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Why We Can't Have Nice Things: Boston Bicycle Advocate Visits Amsterdam and Complains Dutch City Planners Focus on Needs of Dutch Cyclists Rather Than on Bike-Hating People of Color
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From StreetsBlog, which pushes for mass transit and bike routes:

Guest Column: Europe’s Bike and Transit Systems Are a Marvel, But Only For Some

By Lisa Jacobson
Aug 10, 2022
13 COMMENTS

Editor’s note: Lisa Jacobson is a StreetsblogMASS board member, and the Barr Foundation is a major funder of StreetsblogMASS.

This does not appear to be a parody: the author made some of the same points in her Twitter feed.

During a recent six-day study tour with a group of climate grantmakers and advocates in Amsterdam and London,

Amsterdam, perhaps with Copenhagen, is the safe urban bike-commuting capital of the world. So, American advocates of cycling like Jacobson visit it to learn its lessons. But one of its big lessons — the advantages of majoritarian utilitarianism — are downright unAmerican these days.

I marveled at the frequent and fully functioning rail, in contrast to my frustration with the T. The vast, connected networks of protected bike lanes, navigable without fear of Boston drivers or cavernous potholes.

… And yet, throughout the trip, I began to notice gaps in the way transportation solutions were planned. One key takeaway for me was that their approaches were not sufficient for the future of cities in the United States — and that we need to build and improve upon them.

Planning for people means asking who is being served, and who is being left behind

Who? Whom?

On the Barr Climate team, we have an explicit value of centering racial equity in our work. So naturally, thinking about who we plan for – and who continues to be left out – was top of mind for me and our study group.

But, we found that consistently asking ‘for whom’ was absent from much of the context and information we were given. We pressed our hosts with questions about who they are prioritizing in their planning and why, and the answer was often, “well, everyone.”

This is problematic, as it continues to leave people out who have already been excluded many times over.

… This is in contrast to U.S. transit planning where equity analyses are required, riders and neighbors can participate in a process, and transit agencies are called out if they don’t (rightly so) prioritize communities most impacted by air pollution and poor transit service.

… And back in Amsterdam, biking is so ingrained in Dutch culture that more than two-thirds of residents commute by bike. If you are born and raised in Holland, you bike. If you are an immigrant, or a child resisting cultural norms, you might not, and you are excluded, especially if you ride a moped or walk.

“Pedestrians in Amsterdam don’t exist,” said one of our speakers.

Although Europe is making far more headway reducing greenhouse gas emissions than the United States, we can’t follow their lead in how they got there. From what I observed, people of color, immigrants, and low-income people are not prioritized in decision making in these two cities. Climate, impeccable design, and engineering are.

These cities have built exceptional infrastructure for the dominant culture, and that is much of what American tourists experience on their visits.

Throughout the study tour, we heard phrases like “I don’t see color”, and “we are taking care of those people so their voices aren’t needed at the table”. These “color-blind” approaches continue to leave people out and are not going to address the stark racial inequities in our society.

When measuring “success” in transit reliability, separated bike lane miles, or air quality, the U.S. is far behind our European counterparts. I’ll posit that some in the U.S. are inching towards doing better — by centering people most impacted in our planning.

In contrast, while America is inching forward at vast expense by centering the Marginalized, the Dutch are striding forward by centering the Dutch.

Many city planners, advocates, and funders here are recognizing that we have done a poor job listening and providing for vast segments of our communities — and they know that a change is far overdue. Many of my companions on the study tour who have founded, lead, and work for community-based organizations that focus on environmental justice have been doing this work for a long time.

They aren’t getting much accomplished, but Centering the Marginalized is a living, so whaddaya whaddaya?

This experience for me underscored how essential it is to heed to climate justice organizers and the communities they serve. In the long run, we’ll have much better success if we continue to shift the power balance and truly account for who is and isn’t being served well by our transportation systems. None of this is easy, but we must correct our past and create a just transportation future.

By the way, you want to know the one thing uglier than an American car parking lot?

A Dutch bike parking lot.

I’d never seen that many bicycles in one place. The Dutch really are good at getting all the Dutch to ride bikes.

 
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  1. Bikers be so annoying that they get annoyed by other bikers.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @R.G. Camara

    With cyclists moved downward in the Intersectional Points rankings, there must be a mother-in-law joke in there, somewhere?

  2. They aren’t getting much accomplished, but Centering the Marginalized is a living, so whaddaya whaddaya?

    Woke is a grift, plain and simple.

    • Replies: @fish
    @kaganovitch

    White girl goes to Europe tomorrow feel superior. Mostly she succeeds.

    , @Clyde
    @kaganovitch


    They aren’t getting much accomplished, but Centering the Marginalized is a living, so whaddaya whaddaya?
    Woke is a grift, plain and simple.
     
    Not 100% grift, because They do believe the rubbish they are dispensing. But you can make $25000 yearly as a climate activist. As a body at climate demonstrations. A part time gig. You will be paid by the wealthy female heirs to oil fortunes.
    Oil heirs PAYING ECO-ACTIVISTS $25,000-A-YEAR TO PROTEST

    Three oil scions PAYING hundreds of eco activists …
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11099581
    12 hours ago · Offsetting guilt: Eco-minded descendants of billionaire oil barons are PAYING hundreds of activists $25,000-a-year to protest around the world because they feel 'a moral
     
    No man, trans or woman can live on feels alone!
  3. Aaaaand 3 – 2 – 1: The Netherlands runs out of gas and oil with the rest of Europe and the only people who can get anywhere fast are those selfish cyclists. Why oh why were immigrants not encouraged to take up cycling while there was still time? Why were their bikes not subsidized? Why were women in burkas not given tricycles with shopping baskets and half a dozen child seats? The discrimination, the racism.

    In a similar vein I am waiting to hear the first call for immigrants to get free or subsidized heating this winter because they are not used to the cold, and also because racism. Place bets now!

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @model immigrant


    In a similar vein I am waiting to hear the first call for immigrants to get free or subsidized heating this winter because they are not used to the cold, and also because racism. Place bets now!
     
    I had this exact same thought this afternoon.

    My money is on Germany as the first European nation to implement this plan.
    , @fish
    @model immigrant

    In a similar vein I am waiting to hear the first call for immigrants to get free or subsidized heating this winter because they are not used to the cold, and also because racism. Place bets now!


    No bet…..

  4. On the Barr Climate team, we have an explicit value of centering racial equity in our work.

    These types of people — wokes, climate apocalypitics, etc — are just neoliberal creationists who hate White people. They have no other true beliefs, because all of their stated goals are thrown out the window if it doesn’t sufficiently harm Whites or help nonwhites. It explains how they decry high consumption in the 1st world but support millions if low consumption 3rd worlders moving here. It explains why they decry hemophobia but bow down to homophobic demographics like blacks and Muslims. They will do whatever their corporate masters tell them if they think it sufficiently harms Whites. That is the at the heart of their worldview, and it will never change.

    • Agree: Ripple Earthdevil
    • Replies: @mc23
    @Pop Warner

    The Barr Climate team should start here the scope of the work would be much more rewarding then Holland.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=coyaVoVkhVw&list=PLLgqOez346ZN1NODJrl7Z3ApTvf11Czyy&index=11

  5. What about “others”?

    Sī fuerīs Rōmae, Rōmānō vīvitō mōre.

  6. I’d never seen that many bicycles in one place.

    Reminds me of Center Parcs, started, as it happens, by a Dutchman:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piet_Derksen

  7. I wonder how many agents and actors they went through to find that black realtor on a bike in the recent TV ad.

    The legions of white commercial actors must have found new careers by now.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Ralph L

    The legions of white commercial actors must have found new careers by now.

    They can play the husbands of Black women in other commercials.

  8. “World Saved from Global Warming — Women and Minorities Hardest Hit.”

    • Agree: mc23
    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  9. She is likely neither a sociologist nor a transportation planner. So, she is saying one should not plan for the largest number of users? How does it help if majority of Dutch are inconvenienced in riding bikes? They have fully functioning Rail for those who may not bike. What is her complaint? The small number of people who neither want to bike nor ride rail? I am sure they can walk.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @epebble

    She has a master's degree in city planning from Penn. Elite university MCP programs mostly teach progressives how to inject wokeness into urban or state bureaucracies. What the programs lack in quantitative rigor they make up for in ideological conformity. Many of their graduates go on to work in the bureaucracies, in planning firms that create policy for them, or in NGOs. Her job is pretty typical.

    Replies: @epebble

  10. Anonymous[317] • Disclaimer says:

    As a Boston transit advocate, she might want to spend a little more time focusing on Boston’s transit system, which has been, lately, a train wreck. The Brezhnevite malaise has been hitting hard, with a series of high-profile accidents and chronic delays. They’ve been forced to go to a weekend schedule on weekdays and just had a train fire that one rider jumped into the river to escape.

    More remarkably, the transit authority just announced, on very short notice, an unprecedented one-month shutdown of the entire Orange Line, which is the second most used line in the system. They intend to use the time to fix a lot of the recent infrastructure problems, but the shutdown will no doubt create havoc. Seems like a trend these days. It would likely be even worse if it weren’t for the fact that ridership on “the T” remains way down from its pre-pandemic level.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    ...just had a train fire that one rider jumped into the river to escape.
     
    But did he ever get burned?
    No he never got burned
    And his fate is still unlearned
    He may swim forever
    'Neath the streets of Boston
    He's the man, who never got burned



    Ask these informed Hawaiians:



    https://youtu.be/S7Jw_v3F_Q0

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    , @Observator
    @Anonymous

    A lot of the T's problems have been the endless cutbacks, plus the greed of the workers unions. Now there is only one T employee per train, the driver. No more crew members to open the doors or to assist in the event of emergency, as on the bridge. In the stations you now find employees in gaudy red vests called "transportation ambassadors" and if you can find one who comprehends the English language or does not get angry at you for interrupting their break time, you're in luck.

    That person who leaped off the bridge in the recent, way over-hyped "disaster" must have been a complete space shot. The fire was in an element of the undercarriage and didn't actually endanger anyone in the affected car. Someone got hysterical, kicked out a window, everyone else whipped out their smartphones, and the local TV stations got juicy footage they love to show over and over, with an exciting but wildly inaccurate narrative of what actually happened.

  11. When I was attending USC a couple of decades ago, bike theft was a huge problem, and I can’t imagine it’s gotten any better in the years since, what with all the “defund the police” stuff. So, I wouldn’t count on a biking revolution in America’s big cities while that’s still going on.

    There is no end to the good things that become possible once you manage to guarantee basic law and order.

    I am consistently amazed by American progressives who travel to places like Europe and think, “this place needs to be more like a favela.”

  12. I’d never seen that many bicycles in one place. The Dutch really are good at getting all the Dutch to ride bikes.

    you obviously have not been to Japan

    https://www.alamy.com/bicycle-parking-lot-near-isehara-station-isehara-city-kanagawa-prefecture-japan-image183026108.html

    • Replies: @Spect3r
    @anon

    Or Switzerland
    https://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/big-underground-bicycle-parking-basel-switzerland-underground-bicycle-parking-basel-switzerland-114310509.jpg

  13. If you are born and raised in Holland, you bike. If you are an immigrant, or a child resisting cultural norms, you might not, and you are excluded, especially if you ride a moped or walk.

    No one is excluded from riding a bike. It’s a choice. Moving to Holland is a choice.

    Lisa Jacobson is grifter whether she knows it or not. Amsterdam would be a dream city and an example to emulate if it was located in the US. In the US it would also be derided as a Whitetopia.’

    In the US well meaning plans to increase diversity would degrade quality of life for everyone resulting in bike riding being a dangerous activity across large sections of the city.

    Holland has nice things because of the people who live there, the Dutch.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @mc23


    In the US well meaning plans to increase diversity ...
     
    Diversity happens here or there.

    But there are no "well meaning" plans to increase diversity.

    Replies: @mc23

  14. … And back in Amsterdam, biking is so ingrained in Dutch culture that more than two-thirds of residents commute by bike. If you are born and raised in Holland, you bike. If you are an immigrant, or a child resisting cultural norms, you might not, and you are excluded, especially if you ride a moped or walk.

    I’ve got a wild one here. (More of my “nativist bullshit”.)

    If you plop your ass down in someone else’s country, maybe you should not be “resisting [their] cultural norms”, but get with their program, integrate.

    If you can not, if you do not want to, if it violates your religious or cultural requirements… then maybe that nation is just not for you, and you should scuttle your ass back to where you came from, where you belong.

    • Agree: mc23, Fluesterwitz
    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @AnotherDad


    If you can not, if you do not want to, if it violates your religious or cultural requirements… then maybe that nation is just not for you, and you should scuttle your ass back to where you came from, where you belong.
     
    But there’s no free American welfare back home. Or white women.
    , @James Speaks
    @AnotherDad


    If you plop your ass down in someone else’s country, maybe you should not be “resisting [their] cultural norms”, but get with their program, integrate.
     
    No, no, no. Our motto is: When in Rome, be a negro.
  15. Is there any group more insufferable than middle-aged white Karens from America?

  16. @mc23

    If you are born and raised in Holland, you bike. If you are an immigrant, or a child resisting cultural norms, you might not, and you are excluded, especially if you ride a moped or walk.
     
    No one is excluded from riding a bike. It's a choice. Moving to Holland is a choice.

    Lisa Jacobson is grifter whether she knows it or not. Amsterdam would be a dream city and an example to emulate if it was located in the US. In the US it would also be derided as a Whitetopia.'

    In the US well meaning plans to increase diversity would degrade quality of life for everyone resulting in bike riding being a dangerous activity across large sections of the city.

    Holland has nice things because of the people who live there, the Dutch.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    In the US well meaning plans to increase diversity …

    Diversity happens here or there.

    But there are no “well meaning” plans to increase diversity.

    • Replies: @mc23
    @AnotherDad

    Deluded sounded harsh

  17. @Pop Warner

    On the Barr Climate team, we have an explicit value of centering racial equity in our work.
     
    These types of people -- wokes, climate apocalypitics, etc -- are just neoliberal creationists who hate White people. They have no other true beliefs, because all of their stated goals are thrown out the window if it doesn't sufficiently harm Whites or help nonwhites. It explains how they decry high consumption in the 1st world but support millions if low consumption 3rd worlders moving here. It explains why they decry hemophobia but bow down to homophobic demographics like blacks and Muslims. They will do whatever their corporate masters tell them if they think it sufficiently harms Whites. That is the at the heart of their worldview, and it will never change.

    Replies: @mc23

    The Barr Climate team should start here the scope of the work would be much more rewarding then Holland.

  18. Bicycle riders are the BLM of street transportation so it fits.

  19. @AnotherDad
    @mc23


    In the US well meaning plans to increase diversity ...
     
    Diversity happens here or there.

    But there are no "well meaning" plans to increase diversity.

    Replies: @mc23

    Deluded sounded harsh

  20. @Ralph L
    I wonder how many agents and actors they went through to find that black realtor on a bike in the recent TV ad.

    The legions of white commercial actors must have found new careers by now.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    The legions of white commercial actors must have found new careers by now.

    They can play the husbands of Black women in other commercials.

  21. The Dutch really are good at getting all the Dutch to ride bikes.

    The fact that the country is flat as a board and doesn’t get very hot helps.

    Also, riding a bike is the “normal” thing to do. Most people want to be normal. In America it’s normal to drive your SUV to work and anyone who bikes is a weirdo (usually a male – women are even more conformist than men). In the Netherlands, NOT riding a bike to work makes you a weirdo.

    Lastly, riding a bike is part of the Dutch identity. People like to ride bikes because they identify as Dutch and riding bikes is something that Dutch people do, just like Americans like to ride around in giant pickup trucks and roll coal. If you told a Dutchman to drive a giant pickup truck and roll coal, it would make him feel un-Dutch and he wouldn’t enjoy it, even though all Americans know that blowing huge clouds of black smoke (especially at cyclists) is an inherently enjoyable activity.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @anyone with a brain
    @Jack D

    Sounds like Americans need to be culled.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    One of the principal Dutch grievances against the German occupation in WWII was (I kid you not) that the Germans stole their bikes.

  22. Why bikes don’t appeal to blacks?

    Too hard to “bikejack” someone and carry off your six packs of Colt 45 malt liquor.

    Funny though, I’ll bet you’d have to search high and low in the African media to read such silly complaints by the “Racism-R-Us” morons. Surprisingly, African blacks don’t blame all of their problems on whitey.

    Unlike US Wokesters, they aren’t obsessed with hating Whites. They have plenty of black Africans, of different tribes who look and speak slightly different than they do, to focus on.

    Of course these White liberal/left women probably have never seen photos of African women with kids strapped on their backs, with a tall basket of goods balanced on their head, biking along a dusty African road. Obviously not hating bikes.

    So naturally these haters instead focus on the Dutch. Hey those cheese eaters even wear wooden shoes, not \$300/pair Nikes. You can’t even play basketball in those things!

    Imagine, an entire nation in Europe that doesn’t seem to worship black cultural affectations! Can’t let them get away with that…

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @Muggles

    Old joke, new to me: "What do you call a black man on a bicycle?"


    "Thief"

  23. Anon[317] • Disclaimer says:
    @epebble
    She is likely neither a sociologist nor a transportation planner. So, she is saying one should not plan for the largest number of users? How does it help if majority of Dutch are inconvenienced in riding bikes? They have fully functioning Rail for those who may not bike. What is her complaint? The small number of people who neither want to bike nor ride rail? I am sure they can walk.

    Replies: @Anon

    She has a master’s degree in city planning from Penn. Elite university MCP programs mostly teach progressives how to inject wokeness into urban or state bureaucracies. What the programs lack in quantitative rigor they make up for in ideological conformity. Many of their graduates go on to work in the bureaucracies, in planning firms that create policy for them, or in NGOs. Her job is pretty typical.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Anon

    programs lack in quantitative rigor

    Wonder why STEM employers want to hire foreigners by hook or crook.

  24. Anonymous[233] • Disclaimer says:

    A bike based city works for Amsterdam because it like most of Western Europe has an Oceanic climate of mild winters/summers with little snow.

    The US has a Continental climate with extremes of hot, humid summers and cold, snowy winters. Biking full time in most US cities would be absolutely miserable. Too damn cold and too much snow on the ground in winter; too damn hot and humid in the summer that you’d be sweaty, tired mess all the time.

    Also, it’s still the case that even Western Europe is significantly poorer than the US. Americans can simply afford more space, energy, and material stuff than Europeans can, as the ongoing energy crunch in Europe attests. This entails having a car available to move that more stuff around in that more available space. A bike just doesn’t cut it.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Shopping at Costco using a bicycle to get your stuff home doesn't sound very feasible.

    Replies: @Anon, @Reg Cæsar, @International Jew

    , @Ben tillman
    @Anonymous

    It works in Amsterdam because it’s flat.

    , @Stealth
    @Anonymous

    You need to visit Montreal. Cyclists are all over the place, and they don't seem to mind uncomfortable weather conditions. Forty-five degrees (F) and raining? No problem. Ninety-five degrees with tropical humidity? Even better. Blizzard? What blizzard?

    If you're behind the wheel of a car, they're an absolute menace, as if they're actually trying to piss you off.

  25. …vast, connected networks of protected bike lanes, navigable without fear of Boston drivers or cavernous potholes.

    What about stabby, rapey vibrants, any protection from that?

  26. @Anonymous
    A bike based city works for Amsterdam because it like most of Western Europe has an Oceanic climate of mild winters/summers with little snow.

    The US has a Continental climate with extremes of hot, humid summers and cold, snowy winters. Biking full time in most US cities would be absolutely miserable. Too damn cold and too much snow on the ground in winter; too damn hot and humid in the summer that you'd be sweaty, tired mess all the time.

    Also, it's still the case that even Western Europe is significantly poorer than the US. Americans can simply afford more space, energy, and material stuff than Europeans can, as the ongoing energy crunch in Europe attests. This entails having a car available to move that more stuff around in that more available space. A bike just doesn't cut it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ben tillman, @Stealth

    Shopping at Costco using a bicycle to get your stuff home doesn’t sound very feasible.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Having shopped at a Costco one hour away by bicycle here in Japan many times I can verify your statement that it’s a hassle. Among other things you can’t buy any foods that require refrigeration. On the other hand it was never much of a problem with respect to not being able to carry large items. You tend not to buy really big stuff in Japan because your living quarters are so small. That’s all in the past however. We finally broke down and bought a car at the beginning of Covid.

    In general in Japan most businesses are placed close to train and subway stations. Businesses that require a lot of real estate and cannot afford to locate near stations will deliver things to your home for free or for a small charge, or in the case of home centers will simply lend you a car for an hour or two for free. Costco doesn’t do that.

    Replies: @epebble, @Rob McX

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Shopping at Costco using a bicycle to get your stuff home doesn’t sound very feasible.
     
    Which is why they tear down functioning churches to expand their parking lots.

    https://www.baptistpress.com/resource-library/news/city-seeks-to-oust-church-through-eminent-domain/


    https://popmn.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/costco-church-300x172.jpg

    https://wordandway.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/1280px-COSTCO_Makuhari-e.jpg

    Replies: @Luke

    , @International Jew
    @Steve Sailer

    These are popular with a certain crunchy demographic up here in NorCal.
    https://www.market-prospects.com//storage/images/415-1200x675.jpg

    Replies: @George Taylor

  27. I don’t think it’s ugly, but if it’s any consolation it takes up less space than a car lot.

    Another aspect that doesn’t get talked about, with the traffic being as seperated as it is, and the cars being forced to slow down, they don’t have to wear bike helmets and look askance on anyone who does.

    (if you are interested in Danish bike culture, I recommend copenhagenize.com)

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @The Only Catholic Unionist


    Another aspect that doesn’t get talked about, with the traffic being as separated as it is, and the cars being forced to slow down, they don’t have to wear bike helmets and look askance on anyone who does.
     
    Obviously they need more Ukrainian truck drivers

    https://mol.im/a/11099279

    "Heroin, fentanyl, and cocaine in his system."
    Now who does that remind you of?

  28. @R.G. Camara
    Bikers be so annoying that they get annoyed by other bikers.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

    With cyclists moved downward in the Intersectional Points rankings, there must be a mother-in-law joke in there, somewhere?

  29. Anon[990] • Disclaimer says:

    The Dutch are weirdly diehard against wearing helmets when they ride a bicycle. They seem to feel that the incremental hassle of having to buy and put on a helmet will incrementally decrease the number of bicyclists. They feel that the risk of traumatic brain injury is so small that it’s not worth the risk of slowing down the arrival at the ultimate maximum bicycling utopia.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Anon


    They feel that the risk of traumatic brain injury is so small that it’s not worth the risk of slowing down the arrival at the ultimate maximum bicycling utopia.
     
    Probably because the Dutch cruise around in a leisurely manner and obey all traffic signals.

    In the US, there are all kinds of lunatics who think they have a God-given right to act out their Lance Armstrong time trial fantasies on crowded sidewalks as they ignore red lights, stop signs, and crossing signals.

    Replies: @Eric Novak

    , @sb
    @Anon

    The Dutch mostly ride very genteel style bikes. They make the distinction between commuter cycling and hard exercise cycling ( which many also do but in different places to the commuter cyclists )
    In the Anglo countries many/most cyclists ride racing style bikes and ride as if they are in the Tour de France
    By the way if you look at a photo of Amsterdam in the 1950's -it was Car City .
    I'm also bemused as how some here put Amsterdam's cycling culture down to their relative poverty compared to the US . Have these people ever been anywhere ?

  30. @Anonymous
    As a Boston transit advocate, she might want to spend a little more time focusing on Boston's transit system, which has been, lately, a train wreck. The Brezhnevite malaise has been hitting hard, with a series of high-profile accidents and chronic delays. They've been forced to go to a weekend schedule on weekdays and just had a train fire that one rider jumped into the river to escape.

    More remarkably, the transit authority just announced, on very short notice, an unprecedented one-month shutdown of the entire Orange Line, which is the second most used line in the system. They intend to use the time to fix a lot of the recent infrastructure problems, but the shutdown will no doubt create havoc. Seems like a trend these days. It would likely be even worse if it weren't for the fact that ridership on "the T" remains way down from its pre-pandemic level.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Observator

    …just had a train fire that one rider jumped into the river to escape.

    But did he ever get burned?
    No he never got burned
    And his fate is still unlearned
    He may swim forever
    ‘Neath the streets of Boston
    He’s the man, who never got burned

    Ask these informed Hawaiians:

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    And his fate is still unlearned
     
    Her.

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/2022/07/21/metro/mbta-orange-line-train-catches-fire-approaching-station-somerville-passengers-scramble-get-off-train/

    Somerville Fire Chief Charles Breen said the train that caught on fire was on a bridge over the Mystic River between the cities of Somerville and Medford. The train was evacuated and a woman ended up in the water, he said.

    “An unidentified female passenger jumped off the bridge into the river,” Breen said in a phone interview. “Our marine boat happened to be in the river for training and was on scene immediately. The woman refused to get into the boat. She was provided a life jacket and proceeded to swim to shore ... then she walked away.”
     

  31. Anon[990] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Shopping at Costco using a bicycle to get your stuff home doesn't sound very feasible.

    Replies: @Anon, @Reg Cæsar, @International Jew

    Having shopped at a Costco one hour away by bicycle here in Japan many times I can verify your statement that it’s a hassle. Among other things you can’t buy any foods that require refrigeration. On the other hand it was never much of a problem with respect to not being able to carry large items. You tend not to buy really big stuff in Japan because your living quarters are so small. That’s all in the past however. We finally broke down and bought a car at the beginning of Covid.

    In general in Japan most businesses are placed close to train and subway stations. Businesses that require a lot of real estate and cannot afford to locate near stations will deliver things to your home for free or for a small charge, or in the case of home centers will simply lend you a car for an hour or two for free. Costco doesn’t do that.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Anon

    Isn't there costco.com in Japan?

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Rob McX
    @Anon


    Businesses that require a lot of real estate and cannot afford to locate near stations will deliver things to your home for free or for a small charge, or in the case of home centers will simply lend you a car for an hour or two for free. Costco doesn’t do that.
     
    It's amazing what's possible when you have a homogeneous, law-abiding population. Imagine trying this out in a place like Baltimore.

    Replies: @Anon

  32. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Shopping at Costco using a bicycle to get your stuff home doesn't sound very feasible.

    Replies: @Anon, @Reg Cæsar, @International Jew

    Shopping at Costco using a bicycle to get your stuff home doesn’t sound very feasible.

    Which is why they tear down functioning churches to expand their parking lots.

    https://www.baptistpress.com/resource-library/news/city-seeks-to-oust-church-through-eminent-domain/

    • Replies: @Luke
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lol!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  33. @model immigrant
    Aaaaand 3 - 2 - 1: The Netherlands runs out of gas and oil with the rest of Europe and the only people who can get anywhere fast are those selfish cyclists. Why oh why were immigrants not encouraged to take up cycling while there was still time? Why were their bikes not subsidized? Why were women in burkas not given tricycles with shopping baskets and half a dozen child seats? The discrimination, the racism.

    In a similar vein I am waiting to hear the first call for immigrants to get free or subsidized heating this winter because they are not used to the cold, and also because racism. Place bets now!

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @fish

    In a similar vein I am waiting to hear the first call for immigrants to get free or subsidized heating this winter because they are not used to the cold, and also because racism. Place bets now!

    I had this exact same thought this afternoon.

    My money is on Germany as the first European nation to implement this plan.

  34. @Anonymous
    A bike based city works for Amsterdam because it like most of Western Europe has an Oceanic climate of mild winters/summers with little snow.

    The US has a Continental climate with extremes of hot, humid summers and cold, snowy winters. Biking full time in most US cities would be absolutely miserable. Too damn cold and too much snow on the ground in winter; too damn hot and humid in the summer that you'd be sweaty, tired mess all the time.

    Also, it's still the case that even Western Europe is significantly poorer than the US. Americans can simply afford more space, energy, and material stuff than Europeans can, as the ongoing energy crunch in Europe attests. This entails having a car available to move that more stuff around in that more available space. A bike just doesn't cut it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ben tillman, @Stealth

    It works in Amsterdam because it’s flat.

  35. I have a fun game I play with educated Australians, though I have not tried it on Americans yet: in conversation, casually drop the phrase “normal people”, and see how your listener reacts. The response tells you a lot about how they see their society.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @DuanDiRen


    in conversation, casually drop the phrase “normal people”, and see how your listener reacts. The response tells you a lot about how they see their society.

     

    Could you give an example of what you’ve experienced with Australians?

    Replies: @DuanDiRen

  36. @Anon
    The Dutch are weirdly diehard against wearing helmets when they ride a bicycle. They seem to feel that the incremental hassle of having to buy and put on a helmet will incrementally decrease the number of bicyclists. They feel that the risk of traumatic brain injury is so small that it’s not worth the risk of slowing down the arrival at the ultimate maximum bicycling utopia.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @sb

    They feel that the risk of traumatic brain injury is so small that it’s not worth the risk of slowing down the arrival at the ultimate maximum bicycling utopia.

    Probably because the Dutch cruise around in a leisurely manner and obey all traffic signals.

    In the US, there are all kinds of lunatics who think they have a God-given right to act out their Lance Armstrong time trial fantasies on crowded sidewalks as they ignore red lights, stop signs, and crossing signals.

    • Replies: @Eric Novak
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Hipster bicyclists don’t think they’re obligated to pay tax on their bikes or have insurance either, while demanding more bike lanes and rights that motorists have.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  37. @DuanDiRen
    I have a fun game I play with educated Australians, though I have not tried it on Americans yet: in conversation, casually drop the phrase "normal people", and see how your listener reacts. The response tells you a lot about how they see their society.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    in conversation, casually drop the phrase “normal people”, and see how your listener reacts. The response tells you a lot about how they see their society.

    Could you give an example of what you’ve experienced with Australians?

    • Replies: @DuanDiRen
    @Anonymous

    90% of responses "who are normal people?", and 10% (Women who worked in the same government office as me) were the more direct "normal people is such a problematic term".

    "Normal people" is a great filter, because if someone hears it and thinks (normal people) it means they are normal, and you can talk to them normally. If they object or tell you why you shouldn't use it, you know that you need to guard your speech around them. It is enough to sus them out, but not enough to get into trouble.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  38. @AnotherDad

    … And back in Amsterdam, biking is so ingrained in Dutch culture that more than two-thirds of residents commute by bike. If you are born and raised in Holland, you bike. If you are an immigrant, or a child resisting cultural norms, you might not, and you are excluded, especially if you ride a moped or walk.
     
    I've got a wild one here. (More of my "nativist bullshit".)

    If you plop your ass down in someone else's country, maybe you should not be "resisting [their] cultural norms", but get with their program, integrate.

    If you can not, if you do not want to, if it violates your religious or cultural requirements... then maybe that nation is just not for you, and you should scuttle your ass back to where you came from, where you belong.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @James Speaks

    If you can not, if you do not want to, if it violates your religious or cultural requirements… then maybe that nation is just not for you, and you should scuttle your ass back to where you came from, where you belong.

    But there’s no free American welfare back home. Or white women.

  39. @Jack D

    The Dutch really are good at getting all the Dutch to ride bikes.
     
    The fact that the country is flat as a board and doesn't get very hot helps.

    Also, riding a bike is the "normal" thing to do. Most people want to be normal. In America it's normal to drive your SUV to work and anyone who bikes is a weirdo (usually a male - women are even more conformist than men). In the Netherlands, NOT riding a bike to work makes you a weirdo.

    Lastly, riding a bike is part of the Dutch identity. People like to ride bikes because they identify as Dutch and riding bikes is something that Dutch people do, just like Americans like to ride around in giant pickup trucks and roll coal. If you told a Dutchman to drive a giant pickup truck and roll coal, it would make him feel un-Dutch and he wouldn't enjoy it, even though all Americans know that blowing huge clouds of black smoke (especially at cyclists) is an inherently enjoyable activity.

    Replies: @anyone with a brain, @Anonymous

    Sounds like Americans need to be culled.

    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @anyone with a brain

    Sounds like someone is projecting.

  40. @kaganovitch
    They aren’t getting much accomplished, but Centering the Marginalized is a living, so whaddaya whaddaya?

    Woke is a grift, plain and simple.

    Replies: @fish, @Clyde

    White girl goes to Europe tomorrow feel superior. Mostly she succeeds.

  41. @model immigrant
    Aaaaand 3 - 2 - 1: The Netherlands runs out of gas and oil with the rest of Europe and the only people who can get anywhere fast are those selfish cyclists. Why oh why were immigrants not encouraged to take up cycling while there was still time? Why were their bikes not subsidized? Why were women in burkas not given tricycles with shopping baskets and half a dozen child seats? The discrimination, the racism.

    In a similar vein I am waiting to hear the first call for immigrants to get free or subsidized heating this winter because they are not used to the cold, and also because racism. Place bets now!

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @fish

    In a similar vein I am waiting to hear the first call for immigrants to get free or subsidized heating this winter because they are not used to the cold, and also because racism. Place bets now!

    No bet…..

  42. @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    ...just had a train fire that one rider jumped into the river to escape.
     
    But did he ever get burned?
    No he never got burned
    And his fate is still unlearned
    He may swim forever
    'Neath the streets of Boston
    He's the man, who never got burned



    Ask these informed Hawaiians:



    https://youtu.be/S7Jw_v3F_Q0

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    And his fate is still unlearned

    Her.

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/2022/07/21/metro/mbta-orange-line-train-catches-fire-approaching-station-somerville-passengers-scramble-get-off-train/

    Somerville Fire Chief Charles Breen said the train that caught on fire was on a bridge over the Mystic River between the cities of Somerville and Medford. The train was evacuated and a woman ended up in the water, he said.

    “An unidentified female passenger jumped off the bridge into the river,” Breen said in a phone interview. “Our marine boat happened to be in the river for training and was on scene immediately. The woman refused to get into the boat. She was provided a life jacket and proceeded to swim to shore … then she walked away.”

  43. @The Only Catholic Unionist
    I don't think it's ugly, but if it's any consolation it takes up less space than a car lot.

    Another aspect that doesn't get talked about, with the traffic being as seperated as it is, and the cars being forced to slow down, they don't have to wear bike helmets and look askance on anyone who does.

    (if you are interested in Danish bike culture, I recommend copenhagenize.com)

    Replies: @HammerJack

    Another aspect that doesn’t get talked about, with the traffic being as separated as it is, and the cars being forced to slow down, they don’t have to wear bike helmets and look askance on anyone who does.

    Obviously they need more Ukrainian truck drivers

    https://mol.im/a/11099279

    “Heroin, fentanyl, and cocaine in his system.”
    Now who does that remind you of?

  44. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Having shopped at a Costco one hour away by bicycle here in Japan many times I can verify your statement that it’s a hassle. Among other things you can’t buy any foods that require refrigeration. On the other hand it was never much of a problem with respect to not being able to carry large items. You tend not to buy really big stuff in Japan because your living quarters are so small. That’s all in the past however. We finally broke down and bought a car at the beginning of Covid.

    In general in Japan most businesses are placed close to train and subway stations. Businesses that require a lot of real estate and cannot afford to locate near stations will deliver things to your home for free or for a small charge, or in the case of home centers will simply lend you a car for an hour or two for free. Costco doesn’t do that.

    Replies: @epebble, @Rob McX

    Isn’t there costco.com in Japan?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @epebble

    The Japanese Costco website seems to only carry about 10% of their total inventory, and it doesn’t have any of the perishable food items. I’m looking for Jones bacon, frozen shrimp, and various cheeses. They don’t sell that stuff online.

  45. @Anon
    @epebble

    She has a master's degree in city planning from Penn. Elite university MCP programs mostly teach progressives how to inject wokeness into urban or state bureaucracies. What the programs lack in quantitative rigor they make up for in ideological conformity. Many of their graduates go on to work in the bureaucracies, in planning firms that create policy for them, or in NGOs. Her job is pretty typical.

    Replies: @epebble

    programs lack in quantitative rigor

    Wonder why STEM employers want to hire foreigners by hook or crook.

  46. @Anon
    The Dutch are weirdly diehard against wearing helmets when they ride a bicycle. They seem to feel that the incremental hassle of having to buy and put on a helmet will incrementally decrease the number of bicyclists. They feel that the risk of traumatic brain injury is so small that it’s not worth the risk of slowing down the arrival at the ultimate maximum bicycling utopia.

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard, @sb

    The Dutch mostly ride very genteel style bikes. They make the distinction between commuter cycling and hard exercise cycling ( which many also do but in different places to the commuter cyclists )
    In the Anglo countries many/most cyclists ride racing style bikes and ride as if they are in the Tour de France
    By the way if you look at a photo of Amsterdam in the 1950’s -it was Car City .
    I’m also bemused as how some here put Amsterdam’s cycling culture down to their relative poverty compared to the US . Have these people ever been anywhere ?

  47. @AnotherDad

    … And back in Amsterdam, biking is so ingrained in Dutch culture that more than two-thirds of residents commute by bike. If you are born and raised in Holland, you bike. If you are an immigrant, or a child resisting cultural norms, you might not, and you are excluded, especially if you ride a moped or walk.
     
    I've got a wild one here. (More of my "nativist bullshit".)

    If you plop your ass down in someone else's country, maybe you should not be "resisting [their] cultural norms", but get with their program, integrate.

    If you can not, if you do not want to, if it violates your religious or cultural requirements... then maybe that nation is just not for you, and you should scuttle your ass back to where you came from, where you belong.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @James Speaks

    If you plop your ass down in someone else’s country, maybe you should not be “resisting [their] cultural norms”, but get with their program, integrate.

    No, no, no. Our motto is: When in Rome, be a negro.

  48. (((Lisa Jacobson))) ought to stick her nose in apartheid Israel’s bicycle racism, if she’s so consumed by do-gooderism.

  49. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Having shopped at a Costco one hour away by bicycle here in Japan many times I can verify your statement that it’s a hassle. Among other things you can’t buy any foods that require refrigeration. On the other hand it was never much of a problem with respect to not being able to carry large items. You tend not to buy really big stuff in Japan because your living quarters are so small. That’s all in the past however. We finally broke down and bought a car at the beginning of Covid.

    In general in Japan most businesses are placed close to train and subway stations. Businesses that require a lot of real estate and cannot afford to locate near stations will deliver things to your home for free or for a small charge, or in the case of home centers will simply lend you a car for an hour or two for free. Costco doesn’t do that.

    Replies: @epebble, @Rob McX

    Businesses that require a lot of real estate and cannot afford to locate near stations will deliver things to your home for free or for a small charge, or in the case of home centers will simply lend you a car for an hour or two for free. Costco doesn’t do that.

    It’s amazing what’s possible when you have a homogeneous, law-abiding population. Imagine trying this out in a place like Baltimore.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Rob McX

    You show your drivers license at the customer service counter, and the cars that they lend out are all so called K cars, tiny underpowered micro vans or micro pick up trucks.

  50. @Anonymous
    @DuanDiRen


    in conversation, casually drop the phrase “normal people”, and see how your listener reacts. The response tells you a lot about how they see their society.

     

    Could you give an example of what you’ve experienced with Australians?

    Replies: @DuanDiRen

    90% of responses “who are normal people?”, and 10% (Women who worked in the same government office as me) were the more direct “normal people is such a problematic term”.

    “Normal people” is a great filter, because if someone hears it and thinks (normal people) it means they are normal, and you can talk to them normally. If they object or tell you why you shouldn’t use it, you know that you need to guard your speech around them. It is enough to sus them out, but not enough to get into trouble.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @DuanDiRen


    “Normal people” is a great filter, because if someone hears it and thinks (normal people) it means they are normal, and you can talk to them normally.
     
    What are some ways to drop it casually into conversation?
  51. @kaganovitch
    They aren’t getting much accomplished, but Centering the Marginalized is a living, so whaddaya whaddaya?

    Woke is a grift, plain and simple.

    Replies: @fish, @Clyde

    They aren’t getting much accomplished, but Centering the Marginalized is a living, so whaddaya whaddaya?
    Woke is a grift, plain and simple.

    Not 100% grift, because They do believe the rubbish they are dispensing. But you can make \$25000 yearly as a climate activist. As a body at climate demonstrations. A part time gig. You will be paid by the wealthy female heirs to oil fortunes.
    Oil heirs PAYING ECO-ACTIVISTS \$25,000-A-YEAR TO PROTEST

    Three oil scions PAYING hundreds of eco activists …
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11099581
    12 hours ago · Offsetting guilt: Eco-minded descendants of billionaire oil barons are PAYING hundreds of activists \$25,000-a-year to protest around the world because they feel ‘a moral

    No man, trans or woman can live on feels alone!

  52. @anon

    I’d never seen that many bicycles in one place. The Dutch really are good at getting all the Dutch to ride bikes.
     
    you obviously have not been to Japan

    https://www.alamy.com/bicycle-parking-lot-near-isehara-station-isehara-city-kanagawa-prefecture-japan-image183026108.html

    Replies: @Spect3r

    Or Switzerland

  53. @Jack D

    The Dutch really are good at getting all the Dutch to ride bikes.
     
    The fact that the country is flat as a board and doesn't get very hot helps.

    Also, riding a bike is the "normal" thing to do. Most people want to be normal. In America it's normal to drive your SUV to work and anyone who bikes is a weirdo (usually a male - women are even more conformist than men). In the Netherlands, NOT riding a bike to work makes you a weirdo.

    Lastly, riding a bike is part of the Dutch identity. People like to ride bikes because they identify as Dutch and riding bikes is something that Dutch people do, just like Americans like to ride around in giant pickup trucks and roll coal. If you told a Dutchman to drive a giant pickup truck and roll coal, it would make him feel un-Dutch and he wouldn't enjoy it, even though all Americans know that blowing huge clouds of black smoke (especially at cyclists) is an inherently enjoyable activity.

    Replies: @anyone with a brain, @Anonymous

    One of the principal Dutch grievances against the German occupation in WWII was (I kid you not) that the Germans stole their bikes.

  54. Regardless of the racial angle, in the US bike lanes and bike trails are decidedly not an expression of majority rule. Biking infrastructure gets built/paved/painted upon pressure from a few activists promoting their own interest, and in the teeth of a hugely unfavorable cost/benefit ratio.

    • Replies: @Pat Kittle
    @International Jew

    As the Age of Petroleum inevitably winds down, bicycles will become increasingly necessary.

    (Yeah, I know, petroleum is virtually infinite. Virtually.)

  55. @International Jew
    Regardless of the racial angle, in the US bike lanes and bike trails are decidedly not an expression of majority rule. Biking infrastructure gets built/paved/painted upon pressure from a few activists promoting their own interest, and in the teeth of a hugely unfavorable cost/benefit ratio.

    Replies: @Pat Kittle

    As the Age of Petroleum inevitably winds down, bicycles will become increasingly necessary.

    (Yeah, I know, petroleum is virtually infinite. Virtually.)

  56. @Rob McX
    @Anon


    Businesses that require a lot of real estate and cannot afford to locate near stations will deliver things to your home for free or for a small charge, or in the case of home centers will simply lend you a car for an hour or two for free. Costco doesn’t do that.
     
    It's amazing what's possible when you have a homogeneous, law-abiding population. Imagine trying this out in a place like Baltimore.

    Replies: @Anon

    You show your drivers license at the customer service counter, and the cars that they lend out are all so called K cars, tiny underpowered micro vans or micro pick up trucks.

    • Thanks: Rob McX
  57. @epebble
    @Anon

    Isn't there costco.com in Japan?

    Replies: @Anon

    The Japanese Costco website seems to only carry about 10% of their total inventory, and it doesn’t have any of the perishable food items. I’m looking for Jones bacon, frozen shrimp, and various cheeses. They don’t sell that stuff online.

  58. Rough estimate 2000 bikes in that picture. A thing of beauty – the alternative is horrendous.

  59. @Anonymous
    As a Boston transit advocate, she might want to spend a little more time focusing on Boston's transit system, which has been, lately, a train wreck. The Brezhnevite malaise has been hitting hard, with a series of high-profile accidents and chronic delays. They've been forced to go to a weekend schedule on weekdays and just had a train fire that one rider jumped into the river to escape.

    More remarkably, the transit authority just announced, on very short notice, an unprecedented one-month shutdown of the entire Orange Line, which is the second most used line in the system. They intend to use the time to fix a lot of the recent infrastructure problems, but the shutdown will no doubt create havoc. Seems like a trend these days. It would likely be even worse if it weren't for the fact that ridership on "the T" remains way down from its pre-pandemic level.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Observator

    A lot of the T’s problems have been the endless cutbacks, plus the greed of the workers unions. Now there is only one T employee per train, the driver. No more crew members to open the doors or to assist in the event of emergency, as on the bridge. In the stations you now find employees in gaudy red vests called “transportation ambassadors” and if you can find one who comprehends the English language or does not get angry at you for interrupting their break time, you’re in luck.

    That person who leaped off the bridge in the recent, way over-hyped “disaster” must have been a complete space shot. The fire was in an element of the undercarriage and didn’t actually endanger anyone in the affected car. Someone got hysterical, kicked out a window, everyone else whipped out their smartphones, and the local TV stations got juicy footage they love to show over and over, with an exciting but wildly inaccurate narrative of what actually happened.

  60. anonymous[211] • Disclaimer says:

    A couple points here. Amsterdam (like Netherlands cities generally) is quite multi-cultural and migrant, and in fact rather ghetto-ised, with ‘vibrant’ neighbourhoods of Africans, Muslims etc. There are a fair amount of drugs to be found in some quarters. And there is in fact actually some amount of bicycle theft, and sales of stolen bicycles cheaply by drug addicts etc.

    Some Amsterdammers simply live with this reality, and after their bike is stolen they get a new cheap stolen one from a drug addict, so they don’t fret too much after that one gets stolen … and so on. Tho there are also cases where people get in legal trouble for buying a stolen bicycle, police occasionally crack down on the practice, arresting the buyer as well as the seller / thief.

    Another curiosity is that the Netherlands is fairly rainy at times, but the Dutch with their canals and reclaiming land from the sea are quite water-friendly, boat-loving people, and they bicycle in the rain all the time. It’s quite hilarious to enter a Dutch shop or office just after it opens on a rainy morning, and see staff and bank tellers etc still dripping wet from their bike ride into work. One gets used to the sight of a pretty girl with her hair wet and her top all soaked through …

  61. Some people here are getting a little too focused on the biking. This woman’s obsession with “equity” is what is wrecking any public infrastructure project in the US. Boston wouldn’t be able to pull off the Big Dig today because it mostly improved the lives of tourists, white people working downtown and white people in the North End.

    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Correct.

    Ostensibly they are spending public funds intended for the benefit of the (race blind) general public, but in reality they are directing public funds to political allies, even if it's not really something the allies want or ask for. It doesn't matter whether the public overall, and therefore society, benefits from the infrastructure. What matters is that the "experts" act as gatekeepers and keep the white man inconvenienced.

    The precedent was set during the "Freeway Revolts" of the 1960's. Imagine how much more efficient driving in Boston would have been if Route 2 was a freeway all the way to I-93 in downtown instead of abruptly stopping at the Cambridge city limits (the "town line" as they say in Massachusetts).

    Or San Francisco if the Golden Gate Bridge connected to freeways at both ends instead of dumping commuters onto surface streets in the Presidio.

    Literally every major city in the United States has an incomplete freeway system compared to what was planned in the postwar period. And this is a big reason why the US became so suburban. Developers just ignored the urban core and built up where the freeways weren't blocked and the urban centers were ignored and allowed to decay.

    It doesn't matter whether the infrastructure is needed, what matters is that the white man doesn't get his way or benefits from public expenditures. She admits as much in the article.

  62. I offer this so the Dutch will better understand their “underserved” community…

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTStN1Q0F-VZzi2Okunopj5ghIhEF8v3lGHfQ&usqp=CAU

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Mark in BC

    I could see "underserved" becoming a snarky euphemism, eventually turning into a substitute for "homicidal".

  63. @Peter Akuleyev
    Some people here are getting a little too focused on the biking. This woman’s obsession with “equity” is what is wrecking any public infrastructure project in the US. Boston wouldn’t be able to pull off the Big Dig today because it mostly improved the lives of tourists, white people working downtown and white people in the North End.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

    Correct.

    Ostensibly they are spending public funds intended for the benefit of the (race blind) general public, but in reality they are directing public funds to political allies, even if it’s not really something the allies want or ask for. It doesn’t matter whether the public overall, and therefore society, benefits from the infrastructure. What matters is that the “experts” act as gatekeepers and keep the white man inconvenienced.

    The precedent was set during the “Freeway Revolts” of the 1960’s. Imagine how much more efficient driving in Boston would have been if Route 2 was a freeway all the way to I-93 in downtown instead of abruptly stopping at the Cambridge city limits (the “town line” as they say in Massachusetts).

    Or San Francisco if the Golden Gate Bridge connected to freeways at both ends instead of dumping commuters onto surface streets in the Presidio.

    Literally every major city in the United States has an incomplete freeway system compared to what was planned in the postwar period. And this is a big reason why the US became so suburban. Developers just ignored the urban core and built up where the freeways weren’t blocked and the urban centers were ignored and allowed to decay.

    It doesn’t matter whether the infrastructure is needed, what matters is that the white man doesn’t get his way or benefits from public expenditures. She admits as much in the article.

  64. @Anonymous
    A bike based city works for Amsterdam because it like most of Western Europe has an Oceanic climate of mild winters/summers with little snow.

    The US has a Continental climate with extremes of hot, humid summers and cold, snowy winters. Biking full time in most US cities would be absolutely miserable. Too damn cold and too much snow on the ground in winter; too damn hot and humid in the summer that you'd be sweaty, tired mess all the time.

    Also, it's still the case that even Western Europe is significantly poorer than the US. Americans can simply afford more space, energy, and material stuff than Europeans can, as the ongoing energy crunch in Europe attests. This entails having a car available to move that more stuff around in that more available space. A bike just doesn't cut it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ben tillman, @Stealth

    You need to visit Montreal. Cyclists are all over the place, and they don’t seem to mind uncomfortable weather conditions. Forty-five degrees (F) and raining? No problem. Ninety-five degrees with tropical humidity? Even better. Blizzard? What blizzard?

    If you’re behind the wheel of a car, they’re an absolute menace, as if they’re actually trying to piss you off.

  65. I’m sure buried in the fine print of all these bills Biden is signing daily have “climate justice” provisions which require hiring all sorts of diversity experts who are graduating with worthless degrees from our increasingly worthless education system.

    Eventually the disfunction will make it impossible to install so much as a park bench, let alone bike lanes.

    And as others have pointed out, the U.S. is too hot, cold, hilly, spread out and lawless for bike transit to be practical here.

  66. OT but Boston Related:

    Ukranian national, Volodymr Zhukovsky, found “not guilty” this week on all charges related to the killing of seven motorcyclists (he drove a car carrier truck into the motorcyclists):

    https://www.bostonherald.com/2022/08/09/volodymyr-zhukovskyy-trial-jury-deliberating-in-deadly-2019-new-hampshire-crash-that-killed-members-of-jarheads-mc/

    For what it’s worth, Volod is now in ICE custody:

    https://www.bostonherald.com/2022/08/10/volodymyr-zhukovskyy-is-in-ice-custody-after-not-guilty-verdict-for-deadly-new-hampshire-crash/

    Story originally mentioned in Steve’s blog by commenter Lugash:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/nbc-wokeness-is-a-kremlin-plot-against-america/#comment-3384730

  67. With all the attention paid to the media and academia, let’s not overlook the nefarious power of nonprofit foundations, like the Woke author’s Barr Foundation, as perpetual motion machines for funding Wokeness, that can never disappear or go broke, and alchemically transmute capitalist wealth into Jobs for the Woke.

    See NS Lyons’s essential post on why Wokeness isn’t going anywhere:

    https://theupheaval.substack.com/p/no-the-revolution-isnt-over

    [MORE]

    Those who live outside places like Washington D.C. or San Francisco might hear the word “philanthropy” and think it means feeding the hungry, or something naïve and low-brow like that. But “philanthropy” is really a word for how the concentrated power latent in oligarchic money is transformed into applied political and cultural power. In this process, money from concentrations of wealth (today mostly from the tech industry) flows (tax free!) into very special institutions called foundations, where it is laundered of any appearance of corrupt influence or nefarious motive, and then handed out to the vast constellation of non-profit NGOs, activist organizations, think tanks, and academic programs that subsist almost entirely on such money, where it can find a way to “inspire change.” A large proportion of the elite in places like Washington are engaged in helping facilitate this process as their full-time labor. (How to spot a budding young elite aspiring to join this trade: simply scan their job applications for polite requests to be given some power, pretty please, such as a stated desire to “make an impact” or “change the world.”)

    This means the foundations have truly tremendous influence over public policy, because every nominally independent think tank, for example, automatically tailors its projects to attract the blessing of their funding. Government officials, being lazy, and chummy with the non-profit “experts” and executives (who are often former or future colleagues), simply copy their ideas almost directly into the rules they implement. Alternatively, those in the government with an agenda can hand over trial policy ideas in the other direction to be validated “independently” by the other side of the blob. This Wealth-Foundation-NGO-Government Complex thus works in unison to pour huge amounts of money-power into causes that are essentially by definition progressive ones (being to affect rapid change). Today this means there are massive tides of woke capital hard at work changing the world. How much money? Well as Thomas Edsall writes in the New York Times about just one cause du jour:

    Before [George] Floyd’s death, Candid found that philanthropies provided “\$3.3 billion in racial equity funding” for the nine years from 2011 to 2019. Since then, Candid calculations revealed much higher totals for both 2020 and 2021: “50,887 grants valued at \$12.7 billion” and “177 pledges valued at \$11.6 billion.”

    Among the top funders, according to Candid’s calculations, are the Ford Foundation, at \$3 billion; Mackenzie Scott, at \$2.9 billion; JPMorgan Chase & Co. Contributions Program, at \$2.1 billion; W.K. Kellogg Foundation, \$1.2 billion; Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, \$1.1 billion; Silicon Valley Community Foundation, \$1 billion; Walton Family Foundation, \$689 million; The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, \$438 million; and the Foundation to Promote Open Society, \$350.5 million.

    With this much money spent, the priorities of the non-profit sector have already been firmly set for at least the next few years, as budgeted projects are implemented. Hundreds of new institutions will have been set up to get in on the feeding frenzy. And all of these now have an incentive to justify their existence in perpetuity by hyping whatever problem they purportedly exist to solve. The inertia is now immense. In time, their specific priorities may change as the foundations’ priorities change, but one thing you can be sure of is that those priorities will stay woke – because if you begin to dig into what, say, the Ford Foundation has gotten up to in its lifetime, the deeper you go the more and more horrifying it gets – until you learn they were the ones who essentially invented modern left-wing identity politics in the United States in the first place. (The Ford Foundation is also a great example of how the foundations often run riot well beyond even the intentions of their donors. Henry Ford II went to his grave lamenting the family had ever set theirs up in the first place, describing it as “a fiasco from my point of view from day one,” having “got out of control” because, “I didn’t have enough confidence in myself at that stage to push and scream and yell and tell them to go fuck themselves, you know, which I should have done… we can get thrown out or we can go broke; but those people, they’ve got nobody to answer to.”)

    • Thanks: Coemgen
  68. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Shopping at Costco using a bicycle to get your stuff home doesn’t sound very feasible.
     
    Which is why they tear down functioning churches to expand their parking lots.

    https://www.baptistpress.com/resource-library/news/city-seeks-to-oust-church-through-eminent-domain/


    https://popmn.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/costco-church-300x172.jpg

    https://wordandway.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/1280px-COSTCO_Makuhari-e.jpg

    Replies: @Luke

    Lol!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Luke


    Lol!
     
    Are you in Lovelock?


    https://insidenorthernnevada.com/Images/Images/105125.jpg
  69. Even the commenters on the original article are roundly mocking the author! I’m surprised they haven’t turned of the comments!

  70. @anyone with a brain
    @Jack D

    Sounds like Americans need to be culled.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Sounds like someone is projecting.

  71. Speaking of Boston and transit woes:

    https://www.bostonherald.com/2022/08/10/son-of-mbta-transit-police-chief-charged-with-murder-in-everett-shooting-death/

    To encourage cycling on Boston streets is tantamount to being an accessory to murder!

    And this aforementioned piece of shyte should be headed back to pick up a gun and fight.

    https://www.bostonherald.com/2022/08/10/volodymyr-zhukovskyy-is-in-ice-custody-after-not-guilty-verdict-for-deadly-new-hampshire-crash/

  72. So the complaint is that the problem with having a system that works is that it didn’t take into account the thoughts of people who have never made anything work, anywhere, ever?

    Meanwhile here’s a system that works in the US

    https://theduran.locals.com/post/2561632/no-comment

  73. @Muggles
    Why bikes don't appeal to blacks?

    Too hard to "bikejack" someone and carry off your six packs of Colt 45 malt liquor.

    Funny though, I'll bet you'd have to search high and low in the African media to read such silly complaints by the "Racism-R-Us" morons. Surprisingly, African blacks don't blame all of their problems on whitey.

    Unlike US Wokesters, they aren't obsessed with hating Whites. They have plenty of black Africans, of different tribes who look and speak slightly different than they do, to focus on.

    Of course these White liberal/left women probably have never seen photos of African women with kids strapped on their backs, with a tall basket of goods balanced on their head, biking along a dusty African road. Obviously not hating bikes.

    So naturally these haters instead focus on the Dutch. Hey those cheese eaters even wear wooden shoes, not $300/pair Nikes. You can't even play basketball in those things!

    Imagine, an entire nation in Europe that doesn't seem to worship black cultural affectations! Can't let them get away with that...

    Replies: @Old Prude

    Old joke, new to me: “What do you call a black man on a bicycle?”

    “Thief”

  74. @Mark in BC
    I offer this so the Dutch will better understand their "underserved" community...

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTStN1Q0F-VZzi2Okunopj5ghIhEF8v3lGHfQ&usqp=CAU

    Replies: @Rob McX

    I could see “underserved” becoming a snarky euphemism, eventually turning into a substitute for “homicidal”.

  75. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Shopping at Costco using a bicycle to get your stuff home doesn't sound very feasible.

    Replies: @Anon, @Reg Cæsar, @International Jew

    These are popular with a certain crunchy demographic up here in NorCal.

    • Replies: @George Taylor
    @International Jew

    I'm considering an electric cargo bike, to make make shopping trips including Costco. It appears feasible with that type of bike. State and city electric bike incentives may push the final button for me. I have the old school concern for environment, I define that as the Sierra Club before a member of your tribe took it over and made DIE the priority. Although in all honesty I'm just cheap. A subsidized electric bike is a inexpensive way to get around.

  76. Anonymous[179] • Disclaimer says:

    As an American living in the Netherlands, it is nice to be able to do most of your daily activities on a bicycle. We do have a car for bigger shopping trips and traveling, but cargo bikes and trains are an option for those who prefer a bike for everything. If the weather is nice, a 15-20 minute bike ride is vastly preferable to a 5-10 minute car ride and then trying to find a parking spot.

    And the non-Dutch do use the cycling infrastructure here too, they just ride mopeds/scooters on the cycling paths instead. They often illegally modify them to go faster than the 25kph limit and, in general, create havoc on the paths.

    All in all, I’m not sure what lessons Boston (or any American city) could learn from The Netherlands. The roads and traffic would almost have to be completely rebuilt as literally everything revolves around cyclist safety here. I can’t really see any feasible way this could be done in a US city.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Anonymous

    I can’t really see any feasible way this could be done in a US city.

    this is possible. But how does one prevent a cyclist from becoming a moving feast for criminals? That seems impossible. We can no longer safely walk in many neighborhoods. Biking is more unstable than walking.

  77. @International Jew
    @Steve Sailer

    These are popular with a certain crunchy demographic up here in NorCal.
    https://www.market-prospects.com//storage/images/415-1200x675.jpg

    Replies: @George Taylor

    I’m considering an electric cargo bike, to make make shopping trips including Costco. It appears feasible with that type of bike. State and city electric bike incentives may push the final button for me. I have the old school concern for environment, I define that as the Sierra Club before a member of your tribe took it over and made DIE the priority. Although in all honesty I’m just cheap. A subsidized electric bike is a inexpensive way to get around.

  78. @Anonymous
    As an American living in the Netherlands, it is nice to be able to do most of your daily activities on a bicycle. We do have a car for bigger shopping trips and traveling, but cargo bikes and trains are an option for those who prefer a bike for everything. If the weather is nice, a 15-20 minute bike ride is vastly preferable to a 5-10 minute car ride and then trying to find a parking spot.

    And the non-Dutch do use the cycling infrastructure here too, they just ride mopeds/scooters on the cycling paths instead. They often illegally modify them to go faster than the 25kph limit and, in general, create havoc on the paths.

    All in all, I’m not sure what lessons Boston (or any American city) could learn from The Netherlands. The roads and traffic would almost have to be completely rebuilt as literally everything revolves around cyclist safety here. I can’t really see any feasible way this could be done in a US city.

    Replies: @epebble

    I can’t really see any feasible way this could be done in a US city.

    this is possible. But how does one prevent a cyclist from becoming a moving feast for criminals? That seems impossible. We can no longer safely walk in many neighborhoods. Biking is more unstable than walking.

  79. The City of Amsterdam and every other European city, town , village or hamlet must serve it’s disgusting critters of color’s transportation needs.

    The following proposal will serve the needs of the DCC community. Each disgusting critter of color over the age of 18 months will be provided a push button on a lanyard device. A fast push of the button will summon 4 to 8 native Dutch slaves bearing an elaborate and luxurious sedan chair to transport the DCC wherever they them their it wishes to go. 4,6,8,10,12 chair bearers depending on how long the poor pitiful pathetic DCC has been getting obese off Dutch welfare

    The City Transit Department is viewing old movies like Cleopatra, Quo Vadis , The Robe, and other big budget biblical historical epics for ideas about the design and luxury of the sedan chairs. The chairs will probably be manufactured in China by the same designers and crafts critters who make the elaborate sedan chairs for the Chinese Emperor historical epics.

    Jacobsen. Every Single Time

  80. the one thing uglier than an American car parking lot?

    A Dutch bike parking lot.

    Maybe, but a lot smaller. How many acres would you need for the same number of parked cars?

  81. European Jealousy of the American Spirit

    From time-to-time, us Americans are criticized by both European types and advocates of European practices and customs. Americans are seen as “boorish and unsophisticated” unlike our European friends. There may be some truth to the “boorishness and unsophisticated” behavior that some Americans possess, but for the most part, Americans are actually more altruistic and caring than many of our European “cousins”.
    Europeans forget that us “Yanks” bailed them out of two world wars that they themselves started and that we are still paying for to this very day with the various alliances and agreements that the United States has—NATO being a prime example—the United States footing most of the bill. This is why European countries can afford their lavish “social programs”, because their defense system costs are largely borne by the United States.
    This attitude that many Europeans possess about Americans and the United States of America in general is no different than the attitude that some Americans possess about Europeans. It is basic ignorance on “both sides of the pond” that contributes to these attitudes. Fortunately, such ignorance on both sides can be minimized.
    Let’s compare mobility and transportation systems between Europe and the United States.
    Americans are looked down upon by Europeans by our love for cars—true personal mobility that many Europeans can only dream about. Of course, there are Americans who would like to see European-style “diktats” against cars imposed on us as well. Fortunately, they are in the minority,
    Attempts to force European-style constraints on American car owners will fail.
    Let’s look at the reasons why European-style mass transportation systems will fail in America.
    Compared to Europe, the United States is spread out. There is much more land area in the United States than there is in Europe. As many Americans are spread out and do not live in congested urban areas, a car is a necessity.
    European urban areas are centuries older and were created when walking or horse and buggies were the only transportation systems available. These facts make public transportation systems such as rail and buses ideal and a practical solutions.
    Not only that, energy sources are heavily taxed in European countries, unlike the United States, that while taxed in the United States, the total tax burden for energy is not onerous and is not used to dictate transportation policy, unlike European countries where taxation is used to determine (and force) transportation policy.
    In the United States, there are very few urban areas that are as concentrated as European cities, New York City and Chicago being prime examples. In these cities, mass transportation is an ideal solution and works quite well. In both cities, many residents do not own cars and do rely on the mass-transit systems to get around.
    The “down-side” is that many residents own very little due to high rental costs.
    Europeans who visit the United States are amazed by the amount of land, the ability and desirability of ordinary Americans to own acreage, much more than “postage stamp size lots” and the freedom of movement and mobility that cars allow. In many cases, European visitors finally realize that the size of the United States mandates other than mass-transit systems, making cars not only a convenience, but a necessity.
    Europeans who visit the United States come away with the realization that the United States is indeed “the land of plenty”, a good thing. However, many Europeans still have a smug, somewhat supremacist attitude when it comes to Americans. Of course, their cultures and their countries being much older than that of the “relatively young” United States, it is easy to observe why such attitudes would prevail.
    Europeans fail to realize that, because of two destructive “world wars” that much of their infrastructure was destroyed and had to be rebuilt. This was actually “a blessing in disguise” as their societies were rebuilt utilizing modern processes and materials. Contrast that to the United States, where much infrastructure, airports and other transportation facilities are aging, outdated, and could use renovation, updating and other improvements. This also applies to many factories and other manufacturing facilities.
    The same situation existed in Japan, where their infrastructure was destroyed. The Japanese came back like gangbusters, rebuilding their infrastructure, adopting American ideas (that many American companies abandoned) that made them into a powerhouse after the war. All one has to do is observe the global dominance that Japanese car companies still have around the world.
    Unlike American business, Japanese adopted the best practices of its American conqueror and actually “showed us Americans how its done”, a good thing. Adopting the “total quality management” practices and processes of American W. Edward Deming was an extremely smart move, something many American companies failed to adopt due to outright arrogance.

  82. @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Anon


    They feel that the risk of traumatic brain injury is so small that it’s not worth the risk of slowing down the arrival at the ultimate maximum bicycling utopia.
     
    Probably because the Dutch cruise around in a leisurely manner and obey all traffic signals.

    In the US, there are all kinds of lunatics who think they have a God-given right to act out their Lance Armstrong time trial fantasies on crowded sidewalks as they ignore red lights, stop signs, and crossing signals.

    Replies: @Eric Novak

    Hipster bicyclists don’t think they’re obligated to pay tax on their bikes or have insurance either, while demanding more bike lanes and rights that motorists have.

    • Thanks: The Wild Geese Howard
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Eric Novak

    Why do you say that like there should be a car tax or mandatory insurance?

  83. Count the number of bicycles in that dutch parking lot, and compare the size of that parking lot to how big it would need to be to accomodate that many people at the usual 1-SUV-per-person density.

    But the main advantage that The Netherlands has re cycling is that it’s pretty flat.

  84. @DuanDiRen
    @Anonymous

    90% of responses "who are normal people?", and 10% (Women who worked in the same government office as me) were the more direct "normal people is such a problematic term".

    "Normal people" is a great filter, because if someone hears it and thinks (normal people) it means they are normal, and you can talk to them normally. If they object or tell you why you shouldn't use it, you know that you need to guard your speech around them. It is enough to sus them out, but not enough to get into trouble.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    “Normal people” is a great filter, because if someone hears it and thinks (normal people) it means they are normal, and you can talk to them normally.

    What are some ways to drop it casually into conversation?

  85. @Luke
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lol!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Lol!

    Are you in Lovelock?

  86. @Eric Novak
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Hipster bicyclists don’t think they’re obligated to pay tax on their bikes or have insurance either, while demanding more bike lanes and rights that motorists have.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Why do you say that like there should be a car tax or mandatory insurance?

  87. Because they pay nothing to public funding to operate on the street and carry more accident risk than vehicles.

  88. It seems like a group dedicated to mitigating global warming would center something like reducing CO2 emissions, rather than “racial equity”. It’s almost like the environmental goal is secondary to screwing Whitey.

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