelmingly white ethnic Italians speaking Italian. I trust the official birth rate stats more, but from casual observation there were Italian kids everywhere.

    The Five Star Party isn’t anti-immigrant (the leader is married to an Iranian).

    Trump, Bannon, Steve Sailer, and NumbersUSA are not “anti-immigrant”, they want selective immigration policy that is designed to benefit the host nation, like what Canada has.

    Beppe Grillo is totally in that camp and wants to cut immigration from Africa and even deport many already there.

    Most Iranians are ethnically Persian, which is mostly European white. That’s actually closer to immigrating an ethnic French or German or Swedish person and it’s not controversial.

    The mass influx of poor Africans is obviously unpopular with the ethnic Italians. Some said that Renzi planned to help Africans pass through to the rest of Europe, but bordering nations like France and Austria closed their borders with Italy, sealing the African migrants in Italy. France may have voted against LePen and be publicly against “populism”, but they definitely blocked African migrants from entering France.

    Italy has major economic problems, the young ethnic Italians can’t find decent jobs. Even high skilled Italians with college education are working in food service or driving cabs. Or they wise up and get out of Italy. Large low skill immigration makes that much worse. Large numbers of Africans were aggressively pushing street trinkets absolutely everywhere I went. I went to a quiet beach town, Africans were pushing junk. I ate at a fancy restaurant in Florence, some African actually came into the restaurant and tried to sell me stuff at my table.

    Italy is absolutely trying to stop the tide of incoming Africans. Conceptually, it’s easy, just stop using the Navy to bring Africans to Italy. You can still rescue Africans from drowning and drop them back off in their country of departure. They aren’t owed residency in Italy.

    Even in Africa, there is mass intra-Africa migration where people are leaving more rural lifestyles and moving to cities. Unfortunately many Africans are living in slum conditions in the cities of Africa, but they seem to choose that over their previous agrarian lifestyles.

    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    @Massimo Heitor

    Thanks for clarifying about Grillo's wife. Being Iranian per se is not a problem for me, but no one says whether secular or a Khomeinist.

    It's the Islam aspect that disturbed me. Islamic nutjobs are poison even if they're native Europeans.

    But she can't be a believer or she wouldn't have married him without him converting to Islam, which presumably he hasn't.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Massimo Heitor


    Italy is absolutely trying to stop the tide of incoming Africans. Conceptually, it’s easy, just stop using the Navy to bring Africans to Italy. You can still rescue Africans from drowning and drop them back off in their country of departure. They aren’t owed residency in Italy.
     
    No argument on the Africans uglifying Italy.

    But the problem is Italy--meaning the Italian state that is the organ that could be doing it--is absolutely *not* trying to stop the incoming tide of Africans. This is not just conceptually but actually as easy as you note. In fact just not rescuing them would solve most of the problem--95% don't have the means to get there. But towing back to Libya, arresting smugglers, sinking boats quickly *ends* the problem, and they don't do it. The Italians thought the blacks would just go north to greener pastures, but that's been made more difficult and blacks will take up residence anywhere there's an opportunity for grifting, hustling and crime. Pretty much anywhere is better than Africa. So Italians have been quickly destroying their nation.

    White people just have to wake up and discover some self-respect and will to live. "White lives matter!" "White nations matter!"
  121. @Achilles
    @Chrisnonymous


    Yes, but this has to be taken in light of the collapse in brick and mortar businesses that are moving online. Nobody goes to Amazon for dollar store items.
     
    Yes, certainly the move to online shopping is a huge factor affecting this. Yet there seems to be more to it than that.

    While dollar stores thrive, malls are dying. The same BofA analysts' report I quoted cites an expected decrease in the mall space in net new stores primarily due to the closing of department store anchors.

    But not all malls are dying. Luxury malls are doing fine, even flourishing. And why not? People have always enjoyed going shopping. When people go online to shop, there is likely something specific they have in mind to get. But often, or at least it used to be this way, people would spend time in a shopping mall even without having a shopping list because it was fun for them to shop.

    So as high-end malls and low-end dollar stores thrive, middle class malls die.

    Part of this undoubtedly is simply the shrinking of the American middle class due to open-borders trade and immigration.

    But part of this may be that middle class shoppers would spend time in middle class malls if the malls were an enjoyable experience.

    Consider movies as a similar phenomenon. While there are dvds and blu rays and Netflix and other ways to watch movies at home, people will go out to see movies in a theater if there is something enjoyable on offer.

    I wonder whether 'diversity' is part of the reason for declining traffic in middle-class malls, and why shoppers seem not to be enjoying the middle-class mall experience. Obviously this is not a topic that would be addressed in the mainstream media or the establishment academia, unless it can be approached through the angle of white racism.

    But one would think this is something that could be addressed statistically through an analysis of middle-class mall location, local economic trends and change in local ethnic mix.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    I hate to blame everything on the Internet, but I think there is truth in it. What you say about the entertainment factor of malls is true, but that may also be part of what the Internet killed. Consider another entertainment industry that the Internet killed–magazine publishing. I think, in the past, both malls and magazines were ways for people to connect with a larger world. When I was a kid, I liked Legos and books, and I definitely had a sense that there were a lot of both “out there”. How to find them? Go to the mall. Now I can just go online whenever I want to see something. In junior high school, the Ralph Lauren outlet in our mall was an education in what my betters wore. Etc. You see my point.

    In keeping with the broader theme of this post, I’ll point out that another way in which Japan is strange is that people still seem to go to malls just to stroll, browse, spend time with family and friends.

    • Replies: @üeljang
    @Chrisnonymous

    Shopping centers and malls in Japan are not directly comparable with those in the USA because their history in Japan is significantly shallower. Such a thing as a shoppingu sentaa or mooru was practically unknown in Japan even as recently as twenty years ago, and many Japanese of that era would confidently declare that "American suburban-style large-scale commercial establishments" would never succeed in Japan because of Japanese people's "peculiar mentality." (It is remarkable that a large number of Japanese people would declare anything, as they usually enjoy remaining silent or prevaricating to an exasperating degree.)

    Two decades later, and it seems that there is an Aeon Mall in almost every town and city with a population greater than 40,000 persons. I think the popularity of shopping malls as places to visit on a casual outing with friends or family will decline as their novelty wears off.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  122. @spandrell
    @Chrisnonymous

    The Japanese Lawyer's federation has long been a communist stronghold, and law scholars across the country have always been reddest than Mao Zedong's underwear. I don't think the bar exam reforms are going to change that at all.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    That’s not what I meant. The guy I referred to is currently overseas doing research. He has the freedom to do that because of his position. The establishment of more law schools and more academic positions will proliferate the number of people who can engage in this kind of scholarship/political agitation. Since, as you say, the lawyers are red, we can expect the academics and their work to be as well.

  123. biz says:
    @Tiny Duck
    @Ed

    How does it feel? Knowing that you don't matter and will die seeing white girls bear Children of Color, that all your heroes will have their statues torn down, that all your kinds achievemnets will be stricken and replaced from the history books

    Replies: @Pericles, @White Guy In Japan, @Anon, @biz, @Joe Walker

    Uh oh, TD, you’ve fallen behind the times. Nowadays according to the truly wokest people of color and their wokest white allies, these white women bearing children of color it is no longer a good thing but an act of genocide against black America:
    Interracial Marriage is Destroying Black America

    Please do try to keep up. Off to re-education camp for you!

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    @biz

    "the spirit of homosexuality is still spreading among blacks — nothing is destroying the black family quicker today than interracial marriage..."

    Oh, haha.

  124. I’m surprised that the same people who wanted to make the Japanese legal system more like the US’s didn’t also send a team of auto makers to East Germany to study the wonders of the Trabant automobile.

  125. @Vasilis
    @Frau Katze

    Most immigrants to Europe do not want to stay in Greece because the level of benefits extended to them for the protracted process of "job seeking" is nearly nil. Greece never had a welfare state in the German sense of the term, so Greece never was a preferred destination for third world immigrants. There are two groups of immigrants who have thrived in Greece:
    1. Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi farm workers, who do backbreaking farm labor for low wages and who have been mostly unaffected by the crisis. These people mostly do not assimilate.
    2. Workers from the Balkans in farm and industry jobs, who are more demanding and who have mostly gone back home. However some of these people do assimilate.
    So you see Greece has an important lesson to offer the rest of Europe, if you don't want a flood of immigrants from the third world, stop subsidizing them to stay and they will leave.

    On a humanitarian level incoming immigrants are assisted not only by anarchist groups, but also by the Church, the Boy Scouts and even by charities run by the wives of billionaire shipowners. All of these however do not offer lifetime welfare benefits, only emergency assistance.

    Golden Dawn is still around and under trial, but they are nazis and that places a limit on their appeal at 7%. They are trying to run an anti-immigrant platform, but that only works if you have immigrants...

    Greece experienced anti-communist dictatorships during the cold war, so the Communists were made to look sincere freedom fighters! Of course after the collapse of the Soviet Union everyone knows that Communism does not work, which is why a hard core leftist party can ally itself with breakaway Christian Democrats to form a government and base its policy on active NATO participation and on seeking foreign private investment. Actually Greek - American relations have never been better since 1945 and this was true under Obama as it is under Trump.

    My dear Frau Katze, reality is always more complicated than any theory you may have.

    Replies: @Frau Katze

    Yes reality is more complicated. Good to hear from who know the place. Otherwise one is reduced to try to figure it out from biased MSM reports.

    Thanks for the info.

    Yep, the immigrants are looking prosperity. That’s why they head north.

    Eventually even there will collapse under the sheer volume. Even Sweden started running out of money and had to accept fewer.

  126. @Massimo Heitor
    @(((Owen)))


    Italy is still pretty much Italy, but looks unlikely to remain so.

     

    I was just in Italy. I could see lots of Chinese and thousands of very African looking Africans which was new and not at all normal Italy. There were lots of Chinese tourists but also lots of Chinese residents that spoke fluent perfect Italian.

    Italy still felt very Italian, at least the parts that I went to. The tourist hot spots all speak English, but most locals speak only Italian. A few white Italians expressed horror over Trump and the hostility towards Mexicans but where quite agreeable when I explained. Most Trump supporters bear no animosity towards Mexicans or anyone else, but everyone on the globe still doesn't have some innate right to live in the US. Some Italians also said that the media is very heavy handed biased. They also said the mafia is still very active although very behind the scenes.

    Anecdotally, just walking around cities, there were lots of younger children that were overwhelmingly white ethnic Italians speaking Italian. I trust the official birth rate stats more, but from casual observation there were Italian kids everywhere.


    The Five Star Party isn’t anti-immigrant (the leader is married to an Iranian).
     
    Trump, Bannon, Steve Sailer, and NumbersUSA are not "anti-immigrant", they want selective immigration policy that is designed to benefit the host nation, like what Canada has.

    Beppe Grillo is totally in that camp and wants to cut immigration from Africa and even deport many already there.

    Most Iranians are ethnically Persian, which is mostly European white. That's actually closer to immigrating an ethnic French or German or Swedish person and it's not controversial.

    The mass influx of poor Africans is obviously unpopular with the ethnic Italians. Some said that Renzi planned to help Africans pass through to the rest of Europe, but bordering nations like France and Austria closed their borders with Italy, sealing the African migrants in Italy. France may have voted against LePen and be publicly against "populism", but they definitely blocked African migrants from entering France.

    Italy has major economic problems, the young ethnic Italians can't find decent jobs. Even high skilled Italians with college education are working in food service or driving cabs. Or they wise up and get out of Italy. Large low skill immigration makes that much worse. Large numbers of Africans were aggressively pushing street trinkets absolutely everywhere I went. I went to a quiet beach town, Africans were pushing junk. I ate at a fancy restaurant in Florence, some African actually came into the restaurant and tried to sell me stuff at my table.

    Italy is absolutely trying to stop the tide of incoming Africans. Conceptually, it's easy, just stop using the Navy to bring Africans to Italy. You can still rescue Africans from drowning and drop them back off in their country of departure. They aren't owed residency in Italy.

    Even in Africa, there is mass intra-Africa migration where people are leaving more rural lifestyles and moving to cities. Unfortunately many Africans are living in slum conditions in the cities of Africa, but they seem to choose that over their previous agrarian lifestyles.

    Replies: @Frau Katze, @AnotherDad

    Thanks for clarifying about Grillo’s wife. Being Iranian per se is not a problem for me, but no one says whether secular or a Khomeinist.

    It’s the Islam aspect that disturbed me. Islamic nutjobs are poison even if they’re native Europeans.

    But she can’t be a believer or she wouldn’t have married him without him converting to Islam, which presumably he hasn’t.

  127. @jim jones
    Japan is the safest country in the World:

    http://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion/2014/01/25/editorials/crime-rate-dips-again-in-japan/

    Replies: @ANON

    This explains fairly neatly why the MSM in this country has for years been in a full-court press to depict Japan as a moribund, regressing society. The quality of life is so high there and immigration virtually non-existent.

  128. @Lot
    @Charles Pewitt


    Mass legal immigration and illegal immigration were obvious problems to anybody living near Los Angeles or New York by the 1970s.
     
    In rust belt, change the 1970's to 2010's. I went K-12 in the 80's and 90's without a single student in any of my schools who was not white, black, or a mix of white and black. There were a tiny number of Asian business owners, but I don't think I met a hispanic until I got to college.

    Now there are random central americans (thinner, shorter, and darker than Mexicans) plus refugee resettlement agencies seeding Africans and Arabs all over the place.

    Replies: @Frau Katze

    Until the Internet, we knew local conditions only. For me, Victoria, BC. I knew about Chinese and Sikhs only. But very few came to Vancouver Island. My experience with Chinese growing up in BC was positive, seemed to be good immigrants. I still think one could do far worse.

    The MSM never reported on immigration unless it was forced to.

    Post 9/11 I began to dig around. It was stunned to learn that Europe was full of Muslims. I’d never been there, and no MSM like say, Newsweek, thought it was something it should mention.

    Clearly I wouldn’t have foggiest about the southern US either. I knew that there were amnesties (that was reported). But I didn’t know how they were working out as immigrants. No bad reports from the MSM.

    9/11 changed everything for me. Then I did go digging. (It also coincided with my kids growing up and leaving home, so I had more time to dig, despite a full time job. Single parenting doesn’t leave much spare time.)

  129. @Tiny Duck
    Japan has no white men. Since white commit most crime that means lawyers do not have much work to do in he absence of white men

    Replies: @El Dato, @prole, @Ed, @Faraday's Bobcat, @Daniel Chieh

    I actually think there’s more white men in Japan than other NAMs.

  130. @biz
    @Tiny Duck

    Uh oh, TD, you've fallen behind the times. Nowadays according to the truly wokest people of color and their wokest white allies, these white women bearing children of color it is no longer a good thing but an act of genocide against black America:
    Interracial Marriage is Destroying Black America

    Please do try to keep up. Off to re-education camp for you!

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh

    “the spirit of homosexuality is still spreading among blacks — nothing is destroying the black family quicker today than interracial marriage…”

    Oh, haha.

  131. ANON • Disclaimer says:
    @prole
    @Peterike

    Puerto Ricans are not immigrants, they are born US citizens...

    Replies: @ANON

    Technically, and somewhat trivially, you are of course correct. Everyone here knows that. But the fact is 1) an unfortunate relic of America’s imperialist past as well as 2) quite relevant to the issues of ethnic hegemony (and not coincidentally strife) being played out on the national stage these past fifty years.

    Puerto Rico should be given its independence yesterday, and this was true 50 years ago as well.

    • Replies: @Old fogey
    @ANON

    You are totally correct and yet we hear that the Puerto Ricans will get to vote on whether or not they want to become a state while we are given no opportunity to vote on whether we want Puerto Rico as a state. How did that ever happen? Did we ever have sensible and loyal representation in this country?

  132. @Anonymous
    The Japanese can be some strange people sometimes. They have managed to get things completely backwards in this case!

    To think, lawyers causing dynamism. Hah!

    Replies: @EdwardM

    I don’t know, in theory a properly functioning tort system — based on common law, common sense, and a belief in the values of individualism and individual liberty — is necessary for capitalism and serves useful in making the market more efficient. Similarly, transparency in business transactions and dispute resolution mechanisms, even if the terms are complex, should level the playing field in the market.

    Somehow the U.S. legal system has run amok, due primarily to too much government (too many laws, too many levels of courts, too many student loans, etc.), institutionalized corruption of the bar, and stupid civil juries that have bought into the demonization of the evil private sector in the media and feminization of the culture (i.e., making decisions based on emotion).

    Is there a middle ground between the U.S. excess and the undeveloped system in Japan? What’s the civil law system like in the U.K.?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @EdwardM


    Somehow the U.S. legal system has run amok, due primarily to too much government (too many laws, too many levels of courts, too many student loans, etc.), institutionalized corruption of the bar, and stupid civil juries that have bought into the demonization of the evil private sector in the media and feminization of the culture (i.e., making decisions based on emotion).
     
    Ed, with respect to your correctness is pointing out problems we have in this paragraph, I'll tell you the problem we have with the lawyers: In the US the LAWYERS MAKE THE LAWS! That's the problem. Check you what size majority of your state legislators are lawyers, and, yes, it'll be a majority.

    At the Feral Gov't level, most of the congressmen have started out as lawyers. I don't argue that they are stupid, as you do have to be able to think straight, but it makes them most likely bad individuals. (I don't know if this is cause and effect, nature or nurture. Do lawyers get turned into assholes in 3 years of law school, or do just the assholes tend to go into law to get even with society or beat the crap out of it. I have only known 2 lawyers on a personal basis for a decent period of time - both had some real problems that would preclude our being real friends.)

    The reason US laws are so complicated is that, whether consciously or not, the lawyers in congress have no problem passing 100-1000 page bills. That will bring business to their friends and upcoming congressmen, staffers and bureaucrats that they may know from law school. Then, if they make it to the Senate, they don't have time for this, so they delegate the writing of bills, and we all find out how bad we are screwed after it's been passed. Nancy Pelosi explained to us how that works.

    No, Shakespeare was right, but he apparently was just too nice a guy to just lay it out there. "First, kill all the lawyers" was probably the self-censored version of "First, lets genocide all the legal personnel, burn down the law schools, and put all laws on CD in plain (or Olde) English with search features".
  133. @spandrell
    @Truth

    If you weren't a disgusting troll I might even answer to you.

    Replies: @Truth

    Yeah, or:

    B; If I wasn’t correct.

  134. @Eric Rasmusen
    I've written a lot on this. In brief: the problem of the US is not too many lawyers, it's bad laws and bad judges. Japan has had too few lawyers because lawyers like being able to charge high fees, but big business applied pressure and increased the number, because lawyers are indeed productive if they're doing things like helping write contracts, do merger deals, handle patent licensing, issue new stocks and bonds, etc.

    "Lowering the Bar to Raise Up the Bar: Licensing Difficulty and Attorney Quality in Japan," with J. Mark Ramseyer. Journal of Japanese Studies, 41(1): 113-142 (2015). Under certain circumstance, a relaxation in occupational licensing standards can increase the quality of those who enter the industry. The effect turns on the opportunity costs of preparing for the licensing examination: making the test easier can increase the quality of those passing if it lowers the opportunity costs enough to increase the number of those willing to go to the trouble of taking the test. We explore the theoretical circumstances under which this can occur and the actual effect of the relaxation of the difficulty of the bar exam in Japan from 1992 to 2011. http://rasmusen.org/papers/barpass-ram-ras.pdf.

    "Are Americans More Litigious? Some Quantitative Evidence" (with J. Mark Ramseyer). An American Illness , edited by Frank Buckley, http://buckleysmix.com/american-illness-4/ Yale University Press (2013). Many observers suggest that American citizens sue more readily than citizens elsewhere, and that American judges shape society more powerfully than judges elsewhere. We examine the problems involved in exploring these questions quantitatively. The data themselves indicate that American law’s notoriety does not result from how we handle routine disputes. Instead, it results from the peculiar and dysfunctional way American courts handle particular legal doctrines like class actions. pdf ( http://www.rasmusen.org/published/litigation-ramseyer-rasmusen.pdf).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    because lawyers are indeed productive if they’re doing things like helping write contracts, do merger deals, handle patent licensing, issue new stocks and bonds, etc.

    A lot of lawyers are basically computer programmers for contracts. For example, they try to anticipate possibilities and write if-then-else statements into contracts to deal with contingencies.

    • Agree: Autochthon
  135. This article has got to be from The Onion.

  136. @Tiny Duck
    @Ed

    How does it feel? Knowing that you don't matter and will die seeing white girls bear Children of Color, that all your heroes will have their statues torn down, that all your kinds achievemnets will be stricken and replaced from the history books

    Replies: @Pericles, @White Guy In Japan, @Anon, @biz, @Joe Walker

    Someone has been watching too many Planet of the Apes movies.

  137. @IHTG
    @Ed

    Which puts the lie to the extensive alt-right mythology surrounding the 1965 Immigration Act.

    Replies: @Lurker, @Mr. Anon

    What?!

    To unleash mass-immigration you need to dismantle the legal controls.

  138. @Ivy
    @Buffalo Joe

    My guess is that dollar store shoppers are significantly thinner than Walmart shoppers, and no motorized scooter chairs are involved.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Ivy, how did the motorized cart riders shop before the stores provided the lift?

    • Replies: @Ivy
    @Buffalo Joe

    At dollar stores, probably through someone else's assistance. Grocery stores sometimes have their own motorized carts, and some shoppers motor in on their own devices.

    Replies: @anonguy

  139. @Lot
    Trump State Department to rape-ugee resettlement agencies: full speed ahead!

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/26/us/politics/united-states-refugees-trump.html

    Despite repeated efforts by President Trump to curtail refugee resettlements, the State Department this week quietly lifted the department’s restriction on the number of refugees allowed to enter the United States.

    The result could be a near doubling of refugees entering the country, from about 830 people a week in the first three weeks of this month to well over 1,500 people per week by next month, according to refugee advocates. Tens of thousands of refugees are waiting to come to the United States.

    The State Department’s decision was conveyed in an email on Thursday to the private agencies in countries around the world that help refugees manage the nearly two-year application process needed to enter the United States.

    In her email, Jennifer L. Smith, a department official, wrote that the refugee groups could begin bringing people to the United States “unconstrained by the weekly quotas that were in place.”

    Refugee groups now predict that entries into the United States could increase so rapidly that the total number of refugees admitted by Sept. 30, the end of the fiscal year, could exceed 70,000. That is well below the 84,994 refugees admitted in fiscal year 2016, but not by nearly as much as many advocates had feared.
     
    Ann Corcoran:

    https://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/2017/05/27/stunning-news-trump-state-department-opens-the-flood-gates-refugee-admissions-will-explode-in-coming-weeks/

    Trump's first year in office will see more refugee resettlement than 5 out of 8 years when Obama was president and and 6 out of 8 years GWB was president.

    Replies: @Kevin C., @Mr. Anon

    Thanks for the heads-up.

  140. @IHTG
    @Ed

    Which puts the lie to the extensive alt-right mythology surrounding the 1965 Immigration Act.

    Replies: @Lurker, @Mr. Anon

    Which puts the lie to the extensive alt-right mythology surrounding the 1965 Immigration Act.

    No, it doesn’t, nor is it a mythology. The 1990 bill was also bad, but it was Hart-Celler that was the beginning of the replacement of the existing american population. It resulted in immigrant numbers that were too high, and it put in place the mechanism of chain-migration.

    To say it was unimportant to current immigration levels is kind of like saying that the dollars you put into a 401k thirty years ago are less important than the dollars you put in last week.

  141. @Buffalo Joe
    @Ivy

    Ivy, how did the motorized cart riders shop before the stores provided the lift?

    Replies: @Ivy

    At dollar stores, probably through someone else’s assistance. Grocery stores sometimes have their own motorized carts, and some shoppers motor in on their own devices.

    • Replies: @anonguy
    @Ivy


    At dollar stores, probably through someone else’s assistance. Grocery stores sometimes have their own motorized carts, and some shoppers motor in on their own devices.
     
    Nothing says decline of the west to me as much as landing at a US airport and seeing morbidly obese people being chauffeured through the concourses.

    And the pedestrians are pretty much expected to get out of the way.

    Replies: @Old fogey

  142. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “A lot of lawyers are basically computer programmers for contracts.”

    One of the problems for extreme utopian believers in the blind power of law is that a system of law is a rule-based system similar to symbolic-AI based “expert systems”. Experience has been that you can’t build large working intelligent systems this way. Too much “expertise” exists that can’t be captured symbolically (write the rules to give to someone so they “know” how to ride a bike). Too many rules will conflict or need much modification on a case-by-case basis; to understand the rules completely the system will need to understand the entire world, and so on.

  143. I sell commercial insurance, it would be interesting to see the differences in Commercial insurance rates (without the tribal diversity toll), I bet they pay way less.

  144. @(((Owen)))
    @syonredux

    In 1989 there was no modern internet news. We had fresh harsh rules to prosecute employers of illegals. We'd just given an amnesty that Reagan and Bush had promised would end the trouble. Quotas for chain migration were less than half what they are now.

    There was no way to know, short of extensive Freedom Of Information Act and library research that Bush and Reagan had cucked the whole nation back then. Now by 1993 or maybe even 1992 it was just starting to be visible to people paying close attention. But for 1989 your claim is ridiculous.

    Replies: @bomag, @Peterike, @meh, @Charles Pewitt, @syonredux, @Achmed E. Newman

    We had fresh harsh rules to prosecute employers of illegals. We’d just given an amnesty that Reagan and Bush had promised would end the trouble.

    Which were never enforced….

    Quotas for chain migration were less than half what they are now.

    Still too high….

    There was no way to know, short of extensive Freedom Of Information Act and library research that Bush and Reagan had cucked the whole nation back then.

    Yes, there was. I can remember my grandfather fulminating about it in the late ’80s….

  145. @Chrisnonymous
    @Achilles

    I hate to blame everything on the Internet, but I think there is truth in it. What you say about the entertainment factor of malls is true, but that may also be part of what the Internet killed. Consider another entertainment industry that the Internet killed--magazine publishing. I think, in the past, both malls and magazines were ways for people to connect with a larger world. When I was a kid, I liked Legos and books, and I definitely had a sense that there were a lot of both "out there". How to find them? Go to the mall. Now I can just go online whenever I want to see something. In junior high school, the Ralph Lauren outlet in our mall was an education in what my betters wore. Etc. You see my point.

    In keeping with the broader theme of this post, I'll point out that another way in which Japan is strange is that people still seem to go to malls just to stroll, browse, spend time with family and friends.

    Replies: @üeljang

    Shopping centers and malls in Japan are not directly comparable with those in the USA because their history in Japan is significantly shallower. Such a thing as a shoppingu sentaa or mooru was practically unknown in Japan even as recently as twenty years ago, and many Japanese of that era would confidently declare that “American suburban-style large-scale commercial establishments” would never succeed in Japan because of Japanese people’s “peculiar mentality.” (It is remarkable that a large number of Japanese people would declare anything, as they usually enjoy remaining silent or prevaricating to an exasperating degree.)

    Two decades later, and it seems that there is an Aeon Mall in almost every town and city with a population greater than 40,000 persons. I think the popularity of shopping malls as places to visit on a casual outing with friends or family will decline as their novelty wears off.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @üeljang

    I'll take your word on the history and future of malls. Aeon is the only place besides the big & tall store that has clothes that fit me. Plus, they're inexpensive and look like normal clothes. At the big & tall, you pay 2-3 times as much for clownish patterns and colors.

  146. @syonredux
    @(((Owen)))


    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn’t yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization.
     
    Anyone living in the USA in 1989 with half a brain should have been able to see the threat posed by Mestizo/Amerind immigration.

    Replies: @(((Owen))), @David Allan coe, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anonymous Nephew

    In 1989 I had to use my very rusty Spanish to get by in a Chicago suburb – couldn’t believe the number of Mexicans there, Spanish billboards, Spanish radio/TV – so it’s not as if it was just a phenomenon of the South-West states back then.

  147. @Ivy
    @Buffalo Joe

    At dollar stores, probably through someone else's assistance. Grocery stores sometimes have their own motorized carts, and some shoppers motor in on their own devices.

    Replies: @anonguy

    At dollar stores, probably through someone else’s assistance. Grocery stores sometimes have their own motorized carts, and some shoppers motor in on their own devices.

    Nothing says decline of the west to me as much as landing at a US airport and seeing morbidly obese people being chauffeured through the concourses.

    And the pedestrians are pretty much expected to get out of the way.

    • Replies: @Old fogey
    @anonguy

    Just looking at the way 99 percent of the population is dressed in an American airport depresses me sufficiently.

  148. @üeljang
    @Chrisnonymous

    Shopping centers and malls in Japan are not directly comparable with those in the USA because their history in Japan is significantly shallower. Such a thing as a shoppingu sentaa or mooru was practically unknown in Japan even as recently as twenty years ago, and many Japanese of that era would confidently declare that "American suburban-style large-scale commercial establishments" would never succeed in Japan because of Japanese people's "peculiar mentality." (It is remarkable that a large number of Japanese people would declare anything, as they usually enjoy remaining silent or prevaricating to an exasperating degree.)

    Two decades later, and it seems that there is an Aeon Mall in almost every town and city with a population greater than 40,000 persons. I think the popularity of shopping malls as places to visit on a casual outing with friends or family will decline as their novelty wears off.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    I’ll take your word on the history and future of malls. Aeon is the only place besides the big & tall store that has clothes that fit me. Plus, they’re inexpensive and look like normal clothes. At the big & tall, you pay 2-3 times as much for clownish patterns and colors.

  149. @EdwardM
    @Anonymous

    I don't know, in theory a properly functioning tort system -- based on common law, common sense, and a belief in the values of individualism and individual liberty -- is necessary for capitalism and serves useful in making the market more efficient. Similarly, transparency in business transactions and dispute resolution mechanisms, even if the terms are complex, should level the playing field in the market.

    Somehow the U.S. legal system has run amok, due primarily to too much government (too many laws, too many levels of courts, too many student loans, etc.), institutionalized corruption of the bar, and stupid civil juries that have bought into the demonization of the evil private sector in the media and feminization of the culture (i.e., making decisions based on emotion).

    Is there a middle ground between the U.S. excess and the undeveloped system in Japan? What's the civil law system like in the U.K.?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Somehow the U.S. legal system has run amok, due primarily to too much government (too many laws, too many levels of courts, too many student loans, etc.), institutionalized corruption of the bar, and stupid civil juries that have bought into the demonization of the evil private sector in the media and feminization of the culture (i.e., making decisions based on emotion).

    Ed, with respect to your correctness is pointing out problems we have in this paragraph, I’ll tell you the problem we have with the lawyers: In the US the LAWYERS MAKE THE LAWS! That’s the problem. Check you what size majority of your state legislators are lawyers, and, yes, it’ll be a majority.

    At the Feral Gov’t level, most of the congressmen have started out as lawyers. I don’t argue that they are stupid, as you do have to be able to think straight, but it makes them most likely bad individuals. (I don’t know if this is cause and effect, nature or nurture. Do lawyers get turned into assholes in 3 years of law school, or do just the assholes tend to go into law to get even with society or beat the crap out of it. I have only known 2 lawyers on a personal basis for a decent period of time – both had some real problems that would preclude our being real friends.)

    The reason US laws are so complicated is that, whether consciously or not, the lawyers in congress have no problem passing 100-1000 page bills. That will bring business to their friends and upcoming congressmen, staffers and bureaucrats that they may know from law school. Then, if they make it to the Senate, they don’t have time for this, so they delegate the writing of bills, and we all find out how bad we are screwed after it’s been passed. Nancy Pelosi explained to us how that works.

    No, Shakespeare was right, but he apparently was just too nice a guy to just lay it out there. “First, kill all the lawyers” was probably the self-censored version of “First, lets genocide all the legal personnel, burn down the law schools, and put all laws on CD in plain (or Olde) English with search features”.

  150. Only one in five people entering British law courses in 2015 were white males (probably the stereoptypical lawyer image). Two-thirds female, more than a third minority.

    Then, of the 17,000 annual undergrad intake, “5,457 new traineeships were registered with the SRA” in 2015 and 6,077 qualified as solicitors, with a notably lower number of minorities and a lower (61/39) female/male ratio.

    https://www.lawsociety.org.uk/Law-careers/Becoming-a-solicitor/Entry-trends/

    Of these qualified solicitors:

    61 per cent are female and 39 per cent are male.
    (907) 14.9 per cent are from minority ethnic groups.
    Of the ethnic minority groups, 62.8 per cent are female and 37.2 per cent are male.

    What the Law Society doesn’t seem interested in is – what happens to the almost two-thirds of law undergrads who don’t become solicitors?

    https://www.theguardian.com/law/2014/jun/29/law-graduates-legal-aid-university-lawyers

    In a country where there are as many as 200,000 lawyers – about one in 300 of the population – there may be a surplus of tens of thousands of highly educated applicants.

    Burdened with crumpled expectations and large debts, sometimes of more than £50,000, acquired through course fees and living expenses, many find work as paralegals earning less than £20,000 a year with few prospects for promotion. By contrast, solicitors in the City of London may start on £38,000 and within two years can be earning £90,000.

    Clague studied economics and business at Durham University. He graduated in 2008 then borrowed £25,000 to do law conversion studies – essential for those whose first degree was not law – and for the legal practice course (LPC) needed to become a solicitor.

    But on graduation, two years later, he discovered there were not enough training contracts and that he had failed to secure a job.

    “I wanted to be a solicitor. If you spend that much you want a return,” he said.

    • Replies: @Old fogey
    @Anonymous Nephew

    Whenever women enter a job market en masse, you are in trouble. Just consider what happened to the Soviet medical profession when the women took over. The same thing is happening today in the legal field.

    There are not enough jobs to keep all men and all women working for salaries in our society and it will only become more apparent as the robots take over. Women should be encouraged to become good wives and mothers and excellent care-givers for their aged and infirm family members. These are the traditional roles of women for a reason, they are far better at doing these crucial jobs for society than men. Somehow or other the feminists were able to denigrate the importance of these responsibilities and therefore denigrated women's role in society at the same time. Our ancestors were not stupid people when they molded our civilization and it is the height of folly to forget this.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  151. @(((Owen)))
    @syonredux

    In 1989 there was no modern internet news. We had fresh harsh rules to prosecute employers of illegals. We'd just given an amnesty that Reagan and Bush had promised would end the trouble. Quotas for chain migration were less than half what they are now.

    There was no way to know, short of extensive Freedom Of Information Act and library research that Bush and Reagan had cucked the whole nation back then. Now by 1993 or maybe even 1992 it was just starting to be visible to people paying close attention. But for 1989 your claim is ridiculous.

    Replies: @bomag, @Peterike, @meh, @Charles Pewitt, @syonredux, @Achmed E. Newman

    I think the main point you could get out of the replies to this post, Owen, is that it was location dependent. I had personal knowledge that the Mexican invasion was already a big deal in the middle- 1980’s in southern California. Everyone knew that Miami was a foreign zone (yeah, Cubans, not Mexicans, I know) back in the early 80’s. We had Mexicans as farm labor in the late 1970’s in my area that is no where near the Mexican border. Lastly, I wasn’t there, but I would guess at least people in southern and west TX, much of New Mexico and southern Arizona already knew there was a problem way, way before your 1992-1993 date.

    So, it was location, location, location back then, but the problem has been everywhere since going back at least 20 years, and, as you said, we can get information off the internet.

  152. I grew up in Pennsylvania, and went to High School in Philadelphia, graduated in 1988, I never met a Mexican nor saw one until my last year of college in 1992 at Rutgers in New Brunswick, NJ

    Pennsylvania had a significant Puerto Rican population by 1960, about 1% of the population. Today 3% are Puerto Rican.

    The Hispanic population of Pennsylvania did not change from 1970 – 1990…still had no Mexicans in 1999.
    90% of the Hispanic population was Puerto Rican or Cuban in 2010. Still almost no Mexicans, ten times more Asians then Mexicans today

  153. A heaping dose of racial diversity can give all those unemployed and underemployed Japanese lawyers lots to do. If they’d only agree to let the USA, UK and Europe offload some of their troublesome, malcontented third wold population then Japanese society would become very vibrant and a boon to the law enforcement and legal professions!

    The problem is that the Japanese aren’t insane or sentimental like white Europeans, nor do they permit Jews to control their media or influence their government, so they will be consigned to having a boring, staid, safe and stable monoracial society.

  154. @Massimo Heitor
    @(((Owen)))


    Italy is still pretty much Italy, but looks unlikely to remain so.

     

    I was just in Italy. I could see lots of Chinese and thousands of very African looking Africans which was new and not at all normal Italy. There were lots of Chinese tourists but also lots of Chinese residents that spoke fluent perfect Italian.

    Italy still felt very Italian, at least the parts that I went to. The tourist hot spots all speak English, but most locals speak only Italian. A few white Italians expressed horror over Trump and the hostility towards Mexicans but where quite agreeable when I explained. Most Trump supporters bear no animosity towards Mexicans or anyone else, but everyone on the globe still doesn't have some innate right to live in the US. Some Italians also said that the media is very heavy handed biased. They also said the mafia is still very active although very behind the scenes.

    Anecdotally, just walking around cities, there were lots of younger children that were overwhelmingly white ethnic Italians speaking Italian. I trust the official birth rate stats more, but from casual observation there were Italian kids everywhere.


    The Five Star Party isn’t anti-immigrant (the leader is married to an Iranian).
     
    Trump, Bannon, Steve Sailer, and NumbersUSA are not "anti-immigrant", they want selective immigration policy that is designed to benefit the host nation, like what Canada has.

    Beppe Grillo is totally in that camp and wants to cut immigration from Africa and even deport many already there.

    Most Iranians are ethnically Persian, which is mostly European white. That's actually closer to immigrating an ethnic French or German or Swedish person and it's not controversial.

    The mass influx of poor Africans is obviously unpopular with the ethnic Italians. Some said that Renzi planned to help Africans pass through to the rest of Europe, but bordering nations like France and Austria closed their borders with Italy, sealing the African migrants in Italy. France may have voted against LePen and be publicly against "populism", but they definitely blocked African migrants from entering France.

    Italy has major economic problems, the young ethnic Italians can't find decent jobs. Even high skilled Italians with college education are working in food service or driving cabs. Or they wise up and get out of Italy. Large low skill immigration makes that much worse. Large numbers of Africans were aggressively pushing street trinkets absolutely everywhere I went. I went to a quiet beach town, Africans were pushing junk. I ate at a fancy restaurant in Florence, some African actually came into the restaurant and tried to sell me stuff at my table.

    Italy is absolutely trying to stop the tide of incoming Africans. Conceptually, it's easy, just stop using the Navy to bring Africans to Italy. You can still rescue Africans from drowning and drop them back off in their country of departure. They aren't owed residency in Italy.

    Even in Africa, there is mass intra-Africa migration where people are leaving more rural lifestyles and moving to cities. Unfortunately many Africans are living in slum conditions in the cities of Africa, but they seem to choose that over their previous agrarian lifestyles.

    Replies: @Frau Katze, @AnotherDad

    Italy is absolutely trying to stop the tide of incoming Africans. Conceptually, it’s easy, just stop using the Navy to bring Africans to Italy. You can still rescue Africans from drowning and drop them back off in their country of departure. They aren’t owed residency in Italy.

    No argument on the Africans uglifying Italy.

    But the problem is Italy–meaning the Italian state that is the organ that could be doing it–is absolutely *not* trying to stop the incoming tide of Africans. This is not just conceptually but actually as easy as you note. In fact just not rescuing them would solve most of the problem–95% don’t have the means to get there. But towing back to Libya, arresting smugglers, sinking boats quickly *ends* the problem, and they don’t do it. The Italians thought the blacks would just go north to greener pastures, but that’s been made more difficult and blacks will take up residence anywhere there’s an opportunity for grifting, hustling and crime. Pretty much anywhere is better than Africa. So Italians have been quickly destroying their nation.

    White people just have to wake up and discover some self-respect and will to live. “White lives matter!” “White nations matter!”

  155. @David Allan coe
    @syonredux

    It was actually the immigration act of 1990 which caused the most harm to our future demographics....the 1990 Act created the Diversity Lottery, ended the English requirement for naturalization. Created the h1b visa program, and increased legal immigration by 100%

    From 1969 - 1989 the United States admitted 11 million legal immigrants. From 1990 - 2010 the U.S. admitted 22 million Legal immigrants.

    Without the 1990 Immigration act, immigration per year would have been under 650,000 per year instead of 1,250,000 per year.

    Replies: @Ed, @AnotherDad

    It was actually the immigration act of 1990 which caused the most harm to our future demographics….

    There’s a number of people who keep trotting this out. It’s simplistic.

    The 1990 Act was indeed terrible but it is particularly terrible operating on the demographics put in place by the 1965 Act.

    Migration–like other demographic factors–is non-linear. It’s exponential. Your nation isn’t suddenly changed the moment the globalists sneak through their “we are the world” immigration policy. Anymore than you’re immediately coughing and sneezing when you pickup the influenza virus. The virus has to grow. For the first years people can think, nothing has changed. Ergo the vile traitorous schemers suffer no consequences. A few years in … “oh, hey there’s some foreigners running a restaurant.” Then a couple generations later your nation is infected, probably terminally.

    This is particular true for countries like the US with a chain migration policy. Yeah, the 1990 Act made everything worse by jacking up the growth rate. But this recent infection dates to 1965. That’s when the globalists gave America the plague.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @AnotherDad

    Great comment, Dad, as all of yours are. In the mid-1970's, a decade after this act of abomination, there were lots of kids around and almost all were white and American blacks in MOST of the country.

    Politically, people that really followed the actions of this Feral Government would have been able to see what's going on even a few years after the 1965 bill, but on the street, I'd say it would be from the mid-70's to the mid-90's before it hit home (depending on location, as I wrote in reply to Owen).

    , @prole
    @AnotherDad

    From 1966-1981 less than 500,000 people per year immigrated to the United States...30% were from Europe, 2% from Africa.

    From 1991 - 2006 - 1,100,000 immigrated per year, 10% from Europe, 10% from Africa.

    The diversity lottery, instituted in 1990 was much more destructive than anything in the 1965 immigration bill.

    Replies: @Triumph104

  156. @(((Owen)))
    @whorefinder


    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.
     

    Russia is still mostly Russian.

    Britain is no longer Britain.

    Germany is no longer Germany.

    China is still China.

    France is about to be no longer France.

    Italy is still pretty much Italy, but looks unlikely to remain so.

    Poland is very Polish, for as long as it lasts.

    So it's a mixed bag. Some apparent winners are still together, as are some losers. And many apparent losers turned out to win the peace decisively. But not all. And there was no reasonable way to predict how it all would turn out.

    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn't yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization. Laughably now, we still thought communism was the great challenge to civilization back then. Turned out that communism was actually a prophylactic; the nations that suffered under it were the most resistant to slow motion genocide by mass immigration. Those of us that avoided it will soon envy those that were strengthened by the experience: At least they will have nations to leave their children.

    Replies: @syonredux, @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin, @Frau Katze, @fitzGetty, @Mr. Anon, @Massimo Heitor, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    Disagree on your 1989. Afterall, the amnesty was in 1986, so people had already known there was a critical problem back before then–early 80s. The specific Mexican problem wasn’t showing up in a lot of places yet, but it was a recognized large public policy problem.

    Likewise the problem of immigrant communities in Europe was already in existence. Going on 30 years has just made the situation several times worse so that it’s now in everyone’s face. But that doesn’t stop the globalist happy talkers from spewing their same old nonsense.

  157. @(((Owen)))
    @whorefinder


    Who really won WW2, and who really lost?

    Japan is still Japanese.

    America is no longer American.
     

    Russia is still mostly Russian.

    Britain is no longer Britain.

    Germany is no longer Germany.

    China is still China.

    France is about to be no longer France.

    Italy is still pretty much Italy, but looks unlikely to remain so.

    Poland is very Polish, for as long as it lasts.

    So it's a mixed bag. Some apparent winners are still together, as are some losers. And many apparent losers turned out to win the peace decisively. But not all. And there was no reasonable way to predict how it all would turn out.

    In 1989, it looked almost the opposite of how it looks now because really massive immigration hadn't yet emerged as the great post-WWII danger to civilization. Laughably now, we still thought communism was the great challenge to civilization back then. Turned out that communism was actually a prophylactic; the nations that suffered under it were the most resistant to slow motion genocide by mass immigration. Those of us that avoided it will soon envy those that were strengthened by the experience: At least they will have nations to leave their children.

    Replies: @syonredux, @With the thoughts you'd be thinkin, @Frau Katze, @fitzGetty, @Mr. Anon, @Massimo Heitor, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    So it’s a mixed bag. Some apparent winners are still together, as are some losers. And many apparent losers turned out to win the peace decisively. But not all. And there was no reasonable way to predict how it all would turn out.

    (((Owen))). Pretty much agree with this.

    But my one thought would be if you look not at just nominal victors, but a winners and losers in terms of death, destruction they received, then the losers definitely seem to have come out better.

    Big population/destruction losers: Poland, Russia, China, Germany, Japan, Vietnam, Baltics seem to have come out smelling much better than those who skated through in better shape France, Italy, UK, most of Western Europe or who suffered little beyond modest military causualties–US, Canada, Australia.

    Germany is the “loser” outlier here, but I think it was in better shape than the UK and France until the recent Merkel madness in one fell swoop doomed it to civil war or eventual death.

    Of course, as someone else noted, the simple parsimonious explanation is swallowing neoliberal –Soros style “Open Societies”–globalism, is the virus of destruction.

  158. @AnotherDad
    @David Allan coe


    It was actually the immigration act of 1990 which caused the most harm to our future demographics….
     
    There's a number of people who keep trotting this out. It's simplistic.

    The 1990 Act was indeed terrible but it is particularly terrible operating on the demographics put in place by the 1965 Act.

    Migration--like other demographic factors--is non-linear. It's exponential. Your nation isn't suddenly changed the moment the globalists sneak through their "we are the world" immigration policy. Anymore than you're immediately coughing and sneezing when you pickup the influenza virus. The virus has to grow. For the first years people can think, nothing has changed. Ergo the vile traitorous schemers suffer no consequences. A few years in ... "oh, hey there's some foreigners running a restaurant." Then a couple generations later your nation is infected, probably terminally.

    This is particular true for countries like the US with a chain migration policy. Yeah, the 1990 Act made everything worse by jacking up the growth rate. But this recent infection dates to 1965. That's when the globalists gave America the plague.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @prole

    Great comment, Dad, as all of yours are. In the mid-1970’s, a decade after this act of abomination, there were lots of kids around and almost all were white and American blacks in MOST of the country.

    Politically, people that really followed the actions of this Feral Government would have been able to see what’s going on even a few years after the 1965 bill, but on the street, I’d say it would be from the mid-70’s to the mid-90’s before it hit home (depending on location, as I wrote in reply to Owen).

  159. @Paul Walker - Most beautiful man ever...
    “Japanese have shown preference for more informal means of resolving disputes, such as through private negotiation mainly between the parties involved.”
    This is terrible! those stupid Japs need to get up to speed. Coin clipping, usury and rat-faced lawyers is where it's at. :)

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    This is terrible! those stupid Japs need to get up to speed. Coin clipping, usury and rat-faced lawyers is where it’s at.

    Maybe the Japanese have got some fast ambulances over there, doing that drifting and shit. Fast and furious – leave the trial lawyers in the dust.

    BTW, Paul, if you are the most beautiful, how about some .jpegs? I heard you got a purty mouth ….

  160. @AnotherDad
    @David Allan coe


    It was actually the immigration act of 1990 which caused the most harm to our future demographics….
     
    There's a number of people who keep trotting this out. It's simplistic.

    The 1990 Act was indeed terrible but it is particularly terrible operating on the demographics put in place by the 1965 Act.

    Migration--like other demographic factors--is non-linear. It's exponential. Your nation isn't suddenly changed the moment the globalists sneak through their "we are the world" immigration policy. Anymore than you're immediately coughing and sneezing when you pickup the influenza virus. The virus has to grow. For the first years people can think, nothing has changed. Ergo the vile traitorous schemers suffer no consequences. A few years in ... "oh, hey there's some foreigners running a restaurant." Then a couple generations later your nation is infected, probably terminally.

    This is particular true for countries like the US with a chain migration policy. Yeah, the 1990 Act made everything worse by jacking up the growth rate. But this recent infection dates to 1965. That's when the globalists gave America the plague.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @prole

    From 1966-1981 less than 500,000 people per year immigrated to the United States…30% were from Europe, 2% from Africa.

    From 1991 – 2006 – 1,100,000 immigrated per year, 10% from Europe, 10% from Africa.

    The diversity lottery, instituted in 1990 was much more destructive than anything in the 1965 immigration bill.

    • Agree: (((Owen)))
    • Replies: @Triumph104
    @prole

    The diversity lottery only awards 50,000 visas a year. When spouses and children (called derivatives) are included, on average 100,000 foreigners are granted permanent residence status in the US -- one-third of whom are Europeans.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diversity_Immigrant_Visa

  161. @Anonym
    @whorefinder

    Britain is no longer British and no longer has her empire, thanks to Churchill. Germany and Italy are well on their way to being mystery meat nations though, so there is that.

    Replies: @Old fogey

    I don’t think you can blame Churchill for the loss of Britain’s empire. That was Roosevelt’s doing as he pushed for the end of British rule in the sub-continent.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @Old fogey

    It appears Pat has a book on the subject. I should read it.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Churchill,_Hitler_and_the_Unnecessary_War

  162. @dearieme
    The Japanese must have been desperate to risk copying one of the worst aspects of American society.

    I recently had to deal with an American corporate lawyer: once again I concluded that stereotypes often contain much truth.

    Replies: @Old fogey

    Stereotypes are always true; that is why they become stereotypes.

  163. @ANON
    @prole

    Technically, and somewhat trivially, you are of course correct. Everyone here knows that. But the fact is 1) an unfortunate relic of America's imperialist past as well as 2) quite relevant to the issues of ethnic hegemony (and not coincidentally strife) being played out on the national stage these past fifty years.

    Puerto Rico should be given its independence yesterday, and this was true 50 years ago as well.

    Replies: @Old fogey

    You are totally correct and yet we hear that the Puerto Ricans will get to vote on whether or not they want to become a state while we are given no opportunity to vote on whether we want Puerto Rico as a state. How did that ever happen? Did we ever have sensible and loyal representation in this country?

  164. @anonguy
    @Ivy


    At dollar stores, probably through someone else’s assistance. Grocery stores sometimes have their own motorized carts, and some shoppers motor in on their own devices.
     
    Nothing says decline of the west to me as much as landing at a US airport and seeing morbidly obese people being chauffeured through the concourses.

    And the pedestrians are pretty much expected to get out of the way.

    Replies: @Old fogey

    Just looking at the way 99 percent of the population is dressed in an American airport depresses me sufficiently.

  165. @Anonymous Nephew
    Only one in five people entering British law courses in 2015 were white males (probably the stereoptypical lawyer image). Two-thirds female, more than a third minority.

    Then, of the 17,000 annual undergrad intake, "5,457 new traineeships were registered with the SRA" in 2015 and 6,077 qualified as solicitors, with a notably lower number of minorities and a lower (61/39) female/male ratio.

    https://www.lawsociety.org.uk/Law-careers/Becoming-a-solicitor/Entry-trends/

    Of these qualified solicitors:

    61 per cent are female and 39 per cent are male.
    (907) 14.9 per cent are from minority ethnic groups.
    Of the ethnic minority groups, 62.8 per cent are female and 37.2 per cent are male.

     

    What the Law Society doesn't seem interested in is - what happens to the almost two-thirds of law undergrads who don't become solicitors?

    https://www.theguardian.com/law/2014/jun/29/law-graduates-legal-aid-university-lawyers

    In a country where there are as many as 200,000 lawyers – about one in 300 of the population – there may be a surplus of tens of thousands of highly educated applicants.

    Burdened with crumpled expectations and large debts, sometimes of more than £50,000, acquired through course fees and living expenses, many find work as paralegals earning less than £20,000 a year with few prospects for promotion. By contrast, solicitors in the City of London may start on £38,000 and within two years can be earning £90,000.

    Clague studied economics and business at Durham University. He graduated in 2008 then borrowed £25,000 to do law conversion studies – essential for those whose first degree was not law – and for the legal practice course (LPC) needed to become a solicitor.

    But on graduation, two years later, he discovered there were not enough training contracts and that he had failed to secure a job.

    "I wanted to be a solicitor. If you spend that much you want a return," he said.
     

    Replies: @Old fogey

    Whenever women enter a job market en masse, you are in trouble. Just consider what happened to the Soviet medical profession when the women took over. The same thing is happening today in the legal field.

    There are not enough jobs to keep all men and all women working for salaries in our society and it will only become more apparent as the robots take over. Women should be encouraged to become good wives and mothers and excellent care-givers for their aged and infirm family members. These are the traditional roles of women for a reason, they are far better at doing these crucial jobs for society than men. Somehow or other the feminists were able to denigrate the importance of these responsibilities and therefore denigrated women’s role in society at the same time. Our ancestors were not stupid people when they molded our civilization and it is the height of folly to forget this.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Old fogey

    I agree wholeheartedly that It's Not Nice to Fool Mother Nature!. It's good to hear a woman say that once in a while, as most are too brainwashed by the feminists, and nobody will listen to the men about this (until the SHTF).

  166. @Old fogey
    @Anonymous Nephew

    Whenever women enter a job market en masse, you are in trouble. Just consider what happened to the Soviet medical profession when the women took over. The same thing is happening today in the legal field.

    There are not enough jobs to keep all men and all women working for salaries in our society and it will only become more apparent as the robots take over. Women should be encouraged to become good wives and mothers and excellent care-givers for their aged and infirm family members. These are the traditional roles of women for a reason, they are far better at doing these crucial jobs for society than men. Somehow or other the feminists were able to denigrate the importance of these responsibilities and therefore denigrated women's role in society at the same time. Our ancestors were not stupid people when they molded our civilization and it is the height of folly to forget this.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I agree wholeheartedly that It’s Not Nice to Fool Mother Nature!. It’s good to hear a woman say that once in a while, as most are too brainwashed by the feminists, and nobody will listen to the men about this (until the SHTF).

  167. @Ed
    @David Allan coe

    I noticed a similar pattern in terms of UK immigration. The initial liberalization didn't yield as many immigrants as later waves. The largest group Indians was at around 200k or so and many were a result of the expulsion of Uganda Indians. African immigration to the UK was under 100k up through the 90s.

    Replies: @IHTG, @Romanian, @unpc downunder

    There seems to be a pretty strong link between free trade, financialisation and increased immigration to the West. The wealthy FIRE cities attract immigrants to do service jobs for increasingly wealthy upper class whites, while the high property prices drive the working class whites away. And then of course there is the decline of manufacturing and peasant farming in Africa, South America and the Middle East, which provides a strong push factor.

    Free trade dogma is based on blank slate thinking. Force Africans to compete with the Chinese and the Africans won’t up their game, they will give up and come to Europe and America.

  168. @prole
    @AnotherDad

    From 1966-1981 less than 500,000 people per year immigrated to the United States...30% were from Europe, 2% from Africa.

    From 1991 - 2006 - 1,100,000 immigrated per year, 10% from Europe, 10% from Africa.

    The diversity lottery, instituted in 1990 was much more destructive than anything in the 1965 immigration bill.

    Replies: @Triumph104

    The diversity lottery only awards 50,000 visas a year. When spouses and children (called derivatives) are included, on average 100,000 foreigners are granted permanent residence status in the US — one-third of whom are Europeans.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diversity_Immigrant_Visa

  169. @Old fogey
    @Anonym

    I don't think you can blame Churchill for the loss of Britain's empire. That was Roosevelt's doing as he pushed for the end of British rule in the sub-continent.

    Replies: @Anonym

    It appears Pat has a book on the subject. I should read it.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Churchill,_Hitler_and_the_Unnecessary_War

    • Agree: James Richard
  170. They forgot to allow a hostile foreign criminal invasion like the West, the West wasn’t always a lawyers fantasy orgy, it started about 5 years after the 1965 Immigration nationality act in collusion with criminal invasion and anchor baby citizenship.

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