The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
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Why So Little Media Push to Fight the Risks of COVID by Losing Weight?
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Like Wikipedia, the New York Times keeps a list of COVID fatalities in its continuing “Those We’ve Lost” feature. Wikipedia’s metric for inclusion is whether the victim had already had a Wikipedia page, while the NYT picks people for its own reasons, including that they are notable for how young they died. So the latter is a more “curated” list than Wikipedia’s.

Even so, a look through the NYT’s photos is enlightening:

The NYT runs a “Those We’ve Lost” feature about all the famous people who have been struck down … but, on average:

A. They aren’t all that famous
B. Most were old and/or sickly and thus well-past their career primes:

For example, here’s the first name on the NYT’s list:

These databases of COVID deaths illustrate the patterns seen in statistics: this is a bad disease for the old, sickly, and obese, but it’s not exactly wiping out a rising generation of talent that would have contributed so much to America’s future if not for their dying young.

In contrast, probably fewer Americans have died in aircraft crashes down through the decades, but the amount of potential wiped out is high:

The most famous crash killed in 1959 Buddy Holly (age 22), Ritchie Valens (17), and the Big Bopper (29). But here are some other American musicians who died in their primes: Glenn Miller 1944 age 40, Patsy Cline 1963 age 30, Otis Redding 1967 age 26, Jim Croce 1973 age 30, Ronnie Van Zant 1977 age 29, Randy Rhoads 1982 age 25, Stevie Ray Vaughan 1990 age 35, and Aaliyah 2001 age 22. And that’s leaving out somewhat older musicians like John Denver (age 53) and Ricky Nelson (age 45).

The NYT tries to put younger victims toward the top of its Those We’ve Lost list. One obvious pattern is that many seem overweight in their photos.

Why has there been so little push to get Americans to lower the risk of the virus by losing weight? After all, losing weight not only helps you not die of coronavirus, it helps you avoid diabetes, heart attacks, etc etc. So why no weight loss promotion, especially compared to, say, the fanatic media effort this summer to uphold the sacred right of black criminals to resist arrest without anything bad happening to them, which, objectively speaking, might not seem quite as high of a national priority during a health crisis?

If the media scared 50% of Americans into losing 10 pounds to reduce their risk from COVID, that would likely increase life expectancy for the whole country on average more than the virus reduces it.

 
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  1. Anonymous[166] • Disclaimer says:

    Likely not pushing a weight loss agenda because they’d like to see a lot of overweight Deplorables in Flyover Trump Country be taken out by this virus. Same rationale for why they neglected the Opioid Epidemic. A few incidental deaths on the coasts would be okay if this is accomplished….

  2. Daniel H says:

    Why? Fat Shame is verboten.

    To our woke commissars, Fatties are a protected class

  3. “The coronavirus pandemic has taken an incalculable death toll,…”

    Whoa, whoa, whoa!! I thought you people said you had mathematical models that showed how many people were gonna’ die. Do you mean the models don’t work? Ohhh, maybe it’s a divide by 0 error… I sure hope that’s all it is.

    • LOL: JosephB
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    , @Pop Warner
  4. @Daniel H

    BIGOT! I BET YOU’RE A PUKER!
    More calmly, have you seen a lot of our most concerned do-evilers? They have a paunch even bigger than mine!

  5. Our ruling class wants us to be obese losers, “incel” porn addicts, pill poppers, etc. We can argue about why that is (although I think it’s pretty obvious; a citizenry comprised of degenerate weaklings is easier to dominate), but that they are somehow fundamentally against everything that is good for us (including physical fitness), is well nigh indisputable.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  6. … this is a bad disease for the old, sickly, and obese, but it’s not exactly wiping out a rising generation of talent …

    Well, if you just completely disregard future American Sumo wrestling talent and any more Matt “Refrigerator” Perry’s, yeah, sure. Do you really want to go there, Steve?

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
  7. Why has there been so little push to get Americans to lower the risk of the virus by losing weight? After all, losing weight not only helps you not die of coronavirus, it helps you avoid diabetes, heart attacks, etc etc. So why no weight loss promotion, especially compared to, say, the fanatic media effort this summer to uphold the sacred right of black criminals to resist arrest without anything bad happening to them, which, objectively speaking, might not seem quite as high of a national priority during a health crisis?

    Because then it implies that it’s not … Trump’s fault!

    If the media scared 50% of Americans into losing 10 pounds to reduce their risk from COVID, that would likely increase life expectancy for the whole country on average more than the virus reduces it.

    Bingo.

    And not only weight loss there’s a bunch of ridiculously easy and dirt cheap stuff that could have been done. Most obviously vitamin D–particularly for blacks who have been hard hit–vitamin C, zinc+quercetin. (I’m only ten pounds overweight, not diabetic or any other health issue other than getting old and i’m doing all that. It costs me a whopping 25 cents a day.) Plus they could suggest humidification where/when it’s dry–i.e. winter heating season.

    And, of course, you can do zinc+hydroxychloroquine …

    Nope, the important thing is shutting down businesses and blaming Trump.

  8. PJ O’Rourke beat you to it 25 years ago:As PJ O’Rourke wrote about Mogadishu ,“somewhere there’s a real estate developer looking at this place and saying to himself “Beaches. Weight loss. What’s not to love?”

    https://www.c-span.org/video/?471683-1/books-pj-orourke

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  9. “Why has there been so little push to get Americans to lower the risk of the virus by losing weight? After all, losing weight not only helps you not die of coronavirus, it helps you avoid diabetes, heart attacks, etc etc.”

    As Daniel H and bartolo1 have already mentioned: Because that would be fat shaming.

    In general the idea that people can take actions to improve their health (exercise more, drink less, eat more healthily, etc) is culturally out of favor in the US.

    • Replies: @Hootsman
  10. TGGP says: • Website

    I expect they believe they have little power to get people to lose weight, given how difficult many who try find it. There are numerous other causes which may have even less hope for success that the media could take on, but they might find it harder to delude themselves about this. They might even have some personal experience in failing to lose weight, although being overweight is now correlated with being lower-class.

    • Agree: epebble
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
  11. There is no virus. It is a medical coding fraud fueled by greed, hate, and pride. That is why nobody knows anybody who died from BULLS$$HIT-2020.

    Greed: $8000 per phony BS-20 on death cert.

    Hate: Every BS-20 “death” hurts Trump.

    Pride: Nurses and doctors like to imagine they are heroes, so fraudulently pumping BS-20 body counts makes them feel so very very heroic and so very very special even though their jobs are safer than truly dangerous jobs like logging, etc.

    100% medical tyranny hoax.

    So take off your filthy skid-marked face diaper. Now.

    • Troll: AndrewR
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    , @Faraday's Bobcat
  12. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:

    Fight the Risks of COVID

    iSteve you still have a decade plus until you enter the dangerous age zone… but you can start living safer today with this proven defense plan:

    1 Stay outside all the time. With your shirt off. Roam and loiter freely.

    2 Drink red wine. Heavily.

    3 Chain smoke unfiltered cigarettes.

    4 Do drugs. Needle sharing is OK.

    5 Eat only food scraps from dumpsters. Junk food is fine.

    6 Relax. Stop working completely. Pass the time playing a musical instrument; reading poetry aloud; chatting up girls; sh!tposting on unz.com and Jezebel.

    So this is sort of a Mediterranean Keith Richards diet & lifestyle. It may be counterintuitive but it will defend you against Chicom Bat Flu. 100% guaranteed. The data proves homeless guys are bulletproof.

  13. @Achmed E. Newman

    William, not Matt. C’mon, man!

    • Agree: TontoBubbaGoldstein
    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
  14. @Achmed E. Newman

    “The coronavirus pandemic has taken an incalculable death toll,…”

    That struck me too. It’s symptomatic of the whiny feminine hysterics that seems to have progressively taken over the American media.

    “Incalculable” Really? What would be the adjective then for cancer? In fact, the Xi virus has been a boring piker in the deaths department, killing off basically the same people that die in any normal year … peeling off a few (often mediocre) years on average.

    I’d say that this “incalculable” death toll has a 50-50 chance of vanishing on November 4th into just boring background noise.

  15. Not Raul says:

    1. High fructose corn syrup is a big, powerful industry. They come down hard against modest proposals to decrease obesity, such as a soda/candy tax.

    2. If thin people stopped worrying so much about COVID-19, they might engage in more risky behavior, increasing the risk of infecting more vulnerable people.

  16. epebble says:

    Because, like many other intractable social problems, it is very difficult.

    From https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/strategies/index.html

    Strategies to Prevent Obesity

    There is no single or simple solution to the obesity epidemic. It’s a complex problem and there has to be a multifaceted approach. Policy makers, state and local organizations, business and community leaders, school, childcare and healthcare professionals, and individuals must work together to create an environment that supports a healthy lifestyle. There are several ways state and local organizations can create a supportive environment to promote healthy living behaviors that prevent obesity.

    State and Local Programs
    Resources are available to help disseminate consistent public health recommendations and evidence-based practices for state, local, territorial and tribal public health organizations, grantees, and practitioners.

    Knowing your body mass index (BMI), achieving and maintaining a healthy weight, and getting regular physical activity are all actions you can take for yourself to combat obesity.

    Community Efforts
    To reverse the obesity epidemic, community efforts should focus on supporting healthy eating and active living in a variety of settings. Learn about different efforts that can be used in early childhood care, hospitals, schools, and food service venues.

    Healthy Living
    The key to achieving and maintaining a healthy weight isn’t short-term dietary changes; it’s about a lifestyle that includes healthy eating and regular physical activity.

    Assessing Your Weight
    BMI and waist circumference are two screening tools to estimate weight status and potential disease risk.
    Healthy Weight
    A high BMI can be an indicator of high body fatness. Visit the Healthy Weight Website; learn about balancing calories, losing weight, and maintaining a healthy weight.
    ChooseMyPlate
    Healthy eating habits are a key factor for a healthy weight. Visit the ChooseMyPlate Website; look up nutritional information of foods, track your calorie intake, plan meals, and find healthy recipes.
    Physical Activity Basics
    Physical activity is important for health and a healthy weight. Learn about different kinds of physical activity and the guidelines for the amount needed each day.
    Tips for Parents
    Learn about the seriousness of childhood obesity and how to help your child establish healthy behaviors.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  17. Sane nutritional advice would not only undermine our new public medical health authority cult by pointing out how horribly consistently wrong they’ve been in their 100+ years of constantly changing diet advice. But it would also undermine all the huge food companies that buy ads from the media and that make their profits off of the highly processed, high margin, and addictively formulated foods that are the primary cause of obesity.

  18. @Paul Jolliffe

    P.J. O’Rourke and Dave Barry are two guys I get confused between a lot, but they are both hilarious – my type of humor.

    .

    .

    Oops, sorry Ben Tillman, you are right.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  19. prosa123 says:

    One issue is that the risks of being overweight, whether for the virus or anything else, are significantly greater for men than for women given differences in weight distribution. Women seem more receptive to health advice and of course are generally more into dieting and exercise. A government-sponsored campaign to lower one’s Covid risks by losing weight is therefore mostly going to be preaching to the choir, while having less effect on the people – men – who really need the help.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  20. Dan Hess says:

    It isn’t just obesity. You can do many things to reduce your chance of dying from the virus and none of them have been much discussed. Vitamins C, D and zinc have long been regarded as immune system boosters. Why the CDC did not recommend them from day one is beyond me. I think discussion of remedies for when you catch the ‘rona ruins the messaging of EVERYBODY PANIC!

    Like an obsessive, I will keep banging on about what is as far as I can tell is the best way to reduce the risk of COID: humidify during winter. My contempt for a scientific community that refuses to offer guidance on how to fare better with humidity if you DO get the virus grows by the day. In my estimation, humidification in northern climates during winter offers by far the biggest reduction in COVID-19 mortality of any remedy available. The mortality of COVID-19 in winter in northern climates was perhaps 3 times higher than it has been in humid locales and during the humid temperate summer.

    This isn’t speculation and it isn’t pseudo-science. Humidifiers have been sold by the millions every year to combat respiratory infections for at least two generations and perhaps longer than that.

    The two mechanisms by which humid air helps and dry air harms the throat and lungs during a viral respiratory infection are very straightforward.

    (See Moriyama et al. 2020:
    https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/pdf/10.1146/annurev-virology-012420-022445
    “Seasonality of Respiratory Viral Infections” – a broad review of 128 papers)

    (a) Mucociliary clearance (the ability of respiratory cilia to remove foreign particles including viruses) fails in conditions of very dry air.

    (b) Very dry air dries out surfaces in the throat and lungs and results in small injuries, tears and inflammation in the epithelial layers (skin-type surfaces) that are slow to be repaired. This is an easy-to-understand effect – you and I have experienced dry and irritated skin, chapped, cracked lips and a sore throat during winter when the air is very dry. When throat and respiratory surfaces are already in a damaged state from dry air, the ability to fight off respiratory infection is much reduced. Viruses can enter through these tears and breaks and infections increase.

    If Case Fatality Rates (which reflect the odds of dying if you do get the virus) this coming winter return to their formerly high rates of late March and early April 2020, I pray that our gracious blog host helps sound the alarm about the need to humidify dry indoor air when it is cold outside.

    • Thanks: John Achterhof
  21. @Servant of Gla'aki

    that they are somehow fundamentally against everything that is good for us (including physical fitness), is well nigh indisputable.

    I believe that this is exactly why we have seen such widespread and harsh gym shutdowns across the West.

  22. From the US Health and Human Services web site:

    African American women have the highest rates of obesity or being overweight compared to other groups in the United States. About 4 out of 5 African American women are overweight or obese.

    In 2018, African American women were 50 percent more likely to be obese than non-Hispanic white women.

    That’s a great idea, Steve, why don’t you tell black women to lose weight, since this is where we have the greatest chance of making an impact? Just start with one, just pick any one at all. Tell her she should take off ten pounds, you, know, because you care about her health.

    No, don’t, Steve; I’d miss your blog.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Charles St. Charles
  23. Anon[282] • Disclaimer says:

    I compete in a Deadpool each year with a group of about 30 friends. We each choose 15 celebrities who we don’t think will make it to the end of the year. Scoring is 100 minus age of death.

    This time last year, the winner was on 8 out his 15.

    This year, until RBG, nobody had snuffed it since Genesis P Orridge in March.

    There’s about 220 unique names on the list this year.

  24. Brutusale says:
    @prosa123

    Men have lower obesity rates than women.

    As for race, it’s basically what Whole Foods CEO John Mackey got in trouble for pointing out this week.

    • Replies: @prosa123
  25. MrVoid says:

    Weight is important but it’s not everything. Most obese people in America aren’t *just* consuming too many calories. The proportion of those calories that comes from carbs is also greatly excessive. Both factors contribute to high blood pressure. These people need to cut down on calories *and* they need to think about being moderate with carb intake, but it’s sort of un PC in the modern world to tell whole population groups that Covid receptivity is party their own fault (because of dietary choices). It seems as though the establishment is trying to cast Covid as an equal opportunity killer. They (including Fauci) did the same thing with AIDS not too long ago.

  26. Anon[314] • Disclaimer says:

    There’s a virtual ocean of garbage information about obesity. Most people think they know a lot about it, and express their opinions with great confidence, but generally they’re completely full of crap.

    As with IQ and racial crime stats, obesity data is known only by a handful of specialists and nerds. Everyone else just spouts BS, and gets shocked or angry if they’re contradicted.

    Here are some basic facts:

    1. Obesity is very heritable- not quite so much as height, but pretty close.

    2. Obesity is caused by excess calorie intake. Controlling for calorie intake, the macronutrient content of a diet doesn’t matter for weight loss. The carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis is false.

    3. GWAS research is now identifying the specific gene variants associated with body fatness. Nearly all of them act on the brain, causing variation in the drive to eat between individuals.

    4. The human body is simply not designed for weight loss, and in fact actively defends against it. Fat tissue produces the hormone leptin, which circulates in the bloodstream and is detected by the hypothalamus. When someone lose weight, their leptin decreases, and the brain initiates a variety of responses designed to induce excess calorie intake, including increased cravings and decreased energy expenditure.

    5. As a result of the above, virtually all attempts to lose weight fail in the long term. An enormous amount of evidence demonstrates this. The only intervention that does reliably work is gastric bypass surgery.

    JayMan has a good primer on this topic here: https://jaymans.wordpress.com/obesity-facts/

  27. Fat activism is a thing. It’s probably an intersectional thing. Before Transworld started taking off it seemed to be getting some traction. And occasionally I see women of color suggesting that not liking fat is an affront to them.

    Come to think of it, there’s probably a racial angle nobody would want to touch, given what appears to be high rates of obesity in the black community. When health nuts are lecturing Americans on being fat they always pull out cutouts of Bubbas as examples, but not Jamals.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Sam Malone
  28. The media wants the death count as high as possible. They want to keep the nation locked down. This is part of the anti-Trump game plan.

    The media is not reporting any potential effective treatments, while promoting ineffective measures like masks. They report on cases but not deaths to keep people frightened and prolong the pain of shutdowns , closed schools, churches , restaurants , arenas, clubs etc…The media is not going to report on effective preventive measures. They will not report on the benefits of green tea , zinc and vitamin D. They will keep the public in the dark about the rapidly falling fatality rate , the evidence of T cell immunity and the benefits of HCQ and nicotine.

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks
  29. Because people exhaling hard near other people, especially indoors, spreads the ‘rona, therefore the gyms must stay closed until there’s a vaccine. Or so our revered public health establishment tells us.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  30. @AnotherDad

    This.

    Why so little push by the media for anything beneficial?

    Because it was never about saving lives or health or anything beneficial.

    First it was about anti-racism.
    Don’t you dare discriminate against those poor, innocent Chinese people, who need to fly into here right now for reasons it would be racist to question.

    Then it was about Believe Science!
    These Smart People™ know what’s good for you better than you do! How dare you question them!

    Then is was about Obey Leviathan.
    The job of the Governor and her Health Secretary is to control govern you and keep you incarcerated safe. How dare you or your legislature question her divine authority!

    Then is was about Minorities Hardest Hit; Whitey to Blame!
    Etc., etc.

    The occasion of COVID, like every other event nowadays, is an occasion for the media to round all the usual bases of Leftist theology, genuflecting at each station to the Left’s dogmatic pieties. And every base-rounding ends with a home run of hating Trump!

    • Agree: vhrm
  31. SFG says:

    My one-millionth share of the Dow:

    1. Fat shaming is now un-PC.
    2. Weight loss is very difficult, so as a public health intervention it’s of less importance than, say, getting everyone to wear masks, at least as far as coronavirus goes.
    3. It would raise the question of whether increased black and hispanic mortality is due to, say, partially-controllable factors like weight rather than systemic racism.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  32. Corvinus says:

    “Why has there been so little push to get Americans to lower the risk of the virus by losing weight? ”

    Why not start with our current president, Mr. Sailer? Where does he stand on this dire health situation? Well, in August 2019, he mocked a supporter for being overweight at a rally in New Hampshire, after mistaking him for a protester trying to disrupt the event. “That guy has got a serious weight problem. Go home, start exercising,” he said.

    Perhaps he could learn a thing or two from over the pond…

    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/major-new-campaign-encourages-millions-to-lose-weight-and-cut-covid-19-risk

    A new national campaign [July 2020] is under way to encourage millions of adults to kick start their health and reduce their risk of serious illness, including COVID-19. The campaign – unveiled as part of the government’s new Obesity Strategy – encourages adults to introduce changes that will help them work towards a healthier weight, with a suite of free tools and apps supporting people to eat better, drink less alcohol and get active. This includes a new app for the free 12-week NHS Weight Loss Plan, helping people make healthier food choices and learn skills to prevent weight gain.

    …but that would require Trump to trump his own vanity.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/boris-johnson-obesity-coronavirus/2020/07/27/d5d0221c-cff0-11ea-826b-cc394d824e35_story.html

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson suggested a link between his weight and his susceptibility to Covid-19, as he launched a new government anti-obesity program on Monday that will see junk food advertising limited and restaurants and pubs required to post calories for food and drink. The campaign began with newspaper editorials and a social media blitz that included a video showing Johnson fast-walking in slow-motion — in a white button-down shirt and blue slacks — accompanied by inspirational string music and his dog, Dilyn.

    “I was too fat,” Johnson says in the video, about his physique back in April when he was sick with covid-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, and rushed to a hospital to be saved by supplemental oxygen.

    “If the media scared 50% of Americans into losing 10 pounds to reduce their risk…”

    The problem is the overweight/obese people who are conservative/GOP leaning would believe that the media would be duping them. You know, healthy living is Fake News!

    But there has been some coverage to encourage people to shed some weight in light of Covid-19. Just takes some NOTICING.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/obesity-coronavirus-risk-lose-weight/2020/08/21/1de03bbc-e187-11ea-8dd2-d07812bf00f7_story.html

    Stephen O’Rahilly, a prominent expert on obesity and other metabolic disorders — who struggles with his own weight — lost about 20 pounds in the six months before becoming ill with covid-19. He believes this probably protected him from serious disease, and maybe even saved his life. “My experience with the virus wasn’t so terrible,” says O’Rahilly, co-director of the Wellcome Trust-MRC Institute of Metabolic Science at the University of Cambridge in Britain, who said modest diet changes and exercise helped him shed the weight and probably enabled him to escape the worst effects of covid-19.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2020/07/14/obesity-exercise-affect-covid-19-s-severity-patients-not-cities/5425911002/

    “We know from research that physical activity can build a healthier immune system and overall wellness, which help minimize harmful effects of illness and disease,” said Barbara Ainsworth, chair of the American Fitness Index Advisory Board. “This pandemic shows the need to have local parks, trails and connected sidewalks in all neighborhoods that allow people to exercise safely.”

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-low-carb-strategy-for-fighting-the-pandemics-toll-11590811260

    The coronavirus has added a brutal exclamation point to America’s pervasive ill health. Americans with obesity, diabetes, heart disease and other diet-related diseases are about three times more likely to suffer worsened outcomes from Covid-19, including death. Had we flattened the still-rising curves of these conditions, it’s quite possible that our fight against the virus would today look very different.

  33. MrVoid says:
    @Anon

    Low carb diets do work. While it is true that weight loss depends strictly on calory reduction, low carb diets are inherently less calory-laden. Portions of low carb food have less calories and ingestion of low carb food doesn’t induce instant cravings for more of it (the way ingestion of high carb food does). You essentially get calory reduction as a side-benefit of low carb eating. Admittedly, I don’t have scientific citations for this, and I’m basing this heavily on my own personal experience but this is what I’ve experienced and I’ve heard the same thing from many other people.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  34. It’s amazing how even on an HBD blog people still have a blind spot when it comes to weight and weight loss. We accept readily that certain people have certain immutable traits, yet we can’t accept that some people are meant to weigh more than others.

    Very strange and disappointing from Steve and his readers.

  35. @Anon

    Re no. 2: Look at various Amerindians and Austroloids. We have pictures of them where virtually all of the men are <15% body fat. After one generation on the Western Diet virtually all of the men look like The People of Walmart. (And their teeth are sh*t). Saying obesity is genetic is kind of like saying the risk of lung cancer is genetic in a population where everyone smokes.

    Have you ever tried consuming a diet of solely meat and leafy green vegetables? (
    You know, what humans evolved to eat. No cheating. I did, and I was a chubby child and infamous for my appetite. I would eat until literally bloated every lunch and dinner and the pounds came off before my eyes. 30 pounds isn’t water weight.

    The insulin-carb hypothesis is correct. Eat as much meat, broccoli and kale for a few month's, but nothing else, and tell us how much weight you lose. Because you WILL lose weight.

    • Agree: vhrm
  36. Anon[314] • Disclaimer says:
    @ScarletNumber

    Right. Obesity is at least as heritable as IQ is, and probably more. Shown over and over again by the same twin and adoption studies that show IQ is heritable.

    • Replies: @Travis
  37. Xens says:

    that would likely increase life expectancy for the whole country on average more than the virus reduces it

    LOL. OF COURSE IT WOULD. By about two orders of magnitude. 10 pounds weight loss for the entire nation would have a visible impact on life expectancy. A few months for most overweight people (ie., most of us). Covid’s impact is days or hours off of the national life expectancy.

    Some back of the envelope calculations:

    5 points of BMI change = 3yrs life expectancy for an overweight/obese individual, and 10lb is on average 2 points of BMI. 40% of Americans are overweight, and the other 60% of Americans could sit out any weight loss program. 40% * 2/5 * 1yr = 2 months overall life expectancy improvement from the national weight loss program.

    Covid’s impact is miniscule by comparison. If it shaved 5 years on average off the people it hit (that is, imagine the 200K dead had an average life expectancy of 73, and that 329800000 not dead had a life expectancy of 78, your new average life expectancy would be about a day shorter).

  38. they already spent decades doing a campaign to defeat our natural reflex to harass fat people. why would they bring it back for a temporary virus?

    the same as their campaign to defeat our natural reflex against homosexuals.

    the same as their new campaign to defeat our natural reflex against pedophiles.

    those were all healthy, deliberate, on purpose reflexes and behaviors that evolved on their own for thousands of years and which people did without being taught, and which kept society more healthy than it is now.

    hell yes, huge fat people should be mercilessly made fun of and harassed. screw this fat acceptance stuff. it makes our entire population less healthy.

    • Agree: Stan d Mute
    • Troll: ScarletNumber
  39. @Achmed E. Newman

    Those models claimed that if we did everything right we would have about 200k dead by the end of the year. What’s the US tally right now?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  40. @Achmed E. Newman

    P.J. O’Rourke and Dave Barry are two guys I get confused between a lot, but they are both hilarious – my type of humor.

    Barry lives in Miami. O’Rourke attended Miami– the one that “was a university before Florida was a state.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miami_University

    He would have been a Redskin. How fitting for an O’.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  41. MrVoid says:
    @ScarletNumber

    It’s amazing how even on an HBD blog people still have a blind spot when it comes to weight and weight loss. We accept readily that certain people have certain immutable traits, yet we can’t accept that some people are meant to weigh more than others.

    If my dog had been able to choose his food, he would have gorged himself to death on animal fat (maybe with a bit of ground beef thrown in). Fortunately, for him, benevolent humans controlled his diet. HBD implies that some popluation groups will be more self-disciplined than others.

    • Replies: @Sollipsist
  42. Polynikes says:
    @ScarletNumber

    This is a ridiculous bit of fatalism. Even on this blog, I don’t think that something like IQ has ever been alleged to be more than 50-75% purely genetic. Much time has been spent exiting the virtues of environment and values; it’s just not 100% of the equation.

    The same can be said for weight. Some have a tougher time than others, but people have agency in their own fitness. If they didn’t, skinny people would never get fat and fat people would never get physically fit. Both happen every day.

  43. Peterike says:
    @Anon

    “ Controlling for calorie intake, the macronutrient content of a diet doesn’t matter for weight loss. The carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis is false.”

    So 1000 calories of donuts has the same effect on your body as 1000 calories of steak. Yeah, ok.

    • Replies: @Anon
  44. Peterike says:

    “ a national priority during a health crisis?”

    There is not now and there has not been a health crisis. There has been a severe messaging and truth crisis and a crisis of tyranny.

    If the media and government had ignored Covid, none of us would have even noticed.

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks
  45. @MrVoid

    Starches and sugars can make some people more hungry a few minutes after they started eating than before. If you might be one of them, it’s worth experimenting with cutting out sugar and starches in favor of things like butter, meat, and vegetables.

  46. @John Milton’s Ghost

    Black women average 20 pounds heavier than white women. Black men and white men are pretty similar in weight.

  47. @The Wild Geese Howard

    I believe that this is exactly why we have seen such widespread and harsh gym shutdowns across the West.

    You don’t think it has anything to do with all that huffing and puffing in an enclosed space?

  48. Anon[314] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peterike

    So 1000 calories of donuts has the same effect on your body as 1000 calories of steak. Yeah, ok.

    I said that it doesn’t matter for weight loss, which is 100% true. An overweight person who eats a low-calorie diet consisting entirely of junk food will lose weight- just as much weight as he would with a healthy diet of the same number of calories. There are lots of well-designed experiments (i.e. people locked up in hospital wards so that their calorie intake is absolutely controlled) that prove exactly this.

  49. @Pop Warner

    Everyone and his brother blog site owner said the numbers were going to be in the millions, seeing as the fatality rate was going to be 0.5% and higher. Right now, there are only your 200 thousand who died WITH cases of Corona (some may very well have been FROM too many cases of Corona in one evening, plus that virus thing …)

    Oh, plus we didn’t do everything right by any means, at least not per the back-and-forth wishy-washy edicts of idiotic “experts”. People who really did things right were people who ignored the BS as much as was possible, got out into the sunshine for some fun and vitamin D, didn’t wear masks even when yelled at, and ignored “our” “experts”. There are a lot of people who deserve to hear “I told you so” from people like me.

    • Agree: Realist
    • Replies: @Adam Smith
  50. How many famous people who have died of COVID were still healthy and young enough to be in the primes of their careers?

    There is Way Bandy, featured with an array of other victims patients on the cover of a national news magazine. He was only…

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Way_Bandy

    Oh, wait… It was AIDS what got him. In 1986.

    I get this Way confused with the real Way Bandy, the classmate whose name Ronald Duane Wright stole before rising to the top of his profession. That Way is still alive, but squarely in the target COVIDemographic– and living in God’s Waiting Room:

    This 81-Year-Old Grandfather Just Graduated From College: ‘If I Can Do It, Anybody Can’

    He did it his Way. And reproduced.

  51. Puremania says:

    Anon314 is right: the metabolic set point for one’s weight is endogenous. I learned about this in a pleasant evening with a former physicist who now teaches population genetics. He turned me on to Gina Kolata’s book, Rethinking Thin. I also agree with ScarletNumber that this blog, of all places, should have this nailed down. And addressing a few other comments:
    1. Hydroxychloroquine is bad for the 400 million people with favism.
    2. The Covid-19 death count relies on the case count, which is bogus. Over-cycled PCR tests are detecting insubstantial bits of junk and dead virus that don’t nearly constitute an infectious viral load. See Apoorva Mandavilli in NYT.
    3. Humidifiers, according to Jane Brody’s health encyclopedia, can make you sick if not cleaned and de-limed constantly.
    4. Genesis P-orridge died! Why was I not told? Now I must go and blast that Godstar video.

  52. @ScarletNumber

    It’s amazing how even on an HBD blog people still have a blind spot when it comes to weight and weight loss. We accept readily that certain people have certain immutable traits, yet we can’t accept that some people are meant to weigh more than others.

    Very strange and disappointing from Steve and his readers.

    Interesting and noted. But to suggest that suddenly (since the ass end of the 20th century) folks ballooned into land-bound whales due to sudden genetic changes is a stretch. I’ve famous whalers in my family’s past, and surely they’d have delighted at the idea of going for a Nantucket sleighride down a freshly waxed Walmart aisle (had they the misfortune of understanding such a notion).

    Gladwell had his 10,000-hour thing. Why not a 10,000-calorie analogue. If one consumes that much or more in calories daily, that person can and likely will achieve grotesque obesity.

    Scarcity is a sure cure for obesity. When folks can’t game the all-you-can-scarf buffets in Vegas, they will slim down.

    • Replies: @Anon
  53. James Lafond said it best

    There is an absolute jihad against normal working people

  54. Michelle says:

    Because we are living in an upside down universe wherein Lizzo is celebrated for being dangerously obese and Adele is excoriated for losing weight, getting healthier, and exposing the exquisite beauty she has been hiding all along.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  55. Why no push from Sellout Steve to get his commenters to start social distancing and waring masks? Might it be because of the Benjamins?

  56. Anon[314] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kibernetika

    Longitudinal variation in a population over time is largely caused by environmental changes. Cross-sectional variation between individuals at a particular time is largely caused by genes.

    South Korean women are about 8″ taller than they were 100 years ago. Environment. But genetics mostly explains why one particular Korean woman is taller than another in 2020.

  57. While the health benefits of not being overweight have been publicized in the media for decades, has any country (or even a state or a city) actually initiated a public health campaign aimed at lowering rates of obesity? I can’t remember reading about even one, in the last five decades.

    But it’s not just obesity as a risk factor in Covid that’s not getting talked about. It is striking, to me, that in our data oriented times, how little analysis has actually been performed on the mountains of public health data already accumulated on Covid.

    For instance, there are huge variations in mortality from one country to another which should be prompting closer analysis, but seem to get waved away with some mumbling about “classification” and “comorbidities.”

    But yes, in these Covid-19 times being overweight, even if you are young, is a risk factor.

  58. @The Wild Geese Howard

    I believe that this is exactly why we have seen such widespread and harsh gym shutdowns across the West.

    Yes, they seem to have gone after both gyms and churches with particular severity. Likely for two different versions of the same reason ie. supressing physical and spiritual health.

  59. prosa123 says:
    @Brutusale

    Yes, the obesity rate is higher among women, but as I noted already the consequences of obesity are considerably worse for men. Women normally pack on the avoirdupois on their hips and rear ends, where it’s basically harmless, while men carry excess weight on their abdomens, where it’s most definitely not harmless.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  60. It’s all especially puzzling because in recent years the media, employers and even the medical establishment have been non-stop chanting the mantra of holistic “wellness.” Manage your health, be an advocate for yourself and so on. Now it’s cower under your couch until the next edict comes down from on high, telling you what (not) to do.

  61. prosa123 says:
    @MrVoid

    It seems as though the establishment is trying to cast Covid as an equal opportunity killer. They (including Fauci) did the same thing with AIDS not too long ago.

    An older relative of mine, now deceased, was in her 50’s when the AIDS crisis hit in the 1980’s and was absolutely convinced that she was at grave risk. In reality, it would have been hard to imagine anyone who was at less risk – she was long divorced and AFAIK was not even seeing any men let alone sexually active, never used drugs, had never had a blood transfusion, and so on. It took quite a while for her adult children and other relatives to convince her that she wasn’t doomed.

    • Replies: @anon
  62. AndrewR says:

    Thou shalt not fatshame

  63. @Dan Hess

    What is the correlation of seasonal humidity and infection and death rates in specific countries? Let’s say Sweden? Does the following graph predict the course of the outbreak in Stockholm?

    Vitamin C,D, and zinc are doing more than being “immune boosters” in COVID. Since you’re already an MD, you should be able to follow the explanations on MedCram Lectures easily. The following is a summary, but other videos have more in-depth explorations of the effects of various OTC treatments.

    • Replies: @Dan Hess
  64. @Anonymous Jew

    I’m completely on the low carb train, but I think the explanations for why it works and its interaction with genetics may be more complex than the carbs make insulin stores fat hypothesis allows for. Specifically, I suspect the effect of carbs on eating patterns is mediated a lot by the brain, whose reaction to carbs and especially carb+salt+fat style meals may be significantly heritable. In this case, obesity might look heritable in modern society while at the same time, low-carb pre-modern diets would be an effective treatment for everyone.

    • Agree: Anonymous Jew
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Anonymousse
  65. anon[286] • Disclaimer says:

    As hospitals ramp up elective surgeries after several months of pause amid the pandemic, patients are flocking to sign up for procedures such as gastric bypasses, laparoscopic bands and gastric sleeves that restrict the size of the stomach and alter signals between the stomach and brain. When these procedures—part of the category of medical procedures known as bariatric surgery—are successful, they can dramatically reduce a patient’s body weight within months. Many patients hope the weight loss will help them avoid a serious or even fatal case of Covid-19.

    The WSJ has identified bariatric surgery as a Covid “thing”.

    But seriously, I see people doing thing they have put off for extended periods. Because, it’s impossible to seriously claim you want to do something. But don’t have time.

  66. AndrewR says:
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    I personally knew four people who have died of it. A friend of mine is also a physician at Henry Ford hospital in Detroit and he can talk for hours about how his life changed in April. He treated the second person in Michigan to die of it. He went home at 5pm getting ready to discharge her the next day after she improved during the course of her five day admission. Overnight she rapidly tanked, was on a vent by midnight and was dead by morning

  67. @prosa123

    Not merely harmless — some men find a little extra junk in the trunk rather fetching, at least according to my field observation of black and Indo/Pak males admiringly espying my beloved as I escorted her along the streets of pre-Rudy New York. Meanwhile, no woman ever has told a man, “That spare tire of yours drives me wild, grrrrr”

  68. @AnotherDad

    Just chalk it up to bad writing. Like the misuse of literally.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    , @Mr. Anon
  69. @TGGP

    It’s complicated by the interaction of media and medical experts. I doubt many in the media are knowledgeable, humble, and thoughtful enough to believe their pronouncements are not effective for people. However, many medical experts are. (In fact, I have been told this directly by a doctor who said I shouldn’t bother trying to lose weight.) Since media mostly repeat what they’re told by medical experts, they are inadvertently adopting the attitude you suggest.

    For the medical community, there are other complicating factors. For example, focusing on weight loss would put the lie (or at least appear to) to many of the other ideas being promoted such as the necessity of a vaccine before going back to work or the importance of community-wide lockdowns. to

    This is related to the arrogance problem. For example, I was pointing out that the UK’s ICU patients were all fat and that Japan has a super-low BMI back in February or March, but I was derided as a flu-truther. Now, those who accused me have to eat their hat to promote weight loss. On a nation-wide scale, I think this kind of backtracking is preventing people from changing course.

    There is also the problem of advice. In a lockdown, everyone could have adopted intermittent fasting protocols much more easily than during their normal lives and anaerobic routines much more easily than jogging or exercise machines, but this is still not the medical community standards.

    But I think the biggest factor stopping weight loss advice was Trump, or rather TDS. The politics of masks vs no-masks and lockdown vs no-lockdown and HCQ vs no-HCQ all pushed out real discussion, which should always include cooperative brainstorming and listening to minority reports rather just taking sides. In this sense, blue-state and blue-blood Americans are largely responsible for creating a response that was less useful than it could have been.

    By the way, Steve,

    It’s Tuesday, so if you’re probing us for ideas to put into your next TakiMag article, I want to tell you I have been working on my own article on the theme of this missed pandemic opportunity. I’m not telling you to take credit or stop you but so I’m not accused of drinking your miljshake or not attributing you should I be published.

  70. @International Jew

    For a female writer “incalculable” just projects more gravitas than “really lots” (or the male-preferred version, “a shit-ton”)

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  71. Anon[254] • Disclaimer says:

    Many blacks are overweight if not outright obese, so advocating losing weight would be considered not only “fat shaming” but “racist”.

  72. Mactoul says:
    @Anon

    But what causes the excess calorie intake?
    Weight gain is the problem that some calories are going into storage rather than being burnt. What causes diversion of these calories into storage?

  73. Maybe this national emergency will revive Fen-phen. Apparently that stuff really worked. Sure a few weak-hearted folks keeled over but what really killed that drug was the media and trial lawyers. And now that we know that obesity is the #1 gateway for the commie cold shouldn’t we be thinking in terms of doing the least harm, while accepting some risk?

    So: revive Fen-phen but force users to sign a no-lawsuit waiver. Tell the trial lawyers to pound sand.

  74. Mactoul says:
    @Anonymous Jew

    Green vegetables are overrated. You can be fit and healthy with a diet of meat and butter alone, with some fruits for taste.

  75. @Chrisnonymous

    I’ve lost weight by eliminating sugar & starch foods I really like from the house, like orange juice, breakfast cereal, pizza etc. I don’t have the willpower to eat just a little of them, but if I never get started, then it’s much easier.

    • Agree: vhrm, LondonBob
    • Replies: @ganderson
    , @JimB
  76. anon[932] • Disclaimer says:
    @prosa123

    An older relative of mine, now deceased, was in her 50’s when the AIDS crisis hit in the 1980’s and was absolutely convinced that she was at grave risk. In reality, it would have been hard to imagine anyone who was at less risk – she was long divorced and AFAIK was not even seeing any men let alone sexually active, never used drugs, had never had a blood transfusion, and so on. It took quite a while for her adult children and other relatives to convince her that she wasn’t doomed.

    Thanks in part to Anthony Fauci….who today is still an expert. Just ask him.

    • Replies: @ganderson
  77. Anon[316] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve, so you “noticed” that obesity is associated with Covid deaths. Have you noticed that two in three people are overweight or obese, one in three are obese, and zero in three want to be overweight or obese. I don’t think Covid is going to be the thing that will be successful in getting people to lose weight.

    Congratulations: You lost some weight and are in your evangelical stage. You’ll be fat again before five years is up says the longitudinal National Weight Control Registry database. You got fat in later adulthood because body weight and height (the components of BMI) are both 0.8 heritable in adulthood, and heritability increases with age for body weight. I wouldn’t get too smug or self righteous just yet.

    • Replies: @ganderson
  78. Mr. Anon says:
    @AndrewR

    I personally knew four people who have died of it.

    What were their ages?

    Overnight she rapidly tanked, was on a vent by midnight and was dead by morning.

    That seemed to happen a lot. The vent was probably not what a lot of these patients needed. The assumptiong that they needed to be ventillated probably killed a lot of people.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  79. Mr. Anon says:
    @International Jew

    Just chalk it up to bad writing. Like the misuse of literally.

    Or the now fashionable “exponentially”.

  80. Mr. Anon says:

    Loosing weight is good for a variety of reasons. It reduces your chances of getting diabetes, cardio-vascular disease, liver disease, and joint problems. How many people now need knee surgery because they’re carrying around too much weight?

    I rather think the elites want what they consider to be the useless-eater hoi-polloi to be fat, lethargic, and to die early. And they want them confined to thier pads, isolated, neurotic, and anesthetized with food, booze, weed, and netflix.

    It’s all part of the “Great Reset”.

  81. BenKenobi says:
    @Daniel H

    While skinny broads are ideal, I do enjoy going for a roll in some dough. Plus, fatties are easier to manipulate which appeals to my inner sociopath.

  82. JimB says:

    If the media scared 50% of Americans into losing 10 pounds to reduce their risk from COVID, that would likely increase life expectancy for the whole country on average more than the virus reduces it.

    What’s the evidence covid-19 has increased the expected mortality rate in the US? It just seems to be coincidental to other comorbidities that do the actual killing.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  83. @JimB

    Surprisingly, the term morbidity doesn’t refer to death, it refers to ailment: So, comorbidity is “the simultaneous presence of two chronic diseases or conditions in a patient.”

    Hence probably well over 100 million Americans have high blood pressure.

  84. @AnotherDad

    This – and working out a bit especially outside – if possible in the sun – – like riding the bike. And open windows more often than usual when being inside with groups.

  85. @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks, Reg Caesar. So beautiful and – good-tempered.

  86. @Steve Sailer

    In special education “co-morbidity” is used a lot. For example, the rate of co-morbidity between Oppositional Defiance Disorder and learning disabilities is high.

    • Thanks: hhsiii
    • Replies: @Pericles
  87. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    My guess is the TV media (with a few exceptions, like Megan McCain) isn’t fat, so weight loss isn’t on their radar. Similarly, for Trump, he has good genes and good health so even if he’s carrying a few extra pounds, it’s not on the radar for him either.

    But it would have been worth trying some radical ideas to help Americans lose weight.

    And also to add more health-oriented restrictions on immigration, such as Ann Coulter’s “no fat girls” proposal (granted, that still leaves a lot of thin but probably not beneficial potential immigrants like Ilhan Omar).

  88. @Mr. Anon

    Yes! Every time I read “exponentially” I want to scream back, “What’s the exponent?”

    • Replies: @D. K.
    , @Mr. Anon
  89. Neoconned says:
    @Daniel H

    I like it when I’m fat shamed. Gives me a reason to be & stay active.

    Obesity and fat related health issues run on both sides of my family. I have more of a linebacker slash bar bouncer look to me though but i have dropped 50 odd pounds over the past year…..i look a bit like Tony Soprano…..well if he were Irish….

    Anyway i enjoy the very occasional cigar and a bimonthly 2 or 3 beers before bed routine but thats it. I want and need to get at or near 200 lbs again for health reasons alone but Im cursed with a slow metabolism.

    Hoping to be ripped by age 40.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  90. Neoconned says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    As somebody who’s worked in fast food and other restaurants for years I’ll say this….restaurants hire a LOTTA people…..your corner semi sized $3 million in annual sales McD’s has minimum 40 to 50 employees. Most gyms….perhaps 5? Or at least its that way in my area….restaurants also generate a lot of local sales taxes. In the south at least that means half or more of a city’s operations budget….

    But i do agree….it makes zero sense.

  91. Our economy runs on industrial seed oils. Cheap food + chronic disease = Trillions of dollars each year. Until that changes, the reporting can’t change. A lot of health issues are directly linked to their consumption. Why don’t we talk much about obesity, inflammation, and diabetes? If we did, we would be talking about “the loss” of trillions of dollars. Dollars always come first in the US.

    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
  92. Hhsiii says:

    NPR had a piece about a member of The Temptations dying of Covid. Not an original member. A guy who joined in 2006. One of his distinguishing features was being very large yet still able to do the synchronized dance moves.

  93. D. K. says:
    @International Jew

    “[T]he [E]xponent” is the student newspaper at Purdue University. You’re welcome!

  94. AndrewR says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Older, but still. COVID is both deadlier and more contagious than the flu. Acknowledging this doesn’t require approving of the often incompetent and/or tyrannical methods taken by governments to manage the pandemic.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  95. JayMan says: • Website

    The reasons are:

    1. It’s impossible on the timescale involved
    2. Probably wouldn’t work.

  96. Anonymous[125] • Disclaimer says:
    @SFG

    Losing weight is very easy, just stop freaking eating. Nobody who sits at a desk all day needs more than a couple of large meals each week.

  97. @Ben tillman

    LOL! Like that Biden-esque touch at the end…

  98. @Anon

    So why has the U.S. obesity rate risen so much over time? And why does obesity chiefly affect lower socioeconomic groups?

  99. Pericles says:
    @ScarletNumber

    Cheers for the health industry. Nowadays obesity, promiscuity, homosexuality and mutilating your sex organs is normal, while talking back to your hopeless single mom and dito teacher is a disorder.

    • LOL: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
  100. Are you seriously fat-shaming the dead? 😉

  101. “Wikipedia’s metric for inclusion is whether the victim had already had a Wikipedia page”

    Not true. I just checked two of them and they were both created after the person died.

  102. Travis says:
    @Anon

    genetics plays a part, but fails to explain why the obesity rate for American whites was 14% in 1980 and 36% today. Have the genetics of whites changed significantly since 1980 ?

    The prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents 2 to 19 years tripled between 1984-2004. Since this time there has been no significant change in prevalence. Why has childhood obesity increased from 4% to 12% since 1984 ?

    • Replies: @Polemos
  103. Travis says:
    @Anon

    Have obese white people been more fertile since 1980 ? The obesity rates for white Americans went from 14% to 36% from 1980-2015. Genetics cannot explain this rapid increase in obesity.

    • Replies: @Anonymousse
  104. @AndrewR

    You probably knew people who died with, not from CV.

    Personal anecdotes are not data.

  105. @Achmed E. Newman

    Good morning Mr. Newman,

    Dr. Mike Yeadon, a former Vice President and Chief Science Officer for Pfizer, says that half or even “almost all” of the tests for COVID are false positives.

    In an interview Dr. Yeadon was asked:

    “we are basing a government policy, an economic policy, a civil liberties policy, in terms of limiting people to six people in a meeting…all based on, what may well be, completely fake data on this coronavirus?”

    Dr. Yeadon answered with a simple “yes.”

    The survival rate of COVID-19 has been upgraded since May to 99.8% of infections. The present survival rate is far higher than initial grim guesses in March and April, cited by the evil Dr. Fauci, of 94%, or 20 to 30 times deadlier.

    PanicFest is predicated on fraud. The people who fabricated and perpetuated this fraud should be held accountable hanged by the neck until dead. The damage they have caused is so enormous that restitution is simply not an option.

    The CDC admits that only 6% of CoronaDeaths! were from the covid alone. With the testing as fraudulent as it is even these numbers are likely exaggerated.

    https://hubpages.com/politics/Pfizer-Chief-Science-Officer-Second-Wave-Based-on-Fake-Data-of-False-Positives-for-New-Cases-Pandemic-is-Over

    https://theintercept.com/2020/03/17/coronavirus-air-pollution/

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  106. Glad to know “NO FAT CHICKS” hats from truck stop now counts as raising awareness for a life saving public health cause.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  107. @Travis

    Wait till the we see the eventual result of a generation of kids who have been sedentary zombies in front of ipads and phones since they were toddlers…

    Giving any child unlimited access to a touch screen device should be considered a prosecutable form of child abuse

  108. @epebble

    Yes, your basic point is that it’s easier to halt the economy and quarantine the world than it is for the American fatties to drop weight.
    In fact, people around me have gained weight in the last 6 months.

    • Replies: @Charles St. Charles
  109. @Dan Hess

    “Why the CDC did not recommend them from day one is beyond me.”

    The CDC, Centers for Disease Control, has not lived up to it’s clearly stated purpose. In fact, I’ve never heard of anybody’s life being saved by following their official advice. The entire leadership, down two managerial levels at least, should be fired and replaced by actual scientists and medical doctors who are not in the pockets of the drug cartels.

    • Replies: @Polemos
  110. Hootsman says:
    @Mark Roulo

    any adult who needs someone to tell them not to be fat shouldn’t be alive in the first place

  111. Dan Hess says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    I am not arguing against vitamins C, D, Zinc and sleep. All are great.

    With humidity, even seemingly high relative-humidity outdoor air may have little moisture content. The key variable is indoor humidity, since people spend almost all of their time indoors. Alternatively, one may regard the key variable as absolute humidity (the amount of moisture in the air), which is the same concept.

    Stockholm in the winter averages 30 F / -1 C and 75% outdoor humidity. What happens when this air is heated to 72 F / 22 C ?

    https://www.lenntech.com/calculators/humidity/relative-humidity.htm

    That seemingly very humid air will actually be very dry at 18% humidity when warmed to room temperature.

    Similarly at 50% humidity at 32 F will have only 13% relative humidity at room temperature.

    The low absolute humidity in the temperate zone in winter makes people much more susceptible to respiratory infections and increases the severity of existing respiratory infections.

    No place with high absolute humidity (warm + humid) has had anything approaching the death rates of the temperate zone in winter (1%-2.5% in warm/humid places versus 7-9% in cases like NY, Mass, Connecticut and Michigan in winter). And the remedy, humidification is so simple, and yet so little discussed.

    I suspect that the medical establishment may not want to talk about indoor humidity because most hospitals are not equipped to provide adequate humidity in winter, and the liability if they can’t provide basic care would be great. But that’s a terrible reason not to talk about it.

  112. JimB says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Agreed, but my point is that the covid-19 death signal in US mortality data is a 2 sigma effect at best and that there a whole lot of better health reasons to lose weight. And in the time it takes an obese person to lose 20 pounds, covid-19 mutated into something no more serious than a mild flu.

  113. @Dave Pinsen

    Two things to lose weight, and you don’t have to change anything else:

    1. No more eating out, even for coffee
    2. A walk after dinner. Start with 1 mile and work up to what you have time for.

    Honestly, just try it for a month and see if you don’t drop 5 pounds. Everything else in your routine can stay exactly the same.

  114. @MrVoid

    Your dog has the same problem that most people have: breeding for domesticity, and premature removal from nurture. No sane healthy animal will eat itself to death; ‘benevolent’ humans had to progressively remove dogs’ ability to acquire healthy habits by overriding their survival instincts in order to more dependably socialize and exploit them.

    In the same way, benevolent humans had to make other benevolent humans more benevolent by eroding their natural instincts and acquired wisdom… until the average human became as useless, unstable and habitually dependent as the average pet dog. Not as loveable, though.

  115. @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    You are an idiot who has demonstrated an inability to listen to reason, but maybe readers who are on the fence will read my comment.. Total natural cause death statistics show like a 5-sigma spike this year. It takes caveman-level superstition to think there is some secret cause other than COVID.

  116. @Steve Sailer

    Okay, so “comorbidity” might better be understood as something like correlation. Anyway, according to the CDC, https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/covid_weekly/index.htm?fbclid=IwAR3-wrg3tTKK5-9tOHPGAHWFVO3DfslkJ0KsDEPQpWmPbKtp6EsoVV2Qs1Q#Comorbidities, obesity correlated with “COVID deaths” at a rate of only about 3.7 percent (6863 out of 186,101 as of September 19, 2020).

    It shoots up, however, among 25-34 year-olds to about 23%, with those younger and up to five years older not far behind (about 22% and 20%, respectively). Among those 85 and older, however, it falls to a negligible 0.43%.

    BTW, this is the same source that indicates comorbidities in 94% of “COVID deaths” with an average of 2.6 per person! It also shows that about 80% were over 65 and only about 8% were below 55.

  117. @stillCARealist

    Yes, your basic point is that it’s easier to halt the economy and quarantine the world than it is for the American fatties to drop weight.

    Obviously true from recent example.

  118. Mr. Anon says:
    @International Jew

    What’s the exponent, Kenneth?!!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  119. Mr. Anon says:
    @AndrewR

    Older, but still. COVID is both deadlier and more contagious than the flu. Acknowledging this doesn’t require approving of the often incompetent and/or tyrannical methods taken by governments to manage the pandemic.

    As to it’s contagiousness, I don’t know. The way to assess that would be the infection numbers, but those numbers don’t seem too good, given the reliability of the tests and the testing regime. It seems to be more deadly than seasonal flu. I don’t think it has been established that it is more deadly than previous pandemic influenza outbreaks.

    The one thing that does seem to be certain is that the methods taken by (most) governments have been incompetent and/or tyrannical, as you say.

  120. ganderson says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I, too have to keep it out of the house. If I do, I lose weight!

  121. @Neoconned

    I like it when I’m fat shamed. Gives me a reason to be & stay active.

    Or you could have some self esteem and not worry about it.

  122. ganderson says:
    @anon

    Fauci said we were all gonna die of AIDS by 1990. I don’t recall doing so. I think I would have remembered.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  123. ganderson says:
    @Anon

    Not to suck up to our host, but I’m not seeing the smugness and/or self righteousness.

  124. @MrVoid

    “It seems as though the establishment is trying to cast Covid as an equal opportunity killer.”

    Just as they did with AIDS.

    I don’t want to put links in this reply, because it will probably fall into the moderation abyss, but for an example look for the Life Magazine cover from July 1985 that said “Now No One Is Safe From AIDS.”

    There’s also the Newsweek cover from Aug. 1992, “Teens and AIDS.” That same week, Time reported we were “Losing the Battle” on its cover, so I guess these two mags coordinated the hype.

    But my FAVORITE of the stories that (falsely) claimed we’re all at risk of AIDS came from People Magazine on July 30, 1990. The headline read: “Her date came with champagne, roses…and AIDS.”

    When I told someone about that headline recently, they laughed and asked “Is that real? This sounds like your idea of comedy.” It was real. Look it up.

    • Replies: @Stagger Lee
    , @Art Deco
  125. Tim Smith says:
    @Anonymous Jew

    Look at various Amerindians and Austroloids.

    You can look at White Americans in high school and college yearbooks from the early 1980s and before and compare them to today and see the same changes. They really started pushing the seed oils (marketed as vegetable oils) including margarine in the 1970s as being a healthier alternative to animal fats and dairy. Couple that with the change in sweetener from sugar to HFCS (high-fructose corn syrup) and you see the results we have today. The seed oils and HFCS are basically what we mean when we talk about how bad the “western diet” is.

    Also, I did low carb diet myself and got down 30 pounds. Once I got used to not eating junk food (seed oils and HFCS) it was pretty easy to stay away from those things once I became a bit less strict about carbs and I was still able to maintain my lower weight.

  126. @Chrisnonymous

    Most of history people survived primarily on rice, bread, noodles… carbs. They were not fat.

    The idea that carbohydrates are to blame for obesity is so absurd that it’s a wonder people can even get it out with a straight face. We like these food innately because your body and your history (correctly) identifies them as highly efficient ways to consume calories needed for human activity. BLM tier level of agency to blame these foods for poor health.

    Sitting around all day and eating inappropriate quantities is the problem. People think walking around the block or trudging on a elliptical half an hour a couple times a week constitutes an intensity of exercise appropriate for an able bodied adult. If that’s all the activity you’re capable of and you’re under 65 you’re essentially handicapped and a partial human. A civilized society would view that as the embodied equivalent of being illiterate.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
  127. JimB says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I’ve lost weight by eliminating sugar & starch foods I really like from the house, like orange juice, breakfast cereal, pizza etc.

    Something which is hard to do when you still have kids in the house. You can’t put everybody on a diet of baked chicken, steel cut oats, raisins, asparagus, lettuce, and omelettes.

  128. @John Milton’s Ghost

    I was somewhat surprised to find recently that the “fat positive” thing was already around back in the 70s (not too surprised since there’s actually very little going on today that wasn’t metastasizing in that strange decade). I learned this after seeing a 60 Minutes segment from 1978 on YouTube (I think it may be taken down now) about ‘Fat Pride’, the new trend of fat people refusing to be publicly shamed for their weight.

  129. Asking people to exercise some personal responsibility by losing weight doesn’t have the same frisson of authoritarianism that arresting people for not wearing face diapers does.

    • LOL: MrVoid
  130. @AnotherDad

    I track the excess death and CV19 for Wales, population 3m.

    1612 people died of CV19. Definitely OF not WITH. Doctors were allowed to make their own assessment of cause of death. There is clear evidence, below, that WITH CV19 accelerated some deaths by 6 weeks.

    Since the peak of the Farr Curve, (known since 1840, no models needed), the number of non CV19 deaths has been below normal. About 1000 people fewer than usual have died on my estimate.

    So 1600 CV deaths less 1000 short on deaths. Net CV deaths 600 out of 3 million.

    Welsh GDP about 73 Bn GDP with an estimated loss of 10% for CV19. ie £7.3Bn. Taking the 1,600, we could have spend £45m on protecting each patient/case group and still come out even. If we spent nothing, the 600 net extra deaths were less than the about 800 extra deaths from the 2018 flu.

    The original 3 week lockdown was justified to match the peak with hospital capacity. Once it became clear that the NHS was far from overwhelmed, lockdown could and should have ended.

    Grump, grump, grump

  131. @Anon

    2. Obesity is caused by excess calorie intake. Controlling for calorie intake, the macronutrient content of a diet doesn’t matter for weight loss. The carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis is false.

    Nope – and obviously wrong on all 3 counts.

    First, it is literally impossible to define “excess calorie intake” when basal metabolism changes depending on macronutrient composition of isocaloric diets. Obesity is caused by conversion of excess calories into bodyfat – and different macros (and different types of each class of macro) are converted to bodyfat by very different mechanisms.

    We know, for example, that metabolism of different versions of the same macronutrients happens along different pathways.

    Not all carbs are equal; not all fats are equal – in both classes, isocaloric is not the same as isometabolic. ‘Excess’ consumption of X kCal’s worth of different variants of a class of macronutrient will not generate the same number of calories stored as fat.

    Examples: fructose vs glucose metabolism. Excess fructose is preferentially shunted to triglyceride production and thence to fat storage – with very nearly 90% of all excess calories stored as fat. For glucose, there is nowhere near the same conversion rate (only ~20% of ‘excess’ glucose winds up in fat). So ‘carbs’ are easier to store as fat – but there is a hierarchy of badness among carbs.

    Same for different fats – all 9kCal/g, but all processed differently: they all end in the ETC (electron transport chain) that drives Complex V ATP synthase (the little ‘turbine’ in mitochondria that produce ATP – a fascinating little beastie), but they furnish different inputs to that process.

    Different types of fatty acid generate a different number of FADH2, NADH and Acetyl-CoA when subjected to Beta-oxidation. Acetyl-CoA is then converted to additional FADH2 and NADH via the Krebs cycle.

    What this means is that different fatty acids eventually generate different final outputs of FADH2 and NADH (F and N hereafter) and have different F/N ratios (0.48 for palmitic acid; 0.46 for oleic acid;0.45 for palmitoleic acid; 0.43 for linoleic acid).

    An F/N ratio below 0.46 does not drive reverse electron transport (RET) – glucose is the same. RET is a localised version of ‘insulin resistance’ – which at the cell level is a good thing: it eventually shuts off transport to fat cells.

    The upshot is that linoleic acid (the major fatty acid in seed oils) behaves like a supercharged (9kCal/gram) carbohydrate: all of the excess is stored in fat, because it doesn’t’ generate RET.

    By contrast, palmitic and oleic acids are ‘wasted’ by generating RET and causing production of H202 (which is not a bad thing).

    So it is literally preposterous to assert that ‘excess calories’ is a more important determinant of fat storage, than is dietary composition. Consumption ad libitum of saturated fat and low-insulin-producing carbohydrate is associated with a higher basal metabolism: so much so that body composition tends to look after itself. If insulin doesn’t spike, it’s hard to switch on fat storage; if insulin does spike, it’s hard to switch on fat burning. These are known knowns, nowadays.

    The shit hits the metabolic fan when all carbs (or fats) are treated as metabolically equal. They’re absolutely not – to the extent that people who are interested in this stuff think that sugars (and other high-GL carbs) should be considered as a separate ‘macronutrient’ to other carbohydrate, and that high-linoleic-acid fats should be considered as a different class to other fats.

    That Sugar Film” does a good anecdotal portrayal of an isocaloric (2300kCal/day) diet where the macronutrient composition was ’tilted’ towards US levels of sugar (40 tsp/day from all sources).

    The guy gained 8.5kg in two months, developed NAFLD in less than a month, added 4 inches to his waist… and lost it when he removed the sugar.

    All on 2300kCal/day – with the added twist’ that he only consumed foods labelled ‘low fat’ (or otherwise marketed as ‘healthy’.

    If the insulin-resistance model of metabolic syndrome was wrong, it would poorly explain the rise in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, and it would perform poorly in efforts to remediate it.

    However it explains it extremely well, and it performs well at remediation.

    The problem is that the Doctors’ Union has been all-in on anti-fat/pro-carb since Ancel Keys – and the medical ‘profession’ is status obsessed and refuses to admit it’s wrong – ever, about anything.

    So the usual approach is that it ‘walks back’ its known-incorrect advice over periods of decades, and tens of thousands of people die while the system converges on something that is obvious to the unconflicted (Yudkin knew that sugar was a culprit even as Keys was conducting his shoddy, corrupt research).

    Take the lipid hypothesis: It became very clear by the 80s that “Dietary saturated fat → CVD” was wrong.

    It wasn’t abandoned and replaced with “saturated fat is a metabolic positive”. That might have caused some peak ‘health’ bureaucracy some embarrassment, so it was definitely not going to happen.

    Instead, they obfuscated along the same leg (in terms of macronutrients being blamed): the ‘satfat is bad’ nonsense was replaced with “Dietary cholesterol → CVD“; then “Dietary LDL cholesterol → CVD“; then “small-particle LDL cholesterol → CVD: every adult make over 50 needs a statin“.

    And yet for 20 of the last 50 years, it has been pretty well-understood that cholesterol is a symptom of arterial damage, but not a cause. LDL is present at areas of damage to arterial walls, in the same way that firemen are present at house fires. (Likewise: high blood pressure is a symptom, and very likely not a cause).

    This is irrelevant to pill-pushing symptom-treaters: if a pill makes a symptom go away, it’s a resounding success (even if it only doe so to the same extent as placebo). It means that dealing with an asymptomatic patient with a systolic BP of 200 takes the quack 15 minutes: write a prescription for a medication that forces the pressure down – that’s much easier (and more profitable) than spending 90 minutes trying to identify whether or not it’s a symptom of anything (and if so, of what).

    /rant

    • Thanks: JMcG
  132. @Pericles

    I would wager the back-talkers are the same ones who have issues with promiscuity, obesity, gender confusion, etc. Impulsive personalities.

  133. @Days of Broken Arrows

    Good point

    The only people who are risk of dying from this Coronavirus are the obese and the elderly.

  134. @We don’t need industrial seed oils

    I don’t think it’s just the seed oils. Our portion sizes are too big, and we don’t move enough. I lost almost 8 pounds in a little over a week after being in Ireland/Wales 2 summers ago. Their portion sizes were smaller than ours but probably bigger than the rest of Europe’s. Also, there was little salt in the food, to the extent where everything tasted super salty when I returned home. And- American food is obviously pretty good in comparison to theirs. I doubt it was as good or that there was as much variety in our food during the 50s-80s, so there’s one overlooked factor that plays into obesity levels. I’m on the upper end of normal with a BMI of 24ish. I’m very active and my eating is pretty restrained (I don’t really diet beyond avoiding junk food, but I do portion control). I could probably get a bit thinner if I avoided alcohol, but not much, because my relatives on the side of the family I take after were heavyset (though not necessarily obese) in pictures even before America became fat.

  135. Art Deco says:
    @Days of Broken Arrows

    Dimwitted journalists are not the public health establishment (to be sure, the public health establishment has beclowned themselves of late). They’re peddling social hypochondria (“growing problem”) when they’re not peddling disaster porn. Screw ’em.

  136. @Mr. Anon

    A little background might be in order for those young uns, who are not on the same frequency:

    Peak Stupidity supplies this in our post What’s the Frequency, Kenneth?! CAUTION: A beating about the head and body of news anchorman Dan Rather is described. No video is included, unfortunately. Here ya’ go:

    Anyhoo, while walking around Manhattan, NYC on or about (sounds professional, right?) Oct. 4th of 1986, Mr. Rather was assaulted by a crazyman who, while punching him nicely about the head and body, kept shouting “Kenneth, what’s the frequency!” Besides the funny part about the well-deserved beating up of this Lyin’ Press piece-of-work, that line cracks me up. Nobody knew who the guy was till a decade later when a guy named William Tager was jailed for murder of a stagehand of the Today Show on a different network, NBC. Rather identified the guy as his assailant from a decade past.

    What’s the Frequency, Kenneth!? Hahaa, it never gets old. Mr. Rather would end his 1/2 hour TV broadcast with “Courage” for a short period just after the time of his beat-down. It sounded pretty damn nutty, but I guess it WAS kind of courageous of him to not give out the frequency.

    What DID this Mr. Tager mean about the frequency? Apparently he was under the impression that he was having signals beamed directly into his head. He needed to know the frequency to jam it, I suppose, and I guess he mistook Dan Rather for this “Kenneth”, an honest mistake. Though I appreciate the unsuccessful effort by Mr. Tager in trying to put the kibosh on the Lyin Press early in the game, I could have saved him some effort: Yes, you ARE getting signals beamed into your brain, and this particular frequency is Channel 10, least where I live.

    Now, for the REM song. I had no idea what Michael Stipe was even singing about until years later. It doesn’t matter – they had a great sound:

  137. @Anon

    On point (1), did nobody yet point out the following, in 138 comments?:

    Go watch a 1970s movie or get on youtube and watch news or other clips from the time. Where were the obese people then? Who are the ancestors of the many obese people now? Were the Lutheran churches sponsoring the very whitest, blackest, and hispanic-looking people from the Pacific Islands along with Eskimos in large numbers behind our backs. (If Ann Corcoran didn’t write about it, this didn’t happen.)

    How can it be highly genetic if there were very few obese people 50, and even 35 years back?

    • Replies: @Wielgus
    , @Anon
  138. @Open The Gyms, (Slur Redacted)

    I had to write back, due to your handle. Thank you! I had a woman, with a mask on, running on a treadmill 12′ away from me tell me I needed to wear a mask, as I started to work out on the recumbent bike machine. It got kinda heated. The story is here, in Scenes from the Kung Flu Summer re-Panic – Part 11.

  139. Wielgus says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    People in lockdowns probably tend to gain weight, not lose it. For example my habit of going for long walks, often up hills, quite effective for burning off calories, was curtailed. I gained two kilos during the seven or so weeks of the Greek lockdown in the spring.

  140. Wielgus says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    In the 1986 film Platoon, Gardner’s fatness is alluded to, but by today’s standards he looks almost normal weight. People were probably thinner in the Vietnam War, when the film is set.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  141. @Wielgus

    I wouldn’t say “probably” Wielgus. DEFINITELY.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
  142. Polemos says:
    @Travis

    The prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents 2 to 19 years tripled between 1984-2004. Since this time there has been no significant change in prevalence. Why has childhood obesity increased from 4% to 12% since 1984 ?

    In 1986, the Nintendo Entertainment System was released in North America. Ten years later, you have AOL and Prodigy, for examples, offering some basics of Internet web-surfing at home. By 2006, the grown kids long since hooked on gaming and surfing the web were having their own kids and playing with them, showing them Homestar Runner or the earliest cat videos of YouTube.

    Maybe this is part of it?

  143. Polemos says:
    @Joseph Doaks

    Rather than accept the title refers to the control of disease, embrace that it really means control by disease. The Center uses disease to control the population, and so lives up to a covert, unstated purpose.

    /speculation

  144. Anon[314] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I responded to this above, but since a lot of commenters seem similarly confused I’ll respond again.

    Genes don’t just mechanically produce specific physical traits regardless of circumstances. They’re expressed differently in different environments. As I pointed out above, a suboptimal physical (mostly nutritional) environment in childhood will prevent people from growing as tall as their genes would allow them to grow. When the environment changes, gene expression can change with it. As with the Korean women whose average height is 8″ taller than it was a century ago.

    Steve has pointed out that low sub-Saharan African IQ numbers are partially explained by inadequate iodine. Regardless of what their genetic IQ ceiling might be, many sub-Saharan African kids aren’t able to reach it.

    Americans with a genetic propensity for obesity now live in an environment that allows that propensity to be expressed much more than it was in the past.

    If you disagree, explain this to me:

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  145. Blacks are fatter than whites so pointing that out is by definition RAAAAACIST.

    QED.

  146. @Mr. Anon

    Right! Another that’s currently trendy is “orders of magnitude,” which certainly sounds weightier than “add a bunch of zeroes or something”

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  147. throtler says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Whoppi Goldberg, on the same show as Mccain, is a real blimp.

  148. Mr. Anon says:
    @Known Fact

    The term “orders of magnitude” at least has a real meaning, if used properly. “Exponentially”, as it is used colloquially, is meaningless.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  149. Wielgus says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I was born in the early sixties, so tend to be cautious about statements I make about the decade. I do remember articles in the 1970s warning about obesity (I started reading newspapers regularly when I was eleven or so). But my recollections are people then were not as chunky as now, and fast food was only starting to be a thing.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  150. @Anon

    There’s no confusion on our part. I understand gene expression. What you are saying is that its the environment that’s changed. That means the amount of exercise people do (or can do based on lifestyle) and what they eat (or what foods are more widely available).

    That’s the freaking point. Nobody said that our bodies COULDN’T get obese.

    The people that tend to get or stay obese due to their genetics can not do that if they eat differently and exercise.

    • Replies: @Anon
  151. @Wielgus

    Wielgus, I don’t have that good a long-term memory about some things, but for some reason I can remember lots of things that change slowly and smoothly when others don’t notice.

    I can picture myself in the 1980s in all kinds of places and times. There is no way there were NEARLY as many obese people as in, say 2005. (I can remember a good bit of the 1970s too, BTW, just for reference regarding this subject.). However, that’s why I mentioned movies and old clips from TV. Granted, in the movies, they at least used to, till recently, get good-looking people. However, people in the background weren’t selected for anything special. Then there are the news clips.

    It is amazing, Wielgus. 90% of the people who be called fatties (not to their faces unless assholes or good friends while drinking) back in 1985 would be considered in pretty good shape today. As people on this thread noted, look at the Army today, than look at old news videos from the Vietnam War.

  152. @Anonymousse

    It’s a little more complicated than that. Several hundred years ago it was difficult for most people to get sufficient calories regardless, and cereal grains were far different compared to today. Refined flour and sugar were less widely available before the industrial revolution. So yes, if you’re so poor that you can only afford 1700 calories of unsweetened whole wheat bread per day you’ll probably be skinny. And the average White male will stand 5 foot 2 and have a a myriad of health problems before dying toothless at age 44.

    Regarding activity level, most hunter-gatherers are not as active as most people think from studies I’ve come across. It’s human nature to be as lazy as possible. In addition, hunter-gatherers are healthier in other ways. Because they eat tough, chewy food their jaws develop naturally with straight teeth. Also no cavities caused by cereal grains. No high-heeled shoes with arch support to constrain the natural development of the foot etc etc. They’re even fairly long-lived when you exclude childhood mortality and homicide.

    I was a marathon runner and cyclist for over a decade. If you do extreme exercise you can eat crap and stay below 15% body fat. Especially when you’re young. (I assume the many studies failing to find a connection between exercise and weight loss only include moderate “normal” exercise – which never helps me lose weight either). But a diet closer to what’s more – biologically speaking – natural for humans will make it far easier to stay skinny in addition to providing other health benefits.

    In sum, you can stay skinny eating bread if you can’t afford too much of it or are training for your next marathon or just got lucky in the genetic lottery. But for most 40-somethings like me it’s just easier to have a big steak salad for dinner.

  153. Anon[314] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The people that tend to get or stay obese due to their genetics can not do that if they eat differently and exercise.

    No, what the data shows is that they basically can’t not do that. More specifically, they can’t in the long term. In the shorter term they can, and the experience of this shorter term effect is what makes the data counterintuitive.

    Body fatness is regulated by the brain at the subconscious level. The subconscious brain drives fat accumulation by generating motivation to eat.

    This subconscious system can be overridden by the conscious mind, but only partially and temporarily. The vast majority of people find it extraordinarily difficult to permanently resist the urges that their subconscious mind generates, which is why there is very little statistical evidence for the effectiveness of any weight loss intervention. From an empirical perspective, “eat less and exercise more” does not work, because people will not comply with it permanently.

    There are other systems that are regulated subconsciously with temporary conscious overrides: breathing is an example. You can breath less [eat less], temporarily, and thus reduce your blood oxygen level [weight], temporarily. But eventually the urge to breath [eat] will become too strong, and you’ll gasp for air [eat]. Your subconscious mind will take over again and you’ll breath more rapidly [eat more] for a bit until your oxygen level [weight] gets back to where your brain wants it to be.

    The adoption and twin study data on obesity would not make sense if people had as much control as you say they have.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  154. @Anon

    What’s the difference between now and 1985? It’ s not genetics. That’s all I’m saying.

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