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Why Putin Keeps Winning Elections
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From Anatoly Karlin:

Of course, who knows how reliable Russian and especially Soviet crime statistics are.

But it’s interesting that there had been a big ramp up in the murder rate during the Gorky Park era c. 1980.

 
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  1. Russia is a country in search of both warm weather ports and Caesar.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    , @Not Raul
  2. It’s very simple and has nothing to do with murder rates – he’s very good at “fortifying” the elections.
    The dynamics of murder in Russia are also different than the typical American hoodrat drive bys or Cleetus offing someone dumping trash in his dumpster, it is in fact extremely safe anywhere where there’s is no Caucasian element present.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @AnotherDad
    , @Mike Tre
    , @mc23
  3. At least the pre-collapse Soviet Union had good music. What does America have now? Travis Scott?

    This Soviet band from the 1980’s did have to bring in a Chicago cop to play keyboard, but otherwise an impressive Soviet cultural output.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @Cato
  4. Kronos says:

    But it’s interesting that there had been a big ramp up in the murder rate during the Gorky Park era c. 1980.

    In the late 1970s, the CIA started a special covert program intended to destabilize communist regimes with jeans. The jeans were supposed to induce greedy capitalistic bloodshed amongst men and women alike.

  5. Kronos says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Out of curiosity, does anyone know if there was a mass exodus of Soviet scientists akin to “Project Paperclip” with the fall of the Soviet Union?

  6. Anonymous[185] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve, any thoughts on the Mike Goguen case? Strange character – he sounds like he was some sort of intel asset that’s now getting burned.

  7. Steve Sailer:

    “Why Putin Keeps Winning Elections”

    Because his political opponents mysteriously die from Polonium poisoning?

  8. Anon[453] • Disclaimer says:
    @Professional Slav

    It’s very simple and has nothing to do with murder rates – he’s very good at “fortifying” the elections.

    There are a lot of Russian YouTubers these days, who let you know their opinions, pro government or anti. And there are a lot of YouTube channels that feature man on the streets interviews and surveys.

    From watching these it’s clear to me that, along with pro gay rights and anti corruption Russians there are many, young and old, both sexes, who like Putin because he keeps a lid on things, and who are not favorably disposed towards the U.S., including fluent English speakers with the ability to read the foreign press.

    Maybe the elections are fortified, but I’d wager not by much.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer, J.Ross
    • Replies: @BB753
    , @Professional Slav
  9. @Kronos

    I’ve met a Ukrainian defense consultant who owned about 6 acres in the Hollywood Hills.

  10. Zoos says:

    Speaking of upcoming elections, I think we’d do well to keep an eye peeled for Donald Trump Jr.

    I’ve been watching his progress since before Trump Sr was elected, and he has not remained static. He’s been constantly improving as an influencer and speech-giver. Not a lot of media folk have acknowledged or even noticed the import of this, but it’s a fact.

    Politically, he could wind up being Donald Trump Sr on steroids, with much less baggage.

    He’s gotten good at what he does…

  11. BB753 says:
    @Anon

    Unlike the US, where elections are never fortified, not in living memory anyway. Look, democracy is a scam and elections are fraudulent all over the world.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  12. I was expecting a large uptick in the Soviet stats for the latter half of the 1930s, but I suppose this graph employs a legalistic definition of homicide.

  13. Altai says:

    During the 90s Russian ran an economic policy devised by Larry Summers and co (It still amazes me that he was cancelled for his awkward nerd talk about men probably being more interested in mathematics than women rather than overseeing policies that led to one of the greatest mass suicides in history), it led to mass concentration of wealth and deeply antisocial outcomes for the mass of the Russian citizenry. It was intended to, of course, though I’m sure some of them were true believer autistic libertarians who assumed the ideology wasn’t all about hating poor people, it was and the damage to coherent industrial and state power was intentional, it was designed to leave Russia weak without coherent national power.

    When Putin came to power he sided with the less anti-national anti-social oligarchs (Or at least the ones whose total power by siding with him was less damaging than that of the old guard) against the others and came to bring some kind of stability and some kind of coherent state power and national agenda to government, many of the old guard fled Russia with their ill-gotten gains. For this he is seen as Hitler. (Needless to say there is also an ethnic divide between the post-90s oligarchs and the people of the land too)

    In this sense Putin really is the indispensable man. He was able to capture and deploy power to some national interest in Russia. If and when he goes, it’ll be dangerous for Russia. True democracy (Russia is technically a democracy now but the other parties can kept down) would likely result in the countries new politicians being exceptionally corrupt or unable to stand up to international capital in pillaging the country again. It is not a high trust society. (It can’t seem to do that job in any high trust Western country for long except maybe Denmark)

    And Putin has stablised things but he hasn’t solved Russia’s malaise, Russia is still in bad economic territory and the youth still often have little hope.

  14. glib says:

    Strictly speaking he did not win the last one, but what the hell.

  15. @Altai

    And Putin has stablised things but he hasn’t solved Russia’s malaise, Russia is still in bad economic territory and the youth still often have little hope.

    All White countries suffer the same malaise. The difference is in degree. TFR is below replacement level. Most have high levels of non-white immigration. Nearly all have high levels of Government debt and large, sometimes very large, trade deficits.
    Russia is actually the White country with the best prospects. Non-white immigration is noticeably less than in the vast majority of such states. Government debt is only 17% of GDP and it has a large trade surplus and has had for many years. Add to which, US and EU economic sanctions have resulted in import substitution and the rapid development of whole sectors(eg pharmaceuticals )

    So your statement that Russia is in bad economic territory is downright wrong. The United States, by contrast, is in very bad economic territory indeed. Government debt is \$29 trillion. Trade deficits are routinely \$500 bn a year. The only thing keeping America afloat is its status as the World’s Reserve Currency. When the economic collapse occurs later this decade, political and social collapse will follow.
    It is debateable if America will survive this debacle. Regardless, if Russian “youth still often have little hope,” then American youth have no hope at all.

    • Replies: @Alt Right Moderate
  16. D. K. says:

    “But it’s interesting that there had been a big ramp up in the murder rate during the Gorky Park era c. 1980.”

    Which graph are you looking at, Steve?!? I see “a big ramp up” from c. 1965-1975!?! The surprising thing is that the murder rate exploded upwards several years before the Soviet Union imploded!?!?!

    Notice, too, how the murder rate plunged in the United States in the mid-1930s– right after Prohibition ended, in December 1933!

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Almost Missouri
  17. At least Putin talks up his love for the Russian culture and people and Mother Russia itself. Western leaders prattle on about their values and who they are and why they could be better if the would do embrace a DIE culture.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  18. @Zoos

    Better Prez than father. Less cuckish, more based wrt race, closed to AR grassroots. No platinum plan BS.

  19. Art Deco says:

    There have been all sorts of quality of life improvements in Russia over the last 22 years. If they weren’t a direct result of public policy, at least the Russian state did not prevent the natural healing of Russian society. There’s room for improvement, but the patient is in much better condition. Per capita product (in real terms and as a ratio of American per capita product), public safety, fertility, life expectancy, employment levels, timely payment of wages, public and foreign debt, and the development of sectors outside extractive industries are all much improved. And if you assess the period from 1789 to the present, you can argue that it was only during the periods running from 1905 to 1917 and 1988 to 2004 that there was more political tolerance than there is today.

    • Replies: @glib
    , @Arclight
  20. @Anonymous

    Interesting to note that he is from Whitefish, Montana.

    I always wondered who was propping up Richard Spencer, the effeminate “white nationalist leader” who never seems to get deplatformed.

    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
  21. glib says:
    @Art Deco

    that it was only during the periods running from 1905 to 1917 and 1988 to 2004 that there was more political tolerance than there is today.

    Although seldom has the political landscape of Russia changed so fast as it has been changing since, say, September. And standards of living have been, for most, declining since 2017.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  22. Arclight says:
    @Art Deco

    This seems to be my impression as well. Although there are obviously some things going on with the elections, corruption and so on, at the end of the day he appears (to me, an outsider) as someone who is unabashedly proud of Russia, its people, history and culture and is working for their preservation and improvement.

    In contrast, in the US we have plenty of corruption ourselves and a leadership class that is definitely not proud of the country or its people and actively wants to change the people and culture rather than preserve them.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  23. @Anonymous

    Remember Michael Goguen didn’t kill himself?

    • Agree: Not Raul
  24. Ian Smith says:

    I spent some time in Russia at the end of the 2000s. When I’d ask people there if they felt unfree under Putin, they’d look at me like I’d just sprouted a second head.

  25. J.Ross says:
    @BB753

    Conversation with a Czech anon earlier today:
    Cz: What do you do to prove you can vote?
    Am: In my hamlet I have to show a driver’s license, but in big cities you don’t, and calling for this to be required is considered racist. You assert that you are Mr X and they cross that name off a list.
    Cz: How do you know the same Mexican isn’t voting fifty times, claiming to be people who have not arrived yet?
    Am: There’s no criterion, no process, no mechanism, no way of knowing that. It is an unproven certainty that this is happening in certain places.
    Cz: Why don’t you change this?
    Am: They say it isn’t happening and that we must positively prove it to be happening.
    Cz: But if there’s no process then how can anyone positively prove anything?
    Am: This past presidential election a lot of people have checked their vote and found it was changed. When they asked about it they were told that nothing could be done and — not directly told but essentially — that they were stupid and didn’t know who they voted for.

    • Thanks: BB753
    • Replies: @BB753
  26. J.Ross says:

    The funniest thing about Western criticism of Putin is that our pedophile leadership are guilty of every single thing they accuse him of (and usually worse) but completely unable to imitate any of the things which make him a true leader.

  27. J.Ross says:
    @D. K.

    Murder shot up as everything fell apart and people became demoralized. See “Cargo 200.”

  28. @Altai

    And Putin has stablised things but he hasn’t solved Russia’s malaise, Russia is still in bad economic territory and the youth still often have little hope.

    As opposed, to say, a white boy growing up in America in 2021??

  29. Why Putin Keeps Winning Elections

    Russians watch what’s going on in the US?

  30. @Zoos

    So mean, especially since Ted Kennedy recently celebrated his 12th year of sobriety.

    Why did Ted’s boat have a glass bottom?
    So he could see all of his old girlfriends.

    What was Ted’s reply to Mary Jo when she told him she might be pregnant?
    We’ll won’t cross that bridge when we get to it.

  31. Squid says:
    @Zoos

    We all need to ignore tweets, then they will go away. Shriver’s example above demonstrates why. First, it’s slovenly–the guy WAS charged, AND indicted, and TRIED on the charge(s). But he wasn’t found guilty. Now, supposedly he’s innocent until tried and found guilty, but apparently not in Shriver’s mind. But it’s all good. Tweets are for emoting, not thinking, which is reason enough to ignore them.

    Second, what is this business about having no soothing explanation of the hurtful news for her heart-broken son? Wiki says her youngest child is twenty-four. Is he some kind of mental/emotional cripple, or is this just the usual libtard boilerplate about ‘this might make a little girl somewhere cry, so it is bad and must be crushed’?

    The words ‘twitter’ and ‘tweet’ once signified inarticulate noises made by birds. Jack Dorsey’s choice of them to identify his product seems apt. Many of its users do seem to be birdbrains.

  32. Rob says:
    @Anonymous

    Five thousand rows on spreadsheet? That sounds hard to handle. He should have had an assistant put it in database.

    But, being a cad is not a crime. Rape is, so i hope he kept notes on their states of inebriation and the circumstances of their consent.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  33. Rob says:
    @Altai

    I agree. But it is a matter of when Putin goes, not if he goes. As he gets older, Putin will be remembered as a better statesman if he sets up some sort of succession system, even if it is only to happen after he dies. Perhaps something like the US electoral college if pure democracy is not something he wants.

    I don’t know who the second-highest official is in Russia, but without a system set up for elections, he is almost certainly going to be in charge, at least until a coup happens. Secondaries frequently do not have the vision to change course when a course change is obvious, because his legitimacy rests on fulfilling the legacy of the last guy. Look at Chavez and Maduro. It is obvious to the world and even Venezuelans that the current course is not working.

    The second guy also (usually) lacks the charisma or whatever traits it takes to climb to the very top and stay there.

    I wish all the best for Russians, but I am afraid they won’t get it. If Putin loves his country and people, he will set up a system for succession. Unless of course, he does plan to live forever. I mean, the man does wrestle bears and win.

  34. @Professional Slav

    The dynamics of murder in Russia are also different than the typical American hoodrat drive bys or Cleetus offing someone dumping trash in his dumpster, it is in fact extremely safe anywhere where there’s is no Caucasian element present.

    But isn’t the “Caucasian element” present everywhere? At least in the major metros?

    That would be my critique of Putin: Too much big tent “Greater Russia”–keeping the empire–like the Chechens! While Russia is far from short on territory and Russians would be much better off with less “diversity”.

    • Agree: Rosie
  35. @Zero Philosopher

    You are just putting out the discredited propaganda lies of the Global Homo Pederast US Empire.

    The US and UK will be destroyed in a war with Russia. And Russia can now destroy the US without nukes. The US is rotting decomposing corpse as it is now before the Russian Supersonic Missiles arrive on the bulls-eye.

    You are either a very stupid creature…or…you enjoy mass death and destruction.

    The Democratic Party is the anal sex party….The Bush-Ronnie Reagan Party is the other disgusting anal sex party….

  36. Mike Tre says:
    @Professional Slav

    “or Cleetus offing someone dumping trash in his dumpster,”

    Fake news, comrade.

  37. Jack D says:
    @Kronos

    I don’t think so. By the end of the Cold War the Soviets had fallen somewhat behind technologically – THEY were the ones who were stealing American chip designs and reverse engineering them, by which time there were a generation or two out of date. Likewise, their jet engines were behind American designs, especially big jets (the Soviets tended to stick with turboprops which were considered obsolete in the West). It wasn’t like the situation with the Germans where they had advanced rocket technology that was way beyond what we had. The Soviets had some good weapons and maybe were ahead in a few small areas (e.g. working with titanium) but it’s not like they had some major technology that we didn’t have.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @James Forrestal
  38. Anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:

    After the Central Park wilding, gang rape and near murder of the White Central Park jogger, Donald Trump bought a full page advertisement in the NY Post demanding the death penalty for such heinous crimes and called for a return of NYPD law and order as was done in his father’s time.

    I had a similar letter published in the NY Post saying that civilization was collapsing in New York City and much as I opposed all forms of Communism, I note that the Soviet Union didn’t allow these types of crimes to go unpunished and Soviet City were mostly clean and orderly.

    I also wrote that democratic societies all criminal anarchy, regular people will look for strong men on the Left and Right.

    That’s certainly Vladimir Putin’s appeal – so much better than what we have here in Chicago. BLM Black and Latino gang banger anarchy, the criminal justice system dominated, monopolize by BLM, lesbian, Arnie Duncan Liberals who want to end the schools to prison pipeline. It’s pretty much legal for any Black criminal to get away with any and all violent crimes just short of 1st degree murder and even then it’s not sure bet.

    J Ryan
    The Political Cesspool

  39. Art Deco says:
    @AnotherDad

    The population of Russia is > 85% Great Russian. The areas where non-Russians predominate tend to be surrounded by Russians (Tatarstan, Bashkorostan) or to have quite modest populations and income flows (Tuva, Chuvashia, Ossetia, Kabardino-Balkaria, Chechenya). Dagestan as more people than the other Caucasus states, but it is also multi-ethnic. Note, the Caucasus state are just about the least affluent portion of Russia.

    You could declare these areas sovereign (see the Caribbean islands), but they would still have to repair to some foreign patron for sophisticated services if they were to have them, because they haven’t the domestic basis for producing and maintaining them. Capital markets, university medical centers, university research centers, forensic pathology services, and diplomatic and consular representation would have to be provided by the patron to one degree or another. Tatarstan and Bashkorostan might be able to house most of that domestically, but they’d be dependent on Russia because enclaves. They’re also not of optimal composition: both territories have a large minority of Russians living in them.

  40. @D. K.

    Yeah, the big ramp up in murder rates seems to have started in the later 1960s globally irrespective of any local conditions or leadership (“The Big Kill”?). The US only got a handle on it in the late 1990s with Giuliani-style tough-on-crime policies*, while the Soviets may have temporarily damped it with their mid-1980s alcohol restrictions … but then apparently lost all grasp of it even before the Soviet collapse. But yes to Steve’s main point, that Putinist hardman centrism has borne good results.

    *Arguably, US tough-on-crime policies were already beginning to work in the 1980s, but the 1990s crack epidemic derailed the falling murder rate. Maybe this could be verified by looking at where the murders occurred 1990s vs. pre-1990s.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  41. @Anonymous

    sounds like he was some sort of intel asset that’s now getting burned.

    Sounds more like he was just a rich nerd on a tear.

    Is there much intel to be had in NW Montana?

  42. @Anon

    One thing about Russians is that there’s a big inferiority complex and a sense of proud patriotism (third world tier even) to cope with almost African tier standard of living. The Putins of the world make use of it and throw the plebs a bone in form of “gay man bad”, but policy wise if you pay attention he’s importing 160k Uzbeks as labor force and using Russian taxes (ethnic Russian that is) to build Grozny. Meanwhile ethnic Russians can’t even say “Russia for Russians” without being labeled a
    “”nazi”” and enemy of the state.
    The best litmus test is to see where people go. Smart Russian who have the opportunity leave as soon as they can.
    It is very odd to me to see Western right wing embrace Putin and Russia while he’s doing the same as their own leaders, except he also larps as “traditional”. It’s silly.

    • Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros
  43. @AnotherDad

    More and more as time goes by. That’s why you’re labeled an enemy of the state, a dreaded “gnatzee” and a Rusophobe (hilarious term) if you support Russian for Russians, if you don’t want to feed the Caucusus while driving on roads that resemble Dresden after ther bombing.
    And with Putin increasing the flow of central Asians into the more affluent capitals, it’ll only increase. There are tons of videos of the blacker element behaving like your own black element in metros, buses, etc. And the first thing that comes out from the authorities is of course “ethnicity has nothing to do with this”.

  44. @Kronos

    “In the late 1970s, the CIA started a special covert program intended to destabilize communist regimes with jeans.”

    This is half the story. The rest of it involves fattening the denizens of Russia on McDonalds and Coca-Cola so they would be unable to fit into their prized and expensive 501s. The big brains at Langley figured this would drive up the already high rates of mental illness in those cramped apartments stinking of cigarettes and spilt vodka.

  45. @Kronos

    By the mid to late 1990s, quite a few Russian nuclear weapons designers had been hired at Los Alamos. A relative who worked there remarked how it was strange to hear their accents.

  46. @Almost Missouri

    “the 1990s crack epidemic derailed the falling murder rate”

    The crack cocaine epidemic began in Steve’s humble hometown through the auspices of South Central native Freeway Ricky Ross and a few Somocistas high up in the CIA supported Somoza regime. From the beginning it was facilitated by a network of former U.S. military and CIA officers who used the revenue stream coming from the sale of the lethal hybrid cocaine to buy guns for the anti-communist crusade in Central America. The Ted Shackley-led organization figured the collateral damage inflicted upon American citizens was worth it: a new lucrative war to wage from which they would prosper handsomely.

  47. TG says:

    The data for the USA is missing at the early years, but there were two big increases in crime in the US: one after 1888, and one after 1965.

    Suggestion: when the rich crush workers so that it is impossible for the bottom of the working class to make a decent living through honest means – as by forcing population growth up via massive immigration – it’s not good for social peace.

  48. LP5 says:
    @Altai

    Summers alternative exit theory: his female scientist blurting episode was cover for the Russian scandal that his Admin oversaw. It got tongues wagging and fingers typing, ran through some news cycles, and memory of the latter faded quickly.

  49. @Kronos

    I really enjoyed Comrade Detective. It was delightful.

    I found that some of the character’s “boiler-plate” critiques of Capitalism, played for laughs, seemed to ring with more truth than Inwould have admitted in my Normie-Con.

    • Agree: Kronos
    • Replies: @Kronos
  50. @Rob

    ‘But, being a cad is not a crime. Rape is, so i hope he kept notes on their states of inebriation and the circumstances of their consent.’

    It’s a red herring — but how come a woman would become exempt from responsibility for her actions if she becomes intoxicated?

    Does this work if I get drunk and kill someone driving home? A couple of times I’ve gotten drunk and belligerent; I always figured the next morning that I was lucky I didn’t get my ass kicked.

    …never realized I would have been a victim if I had.

    You’d have an argument if the girl was fifteen, or if she was drugged without her knowledge. If she was an adult, and chose to allow herself to become intoxicated, the consequences of that are her own responsibility.

    Dude obviously has issues: five thousand different women? However, I don’t see why he becomes criminally liable if his partners were intoxicated.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  51. @Altai

    When you read about Russia in the early 90s it sounded like the pre-revolutionary Russia of Dr Zhivago, where thousands of amoral Komarovskys were looting the place and enjoying the women, while babushkas were selling their possessions in the streets.

    Putin put a stop to that. He’s a great leader IMHO, my only concern is the succession.

    Solzhenitsyn (in a der Spiegel interview) – “Putin inherited a ransacked and bewildered country, with a poor and demoralized people. And he started to do what was possible — a slow and gradual restoration.

  52. @Colin Wright

    It’s a red herring — but how come a woman would become exempt from responsibility for her actions if she becomes intoxicated?

    She doesn’t. The question is whether she’s in a condition in which to give valid consent. Passed-out-on-the-floor doesn’t qualify. What if, instead of raping her, he just beats her up, or empties her purse, or has her sign a contract or will? These are lesser offenses. Would you have him go free then, too?

    However, she would definitely have responsibility for any child conceived under such circumstances. (As would the sire.) Her misbehavior led to his existence.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  53. @Arclight

    I’d rather be ruled by a Putin who loves his country and its people than the corrupt midwits who rule and despise the USA.

  54. nebulafox says:

    Because nobody in Russia who remembers the 1990s cares to relive them, and many people remember the role that American bankers and State Department types in fancy ties had in their country’s misery at the time. This means that most people in Russia over a certain age is likely to be very skeptical of pro-Western imported democratic types, to the extent they are politically engaged at all.

    I’m considerably more cynical-not necessarily negative, just cynical-about Putin than a lot of commentators here. But there’s no denying that the state of his nation has vastly improved since the 1990s, and his regime had a hand in that. That might not being saying much, considering how awful 90s Russia was, but it is saying something.

    (And it’s not just Russia. One of the CCP’s favorite examples in domestic propaganda when they want to play up the “See, this is what the Americans really mean when they talk about democracy” is 1990s Russia. Other classics are Indian slums or more recently, bombed out Iraqi/Syrian neighborhoods.)

    Vladimir Putin is eventually going to die, and the succession is likely to be messy. But that’s their problem, not ours.

  55. J.Ross says:
    @Jack D

    I don’t like this argument, the issue is the people, and formerly Soviet STEMmies absolutely were desired if they could make it here because they were very solid scientists impressed by what we considered low pay. The same reasoning applied to Germans: it was fortuitous that we were most interested in the next generation of what they had developed, but had they not (but still retained their qualifications — say they had focused on areas besides rocketry), would we permit them to just sort of wander, and possibly end up working for an enemy?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  56. I don’t know alot about Russia, but what really stands out to me is the US data. In the last couple of years we’ve given up about half the murder rate reduction that we achieved in finally getting crime under control after the crazy-high period of the 70s – 90s.

    But as we were all hearing during 2019 and 2020, “sure, crime is increasing slightly, but it’s still very low and likely to go back down shortly.”

    Kind of like inflation right now.

  57. Muggles says:
    @R.G. Camara

    Russia is a country in search of both warm weather ports and Caesar.

    Both have been largely unsuccessful.

    Czar translates as Caesar in Russian.

  58. Muggles says:
    @Anonymous

    Never heard of this guy.

    Divide 5,000 by 365 you get 13.69 years.

    So a new conquest every single night for nearly 14 years.

    Does anyone buy that?

    Given Montana’s tiny population you’d have to fly them in and out on jumbo jets.

    Of course, my own spreadsheet logs over 12,000 times I’ve been right in my arguments with Wife. But she won’t believe that for some reason…

    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @ATBOTL
  59. Jack D says:
    @J.Ross

    Operation Paperclip had very specific people in mind. Earlier in the war, the Nazis had drafted many top scientists as ordinary enlisted men but when they realized that this was a waste of talent, they compiled something called the Osenberg List and recalled them all to scientific duty. Luckily, at the end of the war, this list fell into American hands and gave them a road map of who to look for. von Braun was literally #1 on their list.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  60. ATBOTL says:

    Murders in Russia were very heavily from fighting between middle aged drunks who drink together. That’s how murder in America was a hundred years ago too. Mob assassinations were only ever a small number of the murders. Russia never had a high level of “American” type street crime related murders like street gangs, robbery murders of regular citizens, young men shooting each other over “disses” and that sort of thing. Yes, you could find some cases like that, but not like in “urban” America.

    Russia is essentially an underdeveloped Northern European country with an East Asian minority and very small number of annoying Middle Eastern people who are a low single digit share of the population. The long term trajectory of Russia economically and socially is to be like a big Canada with a will to power…

    BTW, if you follow the serious news out of Russia, which is found in only in business oriented journals, you know that in the last ten years, massive sectors of Russia’s economy and government have been reformed. How many people know about the new research universities modeled after American land grant schools? The reform of the Russian Academy of Sciences? The new privately funded, industry-specific scientific research centers? Or the newly organized coordination of those new institutions with the existing university, government and military scientific research centers into larger programs targeted toward producing economic growth? Not many.

    What about the program to move up the value added chain starting with raw materials? Check out the growth in Russian petrochemicals. That programs’ chain ends with fully indigenously designed and manufactured cars with entirely domestic parts and materials. Other chains will converge on that target too. How many have heard of the Novosibirsk Machine Tool Plant? They don’t just make machine tools anymore. It’s one of the world’s largest manufacturers of consumer power tools. Taking indigenous machine tooling to the top level is another targeted program that is in motion.

    Check out the Russian railroad sector lately? Many new freight train cars in America run on Russian chassis. It might be most at this point, haven’t looked into that lately. Peep privately-owned United Wagon Company’s market cap now if you dare — https://www.uniwagon.com/en/#!main — I just did it for you and it’s over 11 bill. How many people are following all the contracts state-owned Russian Railways has signed to be the lead contractor to rebuild entire countries’ rail networks?

    Anyone check out the performance of the Russian stock market lately? Anyone who put money in right after the sanctions made a killing. It was the best play you could have made. How many people understand that Russia’s stock market reached critical mass? It’s now self-sustaining from internal investment. Many millions of middle class Russians have their money in well run Russian companies that are in no more danger of going belly up or losing their money than Mercedes-Benz or Exxon. Putin ordered state owned companies to pay generous dividends, money that is increasingly going to Russian middle class people and not leaving the country at all. Capital flight continues its long downward trend.

    How many people know what the world-order shattering INSTC even is? Follow growing Russian trade with America’s biggest Latin America ally, growing and stabilizing Columbia, which feels spurned by the lack of US investment? Know about Russia’s massive and largely complete program to be totally self-sufficient in agricultural plant and animal breeding? Know that Russia is the only country in the world where dogs are bred scientifically on a large scale by companies that sell direct to the public? That numerous small Russian private companies are carving out niches and followings internationally in certain consumer product markets?

    How many know that the children of the elites in Moscow who made it into good schools totally reject the conspicuous consumption culture of their parents’ generation and are all into intelligent investing and living simply, while the spoiled brat no good kids are sent to Europe to terrorize trendy night clubs? That you can’t go to a nice restaurant in a developing country these days without seeing a group of Russian engineers in town working on a project? That the future of Russia is “South-South” trade where the West is nowhere to be seen and can’t do anything to stop it?

    The people who understand these things are people who deal with money. The “policy elites” and “foreign policy scholars” are mostly mid-wits who serve only as paid propaganda agents for the system. Maybe one in fifty “foreign policy scholars” are not muppets. No one who matters would put those clowns in charge of their own money, but they want to put them in charge of your money…

    Russia is now laying the deep structural ground work to jump into the top tier of nations in GDP per-capita. Mark my words.

  61. Art Deco says:
    @glib

    And standards of living have been, for most, declining since 2017.

    The World Bank data show a COVID recession with a decline in per capita product (PPP) when comparing 2020 to 2019. It does not show that this metric in 2017 is higher than it is today. There was an abrupt drop in the employment-to-population ratio at the end of 2017 from which the country has not recovered (NB, the current ratio, 0.60, is quite normal for an occidental country).

    • Replies: @glib
  62. Both Putin and Xi have been depicted as Mongol Khans*

    Putin Khan

    View post on imgur.com

    In the last Joe Rogan podcast on AI ethics, the interviewee said that CCP considers its primary opponent to be not the United States, but rather its own tech oligarchs.

    My impression is that as a Mongol warrior chieftain, Putin has similarly dealt with his oligarchs, the so-called seven bankers:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semibankirschina

    *The former as of the Golden Horde, the latter as Qing Manchu Emperor who held the dual title of Mongol Khagan “Khan of Khans”

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  63. Art Deco says:
    @Altai

    And Putin has stablised things but he hasn’t solved Russia’s malaise, Russia is still in bad economic territory and the youth still often have little hope.

    It isn’t.

    1. Per the Maddison Project, the ratio of Russia’s per capita product to that of the United States is around 0.45. The highest value it attained under the old borders was 0.38 in 1975 and the most recent figure assessing the territory under the old borders vis a vis the US was 0.35. (Recall that the American per capita product in real terms has doubled since 1975). Russia has never been so affluent and it’s position vis a vis the West’s anchor economy has never been so advantageous.

    2. Employment-to-population ratio at 0.6 is normal for an occidental country (see Trading Economics)

    3. The total fertility rate requires improvement. It’s about the mean for Europe. (see World Development Indicators)

    4. The share of nominal domestic product accounted for by fuel and mineral exports has fallen to 15%

    5. Public sector debt has fallen to 15% of gdp

    6. External debt is about 25% of gdp.

    7. The country has as we speak a surplus on the current account of the balance-of-payments.

    8. There’s been some trouble with inflation. Still in the single digits.

    • Thanks: Gabe Ruth
  64. Barnard says:
    @Zoos

    Trump Jr. got divorced from his first wife and took up with former Fox News airhead Kimberly Guilfoyle. She is also Gavin Newsom’s ex. Not good judgment there.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  65. J.Ross says:
    @Jack D

    A dodge. I knew 90s Russians. I knew 90s non-Russians. The useful lesson here is that math homework has the power to overturn a bad war result.

  66. ATBOTL says:
    @Muggles

    But things came to a crashing halt in 2016 when his former mistress Amber Baptiste, an exotic dancer from Canada, accused him of “constant sexual abuse,” including “countless hours of forced sodomy,” court papers say.

    Dude, he’s a French-Canadian-American from Bedford, Mass. who is flying in the notoriously wild Montreal strippers for paid work. That’s it, nothing to see here. It’s all prostitutes. Just look at the guy’s picture and imagine how dopey and uncharismatic he is in person.

  67. Kronos says:
    @Dr. Krieger

    I very much enjoyed the “Monopoly” segment. That game is always a great way to strain and tarnish family relations. Sometimes I’d need to literally arm twist my brother to pay up the money he owned me in the game. He still owes me real money today, but I can’t readily arm twist him while he resides in another state.

  68. Rob says:
    @ATBOTL

    After the Warsaw Pact ended, my sister (she’s fluent) said Russians were expecting a Marshall Plan, not looting. In the long run, they may be better off being outside the US sphere.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
  69. Anonymous[418] • Disclaimer says:
    @Zoos

    Politically, he could wind up being Donald Trump Sr on steroids, with much less baggage.

    He goes too much for cheap gimmicks, like Dems R The Real Racists stuff. It isn’t clear he is a leader.

  70. @Kronos

    The Soviet Union and then Russia had a good block of technologies in opto-electronics and gallium arsenide chips in general. US did not come looking, although a few universities did. Stonybrook developed early desktop DNA analyzers using Russian teams. The Koreans, who saw themselves as technology deficient, descended on Russia big time. The Koreans overtook Japan in the display market and the mobile phone market in no small part to Russian engineers/scientists (and licences for British patents).

  71. @Rob

    They had 10’s of billions and no looting. YEltsin screwed it all up.

  72. @ATBOTL

    My office in Saratov is right in the middle of the INSTC. All enquires concerning trade and investment welcom.

  73. mc23 says:
    @Professional Slav

    My friends brother is married to a Russian woman. When they travel to Russia I was told he can’t go around without her. He’ll be targeted, beaten and robbed.

  74. Cato says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Thanks for this — not like anything I’ve seen before. Both innocent and outré.

  75. @Reg Cæsar

    ‘She doesn’t. The question is whether she’s in a condition in which to give valid consent. Passed-out-on-the-floor doesn’t qualify. ‘

    Meh. Let’s leave aside ghouls who would have sex with someone who was literally unconscious. No reason to think the guy’s Bill Cosby.

    If you’re conscious and an adult, you remain responsible for your actions — however drunk you may have chosen to become.

    I’ve always assumed I was playing by that rule. If women are exempt from it, that’s okay, too — but let’s say so.

  76. Putin wins elections because he’s a patriot in a patriotic country.

    Biden wins elections because not a patriot, and he’s in an unpatriotic country. And, of course, his peeps commit massive fraud, which helps quite a bit.

  77. @Verymuchalive

    One of the problems of white youth worldwide is overpriced housing. In Eastern countries there is a lack of housing due to a lack of building during the communist era, in Western countries there is a lack of housing because of over-liberal bank lending and mass immigration.

    However I would have thought Poland, Hungary and Romania are in better economic shape than Russia. All these countries are in pretty good financial shape ( as reflected in their share markets) and are more focused on manufacturing than Russia. Having said that the western war on oil and gas probably won’t do Russia any harm. It’s giving Russia a short-term windfall, while longer term its forcing Russian oil and gas companies to improve their governance and focus on sustainable profits.

  78. Not Raul says:
    @R.G. Camara

    Russia is working on getting access to a warm water port. They also have peacekeepers in Azerbaijan, which could be useful.

    https://iranpress.com/content/32851/iran-russia-review-steps-accelerate-north-south-corridor-construction

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  79. glib says:
    @Art Deco

    I am just reporting on word of mouth consensus here in Russia…

  80. @Not Raul

    Your knowledge of geography leaves a lot to be desired. Obviously, it wasn’t your strong point at school.! As well as Murmansk, all the Russian Black Sea ports are ice free. Novorossiysk, on the Black Sea, is now Russia’s largest port.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_of_Novorossiysk

    NSP is the largest port in Russia and the Black Sea basin and the third in Europe.[12] In 2011 it accounted for 21% of total cargo turnover in the country.[9]
    The Port of Novorossiysk mainly handles grain, coal, mineral fertilizers, timber, oil and oil products, containerized, food, and general cargo. In 2014 the total turnover amounted to 121.59 mln tons, including 720,000 TEU, the largest value for the Black Sea basin and the second-highest in Russia.[5][13][14] Total berth length in NSP equals 8.3 km. The territory is separated into several areas: three cargo terminals (East, West, and Central), a passenger area and the Sheskharis oil harbour.[7]

    Russia is the World’s largest wheat exporter and most of the exports go through the port of Novorossiysk. Russian ports on the Black Sea have been greatly expanded by the incorporation of Crimea into Russia. A link to the Persian Gulf is completely superfluous – and costly- under these circumstances.

  81. Art Deco says:
    @Barnard

    Guilfoyle may be bad judgment. If Trump Jr.’s divorce was of the modal type, (1) it was initiated by his wife de facto and de jure and (2) she did not have what would have been called ‘grounds’ 60 years ago. A great many people who are divorced are in that state because they were married to someone who fancied that that was the correct response to common-and-garden personal dissatisfaction. If they’re not adept at lying to themselves, they discover afterward that there’s one common element to all of their dissatisfying relationships.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    , @Rosie
  82. @Art Deco

    I’ve given up counting all the divorces I’ve seen. They all stem from adultery, drug use, or mental illness- in that order. And it was not shocking to hear a lawyer relative (in family law) tell me the exact same thing.

    Have you ever seen a marriage recover from adultery? I haven’t.

    Drug use turns people into different beasts altogether.

    Mental illness, especially when untreated over time, is awful.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  83. AnonNYNJ says:
    @ATBOTL

    I occasionally lurk on this website, and noticed that this comment is really out of character from your (ATBOTL) previous assessments of Russia, which were decidedly negative and pessimistic. If you don’t mind me asking, what changed?

    I also think you are an interesting commentator – your background seems broadly similar to mine, although IRL I’m what you would probably call a globalist neoliberal (and only half-white to boot!), but I do have some of the same priors as you since we more or less grew up at the same time and in the same place. What’s interesting is you seem intelligent for a white nationalist, but also vaguely play acting at it. Also imho, the maximalist position you seem to (play?) advocate for, reminds me of bit of nationalist party whites in South Africa circa 1980. You want everything and instead will get nothing.

    • Replies: @ATBOTL
  84. Dmitry says:

    knows how reliable Russian crime statistics

    I use the World Bank website which relies on “UN Office on Drugs and Crime’s International Homicide Statistics database”. It seems to be different from Karlin’s drawing after 2010.
    https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/VC.IHR.PSRC.P5?locations=RU-US

    Murder should be easier to compare than other crimes, but there are some differences in definitions being used.

    As for general discussion government statistics in the Russian Federation in recent years, it’s no joke to say they seem to be going to increasingly third world government’s level of accuracy. While in Soviet times official data, like the census (excluding e.g. 1939), was surprisingly accurate.

    Coronavirus deaths have been drawn by 4-5 times lower than the reality, so they could avoid closing the economy. For example, in November 2020 in Novosibirsk there were proportionally more people dying from coronavirus than in New York in April 2020. But the restaurants, bars and nightclubs, were open, and most people were not wearing masks. They just avoided reclassified the deaths as non-coronavirus, and maintain everything open, and recorded almost no-one had died from coronavirus. Meanwhile, in New York in April 2020, there had been less deaths proportionally, and yet the city was closed by the authorities.

    Currently, the new census they are soon releasing, the population of one city Krasnodar is already being claimed to have a population (1,7 million), that would require fertility rates to be between 0,8-9. It seems like the authorities have increasingly stopped caring about drawing the data to be internally consistent and just expects a completely innumerate audience.

  85. @ATBOTL

    How many have heard of the Novosibirsk Machine Tool Plant? They don’t just make machine tools anymore. It’s one of the world’s largest manufacturers of consumer power tools. Taking indigenous machine tooling to the top level is another targeted program that is in motion.

    Yeah that’s obviously a critical element of any advanced industrial economy. Meanwhile, with the ongoing “progression” of financialization/ globalization, the North American Economic Zone has long been headed in the other direction. An excellent — if a little depressing — podcast on the subject:

    https://myth20c.wordpress.com/2020/12/12/the-machine-that-built-the-world/

    The modern world is an integrated system of almost unfathomable complexity, built upon sub systems, technologies, people and practices that if partially removed or neglected sufficiently, result in disastrous supply chain break downs as witnessed in wartime or as the world seized up in response to an over-hyped flu virus in 2020. One of the industries at the heart of the manufacturing economy is the machine tool industry, responsible for “building the machines that build the machines” – mills, lathes, planers, presses, etc. that produce the metal products such as cars, airplanes and household appliances. Without these industrial tools, production would be relegated to hand tools or worse, and for national security reasons is arguably a strategic industry to be protected. As with most things in modern America, however, what is sensible and what is reality is at odds, with the machine tool industry witnessing a global market share decline of number one in the world at around 20% in 1981 to less than 5% today.

  86. @Jack D

    The Soviets had some good weapons and maybe were ahead in a few small areas (e.g. working with titanium) but it’s not like they had some major technology that we didn’t have.

    Well, they’re way ahead of us — and everyone else — in this field:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear-powered_icebreaker

    So there’s that.

  87. Dmitry says:
    @Dmitry

    It seems to be different from Karlin’s drawing after 2010.

    Although the sources are not very clearly indicated (so I’m not sure without checking more, which is I can’t waste time on), I noticed Karlin is likely using information which uses a different definition of homicide for the Russia line than for the USA line.

    That is, he seems to be drawing the numbers from Rosstat which are defined homicide from Article 105 in the Criminal Code. But for the comparison with “homicide definition” in America, you would need to add deaths of Article 111, 4 in the Criminal Code, which would be homicide in the USA, but not murder in Russia.

    So it looks like a drawing made comparing different legal definitions between the countries, where the Russian numbers are using a more narrow legal definition than USA ones. (Although the divergence from the UN line is happening after 2010).

  88. Art Deco says:
    @stillCARealist

    I’ve given up counting all the divorces I’ve seen. They all stem from adultery, drug use, or mental illness- in that order.

    You have an odd circle of friends.

  89. Art Deco says:
    @Dmitry

    Coronavirus deaths have been drawn by 4-5 times lower than the reality, so they could avoid closing the economy.

    Why would they close the economy? The lockdowns don’t work. They just redistribute casualties between time periods.

    No clue why you fancy the death rate from COVID in Russia is the highest in the world and > 3x higher than it has been in the United States.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  90. Rosie says:
    @Art Deco

    she did not have what would have been called ‘grounds’ 60 years ago.

    I have come to the conclusion that men have a tendency to view the romantic relationship as a conquest of sorts. You conquer once, then you are done. The conquered has no further rights that the conqueror is bound to respect.

    Most men, most of the time, manage to overcome this tendency toward a conquest mentality.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  91. Art Deco says:
    @Rosie

    I have come to the conclusion that men have a tendency to view the romantic relationship as a conquest of sorts. You conquer once, then you are done. The conquered has no further rights that the conqueror is bound to respect.

    If you fancy domestic life is properly described in terms of rights and entitlements, you’ve got the wrong attitude.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Rosie
  92. AndrewR says:
    @Anonymous

    Whitefish is the tiny town where Richard Spencer lives.

  93. AndrewR says:
    @Zoos

    Maria, like almost all leftists, is a legitimately bad and stupid person.

  94. Rosie says:
    @Art Deco

    If you fancy domestic life is properly described in terms of rights and entitlements, you’ve got the wrong attitude.

    Nonsense. Marriage is a covenant wherein the parties agree to be bound by certain obligations, which necessarily give rise to corollary entitlements. I am entitled to be cherished by virtue of Mr. Rosie’s promise to cherish me. Mr. Rosie is entitled to be honored by virtue of my promise to honor him.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  95. Dmitry says:
    @Art Deco

    why you fancy the death rate from COVID in Russia is the highest in the world

    Because of lack of lockdown during epidemiological “peaks of waves”, lack of social distancing, increasingly low quality of public healthcare, and currently not too high vaccination level of 40% of the population (with possibly a less effective domestic vaccine, compared to non-Chinese international vaccines https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.08.22.21262161v1.full )

    Lack of lockdown and lack of social distancing, was enabled by the government “reporting style” (to say it politely) of data for coronavirus deaths. Low vaccination level was in first half of this year because mainly of the insufficient production of vaccine, and idiocy of not importing from international sources. In the second half of the year, after domestic vaccine production has ramped up, it is because mainly of low vaccination acceptance from the public.

    Low quality of public healthcare – I’m not sure how to expect otherwise, when average (mean, not median) medics salary is \$500 per month before tax, and full time doctors in Sverdlovsk region reach an average \$1000 per month salary before tax, with inhuman hours. There is so little funding of the healthcare sector, while life expectancy in the Russian Federation has fallen lower than Bangladesh again. On the other hand, reducing old peoples’ number ceteris paribus might be better for the financial position of the pension fund, so a cynical “economical thinking” person might not be worried about these kind of data. And a lot of people will earlier inherit apartments from their grandparents as a result of this pandemic.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  96. Art Deco says:
    @Rosie

    Nonsense. Marriage is a covenant wherein the parties agree to be bound by certain obligations,

    Evidently the term ‘grounds’ is one you don’t understand. If you fancy only adulterers are getting hit with divorce suits, you know nothing. Whatever ‘cherish’ may mean, suing your husband for divorce due to your generic dissatisfaction is not it.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  97. The best thing about Russia, all things aside: No Afros there. And no one wants them. And they know no one wants them.

    As for various Muslims, we’ll wait and see ….

  98. Rosie says:
    @Art Deco

    Whatever ‘cherish’ may mean, suing your husband for divorce due to your generic dissatisfaction is not it.

    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cherish

    If you pull the old bait and switch, where you ignore your wife and stop being an attentive and romantic companion after the knot is tied, you’re not “cherishing” your wife. If you have trouble understanding this, consider whether a man has a moral right to leave a sexless marriage.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  99. Art Deco says:
    @Rosie

    If you pull the old bait and switch, where you ignore your wife and stop being an attentive and romantic companion after the knot is tied, you’re not “cherishing” your wife. If you have trouble understanding this, consider whether a man has a moral right to leave a sexless marriage.

    Everything a husband and father may do for the benefit of his wife and children is pocketed as just something you’re due and then you lard on vague and protean demands that he attend to your emotional states. Then you wind up talking about ‘rights’ again. And your response to your discontents is to replace the marriage economy with a child-support economy. I don’t have any trouble understanding you; I’m just glad I’m not lashed to you.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Rosie
  100. Rosie says:
    @Art Deco

    I’m just glad I’m not lashed to you.

    The feeling’s mutual.

  101. Art Deco says:
    @Dmitry

    Because of lack of lockdown during epidemiological “peaks of waves”

    The lockdowns do not work.

  102. @Professional Slav

    If you think Russians are having it tough, you need to look up some LA videos.

  103. @Dmitry

    Among the few nonimbecile Romanians, it is well known that in April and May 2020, thousands of Romanians working in farms and food processing factories in Germany got covid, but they were never counted in the amazingly small count of covid cases states by the German authorities. We know the name of a Romanian worker who dies of covid, but was never diagnosed as such, nor included in German stats.

    If you don’t believe Russian stats, try American vote counts.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  104. BB753 says:
    @J.Ross

    The presidential election was the greatest electoral steal of the century this side of sub-Saharan Africa, yet Steve Sailer did not see it. What’s up?

  105. @Bardon Kaldian

    Putin Khan is a master in the Russian national martial art, sambo (synthesis of Mongolic wrestling, judo, karate, jujitsu, boxing), taekwondo, and judo (third ranked in USSR, first Russian to be awarded 8th dan). After becoming president, wrote a book Learn Judo with Vladimir Putin

    At the Kōdōkan 講道館 Judo Institute in Tokyo with the Japanese PM Yoshirō Mori in audience–

    View post on imgur.com

  106. Dmitry says:
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    In Germany, there are 69 thousand excess deaths since March 2020, in Russia there are already 900 thousand excess deaths, and it will soon be over a million.

    Authorities faked the coronavirus data without an apology. This is irresponsible behavior during pandemics, as it results that the population is unprotected and without adequate information to decide their risk behaviour. Rosstat is also releasing late data about coronavirus mortality to undercount excess mortality by around half.

    If you were a libertarian (opposed to lockdowns, etc), you still need to give accurate information during a pandemic to people, in order to allow people to decide their own risk profile.

    It’s likely these excess deaths are also undercounting the deaths from coronavirus, as in countries that controlled pandemic like Japan and New Zealand we see negative excess mortality, while in countries with accurate statistics (UK, etc), excess deaths are lower than official coronavirus deaths.

    At least in 2020, there was an attempt to paint the line a bit to look “realistic” up and down movements. This year the authorities seem to become too lazy to care, and just begin to draw with a ruler.

    There is a question whether you want a government to make an effort to “look good” even if by faking, or for them to start not to care anymore. I think the former is better than the latter. When you get to the latter, it’s becoming like Latin American politics, where both the public and their rulers are no longer feel pressure to fake about their attitude to each other.

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