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From The Guardian:

Prince William’s godmother quits palace over comments to black charity boss

Former lady-in-waiting to queen issues apology after Ngozi Fulani questioned over where her ‘people’ came from

Caroline Davies and Hannah Summers
Wed 30 Nov 2022 11.18 EST

The late queen’s lady-in-waiting has resigned and apologised after a black guest at a reception hosted by the queen consort was left feeling traumatised and violated after she questioned her repeatedly about where she “really came from”.

Ngozi Fulani, the founder of the charity Sistah Space, claimed Susan Hussey moved her hair to reveal her name badge and persistently questioned her over where her “people” came from, despite having been told she was a British national.

A spokesperson for the Prince of Wales, who is Lady Hussey’s godson, said the comments were unacceptable and that “racism has no place in our society”.

Perhaps King Charles and Queen-Consort Camilla just wanted the late Queen’s favorite crony gone.

The encounter on Tuesday at a violence against women and girls reception was witnessed by two other women: Mandu Reid, the leader of the Women’s Equality party, who is of mixed heritage, and another black female charity representative.

Hussey, 83, the widow of the former BBC chair Sir Marmaduke Hussey, had recently been appointed one of the ladies of the household. She is a close friend of the king. Her daughter, Katherine Brooke, has just been appointed as one of Camilla’s new queen’s companions.

Buckingham Palace described the remarks as “unacceptable and deeply regrettable”. Hussey has offered her “profound apologies” for hurt caused and resigned her honorary position with immediate effect.

Here is Ngozi Fulani’s description of the conversation:

Lady SH: Where are you from?

Me: Sistah Space.

SH: No, where do you come from?

Me: We’re based in Hackney.

SH: No, what part of Africa are YOU from?

Me: I don’t know, they didn’t leave any records.

SH: Well, you must know where you’re from, I spent time in France. Where are you from?

Me: Here, UK

SH: NO, but what Nationality are you?

Me: I am born here and am British.

SH: No, but where do you really come from, where do your people come from?

Me: ‘My people’, lady, what is this?

SH: Oh I can see I am going to have a challenge getting you to say where you’re from. When did you first come here?

Me: Lady! I am a British national, my parents came here in the 50s when …

SH: Oh, I knew we’d get there in the end, you’re Caribbean!

Me: No Lady, I am of African heritage, Caribbean descent and British nationality.

SH: Oh, so you’re from …”

… [Fulani] wrote: “There was nobody to report it to. I couldn’t report it to the Queen Consort, plus it was such a shock to me and the 2 other women we were stunned into temporary silence. I just stood at the edge of the room, smiled & engaged briefly, with those who spoke to me until I could leave.”

She added: “It was such a struggle to stay in a space you were violated in.”

She told the Guardian the first “no no” was Hussey moving her hair.

“Here I am in this place as part of the 16 days of activism, experiencing non-physical violence

“Non-physical violence” is good, but “hair rape” would be better.

As commenter JCD1974 points out, “You can’t blame the old woman when the black woman looked like she was in costume as an African queen, complete with leopard print dress, a bone necklace and a tiara in her dreadlocks.” She’s dressing like a discount version of Eddie Murphy’s mother, the Queen of Zamunda, in Coming to America.

– you feel like you have the right to approach me, put your hand in my hair and insist I don’t have the right to British nationality. In a space like that, what do you do?”

She said she had “never felt so unwelcome or so uncomfortable”.

She said: “I was almost forced to say that I’m not really British. I don’t know what she meant by ‘my people’. It was incomprehensible for her to consider that I have British citizenship. When she heard my parents were from the Caribbean she said: ‘Finally we are getting somewhere’ … It was overt racism.

Of Hussey’s resignation, she said: “It’s tragic for me that it has ended that way. I would have preferred that she had been spoken to or re-educated.” …

She suggested the palace household could benefit from cultural competency training of the sort run by Sistah Space.

Call now. Sistah Space’s operators are standing by to take your orders for their cultural competency training. After all, you wouldn’t want this to happen to you.

 
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  1. Former UK Home Secretary (Conservative) weighs in on the Great Replacement:

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Anonymous

    I get that he's browner than my last BM, and is named Safid Jadid or some wholly alien Pakistani name like that, but as a "Conservative" he should be able to understand why some people might find it less-than-wonderful that the biggest cities in the UK have been ethnically cleansed of the majority population in a few decades. What would he say if Karachi, Islamabad and Peshawar all became minority Pakistani in a short time?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Anon
    @Anonymous

    "... and here is why it's a good thing!"

    Continues apace.

    , @Richard B
    @Anonymous


    So what?
     
    Sajid Javid is yet another deposit dropped from the bowels of The Coalition of the Fringes. Of course, he responds true to type by asking a question as if there's no answer.

    Regarding World War Hair and The Old Lady, I can't be the only one here who thinks the whole "encounter" was staged. Would it surprise anyone? You can even hear a hostile elite-appointed member of the Coalition whispering in the old lady's ear something along the lines of:

    Listen dear, times have changed, you're on your way out, and are going to have to take one for the team before you go. So let me walk you through what's going to happen.....

    But the big story is the habit of mind that comes from both producing these orchestrated hoaxes and believing in them (or being forced to believe in them), and the impact that is having on the full and healthy functioning of our social institutions - all of them. How anyone can think this is going to end well is beyond me.

  2. Will and Kate threw her under the bus to reveal themselves backstabbing traitors. They don’t stand for Britain, the English people or even their family and close friends.

    They could have said nothing as this is a whole bunch of nothing and let time pass. Quickly, the public forgets such trifles.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Thea

    "Will and Kate threw her under the bus..."

    Definitely. I saw a pic of that black woman. She was in what appeared to be full tribal regalia--and I don't mean a crown and sceptre.

    If the exchange went as reported, she was courteous in the face of the old bat's badgering. But the black woman doesn't look British --and no, people who look like her are not yet the "face of Britain", though they might as well be. And the old bat was persistent and rude, which I would chalk up to age and class.

    But apparently Wills and Kate felt the need to burnish his woke credentials. Too bad. He should have kept his stiff upper lip zipped. Of course, he probably feels he has to be careful after all the mud his even more traitorous little bro and the former yachter now Duchess of L.A. have slung at the BRF. Not to mention being blindsided on his Caribbean visit.

    Poor Philip is doubtless spinning in his grave.

    Replies: @Thea

    , @AndrewR
    @Thea

    The royal family has a tightrope to walk. This doesn't excuse all of their behavior, but it's not 1910 or even 2010 anymore. Meghan and her meat puppet Harry have put the Eye of Woke Sauron on the monarchy. Add Meghan/Harry's non racial bombshells, and Andrew's disastrous response to that roastie's Epstein allegations, and try putting yourself in the shoes of Charles and William. This lady probably has at least a mild form of dementia anyway and shouldn't be in a public facing role. And regardless, I'm sure she's mortified that she has embarrassed the palace, and that she gave her full consent to them to throw her under the bus. The close associates of the British royal family tend to be loyal to a fault.

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @Art Deco

    , @AnotherDad
    @Thea


    Will and Kate threw her under the bus to reveal themselves backstabbing traitors. They don’t stand for Britain, the English people or even their family and close friends.
     
    The only salient benefit taxpaying peasantry was at least supposed to get from supporting the parasitic nobility was protection. Protection from internal banditry and external invasion. The King of England would be living large looting you, but at least, hordes of aliens--say Frenchmen--weren't supposed to invading, raping and pillaging.

    Modern "nobility" doesn't even make nod in the direction to even paying lip service to that noble function.

    Invading looters and parasites welcome!
    , @Alden
    @Thea

    Will and Kate’s American tour is to promote climate change and the sacrifices we ordinary proles must make to save Mother Earth.

    Electrical heating during winter that costs 4 times as much as gas heating, public transportation mixing with thugs and criminals being murdered on subway platforms, vegan food which will starve us, gazillions of our tax dollars for light rail and other useless save Mother Earth projects.

    Will is as much a fabulously wealthy environmentalist as is his father and Earth First.

    Check out photo images of Queen Elizabeth and the Commonwealth leaders at the Commonwealth Conferences. There she and the prime ministers. The only White faces in a sea of the worst black dictators on the planet.

    Skeptics call the Commonwealth Conferences the Cannibals and Kleptomaniacs Conference. A bi annual annoyance as the endless parades make London traffic worse than usual.

    The ordinary British will freeze as monthly heat bills go from £200 a month to £700 a month.

    While the royal family preaches veganism and unaffordable heat bills for the British people.

    Replies: @Kylie

  3. With a perfectly good English name like Ngozi Fulani why she ever ask such a question …..send her to Coventry now!

    • Replies: @Spangel226
    @tyrone

    I was all ready to mock that name, but turns out their is a lad named Sir marmaduke hussey in this article, so ngozi is suddenly not looking so bad.

    Replies: @tyrone, @kaganovitch, @Almost Missouri

    , @Ebony Obelisk
    @tyrone

    What’s your problem jerk?

    Man I cannot wait for white men to lose all institutional power.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Curle

    , @Russ
    @tyrone


    Hussey, 83, the widow of the former BBC chair Sir Marmaduke Hussey
     
    Awaiting the professional wrestler who adopts this moniker.
    , @Mr. Grey
    @tyrone

    I'm pretty sure that Fulani is an old British name, pre-dating the Anglo-Saxons. It comes from one of those black Roman legion soldiers. I think I heard this on the BBC, most likely. I also denounce racism.

  4. I think less of William and Charles for this.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Art Deco

    This is orders of magnitude less revolting than their over-the-top response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which was in large part instigated by the actions of HM's government.

    Replies: @Gordo, @Art Deco

  5. I guess it is rude to touch somebody’s hair, but then again if you are given a name badge so that people can see your name, you probably need to make sure that the badge is not covered by your hair, otherwise it defeats the point.

    Apparently this woman was dressed up in full African folk dress regalia, which does beg the question of where she comes from. Why dress up in this fashion if you don’t want to talk about it?

    Her surname is Fulani, which presumably relates to the Fulani tribe which is found in Nigeria.

    Conversation should have gone like this:

    “Where are you from?”

    “Actually I was born right here in London and grew up here, but my parents came to Britain in the 1950s from (X) and they liked it so much they never went back! I went with them to the home country one time on vacation and loved it, Have you ever been there?”

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Jonathan Mason


    Apparently this woman was dressed up in full African folk dress regalia, which does beg the question of where she comes from. Why dress up in this fashion if you don’t want to talk about it?
     
    Well, that's a very important detail and does indeed justify asking a question. Still, "where do YOU come from?" is a bit rude, don't you think? It carries more than a subtle hint of "what the hell is a POS like you doing here?"

    This is the most pointless kind of "racism." It achieves absolutely nothing useful. It embarrasses whites and angers non-whites. It's really not worth defending. Steve is trying way too hard to make it all about the hair.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Mike Tre
    @Jonathan Mason

    " Why dress up in this fashion if you don’t want to talk about it?"

    Because it's meant to be worshiped, not questioned.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Jonathan Mason


    Conversation should have gone like this:

    “Where are you from?”

    “Actually I was born right here in London and grew up here, but my parents came to Britain in the 1950s from (X) and they liked it so much they never went back! I went with them to the home country one time on vacation and loved it, Have you ever been there?”
     
    More accurately ...

    “Actually I was born right here in London, my parents came from Barbados, but I'm a huge BPD drama queen, I like to dress up like it's halloween as a fake African princess."

    The interesting bit here:

    [Fulani] wrote: “There was nobody to report it to. I couldn’t report it to the Queen Consort, plus it was such a shock to me and the 2 other women we were stunned into temporary silence. I just stood at the edge of the room, smiled & engaged briefly, with those who spoke to me until I could leave.”
    ...
    “It was such a struggle to stay in a space you were violated in.”
    ...
    “Here I am in this place as part of the 16 days of activism, experiencing non-physical violence.
     
    The mega-doses of "oppression" drama and this desire to run to--and expectation of--some sort of minoritarian momma hall-monitor to report her "oppression". All for some routine "where are you from?" awkward conversation.

    Imagine all the oppressive querying various Scots, Welch, Cornish and Irish--not to mention continentals and colonials!--have endured in London over the centuries.
  6. You can’t blame the old woman when the black woman looked like she was in costume as an African queen, complete with leopard print dress, a bone necklace and a tiara in her dreadlocks.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-11488083/REBECCA-ENGLISH-examines-potential-fallout-Lady-Husseys-remarks-Buckingham-Palace-event.html

    • Replies: @songbird
    @jcd1974

    Someone should made a comic strip of it, but where she wears a skull necklace or shrunken heads.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @jcd1974

    Thanks.

    , @Barnard
    @jcd1974

    In a just society, it would be against the law for this woman to claim she is English or British. The same goes for PM Sunak.

    , @Director95
    @jcd1974

    WOW. Let's go over this again. WTF is sistah space doing in Buckingham Palace?
    hint to royals - don't make that dumb mistake again.

  7. Call now. Sistah Space’s operators are standing by to take your orders for their cultural competency training. After all, you wouldn’t want this to happen to you.

    If this Sistah really planned to make that little Hussey get through a game of 20 questions just so she could make a sale, she is Queen of the Salesmen! She does any curly-haired Caribbean-descended black Hackney-based British National proud!

    What’s got me traumatised from this story is all the spelling errors.

    • Replies: @Michigan Patriot
    @Achmed E. Newman

    " White Supremacy " is proven by " Sistah " & her ancestors by living in a Western country for many generations; a stamp of approval !

  8. I’ll take “There’s no actual recording of this conversation and we have to take the aggrieved Sistah’s word for it” for $500, Alex.

    These “race hustling poverty pimps”, in the immortal words of J. C. Watts, should go back where they came from.

    Name me one country that has improved itself by importing masses of POCs.

    • Agree: anonymouseperson
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Jim Don Bob

    'Name me one country that has improved itself by importing masses of POCs.'

    Well, there's Uganda. They benefitted from all the Indians -- at any rate, I'm sure things got worse when they kicked them out.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    , @kaganovitch
    @Jim Don Bob

    Name me one country that has improved itself by importing masses of POCs.

    Well, if imaginary countries count, and apparently they do, the Star Nation of Manticore in David Weber's Honor Harrington sci-fi novels was immeasurably improved by importing PoC. In fact their royal family, the Wintons, are OC. So there.

  9. “hair rape”, lol Steve still firing 98 w/ a devastating breaking ball. Twitter has been such a boon for the Steve-o-sphere!

    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
  10. @tyrone
    With a perfectly good English name like Ngozi Fulani why she ever ask such a question .....send her to Coventry now!

    Replies: @Spangel226, @Ebony Obelisk, @Russ, @Mr. Grey

    I was all ready to mock that name, but turns out their is a lad named Sir marmaduke hussey in this article, so ngozi is suddenly not looking so bad.

    • Replies: @tyrone
    @Spangel226


    marmaduke
     
    ......Makes you want to get a hound dog just so you can name it "Marmaduke".

    Replies: @Spect3r, @Jonathan Mason, @YetAnotherAnon

    , @kaganovitch
    @Spangel226

    I was all ready to mock that name, but turns out their is a lad named Sir marmaduke hussey in this article, so ngozi is suddenly not looking so bad.

    Got the last laugh on that Wodehouse chap, that's for sure.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Spangel226

    Before Marmaduke Hussey was Chairman of the BBC and Susan's husband, he lost a leg at Anzio in WWII.

    Amusingly, in Netflix's prestige soap-opera-for-the-wine-and-cheese-set, The Crown, Susan Hussey is played by Haydn Gwynne, who also portrays Camilla whatsername on Channel 4's mean spirited and occasionally funny parody of the royals, The Windsors. Whether as a casting decision, laziness, or directorial choice, Gwynne portrays both Camilla and Susan approximately the same way: as aging but canny sexual operators scheming to get their way in royal politics. Whether this bears (bore) any relationship to reality, I have no idea.

  11. @Jonathan Mason
    I guess it is rude to touch somebody's hair, but then again if you are given a name badge so that people can see your name, you probably need to make sure that the badge is not covered by your hair, otherwise it defeats the point.

    Apparently this woman was dressed up in full African folk dress regalia, which does beg the question of where she comes from. Why dress up in this fashion if you don't want to talk about it?

    Her surname is Fulani, which presumably relates to the Fulani tribe which is found in Nigeria.

    Conversation should have gone like this:

    "Where are you from?"

    "Actually I was born right here in London and grew up here, but my parents came to Britain in the 1950s from (X) and they liked it so much they never went back! I went with them to the home country one time on vacation and loved it, Have you ever been there?"

    Replies: @silviosilver, @Mike Tre, @AnotherDad

    Apparently this woman was dressed up in full African folk dress regalia, which does beg the question of where she comes from. Why dress up in this fashion if you don’t want to talk about it?

    Well, that’s a very important detail and does indeed justify asking a question. Still, “where do YOU come from?” is a bit rude, don’t you think? It carries more than a subtle hint of “what the hell is a POS like you doing here?”

    This is the most pointless kind of “racism.” It achieves absolutely nothing useful. It embarrasses whites and angers non-whites. It’s really not worth defending. Steve is trying way too hard to make it all about the hair.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @silviosilver

    First of all, it was a gotcha setup - you dress in the most outlandish fashion possible (although the hats that British upper class women wear are pretty weird too, and all those awful colors) and then you dare the elderly rubes to notice. Woke up to date people know the game and pretend not to notice anything no matter how outrageous the getup. The old lady notices and it's "gotcha!".

    Suppose someone German or Austrian or Swiss had come to this event in a dirndl dress? Would it have been rude for the old lady to ask where she (or nowadays, he) was from? Suppose she had? Would she have lost her job?

    In this old lady's world, she WAS being polite. Here someone has gone to a lot of effort (perhaps slain a leopard?) to dress in "folkloric dress". It would be impolite to ignore it - common sense (not woke sense which is always the opposite) says that someone who goes to this effort wants to be noticed, that they want their costume to be a conversation starter. In reality they DO very much want to be noticed but the initiated are supposed to pretend NOT to notice - the old double game. It's like "Rachel" Levy in her skirt and size 12 high heel pumps. You are supposed to keep a straight face and pretend not to notice that "she" is a guy in a dress. If you say anything, you have lost the game. The old lady saw the exotic dress as a sign that read "Please ask me why I am wearing this crazy outfit" (when really the sign read "I dare you to ask me why I am wearing this crazy outfit").

    Replies: @silviosilver

  12. “I was almost forced to say that I’m not really British”

    BINGO! See, even a jogger can catch on every once in a while.

    • Agree: anonymouseperson
  13. England and Wales demographics.

  14. “It’s like watching a nation busily engaged in heaping up its own funeral pyre”

    Enoch Powell-1968

    The pyre is nearly finished now.

    God bless Enoch Powell and goddamn the fools who refused to listen.

  15. The Guardian opens the article with this:

    The late queen’s lady-in-waiting has resigned and apologised after a black guest at a reception hosted by the queen consort was left feeling traumatised and violated after she questioned her repeatedly about where she “really came from”.

    Here’s what an accurate statement of fact would have been:

    The late queen’s lady-in-waiting has resigned and apologised after a black guest at a reception hosted by the queen consort claimed that she was left feeling traumatised and violated after [the lady-in-waiting] questioned her repeatedly about where she “really came from”.

    It’s a fascinating (to me) little example of how owning the mic leads to control of perception.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Recently Based

    Also that bit with "she questioned her repeatedly."

  16. Thing is that this type of conversation has been common in England for 100 years, and till recently it was 99% white on white. It is how the upper classes talk to anyone who isn’t in Debrett’s – the posh who is who (because they know everyone in Debrett’s). Sure it is elitist and perhaps patronising but it certainly isn’t racist.

    My conversation the other day with a cleaner/assistant with broken E European accented English who was helping out at the coroners court when 25 or us potential jurors arrived.
    Where are you from?
    From Lithuania.
    Oh – I ask because I lived in Poland for 20 years.
    Ooh – so we are neighbours haha.

    Was that a micro aggression?

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @michael droy

    By "microaggression's" actual definition, which is often ignored by both Steve and commenters, it certainly could qualify. That's different from the question whether there was anything wrong with the conversation or with noticing and revealing that you noticed.

  17. Actually, the Fulani are a large race in West Africa. I had a dictionary in which that was one of the guide words at the top of the page. Another such word was coelacanth, which has little in common with the Fulani, other than vertebrae.

    Ngozi Fulani = Fouling Nazi.

    • Replies: @nokangaroos
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Fulani are Sahel herders who migrated to West Africa rather recently,
    and regard themselves as white; Gerhard Rohlfs rated their girls as the prettiest
    and horniest he had seen on his travels, and wondered why they fetched the highest
    prices :D but as a rule they were Muslim slave traders (like the Haussa).
    Clearly Ms. Ngozi is aspiring to what she perceives as higher race.

    (the old lady´s attempts at friendly conversation may have not been up to the
    most recent standards but the response was downright rude )

    Replies: @Anonymous

  18. @Spangel226
    @tyrone

    I was all ready to mock that name, but turns out their is a lad named Sir marmaduke hussey in this article, so ngozi is suddenly not looking so bad.

    Replies: @tyrone, @kaganovitch, @Almost Missouri

    marmaduke

    ……Makes you want to get a hound dog just so you can name it “Marmaduke”.

    • Replies: @Spect3r
    @tyrone

    I am waiting for a new dog (my german sheppard died last month of old age) and i didnt know what to name him till now... thank you, Marmaduke it is :D

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @tyrone


    ……Makes you want to get a hound dog just so you can name it “Marmaduke”.
     
    What a wit!

    Duke Hussey was a war hero of World War II who had leg amputated while a prisoner of war.

    Post-war he was a distinguished journalist, and eventually the chairman of the BBC for 10 years.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @tyrone, @kaganovitch

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @tyrone

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marmaduke


    Marmaduke is a newspaper comic strip revolving around the Winslow family and their Great Dane, Marmaduke, and his best friend, a Balinese cat named Carlos, drawn by Brad Anderson from June 1954 to 2015.
     

    "The son of the athlete and colonial administrator Eric Hussey and his wife, Christine Elizabeth Morley, Marmaduke Hussey was educated at Rugby School and Trinity College, Oxford. He served in the Grenadier Guards in World War II and was severely injured at Anzio, having to have a leg amputated as a prisoner-of-war, which resulted in his repatriation"
     

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  19. I’ve been on a bit of a “History of the Anglo-Saxons” kick lately, and I have to say, as strange as Old English words and dress can be, leopard print and “Ngozi” isn’t something I’ve come across yet.

    Maybe she’s Celtic.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  20. @jcd1974
    You can't blame the old woman when the black woman looked like she was in costume as an African queen, complete with leopard print dress, a bone necklace and a tiara in her dreadlocks.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-11488083/REBECCA-ENGLISH-examines-potential-fallout-Lady-Husseys-remarks-Buckingham-Palace-event.html

    Replies: @songbird, @Steve Sailer, @Barnard, @Director95

    Someone should made a comic strip of it, but where she wears a skull necklace or shrunken heads.

  21. @Thea
    Will and Kate threw her under the bus to reveal themselves backstabbing traitors. They don’t stand for Britain, the English people or even their family and close friends.

    They could have said nothing as this is a whole bunch of nothing and let time pass. Quickly, the public forgets such trifles.

    Replies: @Kylie, @AndrewR, @AnotherDad, @Alden

    “Will and Kate threw her under the bus…”

    Definitely. I saw a pic of that black woman. She was in what appeared to be full tribal regalia–and I don’t mean a crown and sceptre.

    If the exchange went as reported, she was courteous in the face of the old bat’s badgering. But the black woman doesn’t look British –and no, people who look like her are not yet the “face of Britain”, though they might as well be. And the old bat was persistent and rude, which I would chalk up to age and class.

    But apparently Wills and Kate felt the need to burnish his woke credentials. Too bad. He should have kept his stiff upper lip zipped. Of course, he probably feels he has to be careful after all the mud his even more traitorous little bro and the former yachter now Duchess of L.A. have slung at the BRF. Not to mention being blindsided on his Caribbean visit.

    Poor Philip is doubtless spinning in his grave.

    • Agree: Thea
    • Replies: @Thea
    @Kylie

    Phillip was the wit of that clan

  22. Has anyone started a dead pool on the British monarchy?

  23. Waking to the news of Christine McVie’s death this morning reminded me of how I’d felt she was underrated compared to Nicks and Buckingham.

    But, also reminded me of how much I hate her execrable song “Oh Daddy”, which mars what would have otherwise been a perfect album for mine. What a lamentable decision to include it, and exclude Nicks’ “Silver Springs”, described as “the best song that never made it to a record album”.

    I assumed the only reason for the inclusion of “Oh Daddy” must be due to the vanity of Mick Fleetwood, who appears to me to be a massive wanker.

    Christine McVie wrote “Oh Daddy” for the band’s drummer, Mick Fleetwood. At the time, Fleetwood was the only father in the band, with two daughters.[1] Fleetwood has described the song as one of his favorite Fleetwood Mac songs of all time.[2] However, both Lindsey Buckingham’s former girlfriend Carol Ann Harris and Stevie Nicks’ biographer Zoe Howe have written that the song was originally written for the band’s lighting director, who McVie had been dating at the time.[3][4] Both Harris and Howe contend McVie only later claimed that the song was written for Fleetwood.[3][4]

    An example of a true woman using her womanly wiles to get her way. Well played, Christine McVie!

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Pat Hannagan

    Yup. I remember her from way back. There was a young female blues singer in northern England called Christine Perfect who sang with a band called Chicken Shack. They had a minor hit with a haunting version of I'd Rather Go Blind, the Etta James hit.

    Occasionally I wondered what had become of her. Decades later I discovered that she and Christine McVie were the same person.

    https://youtu.be/Ohx9Ve7-GS0

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Pat Hannagan

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Pat Hannagan

    Christy McVie had a nicer voice than Stevie Nicks. Stevie Nicks was just prettier, so she was more popular.

    Christy McVie's best were Say You Love Me, Over My Head, and You Make Loving Fun.

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

  24. Most people are not embarrassed to say where their family is from. The questions were not rude at all. Even if they were, I would think that a dignified 83-year-old woman would be excused.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  25. @Anonymous
    Former UK Home Secretary (Conservative) weighs in on the Great Replacement:

    https://twitter.com/sajidjavid/status/1597696442801741826

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Anon, @Richard B

    I get that he’s browner than my last BM, and is named Safid Jadid or some wholly alien Pakistani name like that, but as a “Conservative” he should be able to understand why some people might find it less-than-wonderful that the biggest cities in the UK have been ethnically cleansed of the majority population in a few decades. What would he say if Karachi, Islamabad and Peshawar all became minority Pakistani in a short time?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @AndrewR


    What would he say if Karachi, Islamabad and Peshawar all became minority Pakistani in a short time?
     
    They are already there. Pakistan is an empire, as are India, Iran, Afghanistan, Russia, Ethiopia, and Nigeria.



    https://assets.cureus.com/uploads/figure/file/271574/lightbox_d10fb88029c411ec874849ae4b0ebe02-Figure-1-b-.png



    From your friendly local CIA's Factbook:

    Ethnic groups
    Punjabi 44.7%, Pashtun (Pathan) 15.4%, Sindhi 14.1%, Saraiki 8.4%, Muhajirs 7.6%, Balochi 3.6%, other 6.3%

    Languages
    Punjabi 48%, Sindhi 12%, Saraiki (a Punjabi variant) 10%, Pashto (alternate name, Pashtu) 8%, Urdu (official) 8%, Balochi 3%, Hindko 2%, Brahui 1%, English (official; lingua franca of Pakistani elite and most government ministries), Burushaski, and other 8%

    https://www.cia.gov/the-world-factbook/countries/pakistan/#people-and-society
     

    Replies: @AndrewR, @anonymouseperson, @Almost Missouri, @SZ

  26. anon[684] • Disclaimer says:

    I am of African heritage, Caribbean descent and British nationality

    I can wear any or all of those hats as I see fit. When I’m wearing my British nationality hat, the British are obliged to grant me the implicit trust and esteem of an insider, and to treat as inadmissable any anti-British advocacy I engage in under my other hats. Also, if and when it suits me, I can be none of the above – in which case even if I turn up at Buckingham Palace with a bone through my nose the British aren’t allowed to notice it, even in the context of banal icebreaking smalltalk – where are you from, tell me about that bone through your nose? Who’s the aristocracy here? Whoever gets to be offended (lèse-négresse).

  27. @Thea
    Will and Kate threw her under the bus to reveal themselves backstabbing traitors. They don’t stand for Britain, the English people or even their family and close friends.

    They could have said nothing as this is a whole bunch of nothing and let time pass. Quickly, the public forgets such trifles.

    Replies: @Kylie, @AndrewR, @AnotherDad, @Alden

    The royal family has a tightrope to walk. This doesn’t excuse all of their behavior, but it’s not 1910 or even 2010 anymore. Meghan and her meat puppet Harry have put the Eye of Woke Sauron on the monarchy. Add Meghan/Harry’s non racial bombshells, and Andrew’s disastrous response to that roastie’s Epstein allegations, and try putting yourself in the shoes of Charles and William. This lady probably has at least a mild form of dementia anyway and shouldn’t be in a public facing role. And regardless, I’m sure she’s mortified that she has embarrassed the palace, and that she gave her full consent to them to throw her under the bus. The close associates of the British royal family tend to be loyal to a fault.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    @AndrewR

    Loyalty should be rewarded, not punished.

    I would have preferred that she had been spoken to or re-educated.

    Perhaps in a re-education camp? These people are awful.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    , @Art Deco
    @AndrewR

    This lady probably has at least a mild form of dementia anyway

    There is no indication she's demented.


    Andrew’s disastrous response to that roastie’s Epstein allegations,

    Andrew's 15 years of lying about the subject (one suspects due to avoid embarrassment in front of his daughters and his mother) is irrelevant to this situation.


    Add Meghan/Harry’s non racial bombshells,

    There are no such bombshells.

    Replies: @AndrewR

  28. Who would ever fight for Britain again? Even the royals have turned on their people. I guess everyone wants to rule over negros. Doesn’t look so good to me, but they’re on their way to being the Boers. Good luck.

    • Replies: @Kim
    @Rich


    Even the royals have turned on their people
     
    The royals have always been against "their people".

    Replies: @Rich

  29. @Art Deco
    I think less of William and Charles for this.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    This is orders of magnitude less revolting than their over-the-top response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which was in large part instigated by the actions of HM’s government.

    • Replies: @Gordo
    @AndrewR


    This is orders of magnitude less revolting than their over-the-top response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which was in large part instigated by the actions of HM’s government.
     
    Absolutely true and those actions are a lot more likely to actually ‘cause fallout’.
    , @Art Deco
    @AndrewR

    their over-the-top response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine,

    Their's wasn't.


    which was in large part instigated by the actions of HM’s government.

    It wasn't.

    Replies: @AndrewR

  30. The woman should never have been invited to an event

    Kate Herself should Be Checking Every Twitter Page of Every Invitee before approving guest lists or stepping foot in front of people

    You always need to know who you are dealing with

    The woman’s twitter page was a Big Red Flag pointing to a Big Bag of Trouble

    Whoever invited the woman to this event, on this day, is the Culprit and needs to be fired ASAP

    This was a set-up

    Pack a room full of fire and you’ll get a fire

    P.S. – Did anyone notice that Meghan’s Women of B.S. Conference…the other celebrated woman was a Female Rabbi
    “The Duchess of Sussex was billed to appear with Rabbi Sandy Sasso, the first woman rabbi ordained by the Reconstructionist Judaism movement at the Marriott Downtown Hotel.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Thoughts


    "...the first woman rabbi ordained by the Reconstructionist Judaism movement at the Marriott Downtown Hotel."
     
    She was ordained at a hotel? And a chain at that? I'd have demanded the Rittenhouse.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  31. “I would have preferred that she had been spoken to or re-educated.” …”
    We have ways….

    • Replies: @Sollipsist
    @Currahee

    Looks like the term "re-educated" doesn't carry the same negative connotation anymore? That's why I've come to think that all those dystopian fictions over the past century served as how-to guides rather than warnings...

  32. So, obvious question: is this one of Meghan’s plots?

    The timing is perfect — Palace race row involving the Queen’s friend, and William’s godmother ‘erupts’ just as Will and Kate arrive in the USA . . . .

    According to the indispensible Daily Mail:

    Mr Borkowski told MailOnline: ‘This is a PR disaster for the Royal Family and it is going to cause huge problems, especially at the start of William and Kate’s US trip which will be dominated by a new racism row. They are flying into a perfect storm.

    ‘It is also ammunition for Meghan and Harry who can now tell Americans they have been proved right and say: ‘Look we told you so’ when they are on their own PR blitz with their Netflix show out next week and their Invictus promotions.

    Empress Ngozi of Hackney has been identified as one of Meghan’s supporters in her jihad against the racist royals.

  33. I think Ms. Fulani was being unhelpful in not understanding the old lady’s curiosity. If she really didn’t have a clue about her roots, in spite of distinctly African name, she could have given an anthropologically accurate answer to a politically incorrect question by saying Ethiopia. In fact, anybody can give that answer to end an unpleasant conversation.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @epebble

    I read elsewhere, in the Daily Mail I think, that both her parents were originally from Barbados.

    Her surname at birth was a regular British name. Her parents were Mildred and Gladstone Headley.

    Fulani is the name of a large tribe found in Nigeria. I don't know whether this is a married name or whether she adopted it on purpose.

    Now there is a subject for conversation: "I had a DNA test that showed I was largely Fulani, so I adopted that as my surname." Or "I know I have an African name, but that is thanks to my ex-husband."

    Replies: @epebble, @YetAnotherAnon

  34. @jcd1974
    You can't blame the old woman when the black woman looked like she was in costume as an African queen, complete with leopard print dress, a bone necklace and a tiara in her dreadlocks.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-11488083/REBECCA-ENGLISH-examines-potential-fallout-Lady-Husseys-remarks-Buckingham-Palace-event.html

    Replies: @songbird, @Steve Sailer, @Barnard, @Director95

    Thanks.

  35. @AndrewR
    @Anonymous

    I get that he's browner than my last BM, and is named Safid Jadid or some wholly alien Pakistani name like that, but as a "Conservative" he should be able to understand why some people might find it less-than-wonderful that the biggest cities in the UK have been ethnically cleansed of the majority population in a few decades. What would he say if Karachi, Islamabad and Peshawar all became minority Pakistani in a short time?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    What would he say if Karachi, Islamabad and Peshawar all became minority Pakistani in a short time?

    They are already there. Pakistan is an empire, as are India, Iran, Afghanistan, Russia, Ethiopia, and Nigeria.

    From your friendly local CIA’s Factbook:

    Ethnic groups
    Punjabi 44.7%, Pashtun (Pathan) 15.4%, Sindhi 14.1%, Saraiki 8.4%, Muhajirs 7.6%, Balochi 3.6%, other 6.3%

    Languages
    Punjabi 48%, Sindhi 12%, Saraiki (a Punjabi variant) 10%, Pashto (alternate name, Pashtu) 8%, Urdu (official) 8%, Balochi 3%, Hindko 2%, Brahui 1%, English (official; lingua franca of Pakistani elite and most government ministries), Burushaski, and other 8%

    https://www.cia.gov/the-world-factbook/countries/pakistan/#people-and-society

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Reg Cæsar

    Well, the UK itself is an empire of sorts: Welsh, Irish, Scottish and English. Manx and Cornish too before being wiped out in recent centuries.

    Your omission of China is interesting but presumably accidental. The Uyghurs and Tibetans, among others, would tend to agree.

    We could also add Canada, Mexico, Brasil, Turkey, Australia... And of course the US.

    My mention of Pakistan was rhetorical. Obviously it is less ethnically homogenous than the UK, and it's not exactly a huge magnet for immigration, but if the Chinese and Russians and Germans and Spanish and Persians and especially Hindus and Bantus all started colonizing it, the myriad ethnic groups of Pakistan would likely unite in resentment

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @anonymouseperson
    @Reg Cæsar

    Your comparison is flawed. These people are all visually similar. If all the brown and black people in the U.K. were of various European backgrounds that would be a more accurate comparison. Your example compares apples to oranges, sport.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Reg Cæsar

    That's kinda like if the circa 1950 CIA Factbook described the UK as


    Ethnic groups
    English 44.7%, Scottish 15.4%, Welsh 14.1%, Northern Irish 8.4%, Irish 7.6%, Jews, Gypsies and other Europeans 3.6%, Wogs 6.3%

    Languages
    English 48%, Scots 12%, Cockney (an English variant) 10%, Gaelic (alternate name, Gàidhlig) 8%, Drunk 8%, Jibber Jabber 6%, Received Pronunciation (official; lingua franca of British elite and most government ministries), Wog Talk and other 8%
     
    , @SZ
    @Reg Cæsar

    What a retarded response! It doesn't matter if some of them speak Punjabi while the other talk in Sindi, Swahili, or Eskimo. They all marry their cousins, they all treat their women like shit, and they all spoil their children unless they are penniless and totally destitute. Pakistanis never formed an empire. They were always ruled by others, by people who did not marry their cousins.

  36. Only somewhat OT:

    Richard Curtis: lack of diversity in Love Actually makes me feel a bit stupid

    In a TV special marking the festive romcom’s 20th anniversary the director says ‘some moments … feel out of date’

    https://www.theguardian.com/film/2022/nov/30/richard-curtis-lack-of-diversity-in-love-actually-makes-me-feel-a-bit-stupid

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @PiltdownMan

    Love Actually actually did have blacks—and in the BM/WF role so beloved of media race-counters—probably proportional to their number in Britain at the time.

    But it doesn't matter. Love Actually was stupid trash, and it's embrace by the British—as a Christmas tradition, no less—was a signpost on their way to extinction.

    , @Lurker
    @PiltdownMan

    Richard Curtis is an insufferable libtard.

    I've seen it claimed he's Tribe. No idea of the truth of that. However he is married to Emma Freud. Yes Freud.


    She is the great-granddaughter of psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud
     

    Replies: @Anne Lid

  37. @Thoughts
    The woman should never have been invited to an event

    Kate Herself should Be Checking Every Twitter Page of Every Invitee before approving guest lists or stepping foot in front of people

    You always need to know who you are dealing with

    The woman's twitter page was a Big Red Flag pointing to a Big Bag of Trouble

    Whoever invited the woman to this event, on this day, is the Culprit and needs to be fired ASAP

    This was a set-up

    Pack a room full of fire and you'll get a fire

    P.S. - Did anyone notice that Meghan's Women of B.S. Conference...the other celebrated woman was a Female Rabbi
    "The Duchess of Sussex was billed to appear with Rabbi Sandy Sasso, the first woman rabbi ordained by the Reconstructionist Judaism movement at the Marriott Downtown Hotel."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    “…the first woman rabbi ordained by the Reconstructionist Judaism movement at the Marriott Downtown Hotel.”

    She was ordained at a hotel? And a chain at that? I’d have demanded the Rittenhouse.

    • Thanks: Gordo
    • LOL: Cool Daddy Jimbo
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Reg Cæsar

    I'm partial to Brown's myself.

    https://www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Review-g186338-d188019-Reviews-Brown_s_Hotel-London_England.html

  38. anonymous[308] • Disclaimer says:

    Still no comment on this Nick Fuentes kerfuffle? Easily one of the funniest stories in 2 years, if not more.

    He’s basically a kid streaming from a basement, saying funny, edgy stuff for a bunch of teenage gamers. Half of it is meant ironically. Yet, the Tribe goes full-on blood-libel…over comedy and irony. It’s wild to see.

    Major Streisand Effect in the making. Not intended sarcastically, with Streisand being a Jew and what not.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Guest
    @anonymous

    There's nothing funny or humorous about Nick Fuentes, unless you think the concept of a Nazi Eddie Haskell is humorous (which it isn't).

    Here's him trying to get sponsorships (and failing miserably). Let's see how that works out for him when he's de-banked.

    https://twitter.com/rightweengwatch/status/1597812544776699905?s=20&t=Pw14RdlUZFbCs9ITXB7gYAv

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Legba

  39. Recording or it didn’t happen. Fulani is a headhunter who bagged an octogenarian. Not much of a trophy, or a meal..

  40. @Kylie
    @Thea

    "Will and Kate threw her under the bus..."

    Definitely. I saw a pic of that black woman. She was in what appeared to be full tribal regalia--and I don't mean a crown and sceptre.

    If the exchange went as reported, she was courteous in the face of the old bat's badgering. But the black woman doesn't look British --and no, people who look like her are not yet the "face of Britain", though they might as well be. And the old bat was persistent and rude, which I would chalk up to age and class.

    But apparently Wills and Kate felt the need to burnish his woke credentials. Too bad. He should have kept his stiff upper lip zipped. Of course, he probably feels he has to be careful after all the mud his even more traitorous little bro and the former yachter now Duchess of L.A. have slung at the BRF. Not to mention being blindsided on his Caribbean visit.

    Poor Philip is doubtless spinning in his grave.

    Replies: @Thea

    Phillip was the wit of that clan

    • Agree: Kylie
  41. She’s dressing like a discount version of Eddie Murphy’s mother, the Queen of Zamunda, in Coming to America.

    Aoleon, played by the late Madge Sinclair, which is why she didn’t appear in the sequel.

    Fun Fact: The King and Queen in The Lion King were voiced by James Earl Jones and Madge Sinclair.

  42. @epebble
    I think Ms. Fulani was being unhelpful in not understanding the old lady's curiosity. If she really didn't have a clue about her roots, in spite of distinctly African name, she could have given an anthropologically accurate answer to a politically incorrect question by saying Ethiopia. In fact, anybody can give that answer to end an unpleasant conversation.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I read elsewhere, in the Daily Mail I think, that both her parents were originally from Barbados.

    Her surname at birth was a regular British name. Her parents were Mildred and Gladstone Headley.

    Fulani is the name of a large tribe found in Nigeria. I don’t know whether this is a married name or whether she adopted it on purpose.

    Now there is a subject for conversation: “I had a DNA test that showed I was largely Fulani, so I adopted that as my surname.” Or “I know I have an African name, but that is thanks to my ex-husband.”

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Jonathan Mason

    We had a Congressman from Maryland, born Frizzell Gerald Gray, Africanized later to Kweisi Mfume. I feel a bit queasy trying to pronounce it. At least Muhammad Ali was easy on tongue.

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Jonathan Mason

    Info from The Paper Of Record. She seems to have changed her "slave name" to an African one, quite common these days and a contrast to the days when Caribbean kids were christened Winston or Gladstone (like her dad).

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-11487925/DAVID-WILKES-profiles-domestic-violence-campaigner-backed-Meghan-Markle-Palace-race-row.html


    Miss Fulani told the Future Hackney website, which documents social change in east London, how she grew up in Kilburn, north London, one of seven children of Mildred, who worked for London Transport and then trained as a nurse, and Gladstone Headley, who worked for British Rail.

    Both her parents were born in Barbados. They were, she said, the only black family on their road, which was predominantly Irish.

    ‘The Irish were so good to us and we were so good to them, because we were both oppressed,’ she said, recalling how she and her siblings were not allowed in Asian or white people’s houses.
     

    Kilburn was certainly very Irish back in the day, and IIRC the Irish Centre there was pro-republican, although I'd never have thought of them as anti-racist pioneers.
  43. From the Guardian…

    At that point you should just stop reading.

  44. @AndrewR
    @Art Deco

    This is orders of magnitude less revolting than their over-the-top response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which was in large part instigated by the actions of HM's government.

    Replies: @Gordo, @Art Deco

    This is orders of magnitude less revolting than their over-the-top response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which was in large part instigated by the actions of HM’s government.

    Absolutely true and those actions are a lot more likely to actually ‘cause fallout’.

  45. @Pat Hannagan
    Waking to the news of Christine McVie's death this morning reminded me of how I'd felt she was underrated compared to Nicks and Buckingham.

    But, also reminded me of how much I hate her execrable song "Oh Daddy", which mars what would have otherwise been a perfect album for mine. What a lamentable decision to include it, and exclude Nicks' "Silver Springs", described as "the best song that never made it to a record album".

    I assumed the only reason for the inclusion of "Oh Daddy" must be due to the vanity of Mick Fleetwood, who appears to me to be a massive wanker.

    Christine McVie wrote "Oh Daddy" for the band's drummer, Mick Fleetwood. At the time, Fleetwood was the only father in the band, with two daughters.[1] Fleetwood has described the song as one of his favorite Fleetwood Mac songs of all time.[2] However, both Lindsey Buckingham's former girlfriend Carol Ann Harris and Stevie Nicks' biographer Zoe Howe have written that the song was originally written for the band's lighting director, who McVie had been dating at the time.[3][4] Both Harris and Howe contend McVie only later claimed that the song was written for Fleetwood.[3][4]

    An example of a true woman using her womanly wiles to get her way. Well played, Christine McVie!

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Achmed E. Newman

    Yup. I remember her from way back. There was a young female blues singer in northern England called Christine Perfect who sang with a band called Chicken Shack. They had a minor hit with a haunting version of I’d Rather Go Blind, the Etta James hit.

    Occasionally I wondered what had become of her. Decades later I discovered that she and Christine McVie were the same person.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    There was a young female blues singer in northern England called Christine Perfect
     
    Before F-Mac came The Legendary Christine Perfect Album.


    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/51IsYCyfWKL._SY580_.jpg


    She and Buckingham were the best songwriters of the later band; Danny Kirwan and others did that job before they went girly.

    However, "Don't Stop" was an annoying piece of noise later adopted by an annoying, noisy political party. Whose previous theme song, "Happy Days Are Here Again", dated from the 1920s, when the other party was in control.
    , @Pat Hannagan
    @Jonathan Mason

    You've obviously got a good ear.

    Great cover version that, added it to my likes! Cheers, mate.

  46. @Jim Don Bob
    I'll take "There's no actual recording of this conversation and we have to take the aggrieved Sistah's word for it" for $500, Alex.

    These "race hustling poverty pimps", in the immortal words of J. C. Watts, should go back where they came from.

    Name me one country that has improved itself by importing masses of POCs.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @kaganovitch

    ‘Name me one country that has improved itself by importing masses of POCs.’

    Well, there’s Uganda. They benefitted from all the Indians — at any rate, I’m sure things got worse when they kicked them out.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Colin Wright

    Indians are whiter than Ugandans so in a Ugandan context they are not "POCs"

  47. @Jonathan Mason
    I guess it is rude to touch somebody's hair, but then again if you are given a name badge so that people can see your name, you probably need to make sure that the badge is not covered by your hair, otherwise it defeats the point.

    Apparently this woman was dressed up in full African folk dress regalia, which does beg the question of where she comes from. Why dress up in this fashion if you don't want to talk about it?

    Her surname is Fulani, which presumably relates to the Fulani tribe which is found in Nigeria.

    Conversation should have gone like this:

    "Where are you from?"

    "Actually I was born right here in London and grew up here, but my parents came to Britain in the 1950s from (X) and they liked it so much they never went back! I went with them to the home country one time on vacation and loved it, Have you ever been there?"

    Replies: @silviosilver, @Mike Tre, @AnotherDad

    ” Why dress up in this fashion if you don’t want to talk about it?”

    Because it’s meant to be worshiped, not questioned.

  48. Why on Earth would any white person in today’s environment want to talk to Mme. Fulani? In that crazy get up? At a semi-official State function?

    Is there anything . . . ANYTHING, good that can come of such an encounter?

    You know how poisonous snakes, frogs, insects have a strange and colourful presentation? Means “Stay Away!”

    • Replies: @Danindc
    @Rebunga

    Lol exactly. Why?

    I guess it was genuine curiosity and manners but the lady in waiting has no instincts!

  49. I would say the older white lady was showing poor etiquette, poor manners, in pressing the question to the black lady. But I wouldn’t go so far as “racist.” I’ve had people ask what my (white) ancestry was, such as Irish or German. I understood the curiosity and wasn’t offended. (The correct answer is 75% English and 25% German).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @EricD


    I would say the older white lady was showing poor etiquette, poor manners, in pressing the question to the black lady.
     
    Do you really believe the conversation happened in anything like this form as concocted, long after the fact, by a trained, professional race hustler?

    "Ngozi Fulani" nee Headley also gives her current surname as "Headley-Fulani." She claims to know "basic" Hausa, and to be a "Marriages Registrar, Teacher, African Dancer,Drummer & Ceremonies Officer."

    She may have been married to an actual Fulani, perhaps from Nigeria.

    No word on her given "deadname."

    Replies: @Alden, @Chrisnonymous

  50. @Jonathan Mason
    @epebble

    I read elsewhere, in the Daily Mail I think, that both her parents were originally from Barbados.

    Her surname at birth was a regular British name. Her parents were Mildred and Gladstone Headley.

    Fulani is the name of a large tribe found in Nigeria. I don't know whether this is a married name or whether she adopted it on purpose.

    Now there is a subject for conversation: "I had a DNA test that showed I was largely Fulani, so I adopted that as my surname." Or "I know I have an African name, but that is thanks to my ex-husband."

    Replies: @epebble, @YetAnotherAnon

    We had a Congressman from Maryland, born Frizzell Gerald Gray, Africanized later to Kweisi Mfume. I feel a bit queasy trying to pronounce it. At least Muhammad Ali was easy on tongue.

  51. This woman is opposed to 3 things to be sure:

    -English people moving to cities they built any place in England where Africans have recently become a majority or near majority. (Gentrification)

    -Jews moving to Judea. (Colonization)

    -Whites born in Africa owning and putting to good use any land in Africa. (Exploitation)

    What’s funny is most blacks living in civilized countries aren’t even as polite as this old aristocrat. They are forever speculating on the ethnic origins of everyone they come across; I’ve had more than one ask me, ‘what are you?’

    ‘American’ is never sufficient.

    • Agree: Old and Grumpy
  52. @anonymous
    Still no comment on this Nick Fuentes kerfuffle? Easily one of the funniest stories in 2 years, if not more.

    He's basically a kid streaming from a basement, saying funny, edgy stuff for a bunch of teenage gamers. Half of it is meant ironically. Yet, the Tribe goes full-on blood-libel...over comedy and irony. It's wild to see.

    Major Streisand Effect in the making. Not intended sarcastically, with Streisand being a Jew and what not.

    Replies: @Anonymous Guest

    There’s nothing funny or humorous about Nick Fuentes, unless you think the concept of a Nazi Eddie Haskell is humorous (which it isn’t).

    Here’s him trying to get sponsorships (and failing miserably). Let’s see how that works out for him when he’s de-banked.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Anonymous Guest

    OK Schoolmarm

    , @Legba
    @Anonymous Guest

    I've never watched, but a Nazi Eddie Haskell sounds right up my alley

  53. @Reg Cæsar
    @AndrewR


    What would he say if Karachi, Islamabad and Peshawar all became minority Pakistani in a short time?
     
    They are already there. Pakistan is an empire, as are India, Iran, Afghanistan, Russia, Ethiopia, and Nigeria.



    https://assets.cureus.com/uploads/figure/file/271574/lightbox_d10fb88029c411ec874849ae4b0ebe02-Figure-1-b-.png



    From your friendly local CIA's Factbook:

    Ethnic groups
    Punjabi 44.7%, Pashtun (Pathan) 15.4%, Sindhi 14.1%, Saraiki 8.4%, Muhajirs 7.6%, Balochi 3.6%, other 6.3%

    Languages
    Punjabi 48%, Sindhi 12%, Saraiki (a Punjabi variant) 10%, Pashto (alternate name, Pashtu) 8%, Urdu (official) 8%, Balochi 3%, Hindko 2%, Brahui 1%, English (official; lingua franca of Pakistani elite and most government ministries), Burushaski, and other 8%

    https://www.cia.gov/the-world-factbook/countries/pakistan/#people-and-society
     

    Replies: @AndrewR, @anonymouseperson, @Almost Missouri, @SZ

    Well, the UK itself is an empire of sorts: Welsh, Irish, Scottish and English. Manx and Cornish too before being wiped out in recent centuries.

    Your omission of China is interesting but presumably accidental. The Uyghurs and Tibetans, among others, would tend to agree.

    We could also add Canada, Mexico, Brasil, Turkey, Australia… And of course the US.

    My mention of Pakistan was rhetorical. Obviously it is less ethnically homogenous than the UK, and it’s not exactly a huge magnet for immigration, but if the Chinese and Russians and Germans and Spanish and Persians and especially Hindus and Bantus all started colonizing it, the myriad ethnic groups of Pakistan would likely unite in resentment

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @AndrewR


    Your omission of China is interesting but presumably accidental. The Uyghurs and Tibetans, among others, would tend to agree.
     
    No, I left China out because the Han constitute 92% of the population. (Down from 96% in 1949.) The "imperial" parts are on the fringe, albeit a majority of the land mass.

    I chose states with no ethnic majority.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Peter Lund

  54. @Pat Hannagan
    Waking to the news of Christine McVie's death this morning reminded me of how I'd felt she was underrated compared to Nicks and Buckingham.

    But, also reminded me of how much I hate her execrable song "Oh Daddy", which mars what would have otherwise been a perfect album for mine. What a lamentable decision to include it, and exclude Nicks' "Silver Springs", described as "the best song that never made it to a record album".

    I assumed the only reason for the inclusion of "Oh Daddy" must be due to the vanity of Mick Fleetwood, who appears to me to be a massive wanker.

    Christine McVie wrote "Oh Daddy" for the band's drummer, Mick Fleetwood. At the time, Fleetwood was the only father in the band, with two daughters.[1] Fleetwood has described the song as one of his favorite Fleetwood Mac songs of all time.[2] However, both Lindsey Buckingham's former girlfriend Carol Ann Harris and Stevie Nicks' biographer Zoe Howe have written that the song was originally written for the band's lighting director, who McVie had been dating at the time.[3][4] Both Harris and Howe contend McVie only later claimed that the song was written for Fleetwood.[3][4]

    An example of a true woman using her womanly wiles to get her way. Well played, Christine McVie!

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Achmed E. Newman

    Christy McVie had a nicer voice than Stevie Nicks. Stevie Nicks was just prettier, so she was more popular.

    Christy McVie’s best were Say You Love Me, Over My Head, and You Make Loving Fun.

    • Agree: Russ
    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Christy McVie's tracks on Tusk really suit that double album and compliment Buckingham's zany sound. I can see why they did an album together many years later, they seem way more simpatico than Buckingham and Nicks.

    Funnily enough, I absolutely despised Tusk when I got it as part of my monthly allotment from a record club I was signed up to as a kid. I gave it away to an alcoholic slut of a girlfriend I had when I was in my late teens, early 20s. She loved Fleetwood Mac and I despised them. I should have seen the warning signs.

    For some reason I only really listened to Fleetwood Mac a few years ago now when out of the blue I thought I'd give them a go and went through their catalogue on Spotify. To my amazement they were actually...fantastic!

    I think listening to music is the same as books and the attitude Doris Lessing has is the one for me:

    “There is only one way to read, which is to browse in libraries and bookshops, picking up books that attract you, reading only those, dropping them when they bore you, skipping the parts that drag-and never, never reading anything because you feel you ought, or because it is part of a trend or a movement. Remember that the book which bores you when you are twenty or thirty will open doors for you when you are forty or fifty-and vise versa. Don’t read a book out of its right time for you. ”

    Reading up on Stevie Nicks' bio I see she was a drug addled slut who rode the rockstar cock carousel all the way to the top. I could see in hindsight what my then drunken whore of a girlfriend saw in her. Two kindred spirits!


    Back to McVie, she's of the "easy listening FM" variety but, whereas I generally find "easy listening" rock too hard because it's so trite, she made easy listening actually really rather easy, and nice.

    As I said, I rate Tusk as a double album and now see what so many musos got from Buckingham (like Tame Impala for example covering That's All for Everyone) but also appreciate McVie for what she brings.

    Replies: @Curle

  55. Her last name is Fulani, how do you screw that up?
    ——-
    Police robots incoming, you now understand why Democrats let their cities burn (besides creating an artificial state of affairs in which the Trump presidency was not good). Create the crisis, supply the solution. Meanwhile procedures from the freaking disco age would solve (and in places has solved ) the artificial crisis overnight.

    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @J.Ross


    Create the crisis, supply the solution.
     
    Said solution is always "more government." This government expansion is then staffed with devout Democrats. That's how we ended up with a bloated government infrastructure completely dominated by Democrats in unelected positions. When it reached a critical point, this mass unelected government decided that it could overrule elected officials.
  56. Dumb boomer voluntarily entered a sudden-death, no-free-speech situation and got exactly what she deserved.

    • Replies: @Studley
    @J.Ross


    Dumb boomer voluntarily entered a sudden-death, no-free-speech situation and got exactly what she deserved.
     
    Eh? Baroness Hussey (born 1939) ain't no boomer. Look, I get this 'Ok Boomer" idea (Gen X myself) where you young fellows object to liberal platitudes being directed at you by well-off baby boomers. I sympathize and get where you're coming from.

    But Susan Hussey wasn't doing that. At age 82 she wasn't expressing, anything liberal in that encounter. Most likely unaware of the changing moral imperatives regarding black people in the current year (2022 and back to St George in 2020 at least). More a throwback to genuine intellectual curiosity as to facts, "But where are you from?" (geographically), than current liberal present day absence of factual information discourse.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  57. @jcd1974
    You can't blame the old woman when the black woman looked like she was in costume as an African queen, complete with leopard print dress, a bone necklace and a tiara in her dreadlocks.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-11488083/REBECCA-ENGLISH-examines-potential-fallout-Lady-Husseys-remarks-Buckingham-Palace-event.html

    Replies: @songbird, @Steve Sailer, @Barnard, @Director95

    In a just society, it would be against the law for this woman to claim she is English or British. The same goes for PM Sunak.

  58. You spend years learning to be an interesting, well-informed, polite person in conversation, beginning with learning from your parents, and proceeding through innumerable social settings. So, finally, you’re ready!..no matter whom you wind-up getting seated next to. And then it turns out, after all that, only talking about about the weather is safe. Because you never know who has a chip on their shoulder. Thank you, grievance-studies departments.

  59. Which side of WW Hair do you think this woman is on?

    Whatever side it is; she is certainly talented – and has a good sense of humor : )

    • Replies: @Edward Dett
    @Harpagornis

    Video sparked a connection to the current frontrunner in BBC's Strictly Come Dancing this year: a well-spoken African photographer whose braids almost reach his knees. I exaggerate not: he can definitely sit on his hair. No further comment at this time.

  60. And then it turns out, after all that, only talking about about the weather is safe.

    Sorry to say, SafeNow, that even talking about the weather is fraught with peril now, due to Climate Alarmists.

    From an old Peak Stupidity post titled “You can’t even discuss the weather anymore.”:

    Andy: “It sure looks like we got a cold front a-comin’ thru; don’t you feel it in your bones, Floyd?”

    Floyd: “Yeah, this weather is so variable now, due to that there global warming thingy that guy from Raleigh told me about.”

    Andy (louder): “I said COLD, Floyd, is your hearing aid OK? I can run by the drug store and pick you up some batteries, while I get Ope an ice-cream soda and try to pick up the new girl in town.”

    Floyd: “I hear just fine, Andy. The whole climate is just crazy, now Andy, due to people like YOU and that deputy of yours driving around in that gas guzzling sheriff’s car! Y’all are killing the planet!”

    Andy: “Well, I’m just sorry I asked. Now, how ’bout you just cut my hair, Floyd, and shut the fuck up!”

    Disclaimer: This was not from the original Andy Griffith show series. This is from the new prequel, with a younger, hotter Aunt Bea.

  61. @AndrewR
    @Reg Cæsar

    Well, the UK itself is an empire of sorts: Welsh, Irish, Scottish and English. Manx and Cornish too before being wiped out in recent centuries.

    Your omission of China is interesting but presumably accidental. The Uyghurs and Tibetans, among others, would tend to agree.

    We could also add Canada, Mexico, Brasil, Turkey, Australia... And of course the US.

    My mention of Pakistan was rhetorical. Obviously it is less ethnically homogenous than the UK, and it's not exactly a huge magnet for immigration, but if the Chinese and Russians and Germans and Spanish and Persians and especially Hindus and Bantus all started colonizing it, the myriad ethnic groups of Pakistan would likely unite in resentment

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Your omission of China is interesting but presumably accidental. The Uyghurs and Tibetans, among others, would tend to agree.

    No, I left China out because the Han constitute 92% of the population. (Down from 96% in 1949.) The “imperial” parts are on the fringe, albeit a majority of the land mass.

    I chose states with no ethnic majority.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Han are relatively ethnically heterogeneous, being the product of millennia of Han conquest from a small region in what is now Northeastern China. And lingustically they have a wide variation, despite having a common writing system each language attaches its own pronunciations to.

    Race, ethnicity, country, nation, people, culture, empire, language, etc can all be very complicated to define. Let's just agree that Brits have a right to not want to go from a 98% English/Welsh/Scottish realm to an English/Welsh/Scottish minority within the course of a single century after fifteen centuries of low immigration (the Norman conquest was very significant from a cultural perspective but genetically it would have been very trivial even if the Normans had genetically differed significantly from the British - which they didn't; a tiny number of Norman invaders had an enormous effect on the culture and language of England)

    , @Peter Lund
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Han ethnicity is largely a lie. Yes, the state calls them that. Almost all of them call themselves that. Most of them even believe it.

    But, ackshually, things are a lot more complicated. Many Southerners are surprised when genetic tests reveal they are closer to Vietnamese than they are to Northern Han.

  62. @tyrone
    With a perfectly good English name like Ngozi Fulani why she ever ask such a question .....send her to Coventry now!

    Replies: @Spangel226, @Ebony Obelisk, @Russ, @Mr. Grey

    What’s your problem jerk?

    Man I cannot wait for white men to lose all institutional power.

    • Troll: duncsbaby, tyrone
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Ebony Obelisk


    What’s your problem jerk?
     
    This is a new low for you, Eb. Before, you managed to keep the rudeness in check.

    Replies: @International Jew

    , @Curle
    @Ebony Obelisk

    Cut the Black militant act. Only white women speaking at inclusion seminars say this shit.

  63. @Jonathan Mason
    @Pat Hannagan

    Yup. I remember her from way back. There was a young female blues singer in northern England called Christine Perfect who sang with a band called Chicken Shack. They had a minor hit with a haunting version of I'd Rather Go Blind, the Etta James hit.

    Occasionally I wondered what had become of her. Decades later I discovered that she and Christine McVie were the same person.

    https://youtu.be/Ohx9Ve7-GS0

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Pat Hannagan

    There was a young female blues singer in northern England called Christine Perfect

    Before F-Mac came The Legendary Christine Perfect Album.

    She and Buckingham were the best songwriters of the later band; Danny Kirwan and others did that job before they went girly.

    However, “Don’t Stop” was an annoying piece of noise later adopted by an annoying, noisy political party. Whose previous theme song, “Happy Days Are Here Again”, dated from the 1920s, when the other party was in control.

  64. @Rich
    Who would ever fight for Britain again? Even the royals have turned on their people. I guess everyone wants to rule over negros. Doesn't look so good to me, but they're on their way to being the Boers. Good luck.

    Replies: @Kim

    Even the royals have turned on their people

    The royals have always been against “their people”.

    • Replies: @Rich
    @Kim

    Oddly enough, not really. Monarchs throughout the world have almost uniformly been a friend to the commoner. Queen Victoria was greeted by adoring crowds in Ireland shortly before their 1916 uprising and millions have fought for their "king and country" from every corner of the earth. I would agree that they often mistreated those they conquered, but that was the way of war and is no different from any other system of government that conquers a foreign land.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  65. Anon[292] • Disclaimer says:

    “I am of African heritage, Caribbean descent and British nationality.”

    I don’t speak politically correct UK speech. Is “British nationality” code for not a descendant of the native peoples of Great Britain (English, Welsh, Scottish, Cornish)? In other words, is “British nationality” a way to say “not British in any meaningful sense”?

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anon

    No, it's a way of saying that she has as much right to be British as the historical people of Great Britain, which is a way of saying that the historical people of Great Britain are not a people. Her own Caribbean or African people have the right to perpeturate their own traditions, to distinguish themselves from outsiders, to identify their own interests and advocate for them. The historical inhabitants of Great Britain aren't a people and have no such rights.

    It's not just a British thing - it's what immigrants to any European country assert. "Citizenship" is also used but it has connotations of paper citizenship. "Nationality" is historically seen as a deeper bond - shared ancestry, people who have been in the place for centuries. The appropriation of "nationality" by immigrants is a way of denying that identity to the historical people. It turns nationality into a superficial frivolity that can be put on and taken back off again - I'll cheer for France as long as Morocco isn't playing.

    The early waves of immigration from the British Empire/Commonwealth were facilitated by the fact that the colonized people had an official status as subjects of the British monarch, which put them on an equal standing with the English/Scottish/Welsh. Was it necessary to interpret that as a right to residency in England/Scotland/Wales, or could the British reasonably have said that British law will protect you where you are but gives you no right to be treated like a local wherever you want to go? It was only a theoretical issue when the demographic proportions were different and travel wasn't an option for most people. Enoch Powell described the principle as humbug and tried without success to introduce pragmatic restrictions on movement/residency. Anti-white advocates, who aren't usually defenders of quaint quixotic principles from the 1950's, are strangely protective of the principle that half the people in the world are British subjects and therefore entitled to residency in Great Britain.

  66. This just came up on SkepChick.com as well as on YouTube:

    We Don’t Mate Randomly & that Screws up Genetics Research!

    Why? Well, because when identifying these kinds of correlations, geneticists tend to start with one big assumption: people choose mates at random.

    “Hold on,” you may be thinking, “are geneticists as a population so socially inept that they think people tend to flip a coin when deciding whether or not to date, fornicate, or more accurately have offspring with a potential partner? Do geneticists think all parties are key parties where you go home with whoever has the 1987 Chevy Cavalier?[“]

    No. This is a known issue best summed up in a joke: a farmer was having trouble getting his cows to produce milk and after he ran out of ideas, he turned to the academics at the local university. A multidisciplinary team was assembled, led by a theoretical physicist who was sure they could find a solution. After many weeks of intense work, the physicist went to the farmer in triumph. “I have the solution,” he announced proudly, “but it only works on a spherical cow flying through a vacuum.”

  67. I don’t know what she meant by ‘my people’.

    Oh yeah? I knew exactly what Ms Fulani meant by ‘Sistah’.

  68. • Thanks: tyrone
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Written by a drooling illiterate who can't write a single sentence without making at least two grammatical errors.

    It's also a lie propagated by a Holocaust denier:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:ZIM_(shipping_company)

    The decision to move to Virginia had been made months before and there were still ZIM employees working in the WTC on 9-11. Most steamship companies were once located in lower Manhattan but by 2001 they had been leaving for decades and ZIM was a straggler.

    The towers were always white elephants occupied mainly by government agencies and were half empty when they came down. It was a terrible building to work in. On windy days the towers swayed and creaked like a ship in a storm and the express elevator to the sky lobby vibrated like an amusement park ride.

    Replies: @Alden

  69. What a joke. “Trauma” my ass.

  70. “Sistah Space” seems like it could be a spin-off of the 1980s sitcom “227”; but on the International Space Station.

    • Replies: @fish
    @Not Raul

    Sistah Space” seems like it could be a spin-off of the 1980s sitcom “227”


    How bout Pigs in Space from the “Muppet Show”?

  71. I am getting tired of all the repetitive endless talk about the Royal Family. Now this is partly my own fault for spending so much time at the US version of the UK’s Daily Mail.

    But mostly not. It is not my fault that Harry and Meghan moved here and all on their own, decided they would act like they are America’s Royal Family. They are always to places or sitting in front of microphones and talking like I want them to and they are doing me some kind of favor but all I want is for them to shut up and go away!

    What I have figured out is that the Royal Family are all together, over in the UK, and as of right now, there is no big move to get rid of them. They have ownership, genuine power although not a lot of it, public support and are secure in their position. Harry and Meghan are here by themselves here and don’t represent anyone.

    Most of today’s uproar is due to fears of how Meghan and Harry can use this to strengthen their claims of racism. Everybody has to stop worrying about Meghan and Harry. They will have Nexflix show starting next week, book coming out soon, big to-do for a few days and then — what will they do for an encore, after embarrassing their relatives? Harry and Meghan have no power, all they have is resentment and desperation.

    Enough already.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @notsaying

    So, what would you suggest, the taxpayers buy the largest stretch limo available, load up the Royal Family in it, and tell some ex-Le Mans driver paparazzi that that all the women inside are undressed and have the most humongous stretch marks you've ever seen?

    I'm sick of hearing about them too, even though that's mostly on the comments on this very blog. Crowdfunding? More work for Elton John? So long as it doesn't interrupt Saturday Night Live this time.

  72. @Reg Cæsar
    @AndrewR


    What would he say if Karachi, Islamabad and Peshawar all became minority Pakistani in a short time?
     
    They are already there. Pakistan is an empire, as are India, Iran, Afghanistan, Russia, Ethiopia, and Nigeria.



    https://assets.cureus.com/uploads/figure/file/271574/lightbox_d10fb88029c411ec874849ae4b0ebe02-Figure-1-b-.png



    From your friendly local CIA's Factbook:

    Ethnic groups
    Punjabi 44.7%, Pashtun (Pathan) 15.4%, Sindhi 14.1%, Saraiki 8.4%, Muhajirs 7.6%, Balochi 3.6%, other 6.3%

    Languages
    Punjabi 48%, Sindhi 12%, Saraiki (a Punjabi variant) 10%, Pashto (alternate name, Pashtu) 8%, Urdu (official) 8%, Balochi 3%, Hindko 2%, Brahui 1%, English (official; lingua franca of Pakistani elite and most government ministries), Burushaski, and other 8%

    https://www.cia.gov/the-world-factbook/countries/pakistan/#people-and-society
     

    Replies: @AndrewR, @anonymouseperson, @Almost Missouri, @SZ

    Your comparison is flawed. These people are all visually similar. If all the brown and black people in the U.K. were of various European backgrounds that would be a more accurate comparison. Your example compares apples to oranges, sport.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @anonymouseperson

    There is a large amount of phenotypic variation in Pakistan, as in Europe. Few if any Sicilians could pass as Swedish.

  73. @Jim Don Bob
    I'll take "There's no actual recording of this conversation and we have to take the aggrieved Sistah's word for it" for $500, Alex.

    These "race hustling poverty pimps", in the immortal words of J. C. Watts, should go back where they came from.

    Name me one country that has improved itself by importing masses of POCs.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @kaganovitch

    Name me one country that has improved itself by importing masses of POCs.

    Well, if imaginary countries count, and apparently they do, the Star Nation of Manticore in David Weber’s Honor Harrington sci-fi novels was immeasurably improved by importing PoC. In fact their royal family, the Wintons, are OC. So there.

  74. @Spangel226
    @tyrone

    I was all ready to mock that name, but turns out their is a lad named Sir marmaduke hussey in this article, so ngozi is suddenly not looking so bad.

    Replies: @tyrone, @kaganovitch, @Almost Missouri

    I was all ready to mock that name, but turns out their is a lad named Sir marmaduke hussey in this article, so ngozi is suddenly not looking so bad.

    Got the last laugh on that Wodehouse chap, that’s for sure.

  75. “Harry and Meghan have no power, all they have is resentment and desperation.”

    Unfortunately, as long as Harry has his dimwitted, tampon-headed father’s loyalty and support (and Meghan has it through marriage), they do have power. Not executive power wrt the monarchy but the power to compel worldwide media attention by virtue of their titles.

    I don’t care how Charles feels about them privately. But for the sake of his family and country, he should strip them of their titles and make it clear that publicly, they have only the most tenuous connection with the BRF.

    For years now, they have lied and spread malicious rumors about the BRF with no consequences for their outrageous antics. That needs to stop.

    I have read from sources considered reliable that Markle was a “yacht girl” before becoming involved with Harry. Even worse, not only was Harry protected by babysitters while he played at being a soldier but he was said to beat up escorts that served military bases. Apparently major scrubbing of the internet, payments and NDAs have kept these rumors under wraps. So long as the BRF continues to protect the Markles, they know they have nothing to fear.

    The BRF can put a stop to this nonsense any time it chooses. I can’t figure out why it doesn’t, not after all the sordid revelations about Randy Andy and the Queen is dead and buried.

  76. OT, but so funny that Admiral Levine’s date at the French ambassador’s Bastille Day reception in July, featured in an iSteve post, was put on leave by the Biden administration for stealing a woman’s luggage at the Minneapolis airport. Sam Brinton held the post of Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Spent Fuel and Waste Disposition in the U.S. Department of Energy, an impressive job title if I ever heard one.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/the-further-adventures-of-admiral-levine/

    • Replies: @EdwardM
    @Harry Baldwin

    Some strange details of this story (which I guess is not surprising given how strange the story headline itself is).

    According to the court filings, Brinton said when they opened the bag at their hotel, they realized it wasn’t theirs, but got nervous that someone would think they stole it and didn’t know what to do. They said they emptied the luggage and left the person’s clothes inside the drawers of a dresser in the hotel room.
     

    I guess it's possible that someone could mistakenly grab a bag off the carousel, but, if one discovered this when one arrived at one's hotel, wouldn't 99% of people say, "oh shit!" and immediately rush back to the airport to return the suitcase?

    Brinton claimed to have placed the clothes from the bag inside the hotel room's drawers and departed without the garments, although no clothing was ever recovered from Brinton's hotel room.
     

    Then he traveled back home with the suitcase as if it were his, then took it on his next vacation too. I guess the police eventually pieced this sequence of events together weeks later and confirmed the steps with video footage.

    So what's the real story? Some snit begat by a homo lover's quarrel -- he was traveling with someone, they had a fight, so he stole the other's bag at the airport?

    Of course this guy is obviously mentally ill, so who knows.

    https://nypost.com/2022/11/28/non-binary-biden-nuclear-official-charged-with-stealing-womans-luggage-at-airport/

    Replies: @Alden, @Brutusale, @Jack D, @AnotherDad, @Almost Missouri

    , @Cool Daddy Jimbo
    @Harry Baldwin


    OT, but so funny that Admiral Levine’s date at the French ambassador’s Bastille Day reception in July, featured in an iSteve post, was put on leave by the Biden administration for stealing a woman’s luggage at the Minneapolis airport. Sam Brinton held the post of Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Spent Fuel and Waste Disposition in the U.S. Department of Energy, an impressive job title if I ever heard one.
     
    "Stealing a woman's luggage" is just too fucking perfect.
  77. Harry protected by babysitters while he played at being a soldier but he was said to beat up escorts that served military bases.

    Then there was that Nazi costume he wore to a party in 2005.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    @Harry Baldwin

    Then there was that Nazi costume he wore to a party in 2005.

    Well, nobody's all bad.

  78. “and insist I don’t have the right to British nationality”

    You don’t.

    She said she had “never felt so unwelcome or so uncomfortable”.

    Good. You ARE unwelcome and you SHOULD be uncomfortable.

    She said: “I was almost forced to say that I’m not really British.”

    You’re not. You run a grift called Sistah Space, for pete’s sake. You’re a Basketball-American.

    ****

    I think it’s worth bearing in mind just how often the British, and especially the toff/posh British, can be so insufferable. They seem to think they’re being clever, but nobody else can stand it.

    Seems to me it’s possible that this was a tug-of-war between these two cows, a smiling-while-staring-daggers sort of contest of wills. Who will be the dominant?

    Cow #1: Asks a small-talk question with a dagger hidden inside it. (Sort of like: “Ah, Mr. McGarrigle. (PAUSE) Irish, isn’t it?”)

    Cow #2: Gives an icy, evasive, deliberately rude answer, pretending not to know what Cow #1 actually means. Queen’s gambit declined.

    Cow #1 interprets this as the kick in the shins that it actually is (really, a counter-kick) and digs in her heels, refusing to stop until she gets the stupid answer she demands. “Now we’re getting somewhere” is the tell that there are no honest misunderstandings here. I’ve been through this dance with so many Oxbridge twats I’m almost ready to side with the bison.

    But anybody who spent decades married to a giant, comically large cartoon dog deserves the benefit of the doubt, I’d say.

    • Agree: AndrewR, Recently Based
    • LOL: kaganovitch
    • Replies: @ChrisZ
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I think you nailed the mutually venal motivations lurking in that dialogue, Germ. Condescension versus provocation, each witless in its own way.

    Steve’s suggestion that the whole episode was an easy way for the new royals to rid themselves of an old hanger-on seems likely to me, too.

    What’s ridiculous is that these days the whole world is expected to take notice. In a different time, none of it would ever have gotten beyond the respective “ladies at lunch” crowds:

    Cow #1: “Can you imagine the impertinence…?”

    Cow #2: “Listen to how I stood up to that old muthah f****r…”

    The listeners at each table nod approvingly; each side claims a victory; the rest of us are blissfully left out of it.

  79. @Not Raul
    “Sistah Space” seems like it could be a spin-off of the 1980s sitcom “227”; but on the International Space Station.

    Replies: @fish

    Sistah Space” seems like it could be a spin-off of the 1980s sitcom “227”

    How bout Pigs in Space from the “Muppet Show”?

    • Agree: Not Raul
  80. “She’s dressing like a discount version of Eddie Murphy’s mother, the Queen of Zamunda, in Coming to America.”

    Was she the Queen of Zamunda, or Queen of Wakanda?

  81. “Then there was that Nazi costume he wore to a party in 2005.”

    Yes and frolicking naked while apparently drunk and/or high in Las Vegas. There are pics of both incidents, the latter occurring just ten years ago when he was 27.

    By the way, here’s the link to the blind item about his rough ways

    https://blindgossip.com/famous-son-got-very-rough/#more-101411

    But the worst is this idiot using his family name and title to try to influence our political process (the voting video before the 2020 election) and criticize our First Amendment, calling it “bonkers”. Whatever his handlers have told him, he’s a guest here, uninvited and unwelcome.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Kylie

    At least Harry is here legally, married to an American. And he supports her and their children.

    Unlike 50 million other foreigners here illegally and living off their anchor babies welfare benefits.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Kylie

    , @Yngvar
    @Kylie


    ...frolicking naked while apparently drunk...
     
    A tradition in the British military. It's the last party before combat deployment. Has to get naked, Royal or not, the crazy bastards.

    Replies: @Kylie

  82. The only humans more nauseating than our entitled elites (the Bushes, Bidens, Clintons, Obamas, etc.) are the remnants of the aristocracies and monarchies that still plague Europe. I get that the “Sistah” is a malicious, attention-seeking opportunist, but if her preferred targets are members of the nobility, she might do more good than harm.

  83. The encounter on Tuesday at a violence against women and girls reception

    Should have gone for broke with something like, “How lovely! Are you here to speak about female genital mutilation in your country?”

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Cool Daddy Jimbo
    @International Jew


    Should have gone for broke with something like, “How lovely! Are you here to speak about female genital mutilation in your country?”
     
    Unfortunately we don't really have the moral high ground on the genital mutilation front any more.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  84. @PiltdownMan
    Only somewhat OT:

    Richard Curtis: lack of diversity in Love Actually makes me feel a bit stupid

    In a TV special marking the festive romcom’s 20th anniversary the director says ‘some moments … feel out of date’

    https://www.theguardian.com/film/2022/nov/30/richard-curtis-lack-of-diversity-in-love-actually-makes-me-feel-a-bit-stupid
     

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Lurker

    Love Actually actually did have blacks—and in the BM/WF role so beloved of media race-counters—probably proportional to their number in Britain at the time.

    But it doesn’t matter. Love Actually was stupid trash, and it’s embrace by the British—as a Christmas tradition, no less—was a signpost on their way to extinction.

  85. @Anonymous Guest
    @anonymous

    There's nothing funny or humorous about Nick Fuentes, unless you think the concept of a Nazi Eddie Haskell is humorous (which it isn't).

    Here's him trying to get sponsorships (and failing miserably). Let's see how that works out for him when he's de-banked.

    https://twitter.com/rightweengwatch/status/1597812544776699905?s=20&t=Pw14RdlUZFbCs9ITXB7gYAv

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Legba

    OK Schoolmarm

  86. @Harry Baldwin
    OT, but so funny that Admiral Levine's date at the French ambassador’s Bastille Day reception in July, featured in an iSteve post, was put on leave by the Biden administration for stealing a woman's luggage at the Minneapolis airport. Sam Brinton held the post of Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Spent Fuel and Waste Disposition in the U.S. Department of Energy, an impressive job title if I ever heard one.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/the-further-adventures-of-admiral-levine/

    Replies: @EdwardM, @Cool Daddy Jimbo

    Some strange details of this story (which I guess is not surprising given how strange the story headline itself is).

    According to the court filings, Brinton said when they opened the bag at their hotel, they realized it wasn’t theirs, but got nervous that someone would think they stole it and didn’t know what to do. They said they emptied the luggage and left the person’s clothes inside the drawers of a dresser in the hotel room.

    I guess it’s possible that someone could mistakenly grab a bag off the carousel, but, if one discovered this when one arrived at one’s hotel, wouldn’t 99% of people say, “oh shit!” and immediately rush back to the airport to return the suitcase?

    Brinton claimed to have placed the clothes from the bag inside the hotel room’s drawers and departed without the garments, although no clothing was ever recovered from Brinton’s hotel room.

    Then he traveled back home with the suitcase as if it were his, then took it on his next vacation too. I guess the police eventually pieced this sequence of events together weeks later and confirmed the steps with video footage.

    So what’s the real story? Some snit begat by a homo lover’s quarrel — he was traveling with someone, they had a fight, so he stole the other’s bag at the airport?

    Of course this guy is obviously mentally ill, so who knows.

    https://nypost.com/2022/11/28/non-binary-biden-nuclear-official-charged-with-stealing-womans-luggage-at-airport/

    • Replies: @Alden
    @EdwardM

    SOP when there’s a luggage mix up is call the airline. We lost some luggage once.2 days later an airline guy brought it to where we were staying. Binton must travel a lot. He’s not some kid or unsophisticated person. Very expensive piece, he saw it and stole it.

    , @Brutusale
    @EdwardM

    He had no checked luggage. He had no reason to be at the luggage carousel. Out and out theft.

    Replies: @EdwardM

    , @Jack D
    @EdwardM

    The video showed that after he took the bag from the carousel, he pulled off the owner's luggage tag and discarded it.

    The bag was a "$2,325" Vera Bradley suitcase (BTW prosecutors love to inflate numbers - I don't think that a $2,300 Vera Bradley suitcase is even sold.) But the typical Vera Bradley bag is very distinctive and might catch the eye of a tranny - it's like any other suitcase EXCEPT that it is completely covered in various large colorful flower patterns (there are many models):

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/2534/3568/products/41s2QS-dn9L_1024x1024.jpg?v=1630338838

    So it's not like it was a generic black suitcase and "they" grabbed the wrong one because they own an identical bag. And even if they did, dumping out the clothes and continuing to use it is not a sign of innocence.

    In case anyone hasn't noticed, trannies are mentally ill and so kleptomania would not be out of character.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Achmed E. Newman, @International Jew

    , @AnotherDad
    @EdwardM

    The details of this queers theft are irrelevant.

    What is relevant--and deeply depressing--is that in this day and age the minoritarian regime feels free to and delights in installing this sort of human detritus to run the public bureaucracy. The delight in rubbing our normy noses it. And do so with impunity.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @EdwardM


    So what’s the real story?
     
    I agree with previous commenters, but would add that courtesy of iSteve we have learned that trannies such a Nukie Brinton have a sexual fetish about dressing in women's clothes. Given that this was obviously a wealthy woman's suitcase, .... well, I guess he just couldn't help himself. Now he's trying to retcon some semi-plausible and exculpatory narrative with his lawyers.

    Replies: @EdwardM

  87. @Reg Cæsar
    @AndrewR


    What would he say if Karachi, Islamabad and Peshawar all became minority Pakistani in a short time?
     
    They are already there. Pakistan is an empire, as are India, Iran, Afghanistan, Russia, Ethiopia, and Nigeria.



    https://assets.cureus.com/uploads/figure/file/271574/lightbox_d10fb88029c411ec874849ae4b0ebe02-Figure-1-b-.png



    From your friendly local CIA's Factbook:

    Ethnic groups
    Punjabi 44.7%, Pashtun (Pathan) 15.4%, Sindhi 14.1%, Saraiki 8.4%, Muhajirs 7.6%, Balochi 3.6%, other 6.3%

    Languages
    Punjabi 48%, Sindhi 12%, Saraiki (a Punjabi variant) 10%, Pashto (alternate name, Pashtu) 8%, Urdu (official) 8%, Balochi 3%, Hindko 2%, Brahui 1%, English (official; lingua franca of Pakistani elite and most government ministries), Burushaski, and other 8%

    https://www.cia.gov/the-world-factbook/countries/pakistan/#people-and-society
     

    Replies: @AndrewR, @anonymouseperson, @Almost Missouri, @SZ

    That’s kinda like if the circa 1950 CIA Factbook described the UK as

    Ethnic groups
    English 44.7%, Scottish 15.4%, Welsh 14.1%, Northern Irish 8.4%, Irish 7.6%, Jews, Gypsies and other Europeans 3.6%, Wogs 6.3%

    Languages
    English 48%, Scots 12%, Cockney (an English variant) 10%, Gaelic (alternate name, Gàidhlig) 8%, Drunk 8%, Jibber Jabber 6%, Received Pronunciation (official; lingua franca of British elite and most government ministries), Wog Talk and other 8%

    • Agree: International Jew
  88. @tyrone
    @Spangel226


    marmaduke
     
    ......Makes you want to get a hound dog just so you can name it "Marmaduke".

    Replies: @Spect3r, @Jonathan Mason, @YetAnotherAnon

    I am waiting for a new dog (my german sheppard died last month of old age) and i didnt know what to name him till now… thank you, Marmaduke it is 😀

  89. This woman founded a charity that literally fetishizes women’s “African and Caribbean” origins and then gets insulted when others talk about it.

    • Thanks: Kylie
  90. I have to side with Fulani in this one. Agreed, she is undoubtedly insufferable and was wearing a stupid outfit (if she’s of Caribbean descent, why didn’t she wear the traditional folk costume of whatever Caribbean country she’s from instead of some fakey leopard-spot-nightgown getup that is traditional dress in no African country?).

    Nonetheless, if Fulani’s account of the conversation is accurate, Lady Hussey was unspeakably rude. A social event is not a House panel hearing or a White House press conference, and you don’t badger people about where they’re from or what they do for a living at a social event, even if their initial responses don’t satisfy you. Fulani was not on the witness stand to be cross-examined. I’ve had people–always female people–try that on me on social occasions, and while I haven’t felt “traumatized” like Fulani, I’ve certainly felt irritated. It’s an effort to signal social dominance that is absolutely out of place. As for lifting someone else’s hair to peer at her name-badge–that’s beyond the pale. I once had to sit next to a nosy old lady who grabbed the religious medal I was wearing around my neck to see who it was–don’t do that! Don’t touch other people, or their clothes or their hair extensions, just don’t.

    I’m sorry that Hussey, who was Queen Elizabeth’s very best friend, got the boot. But it’s clear that she was allowed to get away with appalling behavior for years and years just because of her position and her rank on the ladyship scale. I’ll bet there were more than a few members of the royal family and the court who weren’t the slightest bit sad about her departure.

    I do like the name Marmaduke, though. I wish my husband were named Marmaduke.

    • Disagree: Kylie
    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Charlotte Allen

    "Fulani was not on the witness stand to be cross-examined. I’ve had people–always female people–try that on me on social occasions, and while I haven’t felt 'traumatized' like Fulani, I’ve certainly felt irritated. It’s an effort to signal social dominance that is absolutely out of place."

    Exactly. The old lady's badgering was an effort to signal social dominance, not to inflict racial "trauma" on the black woman.

    But the whole brouhaha is not about the typical rudeness people who have more wealth and status commonly inflict on us lesser mortals. This is solely an international news item because a white woman had the temerity to be rude to a black woman. And the black woman is milking it for all it's worth, rather than shrugging it off as we less privileged white women* are expected to do.

    Even when experiencing the general non-racial rudeness that is part of daily life, blacks can kick up a fuss and literally be heard round the world. She's taking advantage of her racial privilege every bit as much as the old bat was taking advantage of her class privilege. Additionally, by presenting herself as quite racially and ethnically apart from the other attendees, she was inviting extra attention. (She definitely stands out in her dress and hairstyle in the pics I saw.) When she got it, she complained. How is that different from the woman wearing a plunging neckline complaining about unwanted male attention? It may be unwanted--but it is not unsolicited.

    But fine if you choose to side with her. Hypocrites crying victim have never enjoyed greater approbation than they do today. Might as well jump on the bandwagon.

    *I say "we" in a general way. I don't know if you're white or not. I've experienced the rudeness to which you refer. It's galling but hardly to the point of inducing "trauma".

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen

    , @Jack D
    @Charlotte Allen


    if she’s of Caribbean descent, why didn’t she wear the traditional folk costume of whatever Caribbean country she’s from
     
    Now you're the one who's being condescending. Her parents were from Barbados and like most British colonies in the Caribbean, there is no "traditional dress". Women might wear outrageous costumes for carnivals such as the "Crop Over" harvest festival but those are not "traditional dress" anymore than a Las Vegas showgirl costume is the traditional dress of American women.

    The "traditional dress" of Bajans would be to dress as closely as they could afford to what people were wearing in London at the time (allowing for climate). "Fulani's" father was named Gladstone because in those benighted days people in the colonies were running TOWARD British culture rather than running away from it with fake African names and fake African costumes.

    Hussey was "cross examining" her because she thought she was enjoying a bit of banter. The woman wore this outrageous outfit and so she thought that when she asked, Fulani would reply , "I am from Nigeria and this is the traditional costume of the Fulani people. Thank you for being curious and making conversation." When she didn't, the Lady thought that this woman wanted to play 20 Questions with her until she guessed right.

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen, @Jonathan Mason

    , @Anonymous
    @Charlotte Allen

    Great comment.

  91. @Reg Cæsar
    Actually, the Fulani are a large race in West Africa. I had a dictionary in which that was one of the guide words at the top of the page. Another such word was coelacanth, which has little in common with the Fulani, other than vertebrae.




    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/13/Wodaabe_during_Gerewol%2C_Cure_Salee%2C_In-Gall%2C_Niger_%2815380276990%29.jpg/220px-Wodaabe_during_Gerewol%2C_Cure_Salee%2C_In-Gall%2C_Niger_%2815380276990%29.jpg


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b7/Coelacanth_off_Pumula_on_the_KwaZulu-Natal_South_Coast%2C_South_Africa%2C_on_22_November_2019.png/250px-Coelacanth_off_Pumula_on_the_KwaZulu-Natal_South_Coast%2C_South_Africa%2C_on_22_November_2019.png



    Ngozi Fulani = Fouling Nazi.

    Replies: @nokangaroos

    The Fulani are Sahel herders who migrated to West Africa rather recently,
    and regard themselves as white; Gerhard Rohlfs rated their girls as the prettiest
    and horniest he had seen on his travels, and wondered why they fetched the highest
    prices 😀 but as a rule they were Muslim slave traders (like the Haussa).
    Clearly Ms. Ngozi is aspiring to what she perceives as higher race.

    (the old lady´s attempts at friendly conversation may have not been up to the
    most recent standards but the response was downright rude )

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @nokangaroos

    Identifying with the Fulani people to the extent of adopting 'Fulani' as your surname is really a bad move for an obvious black supremacist.
    The Fulanis have quite a high cut of autosomal DNA attributable to populations akin to modern Europeans, and this admixture occurred millennia ago.

  92. @AndrewR
    @Thea

    The royal family has a tightrope to walk. This doesn't excuse all of their behavior, but it's not 1910 or even 2010 anymore. Meghan and her meat puppet Harry have put the Eye of Woke Sauron on the monarchy. Add Meghan/Harry's non racial bombshells, and Andrew's disastrous response to that roastie's Epstein allegations, and try putting yourself in the shoes of Charles and William. This lady probably has at least a mild form of dementia anyway and shouldn't be in a public facing role. And regardless, I'm sure she's mortified that she has embarrassed the palace, and that she gave her full consent to them to throw her under the bus. The close associates of the British royal family tend to be loyal to a fault.

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @Art Deco

    Loyalty should be rewarded, not punished.

    I would have preferred that she had been spoken to or re-educated.

    Perhaps in a re-education camp? These people are awful.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Cloudbuster

    She's not being locked in the tower. She'll be fine. Her daughter is a lady in waiting of Camilla.

  93. @J.Ross
    Dumb boomer voluntarily entered a sudden-death, no-free-speech situation and got exactly what she deserved.

    Replies: @Studley

    Dumb boomer voluntarily entered a sudden-death, no-free-speech situation and got exactly what she deserved.

    Eh? Baroness Hussey (born 1939) ain’t no boomer. Look, I get this ‘Ok Boomer” idea (Gen X myself) where you young fellows object to liberal platitudes being directed at you by well-off baby boomers. I sympathize and get where you’re coming from.

    But Susan Hussey wasn’t doing that. At age 82 she wasn’t expressing, anything liberal in that encounter. Most likely unaware of the changing moral imperatives regarding black people in the current year (2022 and back to St George in 2020 at least). More a throwback to genuine intellectual curiosity as to facts, “But where are you from?” (geographically), than current liberal present day absence of factual information discourse.

    • Agree: Old and Grumpy
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Studley

    It's a mindset and she clearly has it.

  94. @Harry Baldwin
    Harry protected by babysitters while he played at being a soldier but he was said to beat up escorts that served military bases.

    Then there was that Nazi costume he wore to a party in 2005.

    Replies: @Cloudbuster

    Then there was that Nazi costume he wore to a party in 2005.

    Well, nobody’s all bad.

  95. @anonymouseperson
    @Reg Cæsar

    Your comparison is flawed. These people are all visually similar. If all the brown and black people in the U.K. were of various European backgrounds that would be a more accurate comparison. Your example compares apples to oranges, sport.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    There is a large amount of phenotypic variation in Pakistan, as in Europe. Few if any Sicilians could pass as Swedish.

  96. @Colin Wright
    @Jim Don Bob

    'Name me one country that has improved itself by importing masses of POCs.'

    Well, there's Uganda. They benefitted from all the Indians -- at any rate, I'm sure things got worse when they kicked them out.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Indians are whiter than Ugandans so in a Ugandan context they are not “POCs”

  97. @AndrewR
    @Art Deco

    This is orders of magnitude less revolting than their over-the-top response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which was in large part instigated by the actions of HM's government.

    Replies: @Gordo, @Art Deco

    their over-the-top response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine,

    Their’s wasn’t.

    which was in large part instigated by the actions of HM’s government.

    It wasn’t.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Art Deco

    Art Deco when Charles and William put a senile lady out to pasture: "This is beyond shameful! Republic now!"

    Art Deco when Charles and William trip over themselves to condemn Russia defending itself from Anglo aggression: "Slava ukraïna!"

  98. @Reg Cæsar
    @AndrewR


    Your omission of China is interesting but presumably accidental. The Uyghurs and Tibetans, among others, would tend to agree.
     
    No, I left China out because the Han constitute 92% of the population. (Down from 96% in 1949.) The "imperial" parts are on the fringe, albeit a majority of the land mass.

    I chose states with no ethnic majority.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Peter Lund

    The Han are relatively ethnically heterogeneous, being the product of millennia of Han conquest from a small region in what is now Northeastern China. And lingustically they have a wide variation, despite having a common writing system each language attaches its own pronunciations to.

    Race, ethnicity, country, nation, people, culture, empire, language, etc can all be very complicated to define. Let’s just agree that Brits have a right to not want to go from a 98% English/Welsh/Scottish realm to an English/Welsh/Scottish minority within the course of a single century after fifteen centuries of low immigration (the Norman conquest was very significant from a cultural perspective but genetically it would have been very trivial even if the Normans had genetically differed significantly from the British – which they didn’t; a tiny number of Norman invaders had an enormous effect on the culture and language of England)

  99. @AndrewR
    @Thea

    The royal family has a tightrope to walk. This doesn't excuse all of their behavior, but it's not 1910 or even 2010 anymore. Meghan and her meat puppet Harry have put the Eye of Woke Sauron on the monarchy. Add Meghan/Harry's non racial bombshells, and Andrew's disastrous response to that roastie's Epstein allegations, and try putting yourself in the shoes of Charles and William. This lady probably has at least a mild form of dementia anyway and shouldn't be in a public facing role. And regardless, I'm sure she's mortified that she has embarrassed the palace, and that she gave her full consent to them to throw her under the bus. The close associates of the British royal family tend to be loyal to a fault.

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @Art Deco

    This lady probably has at least a mild form of dementia anyway

    There is no indication she’s demented.

    Andrew’s disastrous response to that roastie’s Epstein allegations,

    Andrew’s 15 years of lying about the subject (one suspects due to avoid embarrassment in front of his daughters and his mother) is irrelevant to this situation.

    Add Meghan/Harry’s non racial bombshells,

    There are no such bombshells.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Art Deco

    You might be the most childishly contrarian person here besides Corvinus. Even Jack D is reasonable when not discussing Jews or Russia.

    It's true that I don't have a baseline of Lady Hussey's lifetime behavior to compare her current behavior to. Maybe she's always been highly socially inept, but given her long association with the royal family who expect their associates to not be embarrassing, it's a safe bet she's become senile.

    Andrew's behavior has been a huge embarrassment to the family and to the "firm," not just his (now dead) mother, his irrelevant wife and his largely irrelevant daughters. It's quite likely that Charles and William feel the need to run a tighter ship as the direct result of his actions. Part of that tightness might involve removing embarrassing old women from public facing positions.

    And Meghan's allegations about how she felt suicidal and prohibited from seeking mental health care are quite famous. Whatever you - as an internet troll with no one who loves you - may think about her allegations, many people found the allegations shocking, and they did damage to the monarchy.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  100. Just my opinion; the Fulani witch made the whole thing up. And who wears a Caribbean Carnival costume to a daytime business meeting?

    I’ve seen pictures of African women at the UN and politicians in Africa and they don’t wear Carnival costumes. Those of us who’ve worked with black women know they do this all the time. Always watch out. Never have a private conservation with one. She’ll run to HR claiming you’re a racist.

    Did anyone notice the charity the witch works for? Domestic violence. Some same sex violence. Sometimes women hurting men. But most of it is men beating up their women. And in America, Europe and Africa its the African men who commit the most crimes in every categories. Instead of meeting with the Queen try to end black men’s violence against their women. And kids. Not that black men’s violence against everyone will ever end. Just another non profit scam.

    Organization is the typical non profit, making a good living saving blacks from themselves. The new”profession” is called Social Justice Entrepuener some colleges even have PHDs in it. Which means some stupid black witch can get one of those PHDs and walk into a 300K VP of some big foundation.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Alden

    Just my opinion; the Fulani witch made the whole thing up.

    I doubt she made the whole thing up but pretty likely edited it to conform with narrative. The "Oh I can see I am going to have a challenge getting you to say where you’re from. When did you first come here?" is a little to on the nose to be plausible.

  101. @Harry Baldwin
    OT, but so funny that Admiral Levine's date at the French ambassador’s Bastille Day reception in July, featured in an iSteve post, was put on leave by the Biden administration for stealing a woman's luggage at the Minneapolis airport. Sam Brinton held the post of Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Spent Fuel and Waste Disposition in the U.S. Department of Energy, an impressive job title if I ever heard one.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/the-further-adventures-of-admiral-levine/

    Replies: @EdwardM, @Cool Daddy Jimbo

    OT, but so funny that Admiral Levine’s date at the French ambassador’s Bastille Day reception in July, featured in an iSteve post, was put on leave by the Biden administration for stealing a woman’s luggage at the Minneapolis airport. Sam Brinton held the post of Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Spent Fuel and Waste Disposition in the U.S. Department of Energy, an impressive job title if I ever heard one.

    “Stealing a woman’s luggage” is just too fucking perfect.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  102. @EdwardM
    @Harry Baldwin

    Some strange details of this story (which I guess is not surprising given how strange the story headline itself is).

    According to the court filings, Brinton said when they opened the bag at their hotel, they realized it wasn’t theirs, but got nervous that someone would think they stole it and didn’t know what to do. They said they emptied the luggage and left the person’s clothes inside the drawers of a dresser in the hotel room.
     

    I guess it's possible that someone could mistakenly grab a bag off the carousel, but, if one discovered this when one arrived at one's hotel, wouldn't 99% of people say, "oh shit!" and immediately rush back to the airport to return the suitcase?

    Brinton claimed to have placed the clothes from the bag inside the hotel room's drawers and departed without the garments, although no clothing was ever recovered from Brinton's hotel room.
     

    Then he traveled back home with the suitcase as if it were his, then took it on his next vacation too. I guess the police eventually pieced this sequence of events together weeks later and confirmed the steps with video footage.

    So what's the real story? Some snit begat by a homo lover's quarrel -- he was traveling with someone, they had a fight, so he stole the other's bag at the airport?

    Of course this guy is obviously mentally ill, so who knows.

    https://nypost.com/2022/11/28/non-binary-biden-nuclear-official-charged-with-stealing-womans-luggage-at-airport/

    Replies: @Alden, @Brutusale, @Jack D, @AnotherDad, @Almost Missouri

    SOP when there’s a luggage mix up is call the airline. We lost some luggage once.2 days later an airline guy brought it to where we were staying. Binton must travel a lot. He’s not some kid or unsophisticated person. Very expensive piece, he saw it and stole it.

  103. @tyrone
    @Spangel226


    marmaduke
     
    ......Makes you want to get a hound dog just so you can name it "Marmaduke".

    Replies: @Spect3r, @Jonathan Mason, @YetAnotherAnon

    ……Makes you want to get a hound dog just so you can name it “Marmaduke”.

    What a wit!

    Duke Hussey was a war hero of World War II who had leg amputated while a prisoner of war.

    Post-war he was a distinguished journalist, and eventually the chairman of the BBC for 10 years.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Jonathan Mason

    "Duke Hussey was a war hero of World War II who had a leg amputated while a prisoner of war."

    Well, as George Harrison quips to a war hero in A Hard Day's Night:

    "Bet you're sorry you won."

    , @tyrone
    @Jonathan Mason


    Duke Hussey was a war hero of World War II
     
    .......and his widow was canceled by someone named Ngozi ,begs the question ,what the hell was it all for ........OH ,and I'm quite fond of hounds by the way.
    , @kaganovitch
    @Jonathan Mason

    It's good to see, that despite going native, you still have a bit of John Bull/Colonel Blimp in you. Rule Britannia! Fwiw tyrone was just funning with the comic strip 'Marmaduke'. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marmaduke

  104. @International Jew

    The encounter on Tuesday at a violence against women and girls reception
     
    Should have gone for broke with something like, "How lovely! Are you here to speak about female genital mutilation in your country?"

    Replies: @Cool Daddy Jimbo

    Should have gone for broke with something like, “How lovely! Are you here to speak about female genital mutilation in your country?”

    Unfortunately we don’t really have the moral high ground on the genital mutilation front any more.

    • Agree: International Jew
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Cool Daddy Jimbo

    Too true.

  105. @Kylie
    "Then there was that Nazi costume he wore to a party in 2005."

    Yes and frolicking naked while apparently drunk and/or high in Las Vegas. There are pics of both incidents, the latter occurring just ten years ago when he was 27.

    By the way, here's the link to the blind item about his rough ways

    https://blindgossip.com/famous-son-got-very-rough/#more-101411

    But the worst is this idiot using his family name and title to try to influence our political process (the voting video before the 2020 election) and criticize our First Amendment, calling it "bonkers". Whatever his handlers have told him, he's a guest here, uninvited and unwelcome.

    Replies: @Alden, @Yngvar

    At least Harry is here legally, married to an American. And he supports her and their children.

    Unlike 50 million other foreigners here illegally and living off their anchor babies welfare benefits.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Alden

    Unlike 50 million other foreigners here illegally and living off their anchor babies welfare benefits.

    The total enrollment in SNAP amounts to about 40 million, and that's all beneficiaries, not illegal aliens on the rolls. Total enrollment in Medicaid is now about 82 million, or about 1/4 of the population.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Kylie
    @Alden

    "At least Harry is here legally, married to an American."

    That makes it worse, not better. Like it or not, he has the influence attached to his title. If he, a public figure attached to the BRF, calls our First Amendment "bonkers" in a publicly broadcast interview, he needs to go.

    "And he supports her and their children."

    After publicly complaining his father cut off his financial support. (My understanding is that we, the tax-paying public, do in fact, pay some of their security expenses, which would cost way more than welfare for one family of illegals.) Yes, he takes money from woke organizations for trading on his title and smearing his family's name and reputation. as does his wife. But apparently the big contracts are now to some degree in doubt, with disputes over content. One of his wife's vanity projects was cancelled and it appears her Spotify podcasts won't continue next season.

    "Unlike 50 million other foreigners here illegally and living off their anchor babies welfare benefits."

    He's no better than they are. He's taking advantage of a broken system, just like they are, only for larger amounts per capita. And he's as woke as you can get, another high-profile white in a mixed marriage, just what we need.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

  106. @Jonathan Mason
    @epebble

    I read elsewhere, in the Daily Mail I think, that both her parents were originally from Barbados.

    Her surname at birth was a regular British name. Her parents were Mildred and Gladstone Headley.

    Fulani is the name of a large tribe found in Nigeria. I don't know whether this is a married name or whether she adopted it on purpose.

    Now there is a subject for conversation: "I had a DNA test that showed I was largely Fulani, so I adopted that as my surname." Or "I know I have an African name, but that is thanks to my ex-husband."

    Replies: @epebble, @YetAnotherAnon

    Info from The Paper Of Record. She seems to have changed her “slave name” to an African one, quite common these days and a contrast to the days when Caribbean kids were christened Winston or Gladstone (like her dad).

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-11487925/DAVID-WILKES-profiles-domestic-violence-campaigner-backed-Meghan-Markle-Palace-race-row.html

    Miss Fulani told the Future Hackney website, which documents social change in east London, how she grew up in Kilburn, north London, one of seven children of Mildred, who worked for London Transport and then trained as a nurse, and Gladstone Headley, who worked for British Rail.

    Both her parents were born in Barbados. They were, she said, the only black family on their road, which was predominantly Irish.

    ‘The Irish were so good to us and we were so good to them, because we were both oppressed,’ she said, recalling how she and her siblings were not allowed in Asian or white people’s houses.

    Kilburn was certainly very Irish back in the day, and IIRC the Irish Centre there was pro-republican, although I’d never have thought of them as anti-racist pioneers.

  107. @tyrone
    @Spangel226


    marmaduke
     
    ......Makes you want to get a hound dog just so you can name it "Marmaduke".

    Replies: @Spect3r, @Jonathan Mason, @YetAnotherAnon

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marmaduke

    Marmaduke is a newspaper comic strip revolving around the Winslow family and their Great Dane, Marmaduke, and his best friend, a Balinese cat named Carlos, drawn by Brad Anderson from June 1954 to 2015.

    “The son of the athlete and colonial administrator Eric Hussey and his wife, Christine Elizabeth Morley, Marmaduke Hussey was educated at Rugby School and Trinity College, Oxford. He served in the Grenadier Guards in World War II and was severely injured at Anzio, having to have a leg amputated as a prisoner-of-war, which resulted in his repatriation”

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @YetAnotherAnon

    His dad, Eric Hussey, represented Britain in the 110 metres hurdles at the 1908 Olympics. While many fathers lost a lot more than that in WW2, it must have been painful for him to see his son hobbling around when he came home.

  108. @Alden
    @Kylie

    At least Harry is here legally, married to an American. And he supports her and their children.

    Unlike 50 million other foreigners here illegally and living off their anchor babies welfare benefits.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Kylie

    Unlike 50 million other foreigners here illegally and living off their anchor babies welfare benefits.

    The total enrollment in SNAP amounts to about 40 million, and that’s all beneficiaries, not illegal aliens on the rolls. Total enrollment in Medicaid is now about 82 million, or about 1/4 of the population.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Art Deco


    The total enrollment in SNAP amounts to about 40 million, and that’s all beneficiaries, not illegal aliens on the rolls. Total enrollment in Medicaid is now about 82 million, or about 1/4 of the population.
     
    You don't understand. Their mere presence here-- and that of all the legal immigrants earning too little to pay sufficient taxes-- constitutes a form of welfare. Natives are a different story-- our families have been contributing all along, and this is the only country we've got. This is the second-- or more-- home for the newcomers.

    In rare cases, e.g. the Hmong who took our side and lost, or Philippines who've served in our armed forces, one could make the argument that they paid in a different way. (NB: Could make, not must.) Applying that standard to Haitians or Hondurans is obscene.

    Randall Burns of Vdare.com once tried to calculate the monetary value of our citizenship, per capita. I think it was around a quarter million dollars. I would argue that mere legal residency constitutes almost all of that.

    We're giving away the fiscal equivalent of free houses to lawbreakers. How is that not welfare?

    Related, Jennifer Roback Morse of the Ruth Institute issued a wonderful smackdown of the Chucky doll's cynical demographic argument for regularizing illegals:


    SCHUMER’S LABOR SHORTAGE PLAN IS AN INSULT TO OUR INTELLIGENCE

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  109. To me, looks like she wants to appear African. Like all the black American with goofy names inspired by “Roots” (Shaliqua, Dayquan, Arkarious etc.) Unlike the nice British lady reaching out to her, I don’t give a rip.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Dan Smith

    IIRC, the supposedly Gambian women in Roots were given African or faux-African names. The women in America were given conventional names, except for one character named 'Kizzy'. The fashion for giving your daughter a faux-African name which sounds like a digestive disease started earlier, though has grown more pervasive over time.

  110. @Kim
    @Rich


    Even the royals have turned on their people
     
    The royals have always been against "their people".

    Replies: @Rich

    Oddly enough, not really. Monarchs throughout the world have almost uniformly been a friend to the commoner. Queen Victoria was greeted by adoring crowds in Ireland shortly before their 1916 uprising and millions have fought for their “king and country” from every corner of the earth. I would agree that they often mistreated those they conquered, but that was the way of war and is no different from any other system of government that conquers a foreign land.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Rich


    Queen Victoria was greeted by adoring crowds in Ireland shortly before their 1916 uprising...
     
    She died in 1901. It must have been her ghost.

    Replies: @Rich

  111. @nokangaroos
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Fulani are Sahel herders who migrated to West Africa rather recently,
    and regard themselves as white; Gerhard Rohlfs rated their girls as the prettiest
    and horniest he had seen on his travels, and wondered why they fetched the highest
    prices :D but as a rule they were Muslim slave traders (like the Haussa).
    Clearly Ms. Ngozi is aspiring to what she perceives as higher race.

    (the old lady´s attempts at friendly conversation may have not been up to the
    most recent standards but the response was downright rude )

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Identifying with the Fulani people to the extent of adopting ‘Fulani’ as your surname is really a bad move for an obvious black supremacist.
    The Fulanis have quite a high cut of autosomal DNA attributable to populations akin to modern Europeans, and this admixture occurred millennia ago.

  112. @Studley
    @J.Ross


    Dumb boomer voluntarily entered a sudden-death, no-free-speech situation and got exactly what she deserved.
     
    Eh? Baroness Hussey (born 1939) ain't no boomer. Look, I get this 'Ok Boomer" idea (Gen X myself) where you young fellows object to liberal platitudes being directed at you by well-off baby boomers. I sympathize and get where you're coming from.

    But Susan Hussey wasn't doing that. At age 82 she wasn't expressing, anything liberal in that encounter. Most likely unaware of the changing moral imperatives regarding black people in the current year (2022 and back to St George in 2020 at least). More a throwback to genuine intellectual curiosity as to facts, "But where are you from?" (geographically), than current liberal present day absence of factual information discourse.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    It’s a mindset and she clearly has it.

  113. @Art Deco
    @AndrewR

    their over-the-top response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine,

    Their's wasn't.


    which was in large part instigated by the actions of HM’s government.

    It wasn't.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Art Deco when Charles and William put a senile lady out to pasture: “This is beyond shameful! Republic now!”

    Art Deco when Charles and William trip over themselves to condemn Russia defending itself from Anglo aggression: “Slava ukraïna!”

  114. @Alden
    @Kylie

    At least Harry is here legally, married to an American. And he supports her and their children.

    Unlike 50 million other foreigners here illegally and living off their anchor babies welfare benefits.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Kylie

    “At least Harry is here legally, married to an American.”

    That makes it worse, not better. Like it or not, he has the influence attached to his title. If he, a public figure attached to the BRF, calls our First Amendment “bonkers” in a publicly broadcast interview, he needs to go.

    “And he supports her and their children.”

    After publicly complaining his father cut off his financial support. (My understanding is that we, the tax-paying public, do in fact, pay some of their security expenses, which would cost way more than welfare for one family of illegals.) Yes, he takes money from woke organizations for trading on his title and smearing his family’s name and reputation. as does his wife. But apparently the big contracts are now to some degree in doubt, with disputes over content. One of his wife’s vanity projects was cancelled and it appears her Spotify podcasts won’t continue next season.

    “Unlike 50 million other foreigners here illegally and living off their anchor babies welfare benefits.”

    He’s no better than they are. He’s taking advantage of a broken system, just like they are, only for larger amounts per capita. And he’s as woke as you can get, another high-profile white in a mixed marriage, just what we need.

    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Kylie

    Harry used to be an ultra-masculine cad kind of guy. A a rich, handsome bachelor living it up in Las Vegas with naked trollops and wearing Nazi Halloween costumes without a care.

    But, as some of the cruder corners of the internet like to say about emasculated husbands, "Pussy is undefeated"... and Harry is the latest example of it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  115. @Recently Based
    The Guardian opens the article with this:

    The late queen’s lady-in-waiting has resigned and apologised after a black guest at a reception hosted by the queen consort was left feeling traumatised and violated after she questioned her repeatedly about where she “really came from”.
     
    Here's what an accurate statement of fact would have been:

    The late queen’s lady-in-waiting has resigned and apologised after a black guest at a reception hosted by the queen consort claimed that she was left feeling traumatised and violated after [the lady-in-waiting] questioned her repeatedly about where she “really came from”.
     
    It's a fascinating (to me) little example of how owning the mic leads to control of perception.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Also that bit with “she questioned her repeatedly.”

  116. @Art Deco
    @AndrewR

    This lady probably has at least a mild form of dementia anyway

    There is no indication she's demented.


    Andrew’s disastrous response to that roastie’s Epstein allegations,

    Andrew's 15 years of lying about the subject (one suspects due to avoid embarrassment in front of his daughters and his mother) is irrelevant to this situation.


    Add Meghan/Harry’s non racial bombshells,

    There are no such bombshells.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    You might be the most childishly contrarian person here besides Corvinus. Even Jack D is reasonable when not discussing Jews or Russia.

    It’s true that I don’t have a baseline of Lady Hussey’s lifetime behavior to compare her current behavior to. Maybe she’s always been highly socially inept, but given her long association with the royal family who expect their associates to not be embarrassing, it’s a safe bet she’s become senile.

    Andrew’s behavior has been a huge embarrassment to the family and to the “firm,” not just his (now dead) mother, his irrelevant wife and his largely irrelevant daughters. It’s quite likely that Charles and William feel the need to run a tighter ship as the direct result of his actions. Part of that tightness might involve removing embarrassing old women from public facing positions.

    And Meghan’s allegations about how she felt suicidal and prohibited from seeking mental health care are quite famous. Whatever you – as an internet troll with no one who loves you – may think about her allegations, many people found the allegations shocking, and they did damage to the monarchy.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @AndrewR


    you – as an internet troll with no one who loves you
     
    I've butted heads with Art before about various things, and probably will again, but I do appreciate his use of statistics to anchor discussion to measurable reality. Yeah, sometimes stats spergs can miss the real world forest for the statistical trees, but knowing about trees helps too.

    That said, this isn't a statistical discussion, and I know next to nothing about the royals, so ... whatever. I just wanted to say that Art is not completely unloved, even when I disagree with him.
  117. @tyrone
    With a perfectly good English name like Ngozi Fulani why she ever ask such a question .....send her to Coventry now!

    Replies: @Spangel226, @Ebony Obelisk, @Russ, @Mr. Grey

    Hussey, 83, the widow of the former BBC chair Sir Marmaduke Hussey

    Awaiting the professional wrestler who adopts this moniker.

  118. Hussey has herself to blame for not keeping up with the times.

    More appropriate small talk would have been, “My, love the gown. Wakandan?”

  119. @Reg Cæsar
    @Thoughts


    "...the first woman rabbi ordained by the Reconstructionist Judaism movement at the Marriott Downtown Hotel."
     
    She was ordained at a hotel? And a chain at that? I'd have demanded the Rittenhouse.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  120. @Rebunga
    Why on Earth would any white person in today's environment want to talk to Mme. Fulani? In that crazy get up? At a semi-official State function?

    Is there anything . . . ANYTHING, good that can come of such an encounter?

    You know how poisonous snakes, frogs, insects have a strange and colourful presentation? Means "Stay Away!"

    Replies: @Danindc

    Lol exactly. Why?

    I guess it was genuine curiosity and manners but the lady in waiting has no instincts!

  121. That old woman was trying to be polite by making a conversation, while the black one was searching for a scalp to take. William is proving to be as destructive as his mother. Well Wills, maybe you should loan Kate out to both men and women of color so she can be just like mummy but with a modern gay twist. You can find a pasty transgender for an affair. Oddly the more the royals squawk about their non racism, the more it feeds the rumors.

  122. @Kylie
    @Alden

    "At least Harry is here legally, married to an American."

    That makes it worse, not better. Like it or not, he has the influence attached to his title. If he, a public figure attached to the BRF, calls our First Amendment "bonkers" in a publicly broadcast interview, he needs to go.

    "And he supports her and their children."

    After publicly complaining his father cut off his financial support. (My understanding is that we, the tax-paying public, do in fact, pay some of their security expenses, which would cost way more than welfare for one family of illegals.) Yes, he takes money from woke organizations for trading on his title and smearing his family's name and reputation. as does his wife. But apparently the big contracts are now to some degree in doubt, with disputes over content. One of his wife's vanity projects was cancelled and it appears her Spotify podcasts won't continue next season.

    "Unlike 50 million other foreigners here illegally and living off their anchor babies welfare benefits."

    He's no better than they are. He's taking advantage of a broken system, just like they are, only for larger amounts per capita. And he's as woke as you can get, another high-profile white in a mixed marriage, just what we need.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

    Harry used to be an ultra-masculine cad kind of guy. A a rich, handsome bachelor living it up in Las Vegas with naked trollops and wearing Nazi Halloween costumes without a care.

    But, as some of the cruder corners of the internet like to say about emasculated husbands, “Pussy is undefeated”… and Harry is the latest example of it.

    • Thanks: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @JR Ewing


    But, as some of the cruder corners of the internet like to say about emasculated husbands, “🐱 is undefeated”… and Harry is the latest example of it.
     
    The new John Lennon.
  123. @YetAnotherAnon
    @tyrone

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marmaduke


    Marmaduke is a newspaper comic strip revolving around the Winslow family and their Great Dane, Marmaduke, and his best friend, a Balinese cat named Carlos, drawn by Brad Anderson from June 1954 to 2015.
     

    "The son of the athlete and colonial administrator Eric Hussey and his wife, Christine Elizabeth Morley, Marmaduke Hussey was educated at Rugby School and Trinity College, Oxford. He served in the Grenadier Guards in World War II and was severely injured at Anzio, having to have a leg amputated as a prisoner-of-war, which resulted in his repatriation"
     

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    His dad, Eric Hussey, represented Britain in the 110 metres hurdles at the 1908 Olympics. While many fathers lost a lot more than that in WW2, it must have been painful for him to see his son hobbling around when he came home.

  124. @Jonathan Mason
    @tyrone


    ……Makes you want to get a hound dog just so you can name it “Marmaduke”.
     
    What a wit!

    Duke Hussey was a war hero of World War II who had leg amputated while a prisoner of war.

    Post-war he was a distinguished journalist, and eventually the chairman of the BBC for 10 years.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @tyrone, @kaganovitch

    “Duke Hussey was a war hero of World War II who had a leg amputated while a prisoner of war.”

    Well, as George Harrison quips to a war hero in A Hard Day’s Night:

    “Bet you’re sorry you won.”

  125. anon[190] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    "I am of African heritage, Caribbean descent and British nationality."

    I don't speak politically correct UK speech. Is "British nationality" code for not a descendant of the native peoples of Great Britain (English, Welsh, Scottish, Cornish)? In other words, is "British nationality" a way to say "not British in any meaningful sense"?

    Replies: @anon

    No, it’s a way of saying that she has as much right to be British as the historical people of Great Britain, which is a way of saying that the historical people of Great Britain are not a people. Her own Caribbean or African people have the right to perpeturate their own traditions, to distinguish themselves from outsiders, to identify their own interests and advocate for them. The historical inhabitants of Great Britain aren’t a people and have no such rights.

    It’s not just a British thing – it’s what immigrants to any European country assert. “Citizenship” is also used but it has connotations of paper citizenship. “Nationality” is historically seen as a deeper bond – shared ancestry, people who have been in the place for centuries. The appropriation of “nationality” by immigrants is a way of denying that identity to the historical people. It turns nationality into a superficial frivolity that can be put on and taken back off again – I’ll cheer for France as long as Morocco isn’t playing.

    The early waves of immigration from the British Empire/Commonwealth were facilitated by the fact that the colonized people had an official status as subjects of the British monarch, which put them on an equal standing with the English/Scottish/Welsh. Was it necessary to interpret that as a right to residency in England/Scotland/Wales, or could the British reasonably have said that British law will protect you where you are but gives you no right to be treated like a local wherever you want to go? It was only a theoretical issue when the demographic proportions were different and travel wasn’t an option for most people. Enoch Powell described the principle as humbug and tried without success to introduce pragmatic restrictions on movement/residency. Anti-white advocates, who aren’t usually defenders of quaint quixotic principles from the 1950’s, are strangely protective of the principle that half the people in the world are British subjects and therefore entitled to residency in Great Britain.

  126. @Jonathan Mason
    @tyrone


    ……Makes you want to get a hound dog just so you can name it “Marmaduke”.
     
    What a wit!

    Duke Hussey was a war hero of World War II who had leg amputated while a prisoner of war.

    Post-war he was a distinguished journalist, and eventually the chairman of the BBC for 10 years.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @tyrone, @kaganovitch

    Duke Hussey was a war hero of World War II

    …….and his widow was canceled by someone named Ngozi ,begs the question ,what the hell was it all for ……..OH ,and I’m quite fond of hounds by the way.

  127. So, the grievance-monger was too dim or ignorant to know what upper class old birds mean by “your people”.

    They mean your parents. That’s all. No racial implications at all. I’ve been asked where “my people” live. It’s old fashioned not malicious. But angry blacks must always be appeased and grovelled before.

    Lady Sue may come to feel she’s better off out of that world.

    • Replies: @Moses
    @dearieme

    So what if she meant racially? Is there something wrong with that?

    Don’t cuck.

  128. @EdwardM
    @Harry Baldwin

    Some strange details of this story (which I guess is not surprising given how strange the story headline itself is).

    According to the court filings, Brinton said when they opened the bag at their hotel, they realized it wasn’t theirs, but got nervous that someone would think they stole it and didn’t know what to do. They said they emptied the luggage and left the person’s clothes inside the drawers of a dresser in the hotel room.
     

    I guess it's possible that someone could mistakenly grab a bag off the carousel, but, if one discovered this when one arrived at one's hotel, wouldn't 99% of people say, "oh shit!" and immediately rush back to the airport to return the suitcase?

    Brinton claimed to have placed the clothes from the bag inside the hotel room's drawers and departed without the garments, although no clothing was ever recovered from Brinton's hotel room.
     

    Then he traveled back home with the suitcase as if it were his, then took it on his next vacation too. I guess the police eventually pieced this sequence of events together weeks later and confirmed the steps with video footage.

    So what's the real story? Some snit begat by a homo lover's quarrel -- he was traveling with someone, they had a fight, so he stole the other's bag at the airport?

    Of course this guy is obviously mentally ill, so who knows.

    https://nypost.com/2022/11/28/non-binary-biden-nuclear-official-charged-with-stealing-womans-luggage-at-airport/

    Replies: @Alden, @Brutusale, @Jack D, @AnotherDad, @Almost Missouri

    He had no checked luggage. He had no reason to be at the luggage carousel. Out and out theft.

    • Replies: @EdwardM
    @Brutusale

    He thought, "think I'll hang out at the carousel and see if any bag strikes my fancy?" I would say that's as plausible as being exhausted from lots of travel and being semi-delirious (maybe you have a similar bag and usually check it).

    But I think a third possibility-- i.e., some other story involving a personal motive -- is just as likely.

  129. @jcd1974
    You can't blame the old woman when the black woman looked like she was in costume as an African queen, complete with leopard print dress, a bone necklace and a tiara in her dreadlocks.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-11488083/REBECCA-ENGLISH-examines-potential-fallout-Lady-Husseys-remarks-Buckingham-Palace-event.html

    Replies: @songbird, @Steve Sailer, @Barnard, @Director95

    WOW. Let’s go over this again. WTF is sistah space doing in Buckingham Palace?
    hint to royals – don’t make that dumb mistake again.

    • Agree: Old Prude
  130. @Brutusale
    @EdwardM

    He had no checked luggage. He had no reason to be at the luggage carousel. Out and out theft.

    Replies: @EdwardM

    He thought, “think I’ll hang out at the carousel and see if any bag strikes my fancy?” I would say that’s as plausible as being exhausted from lots of travel and being semi-delirious (maybe you have a similar bag and usually check it).

    But I think a third possibility– i.e., some other story involving a personal motive — is just as likely.

  131. … black guest… left feeling traumatised and violated… questioned… repeatedly about where she “really came from.”

    “traumatised and violated”!!
    🙂
    Fragile Negroes must be coddled, pampered, fussed over, apologized to, rewarded, & their perceived offenders sacrificed.

    Whites aren’t so lucky:
    — (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Fragility)

  132. @silviosilver
    @Jonathan Mason


    Apparently this woman was dressed up in full African folk dress regalia, which does beg the question of where she comes from. Why dress up in this fashion if you don’t want to talk about it?
     
    Well, that's a very important detail and does indeed justify asking a question. Still, "where do YOU come from?" is a bit rude, don't you think? It carries more than a subtle hint of "what the hell is a POS like you doing here?"

    This is the most pointless kind of "racism." It achieves absolutely nothing useful. It embarrasses whites and angers non-whites. It's really not worth defending. Steve is trying way too hard to make it all about the hair.

    Replies: @Jack D

    First of all, it was a gotcha setup – you dress in the most outlandish fashion possible (although the hats that British upper class women wear are pretty weird too, and all those awful colors) and then you dare the elderly rubes to notice. Woke up to date people know the game and pretend not to notice anything no matter how outrageous the getup. The old lady notices and it’s “gotcha!”.

    Suppose someone German or Austrian or Swiss had come to this event in a dirndl dress? Would it have been rude for the old lady to ask where she (or nowadays, he) was from? Suppose she had? Would she have lost her job?

    In this old lady’s world, she WAS being polite. Here someone has gone to a lot of effort (perhaps slain a leopard?) to dress in “folkloric dress”. It would be impolite to ignore it – common sense (not woke sense which is always the opposite) says that someone who goes to this effort wants to be noticed, that they want their costume to be a conversation starter. In reality they DO very much want to be noticed but the initiated are supposed to pretend NOT to notice – the old double game. It’s like “Rachel” Levy in her skirt and size 12 high heel pumps. You are supposed to keep a straight face and pretend not to notice that “she” is a guy in a dress. If you say anything, you have lost the game. The old lady saw the exotic dress as a sign that read “Please ask me why I am wearing this crazy outfit” (when really the sign read “I dare you to ask me why I am wearing this crazy outfit”).

    • Thanks: kaganovitch, Kylie
    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Jack D

    You don't have any proof that it was a "setup," but it's all beside the point anyway. You might ask one question about it (and there are plenty of better options than "where do you come from?" - especially right out of the gate) and then drop it the moment you realize the person doesn't want to answer. You know all of this of course.

    You take a lot of heat on this blog because you're forever urging the WNs (and similar types) to give up and accept their race replacement, so I guess you see this as your big chance to deflect a bit of that heat by speaking up for them and defending the most utterly pointless and counterproductive kind of "racism" - which they evidently consider a great joy - probably counting on them to be too dumb to realize the ploy. (You could well be right about that last point.)

  133. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "and insist I don’t have the right to British nationality”

    You don't.

    She said she had “never felt so unwelcome or so uncomfortable”.

    Good. You ARE unwelcome and you SHOULD be uncomfortable.

    She said: “I was almost forced to say that I’m not really British."

    You're not. You run a grift called Sistah Space, for pete's sake. You're a Basketball-American.


    ****

    I think it's worth bearing in mind just how often the British, and especially the toff/posh British, can be so insufferable. They seem to think they're being clever, but nobody else can stand it.

    Seems to me it's possible that this was a tug-of-war between these two cows, a smiling-while-staring-daggers sort of contest of wills. Who will be the dominant?

    Cow #1: Asks a small-talk question with a dagger hidden inside it. (Sort of like: "Ah, Mr. McGarrigle. (PAUSE) Irish, isn't it?")

    Cow #2: Gives an icy, evasive, deliberately rude answer, pretending not to know what Cow #1 actually means. Queen's gambit declined.

    Cow #1 interprets this as the kick in the shins that it actually is (really, a counter-kick) and digs in her heels, refusing to stop until she gets the stupid answer she demands. "Now we're getting somewhere" is the tell that there are no honest misunderstandings here. I've been through this dance with so many Oxbridge twats I'm almost ready to side with the bison.

    But anybody who spent decades married to a giant, comically large cartoon dog deserves the benefit of the doubt, I'd say.

    Replies: @ChrisZ

    I think you nailed the mutually venal motivations lurking in that dialogue, Germ. Condescension versus provocation, each witless in its own way.

    Steve’s suggestion that the whole episode was an easy way for the new royals to rid themselves of an old hanger-on seems likely to me, too.

    What’s ridiculous is that these days the whole world is expected to take notice. In a different time, none of it would ever have gotten beyond the respective “ladies at lunch” crowds:

    Cow #1: “Can you imagine the impertinence…?”

    Cow #2: “Listen to how I stood up to that old muthah f****r…”

    The listeners at each table nod approvingly; each side claims a victory; the rest of us are blissfully left out of it.

    • Agree: AndrewR
  134. @Charlotte Allen
    I have to side with Fulani in this one. Agreed, she is undoubtedly insufferable and was wearing a stupid outfit (if she's of Caribbean descent, why didn't she wear the traditional folk costume of whatever Caribbean country she's from instead of some fakey leopard-spot-nightgown getup that is traditional dress in no African country?).

    Nonetheless, if Fulani's account of the conversation is accurate, Lady Hussey was unspeakably rude. A social event is not a House panel hearing or a White House press conference, and you don't badger people about where they're from or what they do for a living at a social event, even if their initial responses don't satisfy you. Fulani was not on the witness stand to be cross-examined. I've had people--always female people--try that on me on social occasions, and while I haven't felt "traumatized" like Fulani, I've certainly felt irritated. It's an effort to signal social dominance that is absolutely out of place. As for lifting someone else's hair to peer at her name-badge--that's beyond the pale. I once had to sit next to a nosy old lady who grabbed the religious medal I was wearing around my neck to see who it was--don't do that! Don't touch other people, or their clothes or their hair extensions, just don't.

    I'm sorry that Hussey, who was Queen Elizabeth's very best friend, got the boot. But it's clear that she was allowed to get away with appalling behavior for years and years just because of her position and her rank on the ladyship scale. I'll bet there were more than a few members of the royal family and the court who weren't the slightest bit sad about her departure.

    I do like the name Marmaduke, though. I wish my husband were named Marmaduke.

    Replies: @Kylie, @Jack D, @Anonymous

    “Fulani was not on the witness stand to be cross-examined. I’ve had people–always female people–try that on me on social occasions, and while I haven’t felt ‘traumatized’ like Fulani, I’ve certainly felt irritated. It’s an effort to signal social dominance that is absolutely out of place.”

    Exactly. The old lady’s badgering was an effort to signal social dominance, not to inflict racial “trauma” on the black woman.

    But the whole brouhaha is not about the typical rudeness people who have more wealth and status commonly inflict on us lesser mortals. This is solely an international news item because a white woman had the temerity to be rude to a black woman. And the black woman is milking it for all it’s worth, rather than shrugging it off as we less privileged white women* are expected to do.

    Even when experiencing the general non-racial rudeness that is part of daily life, blacks can kick up a fuss and literally be heard round the world. She’s taking advantage of her racial privilege every bit as much as the old bat was taking advantage of her class privilege. Additionally, by presenting herself as quite racially and ethnically apart from the other attendees, she was inviting extra attention. (She definitely stands out in her dress and hairstyle in the pics I saw.) When she got it, she complained. How is that different from the woman wearing a plunging neckline complaining about unwanted male attention? It may be unwanted–but it is not unsolicited.

    But fine if you choose to side with her. Hypocrites crying victim have never enjoyed greater approbation than they do today. Might as well jump on the bandwagon.

    *I say “we” in a general way. I don’t know if you’re white or not. I’ve experienced the rudeness to which you refer. It’s galling but hardly to the point of inducing “trauma”.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @Charlotte Allen
    @Kylie

    I don't know whether I'm white or not myself, since I'm half-Latina, and my Welsh/Scottish/English-descent husband always jokes: "You're lucky--you married a white man." (I actually have the extremely fair skin and red hair that I got from my Scottish paternal grandfather, so I pass for white quite easily even though I look exactly like my Peruvian mother.) Be that as it may, the snobbishness of women toward other women whom they perceive to be either impecunious or their social inferiors knows no boundaries of race, color, or creed. It is no fun to be on the receiving end of that kind of rank-pulling, and since I suffer from extreme esprit d'escalier, I can never think of a mot-juste response to that kind of badgering until the next day.

    What strikes me as comical about the whole episode is that Fulani was obviously not from any black-dominated country either Caribbean or African. Had she been wearing genuine Nigerian traditional dress, she would have projected dignity, and even Susan Hussey would have backed off Instead, she showed up in a leopard-print nightgown, a necklace made of animal teeth, a tiara, and massive hair extensions, a ridiculous costume that marked her as a deracinated Western black with zero class. This undoubtedly made her a slow-moving target for the obnoxious Hussey.

    I took Fulani's side only because I detest Hussey's kind of rudeness, which was all the worse in a woman who had the privilege of being lady-in-waiting to two queens and godmother to a prince (Elizabeth, who had genuine class, would have been ever-gracious, even to the cheesy Fulani). Otherwise, I hold no brief for Fulani, a detestable self-aggrandizer who had the gall to suggest that Hussey be "re-educated" by her grifter-NGO.

    Replies: @Mr. Grey, @ChrisZ, @Kylie

  135. @Alden
    Just my opinion; the Fulani witch made the whole thing up. And who wears a Caribbean Carnival costume to a daytime business meeting?

    I’ve seen pictures of African women at the UN and politicians in Africa and they don’t wear Carnival costumes. Those of us who’ve worked with black women know they do this all the time. Always watch out. Never have a private conservation with one. She’ll run to HR claiming you’re a racist.

    Did anyone notice the charity the witch works for? Domestic violence. Some same sex violence. Sometimes women hurting men. But most of it is men beating up their women. And in America, Europe and Africa its the African men who commit the most crimes in every categories. Instead of meeting with the Queen try to end black men’s violence against their women. And kids. Not that black men’s violence against everyone will ever end. Just another non profit scam.

    Organization is the typical non profit, making a good living saving blacks from themselves. The new”profession” is called Social Justice Entrepuener some colleges even have PHDs in it. Which means some stupid black witch can get one of those PHDs and walk into a 300K VP of some big foundation.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    Just my opinion; the Fulani witch made the whole thing up.

    I doubt she made the whole thing up but pretty likely edited it to conform with narrative. The “Oh I can see I am going to have a challenge getting you to say where you’re from. When did you first come here?” is a little to on the nose to be plausible.

  136. In the Deep South, where I’m from, and I assume in genealogy-obsessed British royals, the question “who are your people?” is expected. “I’m from Raleigh” isn’t really an acceptable answer. We really want to know where your parents and grandparents came from.

  137. @Jonathan Mason
    @tyrone


    ……Makes you want to get a hound dog just so you can name it “Marmaduke”.
     
    What a wit!

    Duke Hussey was a war hero of World War II who had leg amputated while a prisoner of war.

    Post-war he was a distinguished journalist, and eventually the chairman of the BBC for 10 years.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @tyrone, @kaganovitch

    It’s good to see, that despite going native, you still have a bit of John Bull/Colonel Blimp in you. Rule Britannia! Fwiw tyrone was just funning with the comic strip ‘Marmaduke’. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marmaduke

  138. @EdwardM
    @Harry Baldwin

    Some strange details of this story (which I guess is not surprising given how strange the story headline itself is).

    According to the court filings, Brinton said when they opened the bag at their hotel, they realized it wasn’t theirs, but got nervous that someone would think they stole it and didn’t know what to do. They said they emptied the luggage and left the person’s clothes inside the drawers of a dresser in the hotel room.
     

    I guess it's possible that someone could mistakenly grab a bag off the carousel, but, if one discovered this when one arrived at one's hotel, wouldn't 99% of people say, "oh shit!" and immediately rush back to the airport to return the suitcase?

    Brinton claimed to have placed the clothes from the bag inside the hotel room's drawers and departed without the garments, although no clothing was ever recovered from Brinton's hotel room.
     

    Then he traveled back home with the suitcase as if it were his, then took it on his next vacation too. I guess the police eventually pieced this sequence of events together weeks later and confirmed the steps with video footage.

    So what's the real story? Some snit begat by a homo lover's quarrel -- he was traveling with someone, they had a fight, so he stole the other's bag at the airport?

    Of course this guy is obviously mentally ill, so who knows.

    https://nypost.com/2022/11/28/non-binary-biden-nuclear-official-charged-with-stealing-womans-luggage-at-airport/

    Replies: @Alden, @Brutusale, @Jack D, @AnotherDad, @Almost Missouri

    The video showed that after he took the bag from the carousel, he pulled off the owner’s luggage tag and discarded it.

    The bag was a “$2,325” Vera Bradley suitcase (BTW prosecutors love to inflate numbers – I don’t think that a $2,300 Vera Bradley suitcase is even sold.) But the typical Vera Bradley bag is very distinctive and might catch the eye of a tranny – it’s like any other suitcase EXCEPT that it is completely covered in various large colorful flower patterns (there are many models):

    So it’s not like it was a generic black suitcase and “they” grabbed the wrong one because they own an identical bag. And even if they did, dumping out the clothes and continuing to use it is not a sign of innocence.

    In case anyone hasn’t noticed, trannies are mentally ill and so kleptomania would not be out of character.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Jack D

    In case anyone hasn’t noticed, trannies are mentally ill and so kleptomania would not be out of character.

    Nah, can't be. If that was true would you put him in charge of disposing of nuclear waste?

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Johann Ricke

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    I can get you the same one from China for 28 bucks, Jack, if you're that interested.

    , @International Jew
    @Jack D

    So he stole the suitcase for itself, rather than for its contents?!

    Replies: @Jack D

  139. @Jack D
    @silviosilver

    First of all, it was a gotcha setup - you dress in the most outlandish fashion possible (although the hats that British upper class women wear are pretty weird too, and all those awful colors) and then you dare the elderly rubes to notice. Woke up to date people know the game and pretend not to notice anything no matter how outrageous the getup. The old lady notices and it's "gotcha!".

    Suppose someone German or Austrian or Swiss had come to this event in a dirndl dress? Would it have been rude for the old lady to ask where she (or nowadays, he) was from? Suppose she had? Would she have lost her job?

    In this old lady's world, she WAS being polite. Here someone has gone to a lot of effort (perhaps slain a leopard?) to dress in "folkloric dress". It would be impolite to ignore it - common sense (not woke sense which is always the opposite) says that someone who goes to this effort wants to be noticed, that they want their costume to be a conversation starter. In reality they DO very much want to be noticed but the initiated are supposed to pretend NOT to notice - the old double game. It's like "Rachel" Levy in her skirt and size 12 high heel pumps. You are supposed to keep a straight face and pretend not to notice that "she" is a guy in a dress. If you say anything, you have lost the game. The old lady saw the exotic dress as a sign that read "Please ask me why I am wearing this crazy outfit" (when really the sign read "I dare you to ask me why I am wearing this crazy outfit").

    Replies: @silviosilver

    You don’t have any proof that it was a “setup,” but it’s all beside the point anyway. You might ask one question about it (and there are plenty of better options than “where do you come from?” – especially right out of the gate) and then drop it the moment you realize the person doesn’t want to answer. You know all of this of course.

    You take a lot of heat on this blog because you’re forever urging the WNs (and similar types) to give up and accept their race replacement, so I guess you see this as your big chance to deflect a bit of that heat by speaking up for them and defending the most utterly pointless and counterproductive kind of “racism” – which they evidently consider a great joy – probably counting on them to be too dumb to realize the ploy. (You could well be right about that last point.)

  140. First, yeah, the hair touching was about her nametag being covered.

    But do much doesn’t add up:

    This was all about an organization aimed at African and Caribbean women. With that as background, “Where are from?” is a perfectly natural question.

    Then at the end she pushes said organization as doing something it doesn’t actually do.

    In one version she never says where she’s from, and in the other she does.

    It’s all too stupid.

    Here’s a polite response to a remark that you find rude: “Oh, I was born here. My parents came from the Caribbean.”

    But no.

    • Agree: Jonathan Mason
  141. @Jack D
    @EdwardM

    The video showed that after he took the bag from the carousel, he pulled off the owner's luggage tag and discarded it.

    The bag was a "$2,325" Vera Bradley suitcase (BTW prosecutors love to inflate numbers - I don't think that a $2,300 Vera Bradley suitcase is even sold.) But the typical Vera Bradley bag is very distinctive and might catch the eye of a tranny - it's like any other suitcase EXCEPT that it is completely covered in various large colorful flower patterns (there are many models):

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/2534/3568/products/41s2QS-dn9L_1024x1024.jpg?v=1630338838

    So it's not like it was a generic black suitcase and "they" grabbed the wrong one because they own an identical bag. And even if they did, dumping out the clothes and continuing to use it is not a sign of innocence.

    In case anyone hasn't noticed, trannies are mentally ill and so kleptomania would not be out of character.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Achmed E. Newman, @International Jew

    In case anyone hasn’t noticed, trannies are mentally ill and so kleptomania would not be out of character.

    Nah, can’t be. If that was true would you put him in charge of disposing of nuclear waste?

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @kaganovitch


    If that was true would you put him in charge of disposing of nuclear waste?
     
    Au Contraire, it's ideal. Snip off the Hazardous Waste tag and in it goes with the rest of the recycling to India.
    , @Johann Ricke
    @kaganovitch



    In case anyone hasn’t noticed, trannies are mentally ill and so kleptomania would not be out of character.
     
    Nah, can’t be. If that was true would you put him in charge of disposing of nuclear waste?

     

    Perhaps if your intent were to *en*courage rather than *dis*courage an increase in the number of nuclear powers.
  142. By the way, she probably has an English accent, and Brits can identify accents in a second. So of course she wasn’t asking about her.

  143. @Charlotte Allen
    I have to side with Fulani in this one. Agreed, she is undoubtedly insufferable and was wearing a stupid outfit (if she's of Caribbean descent, why didn't she wear the traditional folk costume of whatever Caribbean country she's from instead of some fakey leopard-spot-nightgown getup that is traditional dress in no African country?).

    Nonetheless, if Fulani's account of the conversation is accurate, Lady Hussey was unspeakably rude. A social event is not a House panel hearing or a White House press conference, and you don't badger people about where they're from or what they do for a living at a social event, even if their initial responses don't satisfy you. Fulani was not on the witness stand to be cross-examined. I've had people--always female people--try that on me on social occasions, and while I haven't felt "traumatized" like Fulani, I've certainly felt irritated. It's an effort to signal social dominance that is absolutely out of place. As for lifting someone else's hair to peer at her name-badge--that's beyond the pale. I once had to sit next to a nosy old lady who grabbed the religious medal I was wearing around my neck to see who it was--don't do that! Don't touch other people, or their clothes or their hair extensions, just don't.

    I'm sorry that Hussey, who was Queen Elizabeth's very best friend, got the boot. But it's clear that she was allowed to get away with appalling behavior for years and years just because of her position and her rank on the ladyship scale. I'll bet there were more than a few members of the royal family and the court who weren't the slightest bit sad about her departure.

    I do like the name Marmaduke, though. I wish my husband were named Marmaduke.

    Replies: @Kylie, @Jack D, @Anonymous

    if she’s of Caribbean descent, why didn’t she wear the traditional folk costume of whatever Caribbean country she’s from

    Now you’re the one who’s being condescending. Her parents were from Barbados and like most British colonies in the Caribbean, there is no “traditional dress”. Women might wear outrageous costumes for carnivals such as the “Crop Over” harvest festival but those are not “traditional dress” anymore than a Las Vegas showgirl costume is the traditional dress of American women.

    The “traditional dress” of Bajans would be to dress as closely as they could afford to what people were wearing in London at the time (allowing for climate). “Fulani’s” father was named Gladstone because in those benighted days people in the colonies were running TOWARD British culture rather than running away from it with fake African names and fake African costumes.

    Hussey was “cross examining” her because she thought she was enjoying a bit of banter. The woman wore this outrageous outfit and so she thought that when she asked, Fulani would reply , “I am from Nigeria and this is the traditional costume of the Fulani people. Thank you for being curious and making conversation.” When she didn’t, the Lady thought that this woman wanted to play 20 Questions with her until she guessed right.

    • Replies: @Charlotte Allen
    @Jack D

    I didn't know she was from Barbados--but as it turns out, Barbados, like other Caribbean countries, does have traditional folk-dress, and it is actually quite charming and flattering:

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/619526492462633942/

    Like most folk-dress in Europe and the Americas, it is based on the ordinary wear of Europeans during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, modified by climate and local custom.

    Sorry, but I missed the "banter" part of Hussey's querying. Repeatedly prodding someone about her nationality and where she is from doesn't sound like fun to me. One such question ought to be enough.

    Interesting that you have put a full set of thoughts into Susan Hussey's head.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Jack D

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D

    There is folk dress and there is folk dress.

    Where I live in Ecuador I see people in folk dress everyday, mostly women. They wear Panama hats, shawls, blouses, and swishy pleated skirts. You see them mostly in the market and sometimes working in the fields. This is their daily office attire. There are stores in town that sell nothing but this kind of clothing.

    However in most countries, people dress up in folk outfits on holidays and special occasions, folk clothing is not normal work wear.

    For example English people might dress up as Morris dancers, but they don't normally wear Morris dancing clothes to go shopping in the supermarket, unless they are on the way home from a dress rehearsal.

    When you dress up in something striking and unusual that does not come from a chain store to wear to go to a reception of Buckingham Palace, then of course you expect to be asked about it.

    When I was living in Bermuda many years ago, I flew twice to Hollywood to be on Jeopardy!

    At the audition I wore Bermuda business attire consisting of a blue blazer, white shirt, club tie, yellow Bermuda shorts, blue knee stockings and shoes. Of course I wanted people to comment on it! That was the whole point. So that they would ask me where I was from. (However I did not wear the same attire on the plane.)

    This charity woman was just boorish and did not know how to make small talk, or was just deliberately obnoxious. Take your pick.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  144. @Anonymous
    Former UK Home Secretary (Conservative) weighs in on the Great Replacement:

    https://twitter.com/sajidjavid/status/1597696442801741826

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Anon, @Richard B

    “… and here is why it’s a good thing!”

    Continues apace.

  145. @Cloudbuster
    @AndrewR

    Loyalty should be rewarded, not punished.

    I would have preferred that she had been spoken to or re-educated.

    Perhaps in a re-education camp? These people are awful.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    She’s not being locked in the tower. She’ll be fine. Her daughter is a lady in waiting of Camilla.

  146. @Jack D
    @Charlotte Allen


    if she’s of Caribbean descent, why didn’t she wear the traditional folk costume of whatever Caribbean country she’s from
     
    Now you're the one who's being condescending. Her parents were from Barbados and like most British colonies in the Caribbean, there is no "traditional dress". Women might wear outrageous costumes for carnivals such as the "Crop Over" harvest festival but those are not "traditional dress" anymore than a Las Vegas showgirl costume is the traditional dress of American women.

    The "traditional dress" of Bajans would be to dress as closely as they could afford to what people were wearing in London at the time (allowing for climate). "Fulani's" father was named Gladstone because in those benighted days people in the colonies were running TOWARD British culture rather than running away from it with fake African names and fake African costumes.

    Hussey was "cross examining" her because she thought she was enjoying a bit of banter. The woman wore this outrageous outfit and so she thought that when she asked, Fulani would reply , "I am from Nigeria and this is the traditional costume of the Fulani people. Thank you for being curious and making conversation." When she didn't, the Lady thought that this woman wanted to play 20 Questions with her until she guessed right.

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen, @Jonathan Mason

    I didn’t know she was from Barbados–but as it turns out, Barbados, like other Caribbean countries, does have traditional folk-dress, and it is actually quite charming and flattering:

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/619526492462633942/

    Like most folk-dress in Europe and the Americas, it is based on the ordinary wear of Europeans during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, modified by climate and local custom.

    Sorry, but I missed the “banter” part of Hussey’s querying. Repeatedly prodding someone about her nationality and where she is from doesn’t sound like fun to me. One such question ought to be enough.

    Interesting that you have put a full set of thoughts into Susan Hussey’s head.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Charlotte Allen

    I didn’t know she was from Barbados–but as it turns out, Barbados, like other Caribbean countries, does have traditional folk-dress, and it is actually quite charming and flattering:
    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/619526492462633942/

    Eh, Barbados as a country is younger than me, so how 'traditional' can its native dress (based on flag colors) be? As traditional as Kwanzaa?

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen

    , @Jack D
    @Charlotte Allen

    Most "folk dress" is fake, but those Bajan "folk dress" costumes are especially fake, especially the man's outfit. Where would you get a leopard skin in Barbados? Black people wearing leopard skins (especially outside of Africa) is pure Hollywood imagination. Tarzan, anyone?

    https://www.erbzine.com/mag28/fm14h6.jpg

    The woman's dress vaguely resembles an 18th century dress that could have been worn in any British colony. It wouldn't be unusual for a black woman to wear a do-rag because black hair has always been a problem, or a straw hat against the strong Caribbean sun, but I can't imagine wearing both at once.

    I defy you to find a period photograph or engraving that shows people in Barbados wearing these outfits other than as parade dress or holiday costumes.

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen

  147. @Charlotte Allen
    I have to side with Fulani in this one. Agreed, she is undoubtedly insufferable and was wearing a stupid outfit (if she's of Caribbean descent, why didn't she wear the traditional folk costume of whatever Caribbean country she's from instead of some fakey leopard-spot-nightgown getup that is traditional dress in no African country?).

    Nonetheless, if Fulani's account of the conversation is accurate, Lady Hussey was unspeakably rude. A social event is not a House panel hearing or a White House press conference, and you don't badger people about where they're from or what they do for a living at a social event, even if their initial responses don't satisfy you. Fulani was not on the witness stand to be cross-examined. I've had people--always female people--try that on me on social occasions, and while I haven't felt "traumatized" like Fulani, I've certainly felt irritated. It's an effort to signal social dominance that is absolutely out of place. As for lifting someone else's hair to peer at her name-badge--that's beyond the pale. I once had to sit next to a nosy old lady who grabbed the religious medal I was wearing around my neck to see who it was--don't do that! Don't touch other people, or their clothes or their hair extensions, just don't.

    I'm sorry that Hussey, who was Queen Elizabeth's very best friend, got the boot. But it's clear that she was allowed to get away with appalling behavior for years and years just because of her position and her rank on the ladyship scale. I'll bet there were more than a few members of the royal family and the court who weren't the slightest bit sad about her departure.

    I do like the name Marmaduke, though. I wish my husband were named Marmaduke.

    Replies: @Kylie, @Jack D, @Anonymous

    Great comment.

  148. @PiltdownMan
    Only somewhat OT:

    Richard Curtis: lack of diversity in Love Actually makes me feel a bit stupid

    In a TV special marking the festive romcom’s 20th anniversary the director says ‘some moments … feel out of date’

    https://www.theguardian.com/film/2022/nov/30/richard-curtis-lack-of-diversity-in-love-actually-makes-me-feel-a-bit-stupid
     

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Lurker

    Richard Curtis is an insufferable libtard.

    I’ve seen it claimed he’s Tribe. No idea of the truth of that. However he is married to Emma Freud. Yes Freud.

    She is the great-granddaughter of psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud

    • Replies: @Anne Lid
    @Lurker

    Some Hungarian Jews changed their Hungarianised name Kertész to the Anglo sounding Curtis, like Tony Curtis. Kertész originally must have been Gartner, gardener, and before that who knows what it was.

    Replies: @Jack D

  149. @Charlotte Allen
    @Jack D

    I didn't know she was from Barbados--but as it turns out, Barbados, like other Caribbean countries, does have traditional folk-dress, and it is actually quite charming and flattering:

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/619526492462633942/

    Like most folk-dress in Europe and the Americas, it is based on the ordinary wear of Europeans during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, modified by climate and local custom.

    Sorry, but I missed the "banter" part of Hussey's querying. Repeatedly prodding someone about her nationality and where she is from doesn't sound like fun to me. One such question ought to be enough.

    Interesting that you have put a full set of thoughts into Susan Hussey's head.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Jack D

    I didn’t know she was from Barbados–but as it turns out, Barbados, like other Caribbean countries, does have traditional folk-dress, and it is actually quite charming and flattering:
    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/619526492462633942/

    Eh, Barbados as a country is younger than me, so how ‘traditional’ can its native dress (based on flag colors) be? As traditional as Kwanzaa?

    • Replies: @Charlotte Allen
    @kaganovitch

    Barbados was colonized by the British in the early 17th century. It thus had plenty of time to develop distinctive traditional dress modeled on European clothing but with its own adaptations to a tropical climate and its local culture--as did other Caribbean localities that were originally European colonies but later gained independence. Comparing traditional Caribbean dress to Kwanzaa is ridiculous.

  150. @Charlotte Allen
    @Jack D

    I didn't know she was from Barbados--but as it turns out, Barbados, like other Caribbean countries, does have traditional folk-dress, and it is actually quite charming and flattering:

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/619526492462633942/

    Like most folk-dress in Europe and the Americas, it is based on the ordinary wear of Europeans during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, modified by climate and local custom.

    Sorry, but I missed the "banter" part of Hussey's querying. Repeatedly prodding someone about her nationality and where she is from doesn't sound like fun to me. One such question ought to be enough.

    Interesting that you have put a full set of thoughts into Susan Hussey's head.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Jack D

    Most “folk dress” is fake, but those Bajan “folk dress” costumes are especially fake, especially the man’s outfit. Where would you get a leopard skin in Barbados? Black people wearing leopard skins (especially outside of Africa) is pure Hollywood imagination. Tarzan, anyone?

    The woman’s dress vaguely resembles an 18th century dress that could have been worn in any British colony. It wouldn’t be unusual for a black woman to wear a do-rag because black hair has always been a problem, or a straw hat against the strong Caribbean sun, but I can’t imagine wearing both at once.

    I defy you to find a period photograph or engraving that shows people in Barbados wearing these outfits other than as parade dress or holiday costumes.

    • Replies: @Charlotte Allen
    @Jack D

    I'm sure that few Bajans, especially male Bajans, wear traditional folk-dress nowadays except as costumes, just as few Mexican men and women wear the white outfits with huge sombreros (men) and huge-skirted dresses with peasant blouses (women) that you see in Diego Rivera murals unless they are in a dance troupe or celebrating a holiday. Austrians and Bavarians haul out the lederhosen and dirndls nowadays only for Oktoberfest. But 100 years ago, those clothes were widely worn by ordinary people in everyday life, although they were already on the wane, being regarded as rustic and unsophisticated. Still, even to this day a surprising number of Latin-American women still wear traditional clothes. In Guatemala the embroidered huipil is surprisingly widespread as ordinary dress--and it it far more flattering to Guatemalan women's short, stocky figures than the cheap yoga pants and tight T-shirts they otherwise might wear.

    I never said--or even implied--that leopard prints are traditional Barbadian dress. Quite the contrary--and it was why Fulani looked ridiculous.

    I don't know about wearing a broad-brimmed hat and a do-rag at the same time. Do-rags, which are simplified versions (a simple square) of once-ubiquitous mob caps, don't protect the face and neck against the sun, and for many centuries, down to the 18th, a woman's hat was regarded strictly as a sun-protector, not as a fashion ornament, and women wore them over their veils or caps when they went out. Here is the Wife of Bath in hat and veil in the Ellesmere Manuscript:

    https://inpress.lib.uiowa.edu/feminae/DetailsPage.aspx?Feminae_ID=32397

    And here's a knowledgeable-seeming online article asserting that women typically wore their hats over their caps until around 1780:

    http://www.marquise.de/en/1700/howto/frauen/18hauben.shtml

    Since traditional European-derived folk dress preserves 17th- and 18th-century styles, it would not surprise me that a do-rag plus a big hat might be a genuine part of traditional Barbadian female attire.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  151. @Achmed E. Newman

    Call now. Sistah Space’s operators are standing by to take your orders for their cultural competency training. After all, you wouldn’t want this to happen to you.
     
    If this Sistah really planned to make that little Hussey get through a game of 20 questions just so she could make a sale, she is Queen of the Salesmen! She does any curly-haired Caribbean-descended black Hackney-based British National proud!

    What's got me traumatised from this story is all the spelling errors.

    Replies: @Michigan Patriot

    ” White Supremacy ” is proven by ” Sistah ” & her ancestors by living in a Western country for many generations; a stamp of approval !

  152. @kaganovitch
    @Jack D

    In case anyone hasn’t noticed, trannies are mentally ill and so kleptomania would not be out of character.

    Nah, can't be. If that was true would you put him in charge of disposing of nuclear waste?

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Johann Ricke

    If that was true would you put him in charge of disposing of nuclear waste?

    Au Contraire, it’s ideal. Snip off the Hazardous Waste tag and in it goes with the rest of the recycling to India.

  153. Are all blacks from everywhere now officially one thing, just genetic BIPOX? Do any Africans name their daughters N’gozi, or did she just make up a vaguely “African” name? Are any members of the Fulani tribe actually named Fulani? If there are not, it’s mockery. As if an Irish man moved to America and changed his name to “Franco Germany,” and always wore Lederhosen and a yarmulke. I mean, he is the same race as French, Germans, and Ashkenazi Jews, but it’s pretty misleading. With that mix, an Irish accent Gentile-German clothing, Jewish clothing, and two nationalities in him name, is it beyond the pale to ask what his ethnic background is?

    How is a Brit (as N’gozi states she is) wearing an “African” getup derived from stereotypes and fantasy anything but cultural appropriation and mockery of foreign cultures that Ms. Fulani’s people (the British) colonized?

    Where does a British woman get off mocking Africans with leopard-print dresses and bone necklaces? Also, Ms. Fulani is appropriating non-British hairstyles.

    “I dressed in a silly foreign-ish looking costume a foreigner and people asked if I am foreign” is not the sort of thing that should make international news.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Rob

    "Do any Africans name their daughters N’gozi, or did she just make up a vaguely “African” name?"

    I have a West African friend named Ngozi. It's a real name. She speaks fluent German, and for a few years lived in Berlin writing German soap operas, and translating American ones.

  154. @Kylie
    @Charlotte Allen

    "Fulani was not on the witness stand to be cross-examined. I’ve had people–always female people–try that on me on social occasions, and while I haven’t felt 'traumatized' like Fulani, I’ve certainly felt irritated. It’s an effort to signal social dominance that is absolutely out of place."

    Exactly. The old lady's badgering was an effort to signal social dominance, not to inflict racial "trauma" on the black woman.

    But the whole brouhaha is not about the typical rudeness people who have more wealth and status commonly inflict on us lesser mortals. This is solely an international news item because a white woman had the temerity to be rude to a black woman. And the black woman is milking it for all it's worth, rather than shrugging it off as we less privileged white women* are expected to do.

    Even when experiencing the general non-racial rudeness that is part of daily life, blacks can kick up a fuss and literally be heard round the world. She's taking advantage of her racial privilege every bit as much as the old bat was taking advantage of her class privilege. Additionally, by presenting herself as quite racially and ethnically apart from the other attendees, she was inviting extra attention. (She definitely stands out in her dress and hairstyle in the pics I saw.) When she got it, she complained. How is that different from the woman wearing a plunging neckline complaining about unwanted male attention? It may be unwanted--but it is not unsolicited.

    But fine if you choose to side with her. Hypocrites crying victim have never enjoyed greater approbation than they do today. Might as well jump on the bandwagon.

    *I say "we" in a general way. I don't know if you're white or not. I've experienced the rudeness to which you refer. It's galling but hardly to the point of inducing "trauma".

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen

    I don’t know whether I’m white or not myself, since I’m half-Latina, and my Welsh/Scottish/English-descent husband always jokes: “You’re lucky–you married a white man.” (I actually have the extremely fair skin and red hair that I got from my Scottish paternal grandfather, so I pass for white quite easily even though I look exactly like my Peruvian mother.) Be that as it may, the snobbishness of women toward other women whom they perceive to be either impecunious or their social inferiors knows no boundaries of race, color, or creed. It is no fun to be on the receiving end of that kind of rank-pulling, and since I suffer from extreme esprit d’escalier, I can never think of a mot-juste response to that kind of badgering until the next day.

    What strikes me as comical about the whole episode is that Fulani was obviously not from any black-dominated country either Caribbean or African. Had she been wearing genuine Nigerian traditional dress, she would have projected dignity, and even Susan Hussey would have backed off Instead, she showed up in a leopard-print nightgown, a necklace made of animal teeth, a tiara, and massive hair extensions, a ridiculous costume that marked her as a deracinated Western black with zero class. This undoubtedly made her a slow-moving target for the obnoxious Hussey.

    I took Fulani’s side only because I detest Hussey’s kind of rudeness, which was all the worse in a woman who had the privilege of being lady-in-waiting to two queens and godmother to a prince (Elizabeth, who had genuine class, would have been ever-gracious, even to the cheesy Fulani). Otherwise, I hold no brief for Fulani, a detestable self-aggrandizer who had the gall to suggest that Hussey be “re-educated” by her grifter-NGO.

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Mr. Grey
    @Charlotte Allen

    I knew an upper class Peruvian and he must have been 100% European ancestry.

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen

    , @ChrisZ
    @Charlotte Allen

    Your comments here are a delight to read, Charlotte.

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen

    , @Kylie
    @Charlotte Allen

    You are probably lighter skinned than I am. I'm half Slav and that side of the family has darker skin. I've had Italians think I'm Italian, Native Americans think I'm Native Americans, etc. One summer my friend looked at my bare legs and said, "Your knees are dirty!" I said, "No, that's my tan."

    The old bat was rude to the newcomer of color. But it was a rudeness based on class, not race. The newcomer of color was also rude by deliberately presenting herself as a outsider, then trying to trip up the old bat who was determined to "place" her. She made sure an old Englishwoman's class-based rudeness blew up into an international race incident.

    But ultimately, despite her rudeness, I cut the old bat some slack because she was, after all, at home in her own country. Whereas the newcomer, though she, too, was born there, has deliberately taken steps to ensure she is seen as the other and her loyalty is not to her country of birth but to her tribe.

    When I think how my dark-skinned grandparents, with their thickly accented English, tried so hard to fit into the WASPish community where they settled and then I think of this misfit with her tribal regalia without a shred of loyalty to the country that has given her so much, I get really angry. Eff her.

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen

  155. @Thea
    Will and Kate threw her under the bus to reveal themselves backstabbing traitors. They don’t stand for Britain, the English people or even their family and close friends.

    They could have said nothing as this is a whole bunch of nothing and let time pass. Quickly, the public forgets such trifles.

    Replies: @Kylie, @AndrewR, @AnotherDad, @Alden

    Will and Kate threw her under the bus to reveal themselves backstabbing traitors. They don’t stand for Britain, the English people or even their family and close friends.

    The only salient benefit taxpaying peasantry was at least supposed to get from supporting the parasitic nobility was protection. Protection from internal banditry and external invasion. The King of England would be living large looting you, but at least, hordes of aliens–say Frenchmen–weren’t supposed to invading, raping and pillaging.

    Modern “nobility” doesn’t even make nod in the direction to even paying lip service to that noble function.

    Invading looters and parasites welcome!

    • Agree: Kylie
  156. @Jack D
    @Charlotte Allen


    if she’s of Caribbean descent, why didn’t she wear the traditional folk costume of whatever Caribbean country she’s from
     
    Now you're the one who's being condescending. Her parents were from Barbados and like most British colonies in the Caribbean, there is no "traditional dress". Women might wear outrageous costumes for carnivals such as the "Crop Over" harvest festival but those are not "traditional dress" anymore than a Las Vegas showgirl costume is the traditional dress of American women.

    The "traditional dress" of Bajans would be to dress as closely as they could afford to what people were wearing in London at the time (allowing for climate). "Fulani's" father was named Gladstone because in those benighted days people in the colonies were running TOWARD British culture rather than running away from it with fake African names and fake African costumes.

    Hussey was "cross examining" her because she thought she was enjoying a bit of banter. The woman wore this outrageous outfit and so she thought that when she asked, Fulani would reply , "I am from Nigeria and this is the traditional costume of the Fulani people. Thank you for being curious and making conversation." When she didn't, the Lady thought that this woman wanted to play 20 Questions with her until she guessed right.

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen, @Jonathan Mason

    There is folk dress and there is folk dress.

    Where I live in Ecuador I see people in folk dress everyday, mostly women. They wear Panama hats, shawls, blouses, and swishy pleated skirts. You see them mostly in the market and sometimes working in the fields. This is their daily office attire. There are stores in town that sell nothing but this kind of clothing.

    However in most countries, people dress up in folk outfits on holidays and special occasions, folk clothing is not normal work wear.

    For example English people might dress up as Morris dancers, but they don’t normally wear Morris dancing clothes to go shopping in the supermarket, unless they are on the way home from a dress rehearsal.

    When you dress up in something striking and unusual that does not come from a chain store to wear to go to a reception of Buckingham Palace, then of course you expect to be asked about it.

    When I was living in Bermuda many years ago, I flew twice to Hollywood to be on Jeopardy!

    At the audition I wore Bermuda business attire consisting of a blue blazer, white shirt, club tie, yellow Bermuda shorts, blue knee stockings and shoes. Of course I wanted people to comment on it! That was the whole point. So that they would ask me where I was from. (However I did not wear the same attire on the plane.)

    This charity woman was just boorish and did not know how to make small talk, or was just deliberately obnoxious. Take your pick.

    • Agree: Jack D
    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan, if you ever attend a charity down there, you should be wearing your native Jacksonville dress: cut-off shorts, sandals, and a Ron Jon's T-shirt, probably underwear too...

  157. @EdwardM
    @Harry Baldwin

    Some strange details of this story (which I guess is not surprising given how strange the story headline itself is).

    According to the court filings, Brinton said when they opened the bag at their hotel, they realized it wasn’t theirs, but got nervous that someone would think they stole it and didn’t know what to do. They said they emptied the luggage and left the person’s clothes inside the drawers of a dresser in the hotel room.
     

    I guess it's possible that someone could mistakenly grab a bag off the carousel, but, if one discovered this when one arrived at one's hotel, wouldn't 99% of people say, "oh shit!" and immediately rush back to the airport to return the suitcase?

    Brinton claimed to have placed the clothes from the bag inside the hotel room's drawers and departed without the garments, although no clothing was ever recovered from Brinton's hotel room.
     

    Then he traveled back home with the suitcase as if it were his, then took it on his next vacation too. I guess the police eventually pieced this sequence of events together weeks later and confirmed the steps with video footage.

    So what's the real story? Some snit begat by a homo lover's quarrel -- he was traveling with someone, they had a fight, so he stole the other's bag at the airport?

    Of course this guy is obviously mentally ill, so who knows.

    https://nypost.com/2022/11/28/non-binary-biden-nuclear-official-charged-with-stealing-womans-luggage-at-airport/

    Replies: @Alden, @Brutusale, @Jack D, @AnotherDad, @Almost Missouri

    The details of this queers theft are irrelevant.

    What is relevant–and deeply depressing–is that in this day and age the minoritarian regime feels free to and delights in installing this sort of human detritus to run the public bureaucracy. The delight in rubbing our normy noses it. And do so with impunity.

  158. “She said she had ‘never felt so unwelcome or so uncomfortable’.”

    Looking at her picture I can see why.

  159. @Jack D
    @Charlotte Allen

    Most "folk dress" is fake, but those Bajan "folk dress" costumes are especially fake, especially the man's outfit. Where would you get a leopard skin in Barbados? Black people wearing leopard skins (especially outside of Africa) is pure Hollywood imagination. Tarzan, anyone?

    https://www.erbzine.com/mag28/fm14h6.jpg

    The woman's dress vaguely resembles an 18th century dress that could have been worn in any British colony. It wouldn't be unusual for a black woman to wear a do-rag because black hair has always been a problem, or a straw hat against the strong Caribbean sun, but I can't imagine wearing both at once.

    I defy you to find a period photograph or engraving that shows people in Barbados wearing these outfits other than as parade dress or holiday costumes.

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen

    I’m sure that few Bajans, especially male Bajans, wear traditional folk-dress nowadays except as costumes, just as few Mexican men and women wear the white outfits with huge sombreros (men) and huge-skirted dresses with peasant blouses (women) that you see in Diego Rivera murals unless they are in a dance troupe or celebrating a holiday. Austrians and Bavarians haul out the lederhosen and dirndls nowadays only for Oktoberfest. But 100 years ago, those clothes were widely worn by ordinary people in everyday life, although they were already on the wane, being regarded as rustic and unsophisticated. Still, even to this day a surprising number of Latin-American women still wear traditional clothes. In Guatemala the embroidered huipil is surprisingly widespread as ordinary dress–and it it far more flattering to Guatemalan women’s short, stocky figures than the cheap yoga pants and tight T-shirts they otherwise might wear.

    I never said–or even implied–that leopard prints are traditional Barbadian dress. Quite the contrary–and it was why Fulani looked ridiculous.

    I don’t know about wearing a broad-brimmed hat and a do-rag at the same time. Do-rags, which are simplified versions (a simple square) of once-ubiquitous mob caps, don’t protect the face and neck against the sun, and for many centuries, down to the 18th, a woman’s hat was regarded strictly as a sun-protector, not as a fashion ornament, and women wore them over their veils or caps when they went out. Here is the Wife of Bath in hat and veil in the Ellesmere Manuscript:

    https://inpress.lib.uiowa.edu/feminae/DetailsPage.aspx?Feminae_ID=32397

    And here’s a knowledgeable-seeming online article asserting that women typically wore their hats over their caps until around 1780:

    http://www.marquise.de/en/1700/howto/frauen/18hauben.shtml

    Since traditional European-derived folk dress preserves 17th- and 18th-century styles, it would not surprise me that a do-rag plus a big hat might be a genuine part of traditional Barbadian female attire.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Charlotte Allen


    ... for many centuries, down to the 18th, a woman’s hat was regarded strictly as a sun-protector, not as a fashion ornament...
     
    Correct. In fact the Spanish word for hat is 'sombrero', which, if translated literally, means 'shade-maker'.
  160. @Spangel226
    @tyrone

    I was all ready to mock that name, but turns out their is a lad named Sir marmaduke hussey in this article, so ngozi is suddenly not looking so bad.

    Replies: @tyrone, @kaganovitch, @Almost Missouri

    Before Marmaduke Hussey was Chairman of the BBC and Susan’s husband, he lost a leg at Anzio in WWII.

    Amusingly, in Netflix’s prestige soap-opera-for-the-wine-and-cheese-set, The Crown, Susan Hussey is played by Haydn Gwynne, who also portrays Camilla whatsername on Channel 4’s mean spirited and occasionally funny parody of the royals, The Windsors. Whether as a casting decision, laziness, or directorial choice, Gwynne portrays both Camilla and Susan approximately the same way: as aging but canny sexual operators scheming to get their way in royal politics. Whether this bears (bore) any relationship to reality, I have no idea.

  161. @Jonathan Mason
    I guess it is rude to touch somebody's hair, but then again if you are given a name badge so that people can see your name, you probably need to make sure that the badge is not covered by your hair, otherwise it defeats the point.

    Apparently this woman was dressed up in full African folk dress regalia, which does beg the question of where she comes from. Why dress up in this fashion if you don't want to talk about it?

    Her surname is Fulani, which presumably relates to the Fulani tribe which is found in Nigeria.

    Conversation should have gone like this:

    "Where are you from?"

    "Actually I was born right here in London and grew up here, but my parents came to Britain in the 1950s from (X) and they liked it so much they never went back! I went with them to the home country one time on vacation and loved it, Have you ever been there?"

    Replies: @silviosilver, @Mike Tre, @AnotherDad

    Conversation should have gone like this:

    “Where are you from?”

    “Actually I was born right here in London and grew up here, but my parents came to Britain in the 1950s from (X) and they liked it so much they never went back! I went with them to the home country one time on vacation and loved it, Have you ever been there?”

    More accurately …

    “Actually I was born right here in London, my parents came from Barbados, but I’m a huge BPD drama queen, I like to dress up like it’s halloween as a fake African princess.”

    The interesting bit here:

    [Fulani] wrote: “There was nobody to report it to. I couldn’t report it to the Queen Consort, plus it was such a shock to me and the 2 other women we were stunned into temporary silence. I just stood at the edge of the room, smiled & engaged briefly, with those who spoke to me until I could leave.”

    “It was such a struggle to stay in a space you were violated in.”

    “Here I am in this place as part of the 16 days of activism, experiencing non-physical violence.

    The mega-doses of “oppression” drama and this desire to run to–and expectation of–some sort of minoritarian momma hall-monitor to report her “oppression”. All for some routine “where are you from?” awkward conversation.

    Imagine all the oppressive querying various Scots, Welch, Cornish and Irish–not to mention continentals and colonials!–have endured in London over the centuries.

  162. @kaganovitch
    @Charlotte Allen

    I didn’t know she was from Barbados–but as it turns out, Barbados, like other Caribbean countries, does have traditional folk-dress, and it is actually quite charming and flattering:
    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/619526492462633942/

    Eh, Barbados as a country is younger than me, so how 'traditional' can its native dress (based on flag colors) be? As traditional as Kwanzaa?

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen

    Barbados was colonized by the British in the early 17th century. It thus had plenty of time to develop distinctive traditional dress modeled on European clothing but with its own adaptations to a tropical climate and its local culture–as did other Caribbean localities that were originally European colonies but later gained independence. Comparing traditional Caribbean dress to Kwanzaa is ridiculous.

  163. @EdwardM
    @Harry Baldwin

    Some strange details of this story (which I guess is not surprising given how strange the story headline itself is).

    According to the court filings, Brinton said when they opened the bag at their hotel, they realized it wasn’t theirs, but got nervous that someone would think they stole it and didn’t know what to do. They said they emptied the luggage and left the person’s clothes inside the drawers of a dresser in the hotel room.
     

    I guess it's possible that someone could mistakenly grab a bag off the carousel, but, if one discovered this when one arrived at one's hotel, wouldn't 99% of people say, "oh shit!" and immediately rush back to the airport to return the suitcase?

    Brinton claimed to have placed the clothes from the bag inside the hotel room's drawers and departed without the garments, although no clothing was ever recovered from Brinton's hotel room.
     

    Then he traveled back home with the suitcase as if it were his, then took it on his next vacation too. I guess the police eventually pieced this sequence of events together weeks later and confirmed the steps with video footage.

    So what's the real story? Some snit begat by a homo lover's quarrel -- he was traveling with someone, they had a fight, so he stole the other's bag at the airport?

    Of course this guy is obviously mentally ill, so who knows.

    https://nypost.com/2022/11/28/non-binary-biden-nuclear-official-charged-with-stealing-womans-luggage-at-airport/

    Replies: @Alden, @Brutusale, @Jack D, @AnotherDad, @Almost Missouri

    So what’s the real story?

    I agree with previous commenters, but would add that courtesy of iSteve we have learned that trannies such a Nukie Brinton have a sexual fetish about dressing in women’s clothes. Given that this was obviously a wealthy woman’s suitcase, …. well, I guess he just couldn’t help himself. Now he’s trying to retcon some semi-plausible and exculpatory narrative with his lawyers.

    • Replies: @EdwardM
    @Almost Missouri

    Your Occam's Razor explanation has convinced me. Thanks.

  164. @Charlotte Allen
    @Jack D

    I'm sure that few Bajans, especially male Bajans, wear traditional folk-dress nowadays except as costumes, just as few Mexican men and women wear the white outfits with huge sombreros (men) and huge-skirted dresses with peasant blouses (women) that you see in Diego Rivera murals unless they are in a dance troupe or celebrating a holiday. Austrians and Bavarians haul out the lederhosen and dirndls nowadays only for Oktoberfest. But 100 years ago, those clothes were widely worn by ordinary people in everyday life, although they were already on the wane, being regarded as rustic and unsophisticated. Still, even to this day a surprising number of Latin-American women still wear traditional clothes. In Guatemala the embroidered huipil is surprisingly widespread as ordinary dress--and it it far more flattering to Guatemalan women's short, stocky figures than the cheap yoga pants and tight T-shirts they otherwise might wear.

    I never said--or even implied--that leopard prints are traditional Barbadian dress. Quite the contrary--and it was why Fulani looked ridiculous.

    I don't know about wearing a broad-brimmed hat and a do-rag at the same time. Do-rags, which are simplified versions (a simple square) of once-ubiquitous mob caps, don't protect the face and neck against the sun, and for many centuries, down to the 18th, a woman's hat was regarded strictly as a sun-protector, not as a fashion ornament, and women wore them over their veils or caps when they went out. Here is the Wife of Bath in hat and veil in the Ellesmere Manuscript:

    https://inpress.lib.uiowa.edu/feminae/DetailsPage.aspx?Feminae_ID=32397

    And here's a knowledgeable-seeming online article asserting that women typically wore their hats over their caps until around 1780:

    http://www.marquise.de/en/1700/howto/frauen/18hauben.shtml

    Since traditional European-derived folk dress preserves 17th- and 18th-century styles, it would not surprise me that a do-rag plus a big hat might be a genuine part of traditional Barbadian female attire.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    … for many centuries, down to the 18th, a woman’s hat was regarded strictly as a sun-protector, not as a fashion ornament…

    Correct. In fact the Spanish word for hat is ‘sombrero’, which, if translated literally, means ‘shade-maker’.

  165. @Reg Cæsar
    @AndrewR


    What would he say if Karachi, Islamabad and Peshawar all became minority Pakistani in a short time?
     
    They are already there. Pakistan is an empire, as are India, Iran, Afghanistan, Russia, Ethiopia, and Nigeria.



    https://assets.cureus.com/uploads/figure/file/271574/lightbox_d10fb88029c411ec874849ae4b0ebe02-Figure-1-b-.png



    From your friendly local CIA's Factbook:

    Ethnic groups
    Punjabi 44.7%, Pashtun (Pathan) 15.4%, Sindhi 14.1%, Saraiki 8.4%, Muhajirs 7.6%, Balochi 3.6%, other 6.3%

    Languages
    Punjabi 48%, Sindhi 12%, Saraiki (a Punjabi variant) 10%, Pashto (alternate name, Pashtu) 8%, Urdu (official) 8%, Balochi 3%, Hindko 2%, Brahui 1%, English (official; lingua franca of Pakistani elite and most government ministries), Burushaski, and other 8%

    https://www.cia.gov/the-world-factbook/countries/pakistan/#people-and-society
     

    Replies: @AndrewR, @anonymouseperson, @Almost Missouri, @SZ

    What a retarded response! It doesn’t matter if some of them speak Punjabi while the other talk in Sindi, Swahili, or Eskimo. They all marry their cousins, they all treat their women like shit, and they all spoil their children unless they are penniless and totally destitute. Pakistanis never formed an empire. They were always ruled by others, by people who did not marry their cousins.

  166. @AndrewR
    @Art Deco

    You might be the most childishly contrarian person here besides Corvinus. Even Jack D is reasonable when not discussing Jews or Russia.

    It's true that I don't have a baseline of Lady Hussey's lifetime behavior to compare her current behavior to. Maybe she's always been highly socially inept, but given her long association with the royal family who expect their associates to not be embarrassing, it's a safe bet she's become senile.

    Andrew's behavior has been a huge embarrassment to the family and to the "firm," not just his (now dead) mother, his irrelevant wife and his largely irrelevant daughters. It's quite likely that Charles and William feel the need to run a tighter ship as the direct result of his actions. Part of that tightness might involve removing embarrassing old women from public facing positions.

    And Meghan's allegations about how she felt suicidal and prohibited from seeking mental health care are quite famous. Whatever you - as an internet troll with no one who loves you - may think about her allegations, many people found the allegations shocking, and they did damage to the monarchy.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    you – as an internet troll with no one who loves you

    I’ve butted heads with Art before about various things, and probably will again, but I do appreciate his use of statistics to anchor discussion to measurable reality. Yeah, sometimes stats spergs can miss the real world forest for the statistical trees, but knowing about trees helps too.

    That said, this isn’t a statistical discussion, and I know next to nothing about the royals, so … whatever. I just wanted to say that Art is not completely unloved, even when I disagree with him.

    • Agree: Rob
  167. @tyrone
    With a perfectly good English name like Ngozi Fulani why she ever ask such a question .....send her to Coventry now!

    Replies: @Spangel226, @Ebony Obelisk, @Russ, @Mr. Grey

    I’m pretty sure that Fulani is an old British name, pre-dating the Anglo-Saxons. It comes from one of those black Roman legion soldiers. I think I heard this on the BBC, most likely. I also denounce racism.

  168. @Charlotte Allen
    @Kylie

    I don't know whether I'm white or not myself, since I'm half-Latina, and my Welsh/Scottish/English-descent husband always jokes: "You're lucky--you married a white man." (I actually have the extremely fair skin and red hair that I got from my Scottish paternal grandfather, so I pass for white quite easily even though I look exactly like my Peruvian mother.) Be that as it may, the snobbishness of women toward other women whom they perceive to be either impecunious or their social inferiors knows no boundaries of race, color, or creed. It is no fun to be on the receiving end of that kind of rank-pulling, and since I suffer from extreme esprit d'escalier, I can never think of a mot-juste response to that kind of badgering until the next day.

    What strikes me as comical about the whole episode is that Fulani was obviously not from any black-dominated country either Caribbean or African. Had she been wearing genuine Nigerian traditional dress, she would have projected dignity, and even Susan Hussey would have backed off Instead, she showed up in a leopard-print nightgown, a necklace made of animal teeth, a tiara, and massive hair extensions, a ridiculous costume that marked her as a deracinated Western black with zero class. This undoubtedly made her a slow-moving target for the obnoxious Hussey.

    I took Fulani's side only because I detest Hussey's kind of rudeness, which was all the worse in a woman who had the privilege of being lady-in-waiting to two queens and godmother to a prince (Elizabeth, who had genuine class, would have been ever-gracious, even to the cheesy Fulani). Otherwise, I hold no brief for Fulani, a detestable self-aggrandizer who had the gall to suggest that Hussey be "re-educated" by her grifter-NGO.

    Replies: @Mr. Grey, @ChrisZ, @Kylie

    I knew an upper class Peruvian and he must have been 100% European ancestry.

    • Replies: @Charlotte Allen
    @Mr. Grey

    My mother looked very European (olive skin) but her two much darker siblings looked more phenotypically indio. I'm sure that nearly all Peruvians are at least part indio, including much of my own family.

    One of my sisters is very dark, as is one of her daughters. Our family is all over the boards genetically.

    Replies: @epebble

  169. Steve, check out how the media reports this story.

    10-year-old boy charged with shooting and killing mother over virtual reality headset

    https://www.wisn.com/article/wisconsin-boy-charged-shooting-killing-mom-vr-headset/42110537#

    compared to the demographics of the mother.

  170. @Reg Cæsar
    @AndrewR


    Your omission of China is interesting but presumably accidental. The Uyghurs and Tibetans, among others, would tend to agree.
     
    No, I left China out because the Han constitute 92% of the population. (Down from 96% in 1949.) The "imperial" parts are on the fringe, albeit a majority of the land mass.

    I chose states with no ethnic majority.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Peter Lund

    The Han ethnicity is largely a lie. Yes, the state calls them that. Almost all of them call themselves that. Most of them even believe it.

    But, ackshually, things are a lot more complicated. Many Southerners are surprised when genetic tests reveal they are closer to Vietnamese than they are to Northern Han.

  171. @Lurker
    @PiltdownMan

    Richard Curtis is an insufferable libtard.

    I've seen it claimed he's Tribe. No idea of the truth of that. However he is married to Emma Freud. Yes Freud.


    She is the great-granddaughter of psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud
     

    Replies: @Anne Lid

    Some Hungarian Jews changed their Hungarianised name Kertész to the Anglo sounding Curtis, like Tony Curtis. Kertész originally must have been Gartner, gardener, and before that who knows what it was.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Anne Lid


    and before that who knows what it was.
     
    Before that, it wasn't anything. Jews traditionally didn't have surnames (and they still don't for religious purposes). They followed the X son of Y, naming system, the same as their fellow Semites the Arabs. Jews only took surnames when they were required to do so when modern governments demanded that they take them for record keeping , tax and other purposes.
  172. Being half-asian, I’m very familiar with the “where are you from?” game. I usually just say “North Carolina” (which ain’t lying) and then watch their uncomfortable expression to know what they were really asking. Not sure how I would have reacted to someone as persistent as the person is this article. Maybe just, ok, you got me – I’m half-Korean. Now go ahead and use that knowledge to assume whatever you want to about me.

  173. @Rich
    @Kim

    Oddly enough, not really. Monarchs throughout the world have almost uniformly been a friend to the commoner. Queen Victoria was greeted by adoring crowds in Ireland shortly before their 1916 uprising and millions have fought for their "king and country" from every corner of the earth. I would agree that they often mistreated those they conquered, but that was the way of war and is no different from any other system of government that conquers a foreign land.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Queen Victoria was greeted by adoring crowds in Ireland shortly before their 1916 uprising…

    She died in 1901. It must have been her ghost.

    • Replies: @Rich
    @Reg Cæsar

    1900. On her last visit to Ireland tens of thousands lined the street to cheer her. 16 years is the blink of an eye, ain't it Reg?

  174. @Dan Smith
    To me, looks like she wants to appear African. Like all the black American with goofy names inspired by “Roots” (Shaliqua, Dayquan, Arkarious etc.) Unlike the nice British lady reaching out to her, I don’t give a rip.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    IIRC, the supposedly Gambian women in Roots were given African or faux-African names. The women in America were given conventional names, except for one character named ‘Kizzy’. The fashion for giving your daughter a faux-African name which sounds like a digestive disease started earlier, though has grown more pervasive over time.

  175. @Ebony Obelisk
    @tyrone

    What’s your problem jerk?

    Man I cannot wait for white men to lose all institutional power.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Curle

    What’s your problem jerk?

    This is a new low for you, Eb. Before, you managed to keep the rudeness in check.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Reg Cæsar

    Steve's moderation policy is a mystery to me. I see people who sound pretty reasonable saying he takes days to approve their comments. And then he approves a juvenile insult like this?

    My comments (which, in retrospect, aren't always the best) he seems to approve instantly.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  176. @Mr. Grey
    @Charlotte Allen

    I knew an upper class Peruvian and he must have been 100% European ancestry.

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen

    My mother looked very European (olive skin) but her two much darker siblings looked more phenotypically indio. I’m sure that nearly all Peruvians are at least part indio, including much of my own family.

    One of my sisters is very dark, as is one of her daughters. Our family is all over the boards genetically.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Charlotte Allen

    A young woman at my work in El Segundo, CA was from Peru and was indistinguishable from someone from India. It is strange how the genes blend together. In fact, Peruvians see this resemblance so much that Indian movies are very popular in Peru.

    Latin America's Peru hooked on to Bollywood culture
    https://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/latin-america-s-peru-hooked-on-to-bollywood-culture-with-pix-113090400398_1.html

  177. @Charlotte Allen
    @Kylie

    I don't know whether I'm white or not myself, since I'm half-Latina, and my Welsh/Scottish/English-descent husband always jokes: "You're lucky--you married a white man." (I actually have the extremely fair skin and red hair that I got from my Scottish paternal grandfather, so I pass for white quite easily even though I look exactly like my Peruvian mother.) Be that as it may, the snobbishness of women toward other women whom they perceive to be either impecunious or their social inferiors knows no boundaries of race, color, or creed. It is no fun to be on the receiving end of that kind of rank-pulling, and since I suffer from extreme esprit d'escalier, I can never think of a mot-juste response to that kind of badgering until the next day.

    What strikes me as comical about the whole episode is that Fulani was obviously not from any black-dominated country either Caribbean or African. Had she been wearing genuine Nigerian traditional dress, she would have projected dignity, and even Susan Hussey would have backed off Instead, she showed up in a leopard-print nightgown, a necklace made of animal teeth, a tiara, and massive hair extensions, a ridiculous costume that marked her as a deracinated Western black with zero class. This undoubtedly made her a slow-moving target for the obnoxious Hussey.

    I took Fulani's side only because I detest Hussey's kind of rudeness, which was all the worse in a woman who had the privilege of being lady-in-waiting to two queens and godmother to a prince (Elizabeth, who had genuine class, would have been ever-gracious, even to the cheesy Fulani). Otherwise, I hold no brief for Fulani, a detestable self-aggrandizer who had the gall to suggest that Hussey be "re-educated" by her grifter-NGO.

    Replies: @Mr. Grey, @ChrisZ, @Kylie

    Your comments here are a delight to read, Charlotte.

    • Replies: @Charlotte Allen
    @ChrisZ

    Awww--gee thanks!

  178. That exchange sounded a bit like Abbot & Costello!

    Sorry but,Good God,that woman is ugly as sin!

  179. @ChrisZ
    @Charlotte Allen

    Your comments here are a delight to read, Charlotte.

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen

    Awww–gee thanks!

  180. ‘The Wiz’ will be coming back to Broadway this Spring, “reimagined” by Amber Ruffin.
    What do the oddsmakers at Unz think will be the first PR gossip before it opens?

    Something to do with colorism and Diana Ross?
    Noose on set?
    Too many White people on set?
    Hair?

  181. Anonymous[249] • Disclaimer says:
    @EricD
    I would say the older white lady was showing poor etiquette, poor manners, in pressing the question to the black lady. But I wouldn’t go so far as “racist.” I’ve had people ask what my (white) ancestry was, such as Irish or German. I understood the curiosity and wasn’t offended. (The correct answer is 75% English and 25% German).

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I would say the older white lady was showing poor etiquette, poor manners, in pressing the question to the black lady.

    Do you really believe the conversation happened in anything like this form as concocted, long after the fact, by a trained, professional race hustler?

    “Ngozi Fulani” nee Headley also gives her current surname as “Headley-Fulani.” She claims to know “basic” Hausa, and to be a “Marriages Registrar, Teacher, African Dancer,Drummer & Ceremonies Officer.”

    She may have been married to an actual Fulani, perhaps from Nigeria.

    No word on her given “deadname.”

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Anonymous

    I agree with you the race hustler witch made the whole thing up.

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Anonymous


    She claims... to be a “...African Dancer,Drummer & Ceremonies Officer.”
     
    As a pure Brit, she is obviously engaged in cultural appropriation. How arrogant for an Englishwoman like her to pose as an African Ceremonies Officer! Africans everywhere must be angry over this continuation of the colonial experience.

    Do you really believe the conversation happened in anything like this form
     
    It certainly was strange. If reported accurately, it makes one wonder whether she--and by implication the late Queen and others of their standing and age cohort--don't understand what is happening to the UK in terms of immigration.
  182. The words “Where are you from?” have recently been declared improper. One sees posters in students’ union buildings proclaiming that “Everyone here is from here.”

    Lady SH: Where are you from?

    Me: Sistah Space.

    SH: No, where do you come from?

    Me: We’re based in Hackney.

    Lady Hussey does not know this and thinks Fulani has misunderstood her, probably because she is an African.

    SH: No, what part of Africa are YOU from?

    Me: I don’t know, they didn’t leave any records.

    At this point, Lady Hussey has the information to guess that Fulani is Caribbean but she doesn’t.

    SH: Well, you must know where you’re from, I spent time in France.

    But that does not mean she is French.

    Where are you from?

    She still thinks she has been misunderstood.

    Me: Here, UK

    SH: NO, but what Nationality are you?

    Me: I am born here and am British.

    SH: No, but where do you really come from, where do your people come from?

    By “people” she means extended family. Her “people”, the Waldegraves, were originally baronets (i.e. climbers) from Kent who entered the nobility by marrying upwards.

    Me: ‘My people’, lady, what is this?

    SH: Oh I can see I am going to have a challenge getting you to say where you’re from.

    She senses that Fulani is being difficult but genuinely cannot see what is wrong with a perfectly good question.

    When did you first come here?

    Me: Lady! I am a British national, my parents came here in the 50s when …

    SH: Oh, I knew we’d get there in the end, you’re Caribbean!

    She has placed Fulani at last and is trying to think of something to say about the Caribbean.

    Me: No Lady, I am of African heritage, Caribbean descent and British nationality.

    SH: Oh, so you’re from …”

    To the end she cannot see that Fulani is seriously angry and regards the question as a calculated insult.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Philip Neal

    Thanks.

    , @Anonymous
    @Philip Neal

    There is NO WAY the conversation went down anything like this.

    Someone like Lady Hussey would have a lifetime's worth of experience in dealing smoothly and politely with all manner of boors, provocateuses, etc.

    On the other hand, it is not inconceivable that this kerfuffle was carefully staged to take the wind out of the sails of Harry Hewitt (aka "Prince" Harry) and his own hussy with their Netflix smear job against the Royals. For one thing, Lady Hussey's daughter is apparently still an official "companion" of the current queen consort.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    , @S Johnson
    @Philip Neal

    The conversation is a battle over who has the superior status, Hussey over her right to get a direct answer to a direct question, or Fulani/Headley to protest a breach of modern-day protocol (asking a black lady where she’s from).

  183. @Charlotte Allen
    @Mr. Grey

    My mother looked very European (olive skin) but her two much darker siblings looked more phenotypically indio. I'm sure that nearly all Peruvians are at least part indio, including much of my own family.

    One of my sisters is very dark, as is one of her daughters. Our family is all over the boards genetically.

    Replies: @epebble

    A young woman at my work in El Segundo, CA was from Peru and was indistinguishable from someone from India. It is strange how the genes blend together. In fact, Peruvians see this resemblance so much that Indian movies are very popular in Peru.

    Latin America’s Peru hooked on to Bollywood culture
    https://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/latin-america-s-peru-hooked-on-to-bollywood-culture-with-pix-113090400398_1.html

  184. @Anne Lid
    @Lurker

    Some Hungarian Jews changed their Hungarianised name Kertész to the Anglo sounding Curtis, like Tony Curtis. Kertész originally must have been Gartner, gardener, and before that who knows what it was.

    Replies: @Jack D

    and before that who knows what it was.

    Before that, it wasn’t anything. Jews traditionally didn’t have surnames (and they still don’t for religious purposes). They followed the X son of Y, naming system, the same as their fellow Semites the Arabs. Jews only took surnames when they were required to do so when modern governments demanded that they take them for record keeping , tax and other purposes.

  185. @Philip Neal
    The words "Where are you from?" have recently been declared improper. One sees posters in students' union buildings proclaiming that "Everyone here is from here."


    Lady SH: Where are you from?

    Me: Sistah Space.

    SH: No, where do you come from?

    Me: We’re based in Hackney.

     

    Lady Hussey does not know this and thinks Fulani has misunderstood her, probably because she is an African.


    SH: No, what part of Africa are YOU from?

    Me: I don’t know, they didn’t leave any records.

     

    At this point, Lady Hussey has the information to guess that Fulani is Caribbean but she doesn't.


    SH: Well, you must know where you’re from, I spent time in France.

     

    But that does not mean she is French.


    Where are you from?

     

    She still thinks she has been misunderstood.


    Me: Here, UK

    SH: NO, but what Nationality are you?

    Me: I am born here and am British.

    SH: No, but where do you really come from, where do your people come from?

     

    By "people" she means extended family. Her "people", the Waldegraves, were originally baronets (i.e. climbers) from Kent who entered the nobility by marrying upwards.


    Me: ‘My people’, lady, what is this?

    SH: Oh I can see I am going to have a challenge getting you to say where you’re from.

     

    She senses that Fulani is being difficult but genuinely cannot see what is wrong with a perfectly good question.


    When did you first come here?

    Me: Lady! I am a British national, my parents came here in the 50s when …

    SH: Oh, I knew we’d get there in the end, you’re Caribbean!

     

    She has placed Fulani at last and is trying to think of something to say about the Caribbean.


    Me: No Lady, I am of African heritage, Caribbean descent and British nationality.

    SH: Oh, so you’re from …”

     

    To the end she cannot see that Fulani is seriously angry and regards the question as a calculated insult.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous, @S Johnson

    Thanks.

  186. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/esotericbot/status/1598029263348895746

    Replies: @Jack D

    Written by a drooling illiterate who can’t write a single sentence without making at least two grammatical errors.

    It’s also a lie propagated by a Holocaust denier:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:ZIM_(shipping_company)

    The decision to move to Virginia had been made months before and there were still ZIM employees working in the WTC on 9-11. Most steamship companies were once located in lower Manhattan but by 2001 they had been leaving for decades and ZIM was a straggler.

    The towers were always white elephants occupied mainly by government agencies and were half empty when they came down. It was a terrible building to work in. On windy days the towers swayed and creaked like a ship in a storm and the express elevator to the sky lobby vibrated like an amusement park ride.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Jack D

    You’re right I vaguely remember the big nationwide fuss when it opened. Purpose was to revitalize sketchy (black criminal) area of lower Manhattan. As were so many urban building projects in those days. Detroit even had something called the Renaissance Center that was somehow supposed to save Detroit. Friend’s family had a liquor store in NYC. Her Dad was lobbied big sales pitch to set up a store in the new WTC. He got an incredible deal in low rent for years. As a bribe to move in

    It’s a conspiracy between black criminals and their civil rights lawyers and vote buying politicians and the construction industry.

    Build a commercial industrial or residential neighborhood. Let it flourish for a few decades. Then in come the civil rights pro black criminal attorneys judges and democrat politicians.

    Neighborhood is destroyed. Stays that way for a while. Then along comes a decent mayor like Guiliani chamber of commerce big retailers everybody’s sick of blacks destroying every neighborhood.

    So federal grants are applied for. Government. buildings retail restaurant and expensive condos are built. Banks and small businesses stay. More small businesses to cater to the workers in the offices Even post office has to expand. Which brings in postal workers who use the banks restaurants gas stations etc. So everything is great for a few decades. Maybe Not families but civilized working people in the condos.

    And then the civil rights attorneys judges and their black storm troopers retake the neighborhood.

    And the cycle begins again.

    Replies: @Jack D

  187. @Charlotte Allen
    @Kylie

    I don't know whether I'm white or not myself, since I'm half-Latina, and my Welsh/Scottish/English-descent husband always jokes: "You're lucky--you married a white man." (I actually have the extremely fair skin and red hair that I got from my Scottish paternal grandfather, so I pass for white quite easily even though I look exactly like my Peruvian mother.) Be that as it may, the snobbishness of women toward other women whom they perceive to be either impecunious or their social inferiors knows no boundaries of race, color, or creed. It is no fun to be on the receiving end of that kind of rank-pulling, and since I suffer from extreme esprit d'escalier, I can never think of a mot-juste response to that kind of badgering until the next day.

    What strikes me as comical about the whole episode is that Fulani was obviously not from any black-dominated country either Caribbean or African. Had she been wearing genuine Nigerian traditional dress, she would have projected dignity, and even Susan Hussey would have backed off Instead, she showed up in a leopard-print nightgown, a necklace made of animal teeth, a tiara, and massive hair extensions, a ridiculous costume that marked her as a deracinated Western black with zero class. This undoubtedly made her a slow-moving target for the obnoxious Hussey.

    I took Fulani's side only because I detest Hussey's kind of rudeness, which was all the worse in a woman who had the privilege of being lady-in-waiting to two queens and godmother to a prince (Elizabeth, who had genuine class, would have been ever-gracious, even to the cheesy Fulani). Otherwise, I hold no brief for Fulani, a detestable self-aggrandizer who had the gall to suggest that Hussey be "re-educated" by her grifter-NGO.

    Replies: @Mr. Grey, @ChrisZ, @Kylie

    You are probably lighter skinned than I am. I’m half Slav and that side of the family has darker skin. I’ve had Italians think I’m Italian, Native Americans think I’m Native Americans, etc. One summer my friend looked at my bare legs and said, “Your knees are dirty!” I said, “No, that’s my tan.”

    The old bat was rude to the newcomer of color. But it was a rudeness based on class, not race. The newcomer of color was also rude by deliberately presenting herself as a outsider, then trying to trip up the old bat who was determined to “place” her. She made sure an old Englishwoman’s class-based rudeness blew up into an international race incident.

    But ultimately, despite her rudeness, I cut the old bat some slack because she was, after all, at home in her own country. Whereas the newcomer, though she, too, was born there, has deliberately taken steps to ensure she is seen as the other and her loyalty is not to her country of birth but to her tribe.

    When I think how my dark-skinned grandparents, with their thickly accented English, tried so hard to fit into the WASPish community where they settled and then I think of this misfit with her tribal regalia without a shred of loyalty to the country that has given her so much, I get really angry. Eff her.

    • Replies: @Charlotte Allen
    @Kylie

    I agree that Fulani was pretty dreadful. But Hussey went out of her way to try to trip her up, which was inappropriate for someone of Hussey's status.

  188. @kaganovitch
    @Jack D

    In case anyone hasn’t noticed, trannies are mentally ill and so kleptomania would not be out of character.

    Nah, can't be. If that was true would you put him in charge of disposing of nuclear waste?

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Johann Ricke

    In case anyone hasn’t noticed, trannies are mentally ill and so kleptomania would not be out of character.

    Nah, can’t be. If that was true would you put him in charge of disposing of nuclear waste?

    Perhaps if your intent were to *en*courage rather than *dis*courage an increase in the number of nuclear powers.

  189. @Jonathan Mason
    @Pat Hannagan

    Yup. I remember her from way back. There was a young female blues singer in northern England called Christine Perfect who sang with a band called Chicken Shack. They had a minor hit with a haunting version of I'd Rather Go Blind, the Etta James hit.

    Occasionally I wondered what had become of her. Decades later I discovered that she and Christine McVie were the same person.

    https://youtu.be/Ohx9Ve7-GS0

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Pat Hannagan

    You’ve obviously got a good ear.

    Great cover version that, added it to my likes! Cheers, mate.

  190. Anonymous[405] • Disclaimer says:
    @Philip Neal
    The words "Where are you from?" have recently been declared improper. One sees posters in students' union buildings proclaiming that "Everyone here is from here."


    Lady SH: Where are you from?

    Me: Sistah Space.

    SH: No, where do you come from?

    Me: We’re based in Hackney.

     

    Lady Hussey does not know this and thinks Fulani has misunderstood her, probably because she is an African.


    SH: No, what part of Africa are YOU from?

    Me: I don’t know, they didn’t leave any records.

     

    At this point, Lady Hussey has the information to guess that Fulani is Caribbean but she doesn't.


    SH: Well, you must know where you’re from, I spent time in France.

     

    But that does not mean she is French.


    Where are you from?

     

    She still thinks she has been misunderstood.


    Me: Here, UK

    SH: NO, but what Nationality are you?

    Me: I am born here and am British.

    SH: No, but where do you really come from, where do your people come from?

     

    By "people" she means extended family. Her "people", the Waldegraves, were originally baronets (i.e. climbers) from Kent who entered the nobility by marrying upwards.


    Me: ‘My people’, lady, what is this?

    SH: Oh I can see I am going to have a challenge getting you to say where you’re from.

     

    She senses that Fulani is being difficult but genuinely cannot see what is wrong with a perfectly good question.


    When did you first come here?

    Me: Lady! I am a British national, my parents came here in the 50s when …

    SH: Oh, I knew we’d get there in the end, you’re Caribbean!

     

    She has placed Fulani at last and is trying to think of something to say about the Caribbean.


    Me: No Lady, I am of African heritage, Caribbean descent and British nationality.

    SH: Oh, so you’re from …”

     

    To the end she cannot see that Fulani is seriously angry and regards the question as a calculated insult.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous, @S Johnson

    There is NO WAY the conversation went down anything like this.

    Someone like Lady Hussey would have a lifetime’s worth of experience in dealing smoothly and politely with all manner of boors, provocateuses, etc.

    On the other hand, it is not inconceivable that this kerfuffle was carefully staged to take the wind out of the sails of Harry Hewitt (aka “Prince” Harry) and his own hussy with their Netflix smear job against the Royals. For one thing, Lady Hussey’s daughter is apparently still an official “companion” of the current queen consort.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Anonymous


    There is NO WAY the conversation went down anything like this.
     
    So why not deny it instead of resigning?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Anonymous

  191. This story is based on actual events. I’m a nurse. Several years back I was sharing the previous shift’s nurse’s note with the oncoming nurse re a patient I was passing on at shift change. When the oncoming nurse, a woman of color, noticed the name of the previous nurse, another woman of color, she says to me excitedly, “Oh, she’s Nigerian, too! I know exactly where in Nigeria she is from because of her last name.” I, of course, was appalled and quickly corrected this racist black nurse. “Um…what do you mean ‘Nigerian’? She’s as American as you or me!” Of course, I immediately reported this racist to human resources.

  192. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Pat Hannagan

    Christy McVie had a nicer voice than Stevie Nicks. Stevie Nicks was just prettier, so she was more popular.

    Christy McVie's best were Say You Love Me, Over My Head, and You Make Loving Fun.

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

    Christy McVie’s tracks on Tusk really suit that double album and compliment Buckingham’s zany sound. I can see why they did an album together many years later, they seem way more simpatico than Buckingham and Nicks.

    Funnily enough, I absolutely despised Tusk when I got it as part of my monthly allotment from a record club I was signed up to as a kid. I gave it away to an alcoholic slut of a girlfriend I had when I was in my late teens, early 20s. She loved Fleetwood Mac and I despised them. I should have seen the warning signs.

    For some reason I only really listened to Fleetwood Mac a few years ago now when out of the blue I thought I’d give them a go and went through their catalogue on Spotify. To my amazement they were actually…fantastic!

    I think listening to music is the same as books and the attitude Doris Lessing has is the one for me:

    “There is only one way to read, which is to browse in libraries and bookshops, picking up books that attract you, reading only those, dropping them when they bore you, skipping the parts that drag-and never, never reading anything because you feel you ought, or because it is part of a trend or a movement. Remember that the book which bores you when you are twenty or thirty will open doors for you when you are forty or fifty-and vise versa. Don’t read a book out of its right time for you. ”

    Reading up on Stevie Nicks’ bio I see she was a drug addled slut who rode the rockstar cock carousel all the way to the top. I could see in hindsight what my then drunken whore of a girlfriend saw in her. Two kindred spirits!

    Back to McVie, she’s of the “easy listening FM” variety but, whereas I generally find “easy listening” rock too hard because it’s so trite, she made easy listening actually really rather easy, and nice.

    As I said, I rate Tusk as a double album and now see what so many musos got from Buckingham (like Tame Impala for example covering That’s All for Everyone) but also appreciate McVie for what she brings.

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Pat Hannagan

    If you are getting started with Fleetwood Mac I strongly recommend the album Bare Trees.






    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=F84yWm1ZjCg

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  193. @notsaying
    I am getting tired of all the repetitive endless talk about the Royal Family. Now this is partly my own fault for spending so much time at the US version of the UK's Daily Mail.

    But mostly not. It is not my fault that Harry and Meghan moved here and all on their own, decided they would act like they are America's Royal Family. They are always to places or sitting in front of microphones and talking like I want them to and they are doing me some kind of favor but all I want is for them to shut up and go away!

    What I have figured out is that the Royal Family are all together, over in the UK, and as of right now, there is no big move to get rid of them. They have ownership, genuine power although not a lot of it, public support and are secure in their position. Harry and Meghan are here by themselves here and don't represent anyone.

    Most of today's uproar is due to fears of how Meghan and Harry can use this to strengthen their claims of racism. Everybody has to stop worrying about Meghan and Harry. They will have Nexflix show starting next week, book coming out soon, big to-do for a few days and then -- what will they do for an encore, after embarrassing their relatives? Harry and Meghan have no power, all they have is resentment and desperation.

    Enough already.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    So, what would you suggest, the taxpayers buy the largest stretch limo available, load up the Royal Family in it, and tell some ex-Le Mans driver paparazzi that that all the women inside are undressed and have the most humongous stretch marks you’ve ever seen?

    I’m sick of hearing about them too, even though that’s mostly on the comments on this very blog. Crowdfunding? More work for Elton John? So long as it doesn’t interrupt Saturday Night Live this time.

  194. @Almost Missouri
    @EdwardM


    So what’s the real story?
     
    I agree with previous commenters, but would add that courtesy of iSteve we have learned that trannies such a Nukie Brinton have a sexual fetish about dressing in women's clothes. Given that this was obviously a wealthy woman's suitcase, .... well, I guess he just couldn't help himself. Now he's trying to retcon some semi-plausible and exculpatory narrative with his lawyers.

    Replies: @EdwardM

    Your Occam’s Razor explanation has convinced me. Thanks.

  195. @Jack D
    @EdwardM

    The video showed that after he took the bag from the carousel, he pulled off the owner's luggage tag and discarded it.

    The bag was a "$2,325" Vera Bradley suitcase (BTW prosecutors love to inflate numbers - I don't think that a $2,300 Vera Bradley suitcase is even sold.) But the typical Vera Bradley bag is very distinctive and might catch the eye of a tranny - it's like any other suitcase EXCEPT that it is completely covered in various large colorful flower patterns (there are many models):

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/2534/3568/products/41s2QS-dn9L_1024x1024.jpg?v=1630338838

    So it's not like it was a generic black suitcase and "they" grabbed the wrong one because they own an identical bag. And even if they did, dumping out the clothes and continuing to use it is not a sign of innocence.

    In case anyone hasn't noticed, trannies are mentally ill and so kleptomania would not be out of character.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Achmed E. Newman, @International Jew

    I can get you the same one from China for 28 bucks, Jack, if you’re that interested.

  196. @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D

    There is folk dress and there is folk dress.

    Where I live in Ecuador I see people in folk dress everyday, mostly women. They wear Panama hats, shawls, blouses, and swishy pleated skirts. You see them mostly in the market and sometimes working in the fields. This is their daily office attire. There are stores in town that sell nothing but this kind of clothing.

    However in most countries, people dress up in folk outfits on holidays and special occasions, folk clothing is not normal work wear.

    For example English people might dress up as Morris dancers, but they don't normally wear Morris dancing clothes to go shopping in the supermarket, unless they are on the way home from a dress rehearsal.

    When you dress up in something striking and unusual that does not come from a chain store to wear to go to a reception of Buckingham Palace, then of course you expect to be asked about it.

    When I was living in Bermuda many years ago, I flew twice to Hollywood to be on Jeopardy!

    At the audition I wore Bermuda business attire consisting of a blue blazer, white shirt, club tie, yellow Bermuda shorts, blue knee stockings and shoes. Of course I wanted people to comment on it! That was the whole point. So that they would ask me where I was from. (However I did not wear the same attire on the plane.)

    This charity woman was just boorish and did not know how to make small talk, or was just deliberately obnoxious. Take your pick.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Jonathan, if you ever attend a charity down there, you should be wearing your native Jacksonville dress: cut-off shorts, sandals, and a Ron Jon’s T-shirt, probably underwear too…

  197. No one’s made the obvious Hussy meets Hussey, has hissy joke.
    I’m so proud of you all.

  198. @Kylie
    @Charlotte Allen

    You are probably lighter skinned than I am. I'm half Slav and that side of the family has darker skin. I've had Italians think I'm Italian, Native Americans think I'm Native Americans, etc. One summer my friend looked at my bare legs and said, "Your knees are dirty!" I said, "No, that's my tan."

    The old bat was rude to the newcomer of color. But it was a rudeness based on class, not race. The newcomer of color was also rude by deliberately presenting herself as a outsider, then trying to trip up the old bat who was determined to "place" her. She made sure an old Englishwoman's class-based rudeness blew up into an international race incident.

    But ultimately, despite her rudeness, I cut the old bat some slack because she was, after all, at home in her own country. Whereas the newcomer, though she, too, was born there, has deliberately taken steps to ensure she is seen as the other and her loyalty is not to her country of birth but to her tribe.

    When I think how my dark-skinned grandparents, with their thickly accented English, tried so hard to fit into the WASPish community where they settled and then I think of this misfit with her tribal regalia without a shred of loyalty to the country that has given her so much, I get really angry. Eff her.

    Replies: @Charlotte Allen

    I agree that Fulani was pretty dreadful. But Hussey went out of her way to try to trip her up, which was inappropriate for someone of Hussey’s status.

    • Disagree: AceDeuce, Kylie, Jim Don Bob
  199. @Reg Cæsar
    @Rich


    Queen Victoria was greeted by adoring crowds in Ireland shortly before their 1916 uprising...
     
    She died in 1901. It must have been her ghost.

    Replies: @Rich

    1900. On her last visit to Ireland tens of thousands lined the street to cheer her. 16 years is the blink of an eye, ain’t it Reg?

  200. @Anonymous
    @EricD


    I would say the older white lady was showing poor etiquette, poor manners, in pressing the question to the black lady.
     
    Do you really believe the conversation happened in anything like this form as concocted, long after the fact, by a trained, professional race hustler?

    "Ngozi Fulani" nee Headley also gives her current surname as "Headley-Fulani." She claims to know "basic" Hausa, and to be a "Marriages Registrar, Teacher, African Dancer,Drummer & Ceremonies Officer."

    She may have been married to an actual Fulani, perhaps from Nigeria.

    No word on her given "deadname."

    Replies: @Alden, @Chrisnonymous

    I agree with you the race hustler witch made the whole thing up.

  201. @Anonymous Guest
    @anonymous

    There's nothing funny or humorous about Nick Fuentes, unless you think the concept of a Nazi Eddie Haskell is humorous (which it isn't).

    Here's him trying to get sponsorships (and failing miserably). Let's see how that works out for him when he's de-banked.

    https://twitter.com/rightweengwatch/status/1597812544776699905?s=20&t=Pw14RdlUZFbCs9ITXB7gYAv

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Legba

    I’ve never watched, but a Nazi Eddie Haskell sounds right up my alley

  202. The Anglos have made it a crime to even speak on their own displacement. It’s comical.

  203. @Jack D
    @EdwardM

    The video showed that after he took the bag from the carousel, he pulled off the owner's luggage tag and discarded it.

    The bag was a "$2,325" Vera Bradley suitcase (BTW prosecutors love to inflate numbers - I don't think that a $2,300 Vera Bradley suitcase is even sold.) But the typical Vera Bradley bag is very distinctive and might catch the eye of a tranny - it's like any other suitcase EXCEPT that it is completely covered in various large colorful flower patterns (there are many models):

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/2534/3568/products/41s2QS-dn9L_1024x1024.jpg?v=1630338838

    So it's not like it was a generic black suitcase and "they" grabbed the wrong one because they own an identical bag. And even if they did, dumping out the clothes and continuing to use it is not a sign of innocence.

    In case anyone hasn't noticed, trannies are mentally ill and so kleptomania would not be out of character.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Achmed E. Newman, @International Jew

    So he stole the suitcase for itself, rather than for its contents?!

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @International Jew

    Yes, apparently he dumped the contents into the drawers of the hotel he was staying in and left them behind, taking only the suitcase which he continued to use on subsequent trips. I assume the clothes were not his size and probably not his taste either. It was the brightly colored flowery suitcase that he was attracted to. It probably caught his eye and he grabbed it impulsively.

    I don't think it was the value of the suitcase that he cared about. I'm sure he makes enough to buy his own suitcase. The articles were misleading - they claimed that it was a "$2,325 Vera Bradley suitcase". There is no such thing. You'd be hard pressed to pay more that $230 for such a suitcase. It's not some French luxury brand, it's middle class bourgeois stuff. I'm sure that the brand conscious shoppers of the ghetto wouldn't be caught dead with such low end crap - it's genuine Louis Vuitton for them. $2,325 was apparently the (alleged) value of the suitcase AND its contents. Even that was probably inflated as prosecutors are wont to do.

  204. @Reg Cæsar
    @Ebony Obelisk


    What’s your problem jerk?
     
    This is a new low for you, Eb. Before, you managed to keep the rudeness in check.

    Replies: @International Jew

    Steve’s moderation policy is a mystery to me. I see people who sound pretty reasonable saying he takes days to approve their comments. And then he approves a juvenile insult like this?

    My comments (which, in retrospect, aren’t always the best) he seems to approve instantly.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @International Jew


    And then he approves a juvenile insult like this?
     
    Some have suggested he makes them. Or someone close to him.

    Replies: @Richard B

  205. @Rob
    Are all blacks from everywhere now officially one thing, just genetic BIPOX? Do any Africans name their daughters N’gozi, or did she just make up a vaguely “African” name? Are any members of the Fulani tribe actually named Fulani? If there are not, it’s mockery. As if an Irish man moved to America and changed his name to “Franco Germany,” and always wore Lederhosen and a yarmulke. I mean, he is the same race as French, Germans, and Ashkenazi Jews, but it’s pretty misleading. With that mix, an Irish accent Gentile-German clothing, Jewish clothing, and two nationalities in him name, is it beyond the pale to ask what his ethnic background is?

    How is a Brit (as N’gozi states she is) wearing an “African” getup derived from stereotypes and fantasy anything but cultural appropriation and mockery of foreign cultures that Ms. Fulani’s people (the British) colonized?

    Where does a British woman get off mocking Africans with leopard-print dresses and bone necklaces? Also, Ms. Fulani is appropriating non-British hairstyles.


    “I dressed in a silly foreign-ish looking costume a foreigner and people asked if I am foreign” is not the sort of thing that should make international news.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “Do any Africans name their daughters N’gozi, or did she just make up a vaguely “African” name?”

    I have a West African friend named Ngozi. It’s a real name. She speaks fluent German, and for a few years lived in Berlin writing German soap operas, and translating American ones.

    • Thanks: Rob
  206. @Kylie
    "Then there was that Nazi costume he wore to a party in 2005."

    Yes and frolicking naked while apparently drunk and/or high in Las Vegas. There are pics of both incidents, the latter occurring just ten years ago when he was 27.

    By the way, here's the link to the blind item about his rough ways

    https://blindgossip.com/famous-son-got-very-rough/#more-101411

    But the worst is this idiot using his family name and title to try to influence our political process (the voting video before the 2020 election) and criticize our First Amendment, calling it "bonkers". Whatever his handlers have told him, he's a guest here, uninvited and unwelcome.

    Replies: @Alden, @Yngvar

    …frolicking naked while apparently drunk…

    A tradition in the British military. It’s the last party before combat deployment. Has to get naked, Royal or not, the crazy bastards.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Yngvar

    "A tradition in the British military[frolicking naked while apparently drunk]. It’s the last party before combat deployment. Has to get naked, Royal or not, the crazy bastards."

    In Las Vegas? Really?

    Must have been payback for that whole WWII "overpaid, overfed, oversexed and—over here!” thing. I had no idea Harry was such a history buff. So to speak.

  207. @Thea
    Will and Kate threw her under the bus to reveal themselves backstabbing traitors. They don’t stand for Britain, the English people or even their family and close friends.

    They could have said nothing as this is a whole bunch of nothing and let time pass. Quickly, the public forgets such trifles.

    Replies: @Kylie, @AndrewR, @AnotherDad, @Alden

    Will and Kate’s American tour is to promote climate change and the sacrifices we ordinary proles must make to save Mother Earth.

    Electrical heating during winter that costs 4 times as much as gas heating, public transportation mixing with thugs and criminals being murdered on subway platforms, vegan food which will starve us, gazillions of our tax dollars for light rail and other useless save Mother Earth projects.

    Will is as much a fabulously wealthy environmentalist as is his father and Earth First.

    Check out photo images of Queen Elizabeth and the Commonwealth leaders at the Commonwealth Conferences. There she and the prime ministers. The only White faces in a sea of the worst black dictators on the planet.

    Skeptics call the Commonwealth Conferences the Cannibals and Kleptomaniacs Conference. A bi annual annoyance as the endless parades make London traffic worse than usual.

    The ordinary British will freeze as monthly heat bills go from £200 a month to £700 a month.

    While the royal family preaches veganism and unaffordable heat bills for the British people.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Alden

    "The ordinary British will freeze as monthly heat bills go from £200 a month to £700 a month.

    While the royal family preaches veganism and unaffordable heat bills for the British people."

    The BRF shouldn't be preaching anything. They are royalty, not clergy*. They should appear in public in appropriate attire with smiles on their faces and their big mouths shut, that is, assuming they want the monarchy to continue.

    The British public will not transfer the loyalty and high esteem they felt for the Queen to Charles. He's a tree-hugging dimwit whose only ambitions seem to have been to become King and/or Camilla's tampon. Nothing will become him in life like the leaving of it. William's best option (assuming he wants to be King) is to position himself in a way that suggests historical continuity in a modern context without seeming either outdated or too woke.





    *Neither should that far-left jackoff Welby, even though he's the Archbishop of Canterbury. He's a total whack job, as bad as the Pope.

  208. @Anonymous
    @Philip Neal

    There is NO WAY the conversation went down anything like this.

    Someone like Lady Hussey would have a lifetime's worth of experience in dealing smoothly and politely with all manner of boors, provocateuses, etc.

    On the other hand, it is not inconceivable that this kerfuffle was carefully staged to take the wind out of the sails of Harry Hewitt (aka "Prince" Harry) and his own hussy with their Netflix smear job against the Royals. For one thing, Lady Hussey's daughter is apparently still an official "companion" of the current queen consort.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    There is NO WAY the conversation went down anything like this.

    So why not deny it instead of resigning?

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @silviosilver

    A human may never say "no" to an Ape!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSdYXq4CHIQ

    , @Anonymous
    @silviosilver


    So why not deny it instead of resigning?
     
    Because public perception is not a matter of 19th century common sense.

    Also, within King Chuck's PR machine, it is likely far safer to propose root-and-branch "Year Zero" strategies to eradicate the original sin of racism, than to advocate more measured approaches.

    Replies: @silviosilver

  209. @Currahee
    "I would have preferred that she had been spoken to or re-educated.” …"
    We have ways....

    Replies: @Sollipsist

    Looks like the term “re-educated” doesn’t carry the same negative connotation anymore? That’s why I’ve come to think that all those dystopian fictions over the past century served as how-to guides rather than warnings…

  210. @Philip Neal
    The words "Where are you from?" have recently been declared improper. One sees posters in students' union buildings proclaiming that "Everyone here is from here."


    Lady SH: Where are you from?

    Me: Sistah Space.

    SH: No, where do you come from?

    Me: We’re based in Hackney.

     

    Lady Hussey does not know this and thinks Fulani has misunderstood her, probably because she is an African.


    SH: No, what part of Africa are YOU from?

    Me: I don’t know, they didn’t leave any records.

     

    At this point, Lady Hussey has the information to guess that Fulani is Caribbean but she doesn't.


    SH: Well, you must know where you’re from, I spent time in France.

     

    But that does not mean she is French.


    Where are you from?

     

    She still thinks she has been misunderstood.


    Me: Here, UK

    SH: NO, but what Nationality are you?

    Me: I am born here and am British.

    SH: No, but where do you really come from, where do your people come from?

     

    By "people" she means extended family. Her "people", the Waldegraves, were originally baronets (i.e. climbers) from Kent who entered the nobility by marrying upwards.


    Me: ‘My people’, lady, what is this?

    SH: Oh I can see I am going to have a challenge getting you to say where you’re from.

     

    She senses that Fulani is being difficult but genuinely cannot see what is wrong with a perfectly good question.


    When did you first come here?

    Me: Lady! I am a British national, my parents came here in the 50s when …

    SH: Oh, I knew we’d get there in the end, you’re Caribbean!

     

    She has placed Fulani at last and is trying to think of something to say about the Caribbean.


    Me: No Lady, I am of African heritage, Caribbean descent and British nationality.

    SH: Oh, so you’re from …”

     

    To the end she cannot see that Fulani is seriously angry and regards the question as a calculated insult.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous, @S Johnson

    The conversation is a battle over who has the superior status, Hussey over her right to get a direct answer to a direct question, or Fulani/Headley to protest a breach of modern-day protocol (asking a black lady where she’s from).

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  211. @International Jew
    @Reg Cæsar

    Steve's moderation policy is a mystery to me. I see people who sound pretty reasonable saying he takes days to approve their comments. And then he approves a juvenile insult like this?

    My comments (which, in retrospect, aren't always the best) he seems to approve instantly.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    And then he approves a juvenile insult like this?

    Some have suggested he makes them. Or someone close to him.

    • Replies: @Richard B
    @Reg Cæsar


    Some have suggested he makes them. Or someone close to him.
     
    Interesting. But why would he do that? Boredom?

    Hard to believe someone as busy as Steve could ever be bored. But who knows?
  212. @Art Deco
    @Alden

    Unlike 50 million other foreigners here illegally and living off their anchor babies welfare benefits.

    The total enrollment in SNAP amounts to about 40 million, and that's all beneficiaries, not illegal aliens on the rolls. Total enrollment in Medicaid is now about 82 million, or about 1/4 of the population.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The total enrollment in SNAP amounts to about 40 million, and that’s all beneficiaries, not illegal aliens on the rolls. Total enrollment in Medicaid is now about 82 million, or about 1/4 of the population.

    You don’t understand. Their mere presence here– and that of all the legal immigrants earning too little to pay sufficient taxes– constitutes a form of welfare. Natives are a different story– our families have been contributing all along, and this is the only country we’ve got. This is the second– or more– home for the newcomers.

    In rare cases, e.g. the Hmong who took our side and lost, or Philippines who’ve served in our armed forces, one could make the argument that they paid in a different way. (NB: Could make, not must.) Applying that standard to Haitians or Hondurans is obscene.

    Randall Burns of Vdare.com once tried to calculate the monetary value of our citizenship, per capita. I think it was around a quarter million dollars. I would argue that mere legal residency constitutes almost all of that.

    We’re giving away the fiscal equivalent of free houses to lawbreakers. How is that not welfare?

    Related, Jennifer Roback Morse of the Ruth Institute issued a wonderful smackdown of the Chucky doll’s cynical demographic argument for regularizing illegals:

    SCHUMER’S LABOR SHORTAGE PLAN IS AN INSULT TO OUR INTELLIGENCE

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Reg Cæsar

    Also not all "welfare" is federal. New York City, for example, is splashing out ~$35,000/year on welcoming illegal aliens (whom they mislabel as "asylum seekers"). Similarly situated natives get ~$2/year.

    https://nypost.com/2022/11/23/nycha-president-city-pays-millions-for-migrants-but-wont-help-us/

    Then there are the scholarships, local charities, etc. directed specifically at illegal aliens, and the Media/Cultural Industrial Complex directing bottomless and endless goodwill their way, etc.

  213. @Harpagornis
    Which side of WW Hair do you think this woman is on?


    https://youtu.be/kEvuCrVMFZk

    Whatever side it is; she is certainly talented - and has a good sense of humor : )

    Replies: @Edward Dett

    Video sparked a connection to the current frontrunner in BBC’s Strictly Come Dancing this year: a well-spoken African photographer whose braids almost reach his knees. I exaggerate not: he can definitely sit on his hair. No further comment at this time.

  214. @Yngvar
    @Kylie


    ...frolicking naked while apparently drunk...
     
    A tradition in the British military. It's the last party before combat deployment. Has to get naked, Royal or not, the crazy bastards.

    Replies: @Kylie

    “A tradition in the British military[frolicking naked while apparently drunk]. It’s the last party before combat deployment. Has to get naked, Royal or not, the crazy bastards.”

    In Las Vegas? Really?

    Must have been payback for that whole WWII “overpaid, overfed, oversexed and—over here!” thing. I had no idea Harry was such a history buff. So to speak.

  215. @Jack D
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Written by a drooling illiterate who can't write a single sentence without making at least two grammatical errors.

    It's also a lie propagated by a Holocaust denier:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:ZIM_(shipping_company)

    The decision to move to Virginia had been made months before and there were still ZIM employees working in the WTC on 9-11. Most steamship companies were once located in lower Manhattan but by 2001 they had been leaving for decades and ZIM was a straggler.

    The towers were always white elephants occupied mainly by government agencies and were half empty when they came down. It was a terrible building to work in. On windy days the towers swayed and creaked like a ship in a storm and the express elevator to the sky lobby vibrated like an amusement park ride.

    Replies: @Alden

    You’re right I vaguely remember the big nationwide fuss when it opened. Purpose was to revitalize sketchy (black criminal) area of lower Manhattan. As were so many urban building projects in those days. Detroit even had something called the Renaissance Center that was somehow supposed to save Detroit. Friend’s family had a liquor store in NYC. Her Dad was lobbied big sales pitch to set up a store in the new WTC. He got an incredible deal in low rent for years. As a bribe to move in

    It’s a conspiracy between black criminals and their civil rights lawyers and vote buying politicians and the construction industry.

    Build a commercial industrial or residential neighborhood. Let it flourish for a few decades. Then in come the civil rights pro black criminal attorneys judges and democrat politicians.

    Neighborhood is destroyed. Stays that way for a while. Then along comes a decent mayor like Guiliani chamber of commerce big retailers everybody’s sick of blacks destroying every neighborhood.

    So federal grants are applied for. Government. buildings retail restaurant and expensive condos are built. Banks and small businesses stay. More small businesses to cater to the workers in the offices Even post office has to expand. Which brings in postal workers who use the banks restaurants gas stations etc. So everything is great for a few decades. Maybe Not families but civilized working people in the condos.

    And then the civil rights attorneys judges and their black storm troopers retake the neighborhood.

    And the cycle begins again.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Alden


    Purpose was to revitalize sketchy (black criminal) area of lower Manhattan.
     
    Actually no one had lived in that part of Lower Manhattan since the 19th century. It was pretty much all commercial. When shipping switched to containerization and planes replaced ships for transatlantic crossings, the area became underutilized. Marginal businesses like electronics surplus stores, spice merchants, etc. But not a black criminal area.

    It was however a big boondoggle by the "Port Authority". The Port Authority is a giant unaccountable piggy bank controlled by the governors of NY and NJ. They own all the bridge and river crossings which are like giant money printing machines - the crossings were paid for decades ago but they keep raising the tolls higher and higher - in the '70s it was $1 but now it's $16. Times several hundred thousand vehicles crossing every day x 365 - do the math - it's a LOT of $.

    Actually around half the WTC site was created by landfilling in the river. To dig out the foundations of the center without having it fill up with ground water (it went pretty far underground - there was a below ground train station, garages, shopping mall, etc.) they created something called the "bathtub"- a company from Italy with experience in mining was brought in. They drilled a narrow slit trench a few feet at a time and filled the trench with grout which is a kind of liquidy cement that you can pump. You fill the trench with grout as you drill so the dirt walls of the trench don't collapse. They kept doing this until they had a complete rectangle. Then they dug the dirt out of the middle and revealed the rough concrete wall that had been created in the slit trench. They then drove anchors through the sides to hold the wall up. It was really quite clever. The "bathtub" was invisible once the WTC was built but after the towers came down you could see it again for a time.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  216. @Alden
    @Jack D

    You’re right I vaguely remember the big nationwide fuss when it opened. Purpose was to revitalize sketchy (black criminal) area of lower Manhattan. As were so many urban building projects in those days. Detroit even had something called the Renaissance Center that was somehow supposed to save Detroit. Friend’s family had a liquor store in NYC. Her Dad was lobbied big sales pitch to set up a store in the new WTC. He got an incredible deal in low rent for years. As a bribe to move in

    It’s a conspiracy between black criminals and their civil rights lawyers and vote buying politicians and the construction industry.

    Build a commercial industrial or residential neighborhood. Let it flourish for a few decades. Then in come the civil rights pro black criminal attorneys judges and democrat politicians.

    Neighborhood is destroyed. Stays that way for a while. Then along comes a decent mayor like Guiliani chamber of commerce big retailers everybody’s sick of blacks destroying every neighborhood.

    So federal grants are applied for. Government. buildings retail restaurant and expensive condos are built. Banks and small businesses stay. More small businesses to cater to the workers in the offices Even post office has to expand. Which brings in postal workers who use the banks restaurants gas stations etc. So everything is great for a few decades. Maybe Not families but civilized working people in the condos.

    And then the civil rights attorneys judges and their black storm troopers retake the neighborhood.

    And the cycle begins again.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Purpose was to revitalize sketchy (black criminal) area of lower Manhattan.

    Actually no one had lived in that part of Lower Manhattan since the 19th century. It was pretty much all commercial. When shipping switched to containerization and planes replaced ships for transatlantic crossings, the area became underutilized. Marginal businesses like electronics surplus stores, spice merchants, etc. But not a black criminal area.

    It was however a big boondoggle by the “Port Authority”. The Port Authority is a giant unaccountable piggy bank controlled by the governors of NY and NJ. They own all the bridge and river crossings which are like giant money printing machines – the crossings were paid for decades ago but they keep raising the tolls higher and higher – in the ’70s it was $1 but now it’s $16. Times several hundred thousand vehicles crossing every day x 365 – do the math – it’s a LOT of $.

    Actually around half the WTC site was created by landfilling in the river. To dig out the foundations of the center without having it fill up with ground water (it went pretty far underground – there was a below ground train station, garages, shopping mall, etc.) they created something called the “bathtub”- a company from Italy with experience in mining was brought in. They drilled a narrow slit trench a few feet at a time and filled the trench with grout which is a kind of liquidy cement that you can pump. You fill the trench with grout as you drill so the dirt walls of the trench don’t collapse. They kept doing this until they had a complete rectangle. Then they dug the dirt out of the middle and revealed the rough concrete wall that had been created in the slit trench. They then drove anchors through the sides to hold the wall up. It was really quite clever. The “bathtub” was invisible once the WTC was built but after the towers came down you could see it again for a time.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    the crossings were paid for decades ago but they keep raising the tolls higher and higher

    You charge tolls to pay for maintenance and security costs, not just to amortize the bonds. Having people pay in their capacity as motorists rather than as property holders or general consumers is closer to a theoretical optimum as costs and benefits are aligned. (I think the Path trains are the only component of the Authority's operation which lose money).

    One problem with the Port Authority is that it encompasses a jumble of activities which could be readily pulled apart and put under separate authorities with boards appointed by actual stakeholder jurisdictions. The local airports in Poughkeepsie / Newburgh and in Atlantic City are included. The successor to the Trade Center - a real estate project entirely within New York City - is included. Facilities for which New York is a point of entry and a point of departure (e.g. the port and the air terminals) are thrown in with facilities meant to move people around greater New York (the bridges, tunnels, and Path trains). Civil aviation, which handles 99% of the passenger traffic but just 4% of the freight by tonnage) is thrown in with the port (which handles 96% of the freight and just 1% of the passengers). Breaking it up into six pieces (of which three would be bi-state authorities) and having local officials appoint the boards would be agreeable.

    Replies: @Jack D

  217. @International Jew
    @Jack D

    So he stole the suitcase for itself, rather than for its contents?!

    Replies: @Jack D

    Yes, apparently he dumped the contents into the drawers of the hotel he was staying in and left them behind, taking only the suitcase which he continued to use on subsequent trips. I assume the clothes were not his size and probably not his taste either. It was the brightly colored flowery suitcase that he was attracted to. It probably caught his eye and he grabbed it impulsively.

    I don’t think it was the value of the suitcase that he cared about. I’m sure he makes enough to buy his own suitcase. The articles were misleading – they claimed that it was a “$2,325 Vera Bradley suitcase”. There is no such thing. You’d be hard pressed to pay more that $230 for such a suitcase. It’s not some French luxury brand, it’s middle class bourgeois stuff. I’m sure that the brand conscious shoppers of the ghetto wouldn’t be caught dead with such low end crap – it’s genuine Louis Vuitton for them. $2,325 was apparently the (alleged) value of the suitcase AND its contents. Even that was probably inflated as prosecutors are wont to do.

  218. @J.Ross
    Her last name is Fulani, how do you screw that up?
    -------
    Police robots incoming, you now understand why Democrats let their cities burn (besides creating an artificial state of affairs in which the Trump presidency was not good). Create the crisis, supply the solution. Meanwhile procedures from the freaking disco age would solve (and in places has solved ) the artificial crisis overnight.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    Create the crisis, supply the solution.

    Said solution is always “more government.” This government expansion is then staffed with devout Democrats. That’s how we ended up with a bloated government infrastructure completely dominated by Democrats in unelected positions. When it reached a critical point, this mass unelected government decided that it could overrule elected officials.

    • Agree: J.Ross
  219. @JR Ewing
    @Kylie

    Harry used to be an ultra-masculine cad kind of guy. A a rich, handsome bachelor living it up in Las Vegas with naked trollops and wearing Nazi Halloween costumes without a care.

    But, as some of the cruder corners of the internet like to say about emasculated husbands, "Pussy is undefeated"... and Harry is the latest example of it.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    But, as some of the cruder corners of the internet like to say about emasculated husbands, “🐱 is undefeated”… and Harry is the latest example of it.

    The new John Lennon.

  220. @silviosilver
    @Anonymous


    There is NO WAY the conversation went down anything like this.
     
    So why not deny it instead of resigning?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Anonymous

    A human may never say “no” to an Ape!

  221. I’ve yet to see even a single video of a white person daring to touch a black person’s hair. Yet, I’ve seen more videos of black people, usual the females, literally DRAGGING white females by their hair, and violently RIPPING their hair from their scalps usually while pummeling their prey in face with their free hand, than I cared to.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Wiigstock

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/where-are-the-hair-touching-videos/#comment-4742255

  222. @Reg Cæsar
    @Art Deco


    The total enrollment in SNAP amounts to about 40 million, and that’s all beneficiaries, not illegal aliens on the rolls. Total enrollment in Medicaid is now about 82 million, or about 1/4 of the population.
     
    You don't understand. Their mere presence here-- and that of all the legal immigrants earning too little to pay sufficient taxes-- constitutes a form of welfare. Natives are a different story-- our families have been contributing all along, and this is the only country we've got. This is the second-- or more-- home for the newcomers.

    In rare cases, e.g. the Hmong who took our side and lost, or Philippines who've served in our armed forces, one could make the argument that they paid in a different way. (NB: Could make, not must.) Applying that standard to Haitians or Hondurans is obscene.

    Randall Burns of Vdare.com once tried to calculate the monetary value of our citizenship, per capita. I think it was around a quarter million dollars. I would argue that mere legal residency constitutes almost all of that.

    We're giving away the fiscal equivalent of free houses to lawbreakers. How is that not welfare?

    Related, Jennifer Roback Morse of the Ruth Institute issued a wonderful smackdown of the Chucky doll's cynical demographic argument for regularizing illegals:


    SCHUMER’S LABOR SHORTAGE PLAN IS AN INSULT TO OUR INTELLIGENCE

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Also not all “welfare” is federal. New York City, for example, is splashing out ~$35,000/year on welcoming illegal aliens (whom they mislabel as “asylum seekers”). Similarly situated natives get ~$2/year.

    https://nypost.com/2022/11/23/nycha-president-city-pays-millions-for-migrants-but-wont-help-us/

    Then there are the scholarships, local charities, etc. directed specifically at illegal aliens, and the Media/Cultural Industrial Complex directing bottomless and endless goodwill their way, etc.

  223. @Wiigstock
    I've yet to see even a single video of a white person daring to touch a black person's hair. Yet, I've seen more videos of black people, usual the females, literally DRAGGING white females by their hair, and violently RIPPING their hair from their scalps usually while pummeling their prey in face with their free hand, than I cared to.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  224. @michael droy
    Thing is that this type of conversation has been common in England for 100 years, and till recently it was 99% white on white. It is how the upper classes talk to anyone who isn't in Debrett's - the posh who is who (because they know everyone in Debrett's). Sure it is elitist and perhaps patronising but it certainly isn't racist.

    My conversation the other day with a cleaner/assistant with broken E European accented English who was helping out at the coroners court when 25 or us potential jurors arrived.
    Where are you from?
    From Lithuania.
    Oh - I ask because I lived in Poland for 20 years.
    Ooh - so we are neighbours haha.

    Was that a micro aggression?

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    By “microaggression’s” actual definition, which is often ignored by both Steve and commenters, it certainly could qualify. That’s different from the question whether there was anything wrong with the conversation or with noticing and revealing that you noticed.

  225. @Anonymous
    @EricD


    I would say the older white lady was showing poor etiquette, poor manners, in pressing the question to the black lady.
     
    Do you really believe the conversation happened in anything like this form as concocted, long after the fact, by a trained, professional race hustler?

    "Ngozi Fulani" nee Headley also gives her current surname as "Headley-Fulani." She claims to know "basic" Hausa, and to be a "Marriages Registrar, Teacher, African Dancer,Drummer & Ceremonies Officer."

    She may have been married to an actual Fulani, perhaps from Nigeria.

    No word on her given "deadname."

    Replies: @Alden, @Chrisnonymous

    She claims… to be a “…African Dancer,Drummer & Ceremonies Officer.”

    As a pure Brit, she is obviously engaged in cultural appropriation. How arrogant for an Englishwoman like her to pose as an African Ceremonies Officer! Africans everywhere must be angry over this continuation of the colonial experience.

    Do you really believe the conversation happened in anything like this form

    It certainly was strange. If reported accurately, it makes one wonder whether she–and by implication the late Queen and others of their standing and age cohort–don’t understand what is happening to the UK in terms of immigration.

  226. Anonymous[363] • Disclaimer says:
    @silviosilver
    @Anonymous


    There is NO WAY the conversation went down anything like this.
     
    So why not deny it instead of resigning?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Anonymous

    So why not deny it instead of resigning?

    Because public perception is not a matter of 19th century common sense.

    Also, within King Chuck’s PR machine, it is likely far safer to propose root-and-branch “Year Zero” strategies to eradicate the original sin of racism, than to advocate more measured approaches.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Anonymous

    That's totally unconvincing. Try again.

  227. @Jack D
    @Alden


    Purpose was to revitalize sketchy (black criminal) area of lower Manhattan.
     
    Actually no one had lived in that part of Lower Manhattan since the 19th century. It was pretty much all commercial. When shipping switched to containerization and planes replaced ships for transatlantic crossings, the area became underutilized. Marginal businesses like electronics surplus stores, spice merchants, etc. But not a black criminal area.

    It was however a big boondoggle by the "Port Authority". The Port Authority is a giant unaccountable piggy bank controlled by the governors of NY and NJ. They own all the bridge and river crossings which are like giant money printing machines - the crossings were paid for decades ago but they keep raising the tolls higher and higher - in the '70s it was $1 but now it's $16. Times several hundred thousand vehicles crossing every day x 365 - do the math - it's a LOT of $.

    Actually around half the WTC site was created by landfilling in the river. To dig out the foundations of the center without having it fill up with ground water (it went pretty far underground - there was a below ground train station, garages, shopping mall, etc.) they created something called the "bathtub"- a company from Italy with experience in mining was brought in. They drilled a narrow slit trench a few feet at a time and filled the trench with grout which is a kind of liquidy cement that you can pump. You fill the trench with grout as you drill so the dirt walls of the trench don't collapse. They kept doing this until they had a complete rectangle. Then they dug the dirt out of the middle and revealed the rough concrete wall that had been created in the slit trench. They then drove anchors through the sides to hold the wall up. It was really quite clever. The "bathtub" was invisible once the WTC was built but after the towers came down you could see it again for a time.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    the crossings were paid for decades ago but they keep raising the tolls higher and higher

    You charge tolls to pay for maintenance and security costs, not just to amortize the bonds. Having people pay in their capacity as motorists rather than as property holders or general consumers is closer to a theoretical optimum as costs and benefits are aligned. (I think the Path trains are the only component of the Authority’s operation which lose money).

    One problem with the Port Authority is that it encompasses a jumble of activities which could be readily pulled apart and put under separate authorities with boards appointed by actual stakeholder jurisdictions. The local airports in Poughkeepsie / Newburgh and in Atlantic City are included. The successor to the Trade Center – a real estate project entirely within New York City – is included. Facilities for which New York is a point of entry and a point of departure (e.g. the port and the air terminals) are thrown in with facilities meant to move people around greater New York (the bridges, tunnels, and Path trains). Civil aviation, which handles 99% of the passenger traffic but just 4% of the freight by tonnage) is thrown in with the port (which handles 96% of the freight and just 1% of the passengers). Breaking it up into six pieces (of which three would be bi-state authorities) and having local officials appoint the boards would be agreeable.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Art Deco


    You charge tolls to pay for maintenance and security costs, not just to amortize the bonds.
     
    It still doesn't add up to 16 bucks no matter what you throw in there. The tunnels and bridge tolls are just giant unaccountable honey pots for politicians that bear no relation to operating costs. They should have been built as regulated private utilities and the tolls limited to the actual costs involved and any increases approved by the Public Utility Commission. The way it is now you have the foxes guarding the henhouse.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  228. @Cool Daddy Jimbo
    @International Jew


    Should have gone for broke with something like, “How lovely! Are you here to speak about female genital mutilation in your country?”
     
    Unfortunately we don't really have the moral high ground on the genital mutilation front any more.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Too true.

  229. @Anonymous
    @silviosilver


    So why not deny it instead of resigning?
     
    Because public perception is not a matter of 19th century common sense.

    Also, within King Chuck's PR machine, it is likely far safer to propose root-and-branch "Year Zero" strategies to eradicate the original sin of racism, than to advocate more measured approaches.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    That’s totally unconvincing. Try again.

  230. @Alden
    @Thea

    Will and Kate’s American tour is to promote climate change and the sacrifices we ordinary proles must make to save Mother Earth.

    Electrical heating during winter that costs 4 times as much as gas heating, public transportation mixing with thugs and criminals being murdered on subway platforms, vegan food which will starve us, gazillions of our tax dollars for light rail and other useless save Mother Earth projects.

    Will is as much a fabulously wealthy environmentalist as is his father and Earth First.

    Check out photo images of Queen Elizabeth and the Commonwealth leaders at the Commonwealth Conferences. There she and the prime ministers. The only White faces in a sea of the worst black dictators on the planet.

    Skeptics call the Commonwealth Conferences the Cannibals and Kleptomaniacs Conference. A bi annual annoyance as the endless parades make London traffic worse than usual.

    The ordinary British will freeze as monthly heat bills go from £200 a month to £700 a month.

    While the royal family preaches veganism and unaffordable heat bills for the British people.

    Replies: @Kylie

    “The ordinary British will freeze as monthly heat bills go from £200 a month to £700 a month.

    While the royal family preaches veganism and unaffordable heat bills for the British people.”

    The BRF shouldn’t be preaching anything. They are royalty, not clergy*. They should appear in public in appropriate attire with smiles on their faces and their big mouths shut, that is, assuming they want the monarchy to continue.

    The British public will not transfer the loyalty and high esteem they felt for the Queen to Charles. He’s a tree-hugging dimwit whose only ambitions seem to have been to become King and/or Camilla’s tampon. Nothing will become him in life like the leaving of it. William’s best option (assuming he wants to be King) is to position himself in a way that suggests historical continuity in a modern context without seeming either outdated or too woke.

    *Neither should that far-left jackoff Welby, even though he’s the Archbishop of Canterbury. He’s a total whack job, as bad as the Pope.

    • Agree: Jonathan Mason
  231. @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    the crossings were paid for decades ago but they keep raising the tolls higher and higher

    You charge tolls to pay for maintenance and security costs, not just to amortize the bonds. Having people pay in their capacity as motorists rather than as property holders or general consumers is closer to a theoretical optimum as costs and benefits are aligned. (I think the Path trains are the only component of the Authority's operation which lose money).

    One problem with the Port Authority is that it encompasses a jumble of activities which could be readily pulled apart and put under separate authorities with boards appointed by actual stakeholder jurisdictions. The local airports in Poughkeepsie / Newburgh and in Atlantic City are included. The successor to the Trade Center - a real estate project entirely within New York City - is included. Facilities for which New York is a point of entry and a point of departure (e.g. the port and the air terminals) are thrown in with facilities meant to move people around greater New York (the bridges, tunnels, and Path trains). Civil aviation, which handles 99% of the passenger traffic but just 4% of the freight by tonnage) is thrown in with the port (which handles 96% of the freight and just 1% of the passengers). Breaking it up into six pieces (of which three would be bi-state authorities) and having local officials appoint the boards would be agreeable.

    Replies: @Jack D

    You charge tolls to pay for maintenance and security costs, not just to amortize the bonds.

    It still doesn’t add up to 16 bucks no matter what you throw in there. The tunnels and bridge tolls are just giant unaccountable honey pots for politicians that bear no relation to operating costs. They should have been built as regulated private utilities and the tolls limited to the actual costs involved and any increases approved by the Public Utility Commission. The way it is now you have the foxes guarding the henhouse.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    Well, you can audit their books. As a public authority, it's a reasonable wager they're overstaffed and they suffer from excessive employee compensation (mainly from sweetheart retirement programs). That's a different issue than financing out of tolls v. taxes. Some of the excess is indubitably to finance the deficit from the PATH trains.

  232. @dearieme
    So, the grievance-monger was too dim or ignorant to know what upper class old birds mean by "your people".

    They mean your parents. That's all. No racial implications at all. I've been asked where "my people" live. It's old fashioned not malicious. But angry blacks must always be appeased and grovelled before.

    Lady Sue may come to feel she's better off out of that world.

    Replies: @Moses

    So what if she meant racially? Is there something wrong with that?

    Don’t cuck.

  233. @Pat Hannagan
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Christy McVie's tracks on Tusk really suit that double album and compliment Buckingham's zany sound. I can see why they did an album together many years later, they seem way more simpatico than Buckingham and Nicks.

    Funnily enough, I absolutely despised Tusk when I got it as part of my monthly allotment from a record club I was signed up to as a kid. I gave it away to an alcoholic slut of a girlfriend I had when I was in my late teens, early 20s. She loved Fleetwood Mac and I despised them. I should have seen the warning signs.

    For some reason I only really listened to Fleetwood Mac a few years ago now when out of the blue I thought I'd give them a go and went through their catalogue on Spotify. To my amazement they were actually...fantastic!

    I think listening to music is the same as books and the attitude Doris Lessing has is the one for me:

    “There is only one way to read, which is to browse in libraries and bookshops, picking up books that attract you, reading only those, dropping them when they bore you, skipping the parts that drag-and never, never reading anything because you feel you ought, or because it is part of a trend or a movement. Remember that the book which bores you when you are twenty or thirty will open doors for you when you are forty or fifty-and vise versa. Don’t read a book out of its right time for you. ”

    Reading up on Stevie Nicks' bio I see she was a drug addled slut who rode the rockstar cock carousel all the way to the top. I could see in hindsight what my then drunken whore of a girlfriend saw in her. Two kindred spirits!


    Back to McVie, she's of the "easy listening FM" variety but, whereas I generally find "easy listening" rock too hard because it's so trite, she made easy listening actually really rather easy, and nice.

    As I said, I rate Tusk as a double album and now see what so many musos got from Buckingham (like Tame Impala for example covering That's All for Everyone) but also appreciate McVie for what she brings.

    Replies: @Curle

    If you are getting started with Fleetwood Mac I strongly recommend the album Bare Trees.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Curle

    Very nice, thanks for the link.

    Some of the rhythm guitar work sort of reminds me of this old gem....


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pxq63cYIY1c

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

  234. @Curle
    @Pat Hannagan

    If you are getting started with Fleetwood Mac I strongly recommend the album Bare Trees.






    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=F84yWm1ZjCg

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Very nice, thanks for the link.

    Some of the rhythm guitar work sort of reminds me of this old gem….

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Such a fucking fantastic song, easily in my top ten songs of all time, I just love the repetition with the slicing guitar non-solo, the constant looping rhythm, the reason why people love Velvet Underground.

    Cheers to you both!

    And to Sterling Morrison, they should have named a fighter jet after you!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EqmKoJ6EbUc

    Put that track on anytime anywhere and you'll see people revealing themselves and their guiding spirit. If Friedrich Paulus had have heard this he would have pushed on or broke out and saved the West!

  235. @Ebony Obelisk
    @tyrone

    What’s your problem jerk?

    Man I cannot wait for white men to lose all institutional power.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Curle

    Cut the Black militant act. Only white women speaking at inclusion seminars say this shit.

  236. @Reg Cæsar
    @International Jew


    And then he approves a juvenile insult like this?
     
    Some have suggested he makes them. Or someone close to him.

    Replies: @Richard B

    Some have suggested he makes them. Or someone close to him.

    Interesting. But why would he do that? Boredom?

    Hard to believe someone as busy as Steve could ever be bored. But who knows?

  237. @Anonymous
    Former UK Home Secretary (Conservative) weighs in on the Great Replacement:

    https://twitter.com/sajidjavid/status/1597696442801741826

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Anon, @Richard B

    So what?

    Sajid Javid is yet another deposit dropped from the bowels of The Coalition of the Fringes. Of course, he responds true to type by asking a question as if there’s no answer.

    Regarding World War Hair and The Old Lady, I can’t be the only one here who thinks the whole “encounter” was staged. Would it surprise anyone? You can even hear a hostile elite-appointed member of the Coalition whispering in the old lady’s ear something along the lines of:

    Listen dear, times have changed, you’re on your way out, and are going to have to take one for the team before you go. So let me walk you through what’s going to happen…..

    But the big story is the habit of mind that comes from both producing these orchestrated hoaxes and believing in them (or being forced to believe in them), and the impact that is having on the full and healthy functioning of our social institutions – all of them. How anyone can think this is going to end well is beyond me.

  238. Talk about “commoners”…

  239. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Curle

    Very nice, thanks for the link.

    Some of the rhythm guitar work sort of reminds me of this old gem....


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pxq63cYIY1c

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan

    Such a fucking fantastic song, easily in my top ten songs of all time, I just love the repetition with the slicing guitar non-solo, the constant looping rhythm, the reason why people love Velvet Underground.

    Cheers to you both!

    And to Sterling Morrison, they should have named a fighter jet after you!

    Put that track on anytime anywhere and you’ll see people revealing themselves and their guiding spirit. If Friedrich Paulus had have heard this he would have pushed on or broke out and saved the West!

  240. @Jack D
    @Art Deco


    You charge tolls to pay for maintenance and security costs, not just to amortize the bonds.
     
    It still doesn't add up to 16 bucks no matter what you throw in there. The tunnels and bridge tolls are just giant unaccountable honey pots for politicians that bear no relation to operating costs. They should have been built as regulated private utilities and the tolls limited to the actual costs involved and any increases approved by the Public Utility Commission. The way it is now you have the foxes guarding the henhouse.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Well, you can audit their books. As a public authority, it’s a reasonable wager they’re overstaffed and they suffer from excessive employee compensation (mainly from sweetheart retirement programs). That’s a different issue than financing out of tolls v. taxes. Some of the excess is indubitably to finance the deficit from the PATH trains.

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