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As a commenter pointed out, NFL rules mandate a large, rock-hard football that is hard to hold, hard to throw, hard to catch, easy to fumble, easy to kick, and easy to punt. For the last two weeks, there have been allegations (the factuality of which I won’t get into) that the cleverest franchise of the century, the New England Patriots, has systematically let some air out of the balls they use on offense (but not the ball used for kicking, which is kept by the refs), and that this helps them complete more passes and fumble less.

If so, the NFL should follow the Patriots’ lead and reduce the air pressure for all footballs, including the kicking and punting balls, because this would make the NFL more entertaining. There would be more one-handed and fingertip catches, better passes (especially in the second half of the season when the weather turns bad), fewer fumbles, and more interceptions (defensive players seldom have soft hands like receivers do, so seemingly easy interceptions frequently clang off their hands at present). Field goal kicking and punting would both become harder, which would encourage coaches to go for first downs more on fourth down, which is more exciting than kicking or punting.

 
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  1. For the last two weeks, there have been allegations (the factuality of which I won’t get into)

    How come you won’t get into it? Are you not interested, or is it just that you have no idea?

    I was thinking that your stats expertise could be applied here.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Has there been a shortage of people thinking hard for the last two weeks about the air pressure of the Patriots' footballs?
  2. @Anonymous

    For the last two weeks, there have been allegations (the factuality of which I won’t get into)
     
    How come you won't get into it? Are you not interested, or is it just that you have no idea?

    I was thinking that your stats expertise could be applied here.

    Has there been a shortage of people thinking hard for the last two weeks about the air pressure of the Patriots’ footballs?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Good point. I guess when there are even professional physicists and stuff weighing in on the issue, it's hard to think of a different angle or take on it.

    But still, people are interested in your opinion on the matter, regardless of how true or accurate it is or if it's a unique opinion.

    So what do you think? Do you think they've been been deliberately messing with the balls?
    , @jack
    A football is a prolate spheroid. Deflating it would probably distort the shape enough to increase the drag on the ball and make it more difficult to throw for distance, or even accuracy. So I think it's a bad idea.
    , @Father O'Hara
    Further thoughts on Bill Cosby?
  3. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    If so, the NFL should follow the Patriots’ lead and reduce the air pressure for all footballs, including the kicking and punting balls, because this would make the NFL more entertaining.

    Sure, but if the Pats were doing it while nobody else was, then they were still cheating. And if they’ve been cheating, they should be stripped of their titles and wins.

    • Replies: @Bill

    Sure, but if the Pats were doing it while nobody else was, then they were still cheating. And if they’ve been cheating, they should be stripped of their titles and wins.
     
    I've never understood what "cheating" is in the context of professional sports. An offensive lineman holding on every play and getting away with it is skill. A receiver pushing off on an out route, but doing it with subtlety so that he gets away with it is skill. Deflating footballs is cheating.

    Anon suggests the answer is that "cheating" is just a synonym for innovation and that hatred of cheating is really just hatred of innovation. Could be. At least that is some kind of explanation. Another possibility is that "cheating" is cheating that the talking heads on TV disapprove of and "skill" or, even better, "smart football" is cheating the talking heads on TV approve of. That's not that helpful, though. What determines which kinds of cheating are "cheating" for the talking heads and which kinds are "smart football?"
  4. o/t

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-31085912

    US President Barack Obama plans to close a tax loophole that allows US firms to avoid paying taxes on overseas profits, the White House says. His 2016 budget will impose a one-off 14% tax on US profits stashed overseas, as well as a 19% tax on any future profits as they are earned.

    The $238bn (£158bn) raised will be used to fund road projects in the US. The proposal is one of the main components of Mr Obama’s latest budget, due to be presented on Monday.

    The spending plan, including the proposal on overseas profits, would require approval from the Republican-controlled Congress to be made law, something seen as unlikely.

    Thoughts ? Steve’s often remarked on how, say, Microsoft is a very profitable Puerto Rico disk-printing operation, with a hugely loss-making research branch in Redmond.

    ( US corporation taxes are quite high at 35% IIRC (UK 22%, places like Ireland 12%)).

  5. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Has there been a shortage of people thinking hard for the last two weeks about the air pressure of the Patriots' footballs?

    Good point. I guess when there are even professional physicists and stuff weighing in on the issue, it’s hard to think of a different angle or take on it.

    But still, people are interested in your opinion on the matter, regardless of how true or accurate it is or if it’s a unique opinion.

    So what do you think? Do you think they’ve been been deliberately messing with the balls?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Where there's smoke there's often fire, especially when the fire would be in the interest of smart guys with a history of ruthlessness. But that's just my prejudice. I haven't looked into it. Do I have a lot of value to add on a question that isn't lacking for analysis by others?
  6. @Anonymous
    Good point. I guess when there are even professional physicists and stuff weighing in on the issue, it's hard to think of a different angle or take on it.

    But still, people are interested in your opinion on the matter, regardless of how true or accurate it is or if it's a unique opinion.

    So what do you think? Do you think they've been been deliberately messing with the balls?

    Where there’s smoke there’s often fire, especially when the fire would be in the interest of smart guys with a history of ruthlessness. But that’s just my prejudice. I haven’t looked into it. Do I have a lot of value to add on a question that isn’t lacking for analysis by others?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    You've attained guru status. The masses demand Your Take On Things.
    , @Danindc
    Much ado about nothing. The Pats are winners karma caught up to Seattle although Belichick totally froze at the end by not calling a time out. Carrol's awful play call saved them.
  7. Forget deflating footballs.

    Forget inflating footballs with air. Inflate them with helium.

    That ought to ramp up the excitement!

  8. Do I have a lot of value to add on a question that isn’t lacking for analysis by others?

    Well, you could always notice something.

  9. Am I the only one that says everybody just use the same ball … like when we were kids and it was a freakin’ game!

  10. Khan Academy’s take on Deflategate, with an Ideal Gas Law Lesson.

  11. @Steve Sailer
    Where there's smoke there's often fire, especially when the fire would be in the interest of smart guys with a history of ruthlessness. But that's just my prejudice. I haven't looked into it. Do I have a lot of value to add on a question that isn't lacking for analysis by others?

    You’ve attained guru status. The masses demand Your Take On Things.

  12. Sure, but if the Pats were doing it while nobody else was, then they were still cheating. And if they’ve been cheating, they should be stripped of their titles and wins.

    Someone is taking football way too seriously.

  13. Steve, here’s a story tying together some of the topics you’ve written about: Milken, Latinos, and LA. Looks like Michael Milken has found his latest racket:

    “Michael Milken pitches Latinos as economic force”

    http://www.laobserved.com/archive/2015/01/michael_milken_pitches_la.php

  14. Hey Anonymous, what do you think of the confessed ball-inflation cheat who just won league MVP?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Full disclosure: I'm a Packer backer. Did our QB really CONFESS cheating or just hint at it sort of like Mr. Brady?
  15. It would be trivial to design a closed cell foam football that doesn’t need inflation.

  16. I’m confused how this scandal is a thing. If deflating the ball gives the Patriots an edge, wouldn’t it give the other team an edge as well? Do they change balls on every down, using that teams ball? If so, why didn’t anyone think of this problem before?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    For that last 7 or 8 years, each team gets to supply the balls it uses on offense, except for kicking.
  17. “Balls!” said the Queen.
    “If I deflate them, I’ll be King!”

  18. OT

    Jeep multicultural Super Bowl ad? This land is their land? Huh?

    • Replies: @Watching from Japan
    Jeep multicultural Super Bowl ad? This land is their land? Huh?
    The commercial is not really multicultural. It expands the meaning of "this land" to include the whole world but shows foreign people living in their own lands, not America.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkWEGM0UQ-4
  19. In reference to the post about hand size, It would also mean smaller players would have a better chance of entering the league, and thus less damaging concussions and fewer lawsuits.

  20. I can’t believe the Seahawks didn’t run the ball.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch has fumbled 27 times in 2300 rushes and receptions in his career. If you figure half those fumbles are lost to the defense, that's about 0.6% chance of Lynch losing the ball on a fumble. Russell Wilson has a career 2.1% interception rate, plus Wilson has fumbled 31 times in his three year career, so there's also the chance of fumbling on a sack.
  21. @Trumpenprole
    I'm confused how this scandal is a thing. If deflating the ball gives the Patriots an edge, wouldn't it give the other team an edge as well? Do they change balls on every down, using that teams ball? If so, why didn't anyone think of this problem before?

    For that last 7 or 8 years, each team gets to supply the balls it uses on offense, except for kicking.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    Doesn't that rule just cry out to be exploited? Where else do we ever see such a thing? Do MLB teams supply their own balls to the pitcher? Do gamblers get to bring their own card decks to the casino tables?

    Do the Democrats get to plant their allies to moderate presidential debates?? Whoops...

  22. @Anonymous
    I can't believe the Seahawks didn't run the ball.

    Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch has fumbled 27 times in 2300 rushes and receptions in his career. If you figure half those fumbles are lost to the defense, that’s about 0.6% chance of Lynch losing the ball on a fumble. Russell Wilson has a career 2.1% interception rate, plus Wilson has fumbled 31 times in his three year career, so there’s also the chance of fumbling on a sack.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Also Lynch only would have had to hold on for half a yard.
  23. @Steve Sailer
    Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch has fumbled 27 times in 2300 rushes and receptions in his career. If you figure half those fumbles are lost to the defense, that's about 0.6% chance of Lynch losing the ball on a fumble. Russell Wilson has a career 2.1% interception rate, plus Wilson has fumbled 31 times in his three year career, so there's also the chance of fumbling on a sack.

    Also Lynch only would have had to hold on for half a yard.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Lynch led the NFL in rushing touchdowns the last two years.

    Of course, if the Patriot defensive back hadn't made a great play, we'd be complimenting Seattle on their brilliant playcalling on the winning touchdown pass.

    I suspect the poor Seahawk receiver will have nightmares about the play. Watching in slow motion it's a classic nightmare: everything's going perfectly, your hands are inches from catching the Super Bowl winning pass, and then -- bam -- somebody bangs through and takes it from you.
  24. @Anonymous
    Also Lynch only would have had to hold on for half a yard.

    Lynch led the NFL in rushing touchdowns the last two years.

    Of course, if the Patriot defensive back hadn’t made a great play, we’d be complimenting Seattle on their brilliant playcalling on the winning touchdown pass.

    I suspect the poor Seahawk receiver will have nightmares about the play. Watching in slow motion it’s a classic nightmare: everything’s going perfectly, your hands are inches from catching the Super Bowl winning pass, and then — bam — somebody bangs through and takes it from you.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    You're right. But that's why it's insane not to run there. You really shouldn't be relying on your playcalling, brilliant or otherwise, half a yard from the goal line.
    , @wiseguy
    From the last minute of the game, the brawl deserves more consternation than Carroll's play call.

    I guess the media would rather over overlook that embarrassing moment and not pile on the NFL for now.

    Also, Belichick's decision not to call a timeout during the last series was worse. There was no downside to calling a timeout and giving Brady a chance to drive down for a field goal in the event that the Seahawks scored.

  25. I propose that they get rid of the kicked extra point and make the 2-point conversion mandatory after every touchdown. Lotta drama there.

    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    At that point, it really would be time to call it something else than "football".
  26. @Steve Sailer
    Has there been a shortage of people thinking hard for the last two weeks about the air pressure of the Patriots' footballs?

    A football is a prolate spheroid. Deflating it would probably distort the shape enough to increase the drag on the ball and make it more difficult to throw for distance, or even accuracy. So I think it’s a bad idea.

  27. @Steve Sailer
    Lynch led the NFL in rushing touchdowns the last two years.

    Of course, if the Patriot defensive back hadn't made a great play, we'd be complimenting Seattle on their brilliant playcalling on the winning touchdown pass.

    I suspect the poor Seahawk receiver will have nightmares about the play. Watching in slow motion it's a classic nightmare: everything's going perfectly, your hands are inches from catching the Super Bowl winning pass, and then -- bam -- somebody bangs through and takes it from you.

    You’re right. But that’s why it’s insane not to run there. You really shouldn’t be relying on your playcalling, brilliant or otherwise, half a yard from the goal line.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Especially when you have Marshawn Lynch and a timeout.
  28. “Jeep multicultural Super Bowl ad? This land is their land? Huh?”

    I thought the same thing.

  29. @Anonymous
    You're right. But that's why it's insane not to run there. You really shouldn't be relying on your playcalling, brilliant or otherwise, half a yard from the goal line.

    Especially when you have Marshawn Lynch and a timeout.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Yep.

    That was an insane series of plays at the end though. I though the Pats had the game in the bag but then the Seahawks managed to make a drive back with that incredible catch. Then I thought the Seahawks would definitely win with Lynch running the ball.
  30. @Steve Sailer
    Lynch led the NFL in rushing touchdowns the last two years.

    Of course, if the Patriot defensive back hadn't made a great play, we'd be complimenting Seattle on their brilliant playcalling on the winning touchdown pass.

    I suspect the poor Seahawk receiver will have nightmares about the play. Watching in slow motion it's a classic nightmare: everything's going perfectly, your hands are inches from catching the Super Bowl winning pass, and then -- bam -- somebody bangs through and takes it from you.

    From the last minute of the game, the brawl deserves more consternation than Carroll’s play call.

    I guess the media would rather over overlook that embarrassing moment and not pile on the NFL for now.

    Also, Belichick’s decision not to call a timeout during the last series was worse. There was no downside to calling a timeout and giving Brady a chance to drive down for a field goal in the event that the Seahawks scored.

  31. In a semi-similar situation, the late Steve McNair drove the Tennessee Titans in a 1990s Super Bowl down to the 9 yard line with six seconds left (after an incredible scramble play). The winded Rams defensive linemen were hoping he didn’t try to run it in because they’d never catch him. They were happy when he threw it.

    Of course, it was a good pass, and a good catch, but the Ram defender made an outstanding tackle on the 1-yard-line to save the game.

    That’s a fewer regrets situation, though, because the Titans didn’t make a bad decision or a bad execution, they just ran out of time a yard from the goalline.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    An example of a smart, sophisticated football coach overthinking a situation where lesser coaches would have just given the ball to Lynch.
  32. @Steve Sailer
    Especially when you have Marshawn Lynch and a timeout.

    Yep.

    That was an insane series of plays at the end though. I though the Pats had the game in the bag but then the Seahawks managed to make a drive back with that incredible catch. Then I thought the Seahawks would definitely win with Lynch running the ball.

  33. I thought the Seahags had the edge and they did, except the end part.

  34. I’m having a weird sense of deja vu. Like I’ve made this point to you before. As a conservative, you should suggest that the league experiment, perhaps in preseason, with <fill in your idea here>. Never force people to be unwilling participants in a radical experiment.

  35. I thought Edelman looked like the MVP for New England. Just as Lynch almost always got another yard more than seemed possible on his runs, Edelman squirmed for an extra few yards quite often on receptions or punt returns.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Yes, Edelman had a great game and definitely could have been MVP. Gronkowski had a good game too. I guess they had to give it to Brady though.
  36. Carroll’s defense of his fateful play-call made sense.

    He planned on throwing on second, where the clock would stop in the event of an incompletion; then he would run on third and take the timeout if that failed; and finally he would have had the option to call anything on fourth.

    If he ran on second down, he would have likely called his timeout if he got stuffed. If he ran on third down and got stuffed again, there would have been a good chance of the clock running out before a fourth play could be pulled off.

    So essentially, he’d have two chances to run it in either way, and his pass call guaranteed (unless it resulted in a turnover, of course) that he would be able to take another shot in addition to those two runs.

  37. @Steve Sailer
    I thought Edelman looked like the MVP for New England. Just as Lynch almost always got another yard more than seemed possible on his runs, Edelman squirmed for an extra few yards quite often on receptions or punt returns.

    Yes, Edelman had a great game and definitely could have been MVP. Gronkowski had a good game too. I guess they had to give it to Brady though.

  38. @Steve Sailer
    In a semi-similar situation, the late Steve McNair drove the Tennessee Titans in a 1990s Super Bowl down to the 9 yard line with six seconds left (after an incredible scramble play). The winded Rams defensive linemen were hoping he didn't try to run it in because they'd never catch him. They were happy when he threw it.

    Of course, it was a good pass, and a good catch, but the Ram defender made an outstanding tackle on the 1-yard-line to save the game.

    That's a fewer regrets situation, though, because the Titans didn't make a bad decision or a bad execution, they just ran out of time a yard from the goalline.

    An example of a smart, sophisticated football coach overthinking a situation where lesser coaches would have just given the ball to Lynch.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Haha good point. Carroll is known for overthinking stuff and trying trick plays and going for it on 4th down. An old school meathead coach would have just given the ball to Lynch and won.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pete_Carroll#Coaching_style

    Carroll draws coaching inspiration from the 1974 book The Inner Game of Tennis, by tennis coach W. Timothy Gallwey, which he picked up as graduate student at the University of the Pacific; he summarizes the philosophy he took from the book as "all about clearing the clutter in the interactions between your conscious and subconscious mind" enabled "through superior practice and a clear approach. Focus, clarity and belief in yourself are what allows [sic] you to express your ability without discursive thoughts and concerns."[83] He wrote a foreword for a later edition, noting that athletes "must clear their minds of all confusion and earn the ability to let themselves play freely."[22] He also cites influences from psychologists Abraham Maslow and Carl Jung, Buddhist meditation master Chögyam Trungpa and Zen master D. T. Suzuki.
     
    , @Steve Sailer
    You could run once, call time out, throw, and then still have time for a third play. The downside is the defense would be more expecting this sequence.
    , @the raven

    An example of a smart, sophisticated football coach overthinking a situation where lesser coaches would have just given the ball to Lynch.
     
    Reminds me of the NBA Finals two years ago. Popovich might be the best coach there is, but he decided to keep Tim Duncan out on the last play to better guard the three point shot. The Heat missed, but then Duncan wasn't there to get the rebound, and they hit the next one. May have cost them the championship.
    , @Father O'Hara
    Edelman has a Jewish dad and a White mom. It says he was raised "Christian" but declares himself a Jew. Did he do that for monetary gain,or he doesn't like his mother,or what,but I have noticed in the Jewish/White marriages the mother is kind of 2nd class.You grow up in a wealthy Jewish enclave you're gonna want to be like the cool kids...I guess. Edelman,being a stud from day one,should have the balls to be what he is,a mix,or maybe he saw Exodus and got all hopped up on being Super Jew?? Blacks ALWAYS go black,tho its interesting that Barry will only reference his white family. He hates them,but he seems proud of 'em. Seems jew/white mixes tend to go Jew. I know a guy whose mother is Catholic and married a Jew;he dumped her and now she is "shtruggling" to get by. I don't think her kids are in any way Jewish.I never talk personal stuff with them.One of the girls just had a baby,unwed,by --I kid you not--a Honduran lad.
  39. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    An example of a smart, sophisticated football coach overthinking a situation where lesser coaches would have just given the ball to Lynch.

    Haha good point. Carroll is known for overthinking stuff and trying trick plays and going for it on 4th down. An old school meathead coach would have just given the ball to Lynch and won.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pete_Carroll#Coaching_style

    Carroll draws coaching inspiration from the 1974 book The Inner Game of Tennis, by tennis coach W. Timothy Gallwey, which he picked up as graduate student at the University of the Pacific; he summarizes the philosophy he took from the book as “all about clearing the clutter in the interactions between your conscious and subconscious mind” enabled “through superior practice and a clear approach. Focus, clarity and belief in yourself are what allows [sic] you to express your ability without discursive thoughts and concerns.”[83] He wrote a foreword for a later edition, noting that athletes “must clear their minds of all confusion and earn the ability to let themselves play freely.”[22] He also cites influences from psychologists Abraham Maslow and Carl Jung, Buddhist meditation master Chögyam Trungpa and Zen master D. T. Suzuki.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    All that Zen stuff seems to keep Pete Carroll looking pretty good for a 63-year-old. He could play both roles in a remake of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.
    , @Hibernian
    He beat the Pack with tricks the Cheeseheads fell for.
  40. @Steve Sailer
    An example of a smart, sophisticated football coach overthinking a situation where lesser coaches would have just given the ball to Lynch.

    You could run once, call time out, throw, and then still have time for a third play. The downside is the defense would be more expecting this sequence.

  41. @Steve Sailer
    Where there's smoke there's often fire, especially when the fire would be in the interest of smart guys with a history of ruthlessness. But that's just my prejudice. I haven't looked into it. Do I have a lot of value to add on a question that isn't lacking for analysis by others?

    Much ado about nothing. The Pats are winners karma caught up to Seattle although Belichick totally froze at the end by not calling a time out. Carrol’s awful play call saved them.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Belichik might not have called time because he wanted to hurry up and let the Seahawks score so the Pats would have a final shot at winning it. Which would make Carroll look even worse.
  42. Wilson did most of his damage in the Super Bowl when dropping back about 8 or even ten yards then throwing deep or running. The play he got intercepted on, however, was the kind of quick short pass over the middle that Brady had been using all game. But Brady is a half foot taller and can see better over linemen.

    Wilson’s interception was like a shorter version of Brady’s second interception: decent throw to a man briefly open, but a terrific individual defensive effort. (Let’s not discuss Brady’s first interception.)

  43. Cunning should be the word for this ‘tactic’, clever should be reserved for novel plays.

  44. @Anonymous
    Haha good point. Carroll is known for overthinking stuff and trying trick plays and going for it on 4th down. An old school meathead coach would have just given the ball to Lynch and won.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pete_Carroll#Coaching_style

    Carroll draws coaching inspiration from the 1974 book The Inner Game of Tennis, by tennis coach W. Timothy Gallwey, which he picked up as graduate student at the University of the Pacific; he summarizes the philosophy he took from the book as "all about clearing the clutter in the interactions between your conscious and subconscious mind" enabled "through superior practice and a clear approach. Focus, clarity and belief in yourself are what allows [sic] you to express your ability without discursive thoughts and concerns."[83] He wrote a foreword for a later edition, noting that athletes "must clear their minds of all confusion and earn the ability to let themselves play freely."[22] He also cites influences from psychologists Abraham Maslow and Carl Jung, Buddhist meditation master Chögyam Trungpa and Zen master D. T. Suzuki.
     

    All that Zen stuff seems to keep Pete Carroll looking pretty good for a 63-year-old. He could play both roles in a remake of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Yeah he does look good for his age and is in shape and spry and energetic on the sidelines. Belichik looks miserable and looks as if he's trying to hide his paunch with those sweatshirts he wears.
  45. Pete Carroll took all of the blame for the call for a pass, but it was Russell Wilson who threw it into dangerous coverage and lost. I’m sure Carroll didn’t expect that Wilson would do that, but Wilson had really screwed up seriously last game as well with his 4 interceptions.

    Even Brady screws these things up sometimes when you least expect it. I really do find some of the decisions quarterbacks make to be hard to understand. When just about everything should be telling them, the worst thing in the world would be to throw an interception now, they just throw the football into a crowd, or just throw it up for grabs.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    It was a quick slant play. You have to throw it right away basically. In order for the play to be successful, you can't rely hesitate. You have to commit the throw right away. So it's more on the play call itself than the QB in that situation.
  46. @Steve Sailer
    All that Zen stuff seems to keep Pete Carroll looking pretty good for a 63-year-old. He could play both roles in a remake of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.

    Yeah he does look good for his age and is in shape and spry and energetic on the sidelines. Belichik looks miserable and looks as if he’s trying to hide his paunch with those sweatshirts he wears.

  47. @Danindc
    Much ado about nothing. The Pats are winners karma caught up to Seattle although Belichick totally froze at the end by not calling a time out. Carrol's awful play call saved them.

    Belichik might not have called time because he wanted to hurry up and let the Seahawks score so the Pats would have a final shot at winning it. Which would make Carroll look even worse.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    Then you call timeout and let them score. And save 25 seconds.
  48. @candid_observer
    Pete Carroll took all of the blame for the call for a pass, but it was Russell Wilson who threw it into dangerous coverage and lost. I'm sure Carroll didn't expect that Wilson would do that, but Wilson had really screwed up seriously last game as well with his 4 interceptions.

    Even Brady screws these things up sometimes when you least expect it. I really do find some of the decisions quarterbacks make to be hard to understand. When just about everything should be telling them, the worst thing in the world would be to throw an interception now, they just throw the football into a crowd, or just throw it up for grabs.

    It was a quick slant play. You have to throw it right away basically. In order for the play to be successful, you can’t rely hesitate. You have to commit the throw right away. So it’s more on the play call itself than the QB in that situation.

  49. That’s got to be one of the worst play calls in history. I can’t remember the last time there was play call that bad.

  50. The ad that bugged me was the Always “like a girl” ad. I hate having that nonsense stuffed down my throat.

    In her book, “The War on Boys”, Christina Hoff Sommers offered a clue as to why “girls’ self-confidence drops” as they enter their teens… they come into contact with reality. She pointed out that the group in the survey with the highest self-confidence was the one with the lowest outlook: young black boys, who are all certain that they’re going to be Rap Stars and professional athletes when they grow up. Girls are simply quicker than the boys to realize that they’re not all going to be International Environmentalist Super-Lawyers.

    The ad was pure feminist tripe.

    • Replies: @BurplesonAFB
    The girls did throw and punch like girls though.
  51. @Anonymous
    OT

    Jeep multicultural Super Bowl ad? This land is their land? Huh?

    Jeep multicultural Super Bowl ad? This land is their land? Huh?
    The commercial is not really multicultural. It expands the meaning of “this land” to include the whole world but shows foreign people living in their own lands, not America.

    • Replies: @Auntie Analogue
    The Jeep spot is stealth-multicultural and stealth-Open-Borders because the spot is actually globalist.
  52. Notice how the media is all on Carroll for the bad call and not Wilson for the horrible read.

    WILSON DIDN’T HAVE TO THROW THE DAMN BALL. THEY HAD TWO MORE DOWNS AND TIME ON THE CLOCK.

    Wilson through five pics in the last two games … he’s not that great a player.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    On a quick slant at the goal line, you have to throw it right away. No real time to read after the ball is snapped. If Wilson should be blamed for a bad read, it would have to be a bad read before the snap.
  53. @Johanus de Morgateroyde
    The ad that bugged me was the Always "like a girl" ad. I hate having that nonsense stuffed down my throat.

    In her book, "The War on Boys", Christina Hoff Sommers offered a clue as to why "girls' self-confidence drops" as they enter their teens... they come into contact with reality. She pointed out that the group in the survey with the highest self-confidence was the one with the lowest outlook: young black boys, who are all certain that they're going to be Rap Stars and professional athletes when they grow up. Girls are simply quicker than the boys to realize that they're not all going to be International Environmentalist Super-Lawyers.

    The ad was pure feminist tripe.

    The girls did throw and punch like girls though.

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    Its child abuse to put some boy in the ad and some bitch cross-examining him. And it was a tampon ad?? Not even Nike or some overpriced junk like that where they show the manly gals running thru the mountains with that nasty look on their face.
  54. @Watching from Japan
    Jeep multicultural Super Bowl ad? This land is their land? Huh?
    The commercial is not really multicultural. It expands the meaning of "this land" to include the whole world but shows foreign people living in their own lands, not America.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkWEGM0UQ-4

    The Jeep spot is stealth-multicultural and stealth-Open-Borders because the spot is actually globalist.

    • Replies: @Watching from Japan
    The Jeep spot is stealth-multicultural and stealth-Open-Borders because the spot is actually globalist.

    I don't see it. To me the jeep ad looks like a very traditional take on the world as a place full of strange and beautiful lands to explore and exoctic people to meet. It's the type of concept they might have done for an airline in the Mad Men era.
  55. @Haven Studboy
    Notice how the media is all on Carroll for the bad call and not Wilson for the horrible read.

    WILSON DIDN'T HAVE TO THROW THE DAMN BALL. THEY HAD TWO MORE DOWNS AND TIME ON THE CLOCK.

    Wilson through five pics in the last two games ... he's not that great a player.

    On a quick slant at the goal line, you have to throw it right away. No real time to read after the ball is snapped. If Wilson should be blamed for a bad read, it would have to be a bad read before the snap.

    • Replies: @Haven Studboy
    The loop footage shows it wasn't that quick a slant. Go watch it.

    The qb should've chucked the ball into the stands but he didn't because he couldn't see the defender because like Steve said he's not tall.

    BTW Marshawn is not a great goal line stand ball carrier. He mostly fails from one yard out in recent history.
  56. @Anonymous
    On a quick slant at the goal line, you have to throw it right away. No real time to read after the ball is snapped. If Wilson should be blamed for a bad read, it would have to be a bad read before the snap.

    The loop footage shows it wasn’t that quick a slant. Go watch it.

    The qb should’ve chucked the ball into the stands but he didn’t because he couldn’t see the defender because like Steve said he’s not tall.

    BTW Marshawn is not a great goal line stand ball carrier. He mostly fails from one yard out in recent history.

  57. The game was great, ads terrible. Drive a Honda and you’ll never see your son? Buy this insurance and your kid will die? A pc lecture browbeating on boys? America belongs to … foreigners?

    Only the Neeson ad Brosnan ads were funny.

    Carrols call has to be the worst in recent memory. Why not throw to the sideline? Worst its out of bounds? Or back of the end zone to play the height advatage?

    • Replies: @Coemgen

    The game was great, ads terrible.
     
    Agreed. Also, in addition to the ads, the Super Bowl XLIX Halftime Show was horrible - especially in comparison to last year's show.
  58. The intended receiver never even got in the end zone, so even if he’d made the catch the he wouldn’t have scored.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    If he makes the catch momentum almost surely puts him in the end zone.
  59. The Carroll bad call meme is crap. QB had multiple reads and he blew it:

    Carroll said Wilson also had a read on the other side to Baldwin. But he said Wilson went to the right place with the ball.

    http://seattletimes.com/html/seahawks/2025601820_seahawkscondotta02xml.html

    It’s all bs. The guy obviously didn’t go “to the right place with the ball” …

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It's tough to be a Super Bowl winning quarterback.
    , @Anonymous
    Like Steve said, Wilson was at his best when scrambling or going deep. He had more trouble when sitting in the pocket and trying to pick apart the defense with short passes, which Brady was excelling at in the game. This was good enough for most of the game for the Seahawks because Lynch was rushing well. This probably should have factored in the decision making of that last play.
  60. @Luke Lea
    I propose that they get rid of the kicked extra point and make the 2-point conversion mandatory after every touchdown. Lotta drama there.

    At that point, it really would be time to call it something else than “football”.

  61. @Haven Studboy
    The Carroll bad call meme is crap. QB had multiple reads and he blew it:

    Carroll said Wilson also had a read on the other side to Baldwin. But he said Wilson went to the right place with the ball.

    http://seattletimes.com/html/seahawks/2025601820_seahawkscondotta02xml.html

    It's all bs. The guy obviously didn't go "to the right place with the ball" ...

    It’s tough to be a Super Bowl winning quarterback.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    Main reason Carroll should have handed to Lynch is Wilson is not that good. He shouldnt have been in that position. Outside chance New England would've let them score. Lynch isa bull who was on his game - he gets in on the next play. Terrible terrible blunder by Seattle.

    Only worse play call I remember was Vikings letting Favre pass when they had chance to set ball for 47 ysrd field goal. He rolls out throws across field- picked off and Saints win the super bowl. Tragic for Viking fans.
  62. @Whiskey
    The game was great, ads terrible. Drive a Honda and you'll never see your son? Buy this insurance and your kid will die? A pc lecture browbeating on boys? America belongs to ... foreigners?

    Only the Neeson ad Brosnan ads were funny.

    Carrols call has to be the worst in recent memory. Why not throw to the sideline? Worst its out of bounds? Or back of the end zone to play the height advatage?

    The game was great, ads terrible.

    Agreed. Also, in addition to the ads, the Super Bowl XLIX Halftime Show was horrible – especially in comparison to last year’s show.

  63. “Belichik looks miserable and looks as if he’s trying to hide his paunch with those sweatshirts he wears.”

    As a pundit on the NFL Network said, “he looks liked just got bailed out for his DUI”.

    Also, the commercials this year sucked.

  64. @Auntie Analogue
    The Jeep spot is stealth-multicultural and stealth-Open-Borders because the spot is actually globalist.

    The Jeep spot is stealth-multicultural and stealth-Open-Borders because the spot is actually globalist.

    I don’t see it. To me the jeep ad looks like a very traditional take on the world as a place full of strange and beautiful lands to explore and exoctic people to meet. It’s the type of concept they might have done for an airline in the Mad Men era.

  65. I didn’t see a single anti white man, all-miscegenation-all-the-time Super Bowl advert — I DVR’d the game, so it took me about 30 minutes to watch it. Great game!

    So am I right? Were the ads chockablock with lame, weak, cowardly, unattractive, idiotic, retarded, fat, doofusy, sexually repulsive white men being put in their place by strong, competent, brilliant, great-looking, amazing black men with at least one white woman clinging to each of his arms? And lots and lots of mix-raced … babies being held by whitey-white women?

  66. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Haven Studboy
    The Carroll bad call meme is crap. QB had multiple reads and he blew it:

    Carroll said Wilson also had a read on the other side to Baldwin. But he said Wilson went to the right place with the ball.

    http://seattletimes.com/html/seahawks/2025601820_seahawkscondotta02xml.html

    It's all bs. The guy obviously didn't go "to the right place with the ball" ...

    Like Steve said, Wilson was at his best when scrambling or going deep. He had more trouble when sitting in the pocket and trying to pick apart the defense with short passes, which Brady was excelling at in the game. This was good enough for most of the game for the Seahawks because Lynch was rushing well. This probably should have factored in the decision making of that last play.

  67. @Anonymous

    If so, the NFL should follow the Patriots’ lead and reduce the air pressure for all footballs, including the kicking and punting balls, because this would make the NFL more entertaining.
     
    Sure, but if the Pats were doing it while nobody else was, then they were still cheating. And if they've been cheating, they should be stripped of their titles and wins.

    Sure, but if the Pats were doing it while nobody else was, then they were still cheating. And if they’ve been cheating, they should be stripped of their titles and wins.

    I’ve never understood what “cheating” is in the context of professional sports. An offensive lineman holding on every play and getting away with it is skill. A receiver pushing off on an out route, but doing it with subtlety so that he gets away with it is skill. Deflating footballs is cheating.

    Anon suggests the answer is that “cheating” is just a synonym for innovation and that hatred of cheating is really just hatred of innovation. Could be. At least that is some kind of explanation. Another possibility is that “cheating” is cheating that the talking heads on TV disapprove of and “skill” or, even better, “smart football” is cheating the talking heads on TV approve of. That’s not that helpful, though. What determines which kinds of cheating are “cheating” for the talking heads and which kinds are “smart football?”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    You don't see how fiddling with the basic equipment of the game that's supposed to be standardized and the same for all competitors would be cheating?
  68. @Anonymous
    Belichik might not have called time because he wanted to hurry up and let the Seahawks score so the Pats would have a final shot at winning it. Which would make Carroll look even worse.

    Then you call timeout and let them score. And save 25 seconds.

    • Replies: @CJ
    Then you call timeout and let them score. And save 25 seconds.

    Yes, your reasoning seems sound to me. I cannot understand why Belichick did not call a timeout there. Had the Seahawks run some kind of end-around sweep and scored, or had Wilson scrambled and then run it in, there might have been no time at all left on the clock.

    Now that I've heard Carroll's explanation for the slant pass play call, I understand it -- it's still a bad play call, probably the result of overthinking, but I understand it. What's impossible to fathom is why New England didn't call a timeout. It looks like Belichick's brain fart was bailed out by Carroll's overstrategizing (and a great physical play by the NE defender).

  69. @Steve Sailer
    It's tough to be a Super Bowl winning quarterback.

    Main reason Carroll should have handed to Lynch is Wilson is not that good. He shouldnt have been in that position. Outside chance New England would’ve let them score. Lynch isa bull who was on his game – he gets in on the next play. Terrible terrible blunder by Seattle.

    Only worse play call I remember was Vikings letting Favre pass when they had chance to set ball for 47 ysrd field goal. He rolls out throws across field- picked off and Saints win the super bowl. Tragic for Viking fans.

  70. @Steve Sailer
    An example of a smart, sophisticated football coach overthinking a situation where lesser coaches would have just given the ball to Lynch.

    An example of a smart, sophisticated football coach overthinking a situation where lesser coaches would have just given the ball to Lynch.

    Reminds me of the NBA Finals two years ago. Popovich might be the best coach there is, but he decided to keep Tim Duncan out on the last play to better guard the three point shot. The Heat missed, but then Duncan wasn’t there to get the rebound, and they hit the next one. May have cost them the championship.

  71. @Steve Sailer
    The intended receiver never even got in the end zone, so even if he'd made the catch the he wouldn't have scored.

    If he makes the catch momentum almost surely puts him in the end zone.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The receiver got bounced hard by the guy making the interception and never reached the goal line.
  72. What about that Seattle cornerback, the one that got picked on all day? What’s he going to be doing year after next?

  73. @Steve Sailer
    For that last 7 or 8 years, each team gets to supply the balls it uses on offense, except for kicking.

    Doesn’t that rule just cry out to be exploited? Where else do we ever see such a thing? Do MLB teams supply their own balls to the pitcher? Do gamblers get to bring their own card decks to the casino tables?

    Do the Democrats get to plant their allies to moderate presidential debates?? Whoops…

  74. There would be more one-handed and fingertip catches, better passes (especially in the second half of the season when the weather turns bad), fewer fumbles,

    All depends what kind of game you want to see. Do you want it to resemble more Rugby, or more Jai-Alay? (Maybe replace the football with a velcro baseball…)

    Doesn’t a high-flying passing game imply more injuries?

    I think it would be cool to replace the football with a 20# medicine ball, but I like running plays…

  75. Useful breakdown of the statistics of the play call:

    http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/eye-on-football/25017292/how-unlikely-was-russell-wilsons-game-ending-interception

    Since 1998, teams had been faced with second-and-goal from inside the 2-yard line, with less than five minutes left in a game where they were down between four and eight points (so it is still a one-possession game but they are in need of a touchown) 81 times. Of those 81 plays, 47 were runs and 34 were passes. That’s a pass play rate of 42 percent, which is not all that low, but it’s significantly higher than the rate at which Seattle called passes in 2-yards-to-go situations this season and over the past three.

    On those 47 running plays, teams had scored 25 touchdowns and fumbled twice. That’s a touchdown rate of 53.2 percent. Pretty good stuff. Considering it was Marshawn Lynch in the backfield, I think it’s fairly safe to say Seattle’s odds of scoring if they had run the ball might have been even higher than that.

    Meanwhile, on those 34 pass plays, teams had gone 14 of 33 for 14 touchdowns and one sack. That’s a touchdown rate of 41.2 percent, significantly lower when compared to the rate of teams that ran the ball in similar situations.

    Here’s another thing: Of those 33 passes, NONE was intercepted. Wilson’s pick was truly the first of its kind in a very long time. It’s no wonder why Lynch wasn’t in the mood to talk about it after the game.

    • Replies: @candid_observer
    Just to follow up a bit on this statistical analysis, the play calling per se doesn't seem so crazy.

    Yes, the touchdown rate for running was a bit higher than by throwing, but the turnover rate certainly was higher as well -- two of the 47 runs were fumbled, but NONE of the 34 pass plays.

    In a situation in which one has three plays to get into the endzone, throwing in a pass is a pretty good idea, especially when it will put the defense in a position in which it can't assume a play will be a run.

  76. @Danindc
    If he makes the catch momentum almost surely puts him in the end zone.

    The receiver got bounced hard by the guy making the interception and never reached the goal line.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    Because he was beaten to the spot. All credit to Butler but if Lockett catches the ball it changes their positioning and he falls into the end zone. Speculative of course.... Butler made a spectacular play - any hesitation and they lose.
  77. @Steve Sailer
    Has there been a shortage of people thinking hard for the last two weeks about the air pressure of the Patriots' footballs?

    Further thoughts on Bill Cosby?

  78. @Steve Sailer
    The receiver got bounced hard by the guy making the interception and never reached the goal line.

    Because he was beaten to the spot. All credit to Butler but if Lockett catches the ball it changes their positioning and he falls into the end zone. Speculative of course…. Butler made a spectacular play – any hesitation and they lose.

  79. @candid_observer
    Useful breakdown of the statistics of the play call:

    http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/eye-on-football/25017292/how-unlikely-was-russell-wilsons-game-ending-interception


    Since 1998, teams had been faced with second-and-goal from inside the 2-yard line, with less than five minutes left in a game where they were down between four and eight points (so it is still a one-possession game but they are in need of a touchown) 81 times. Of those 81 plays, 47 were runs and 34 were passes. That's a pass play rate of 42 percent, which is not all that low, but it's significantly higher than the rate at which Seattle called passes in 2-yards-to-go situations this season and over the past three.

    On those 47 running plays, teams had scored 25 touchdowns and fumbled twice. That's a touchdown rate of 53.2 percent. Pretty good stuff. Considering it was Marshawn Lynch in the backfield, I think it's fairly safe to say Seattle's odds of scoring if they had run the ball might have been even higher than that.

    Meanwhile, on those 34 pass plays, teams had gone 14 of 33 for 14 touchdowns and one sack. That's a touchdown rate of 41.2 percent, significantly lower when compared to the rate of teams that ran the ball in similar situations.

    Here's another thing: Of those 33 passes, NONE was intercepted. Wilson's pick was truly the first of its kind in a very long time. It's no wonder why Lynch wasn't in the mood to talk about it after the game.

     

    Just to follow up a bit on this statistical analysis, the play calling per se doesn’t seem so crazy.

    Yes, the touchdown rate for running was a bit higher than by throwing, but the turnover rate certainly was higher as well — two of the 47 runs were fumbled, but NONE of the 34 pass plays.

    In a situation in which one has three plays to get into the endzone, throwing in a pass is a pretty good idea, especially when it will put the defense in a position in which it can’t assume a play will be a run.

  80. @BurplesonAFB
    The girls did throw and punch like girls though.

    Its child abuse to put some boy in the ad and some bitch cross-examining him. And it was a tampon ad?? Not even Nike or some overpriced junk like that where they show the manly gals running thru the mountains with that nasty look on their face.

  81. @Steve Sailer
    An example of a smart, sophisticated football coach overthinking a situation where lesser coaches would have just given the ball to Lynch.

    Edelman has a Jewish dad and a White mom. It says he was raised “Christian” but declares himself a Jew. Did he do that for monetary gain,or he doesn’t like his mother,or what,but I have noticed in the Jewish/White marriages the mother is kind of 2nd class.You grow up in a wealthy Jewish enclave you’re gonna want to be like the cool kids…I guess. Edelman,being a stud from day one,should have the balls to be what he is,a mix,or maybe he saw Exodus and got all hopped up on being Super Jew?? Blacks ALWAYS go black,tho its interesting that Barry will only reference his white family. He hates them,but he seems proud of ’em. Seems jew/white mixes tend to go Jew. I know a guy whose mother is Catholic and married a Jew;he dumped her and now she is “shtruggling” to get by. I don’t think her kids are in any way Jewish.I never talk personal stuff with them.One of the girls just had a baby,unwed,by –I kid you not–a Honduran lad.

  82. @Bill

    Sure, but if the Pats were doing it while nobody else was, then they were still cheating. And if they’ve been cheating, they should be stripped of their titles and wins.
     
    I've never understood what "cheating" is in the context of professional sports. An offensive lineman holding on every play and getting away with it is skill. A receiver pushing off on an out route, but doing it with subtlety so that he gets away with it is skill. Deflating footballs is cheating.

    Anon suggests the answer is that "cheating" is just a synonym for innovation and that hatred of cheating is really just hatred of innovation. Could be. At least that is some kind of explanation. Another possibility is that "cheating" is cheating that the talking heads on TV disapprove of and "skill" or, even better, "smart football" is cheating the talking heads on TV approve of. That's not that helpful, though. What determines which kinds of cheating are "cheating" for the talking heads and which kinds are "smart football?"

    You don’t see how fiddling with the basic equipment of the game that’s supposed to be standardized and the same for all competitors would be cheating?

    • Replies: @Bill
    Your reading comprehension is poor.
  83. @Danindc
    Then you call timeout and let them score. And save 25 seconds.

    Then you call timeout and let them score. And save 25 seconds.

    Yes, your reasoning seems sound to me. I cannot understand why Belichick did not call a timeout there. Had the Seahawks run some kind of end-around sweep and scored, or had Wilson scrambled and then run it in, there might have been no time at all left on the clock.

    Now that I’ve heard Carroll’s explanation for the slant pass play call, I understand it — it’s still a bad play call, probably the result of overthinking, but I understand it. What’s impossible to fathom is why New England didn’t call a timeout. It looks like Belichick’s brain fart was bailed out by Carroll’s overstrategizing (and a great physical play by the NE defender).

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Chess game, boys. Carroll was looking for Belichick to take that timeout. That would give him an extra shot at running, Seattle's strong suit, as he only had one timeout of his own left. Belichick forced his hand by not calling the timeout, so if they didn't score on that play, they'd have had to call their last timeout. Third down would have been it, whether they scored or not, as there would be no time left and no timeouts. Again, Belichick forced his rival out of his comfort zone.

    For all his alleged beastliness, the Crotch Grabber averaged fewer yards per carry than he did in the regular season. He did nothing in the first half, which is where Seattle really lost the game.

    To the weenie whining about fair play, did you see the game? The zebras didn't cover themselves up with glory. In the past 5-7 years, I've never seen a punter get hit in the plant leg and not have the 15-yard penalty call...until this game. Seattle also seems to have added the Bronco/Raven cut blocking schemes to their repertoire.

    To bring things full circle on this HBD blog, key to victory is knowing how to act. Baldwin's poop celebration gave the Patriots a shorter field at the end of the third quarter, and Bennett's stupid offside took the Patriots out of a dangerous position on their own goal line at the end. There's a huge difference between a kneel-down and an actual running play to run out the clock. Boyz, "acting white" is the way to go in that situation.

    http://www.breitbart.com/sports/2015/02/02/legion-of-bums-take-the-class-out-of-classic/
  84. @Anonymous
    You don't see how fiddling with the basic equipment of the game that's supposed to be standardized and the same for all competitors would be cheating?

    Your reading comprehension is poor.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Your sense of sportsmanship and fair play is non-existent.
  85. @Bill
    Your reading comprehension is poor.

    Your sense of sportsmanship and fair play is non-existent.

    • Replies: @Bill
    That is purest projection.
  86. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “1984 Was Right: America Now a Nation of Proles Obsessed With Super Bowl”

    “Proles upset over Seahawks’ bad play calling while ignoring greater evils committed by Obama”

    http://www.infowars.com/1984-was-right-america-now-a-nation-of-proles-obsessed-with-super-bowl/

    Americans are more outraged over Seahawks Coach Pete Carroll’s play calling during the Super Bowl than they are about President Obama, revealing that America is now a nation of “proles” obsessed with football, beer and gambling, just as the novel 1984 predicted.

    Twitter exploded in debate this morning over Carroll’s decision to call a pass play on second-and-goal instead of handing the ball to running back Marshawn Lynch, which resulted in the New England Patriots intercepting the ball and winning their first Super Bowl in 10 years.

    “Seattle Seahawks coach is on the defensive about play call as media, fans, Twitter and even his own players take aim,” former Texas House Representative Aaron Peña tweeted, describing the state of the world Monday.

    This means America is now a nation of “proles,” whom George Orwell described as the majority of the population who are too distracted by “films, football, beer, and above all, gambling” to care about the decline of America and the destruction of the Bill of Rights.

    “It was not desirable that the proles should have strong political feelings,” Orwell wrote in 1984 from the establishment’s perspective. “All that was required of them was a primitive patriotism which could be appealed to whenever it was necessary to make them accept longer working-hours or shorter rations, and even when they became discontented, as they sometimes did, their discontent led nowhere, because being without general ideas, they could only focus in on petty specific grievances.”

    “The larger evils invariably escaped their notice.”

    And today, the larger evils committed by President Obama and the global elite escape the notice of the millions of Americans now upset over Carroll’s play calling.

  87. I for one am delighted by Carroll’s call. Fuck the bigmouth Seahawks and Marshawn the moron. They limped their way through on luck and it finally ran out.

    I can’t believe the Seahawks didn’t run the ball.

    If they’d run the ball you could just as easily wonder why they didn’t pass the ball.

    Also Lynch only would have had to hold on for half a yard.

    Everything’s much harder on the 1 yard line.

    I thought the Seahags had the edge and they did, except the end part.

    Like the Brady’s first drive to the red zone, where he was intercepted?

    karma caught up to Seattle

    Their luck finally ran out.

    Doesn’t that rule just cry out to be exploited? Where else do we ever see such a thing? Do MLB teams supply their own balls to the pitcher? Do gamblers get to bring their own card decks to the casino tables?

    Like I said in another thread, the way it is now, maybe the NFL figures if someone’s going to be messing with the balls, it’s going to be a team getting them the way they like them, not a ref (or other 3rd party) paid by one team to sabotage the other team’s balls. It’s probably a wink-wink nudge-nudge type situation.

    You don’t see how fiddling with the basic equipment of the game that’s supposed to be standardized and the same for all competitors would be cheating?

    In this context, no, not really. I looks a lot like a wink-wink nudge-nudge situation to me.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    In this context, no, not really. I looks a lot like a wink-wink nudge-nudge situation to me.
     
    What do you mean? In which context would it not be cheating?

    The only context I can think of in which it wouldn't be cheating is if it was understood by all the teams that deflating the balls was permissible. Is there any indication that this was the case?
  88. I’m glad it was Seattle’s back Brady and the Pats stepped on to reach their 4th Superbowl trophy.

  89. I just want to add that “Russel Wilson” sounds like the scion of a merger of sports equipment empires.

  90. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Svigor
    I for one am delighted by Carroll's call. Fuck the bigmouth Seahawks and Marshawn the moron. They limped their way through on luck and it finally ran out.

    I can’t believe the Seahawks didn’t run the ball.
     
    If they'd run the ball you could just as easily wonder why they didn't pass the ball.

    Also Lynch only would have had to hold on for half a yard.
     
    Everything's much harder on the 1 yard line.

    I thought the Seahags had the edge and they did, except the end part.
     
    Like the Brady's first drive to the red zone, where he was intercepted?

    karma caught up to Seattle
     
    Their luck finally ran out.

    Doesn’t that rule just cry out to be exploited? Where else do we ever see such a thing? Do MLB teams supply their own balls to the pitcher? Do gamblers get to bring their own card decks to the casino tables?
     
    Like I said in another thread, the way it is now, maybe the NFL figures if someone's going to be messing with the balls, it's going to be a team getting them the way they like them, not a ref (or other 3rd party) paid by one team to sabotage the other team's balls. It's probably a wink-wink nudge-nudge type situation.

    You don’t see how fiddling with the basic equipment of the game that’s supposed to be standardized and the same for all competitors would be cheating?
     
    In this context, no, not really. I looks a lot like a wink-wink nudge-nudge situation to me.

    In this context, no, not really. I looks a lot like a wink-wink nudge-nudge situation to me.

    What do you mean? In which context would it not be cheating?

    The only context I can think of in which it wouldn’t be cheating is if it was understood by all the teams that deflating the balls was permissible. Is there any indication that this was the case?

  91. el topo [AKA "darryl revok"] says:

    The brawl at the end of the game is the only time the term “chimp-out” spontaneously popped into my mind. Interesting that none of the otherwise very thorough post-game analysis even touched on it. Nor did they talk about Michael Bennett’s fatal “encroachment” penalty when there was still an off-chance of Seattle getting a safety and getting the ball back. When Bennett was asked about that penalty he roundly insulted the reporter.

    So f**k the Seahawks, it’s clear that the more sportsmanlike team won.

  92. @dee nile
    Hey Anonymous, what do you think of the confessed ball-inflation cheat who just won league MVP?

    Full disclosure: I’m a Packer backer. Did our QB really CONFESS cheating or just hint at it sort of like Mr. Brady?

  93. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Brad Johnson paid some people $7,500 to have the balls deflated for the Super Bowl he won:

    http://www.upi.com/Sports_News/2015/01/21/Former-Bucs-QB-Brad-Johnson-paid-7500-to-have-balls-deflated-before-Super-Bowl-XXVII/2381421855329/

    Former Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback and Super Bowl champion Brad Johnson is finding himself unexpectedly back in the spotlight after comments he made about deflating game balls have new relevancy as “Deflate-gate”

    In 2012, nearly a decade after the Bucs beat the Oakland Raiders in Super Bowl XXVII, Johnson admitted he paid NFL equipment officials $7,500 to deflate the game’s balls to his liking.

    “I paid some guys off to get the balls right,” Johnson told the Tampa Bay Times in 2012.

    “I went and got all 100 footballs, and they took care of all of them. Seventy-five hundred [dollars]. They took care of them.”

  94. @Anonymous
    Haha good point. Carroll is known for overthinking stuff and trying trick plays and going for it on 4th down. An old school meathead coach would have just given the ball to Lynch and won.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pete_Carroll#Coaching_style

    Carroll draws coaching inspiration from the 1974 book The Inner Game of Tennis, by tennis coach W. Timothy Gallwey, which he picked up as graduate student at the University of the Pacific; he summarizes the philosophy he took from the book as "all about clearing the clutter in the interactions between your conscious and subconscious mind" enabled "through superior practice and a clear approach. Focus, clarity and belief in yourself are what allows [sic] you to express your ability without discursive thoughts and concerns."[83] He wrote a foreword for a later edition, noting that athletes "must clear their minds of all confusion and earn the ability to let themselves play freely."[22] He also cites influences from psychologists Abraham Maslow and Carl Jung, Buddhist meditation master Chögyam Trungpa and Zen master D. T. Suzuki.
     

    He beat the Pack with tricks the Cheeseheads fell for.

  95. @CJ
    Then you call timeout and let them score. And save 25 seconds.

    Yes, your reasoning seems sound to me. I cannot understand why Belichick did not call a timeout there. Had the Seahawks run some kind of end-around sweep and scored, or had Wilson scrambled and then run it in, there might have been no time at all left on the clock.

    Now that I've heard Carroll's explanation for the slant pass play call, I understand it -- it's still a bad play call, probably the result of overthinking, but I understand it. What's impossible to fathom is why New England didn't call a timeout. It looks like Belichick's brain fart was bailed out by Carroll's overstrategizing (and a great physical play by the NE defender).

    Chess game, boys. Carroll was looking for Belichick to take that timeout. That would give him an extra shot at running, Seattle’s strong suit, as he only had one timeout of his own left. Belichick forced his hand by not calling the timeout, so if they didn’t score on that play, they’d have had to call their last timeout. Third down would have been it, whether they scored or not, as there would be no time left and no timeouts. Again, Belichick forced his rival out of his comfort zone.

    For all his alleged beastliness, the Crotch Grabber averaged fewer yards per carry than he did in the regular season. He did nothing in the first half, which is where Seattle really lost the game.

    To the weenie whining about fair play, did you see the game? The zebras didn’t cover themselves up with glory. In the past 5-7 years, I’ve never seen a punter get hit in the plant leg and not have the 15-yard penalty call…until this game. Seattle also seems to have added the Bronco/Raven cut blocking schemes to their repertoire.

    To bring things full circle on this HBD blog, key to victory is knowing how to act. Baldwin’s poop celebration gave the Patriots a shorter field at the end of the third quarter, and Bennett’s stupid offside took the Patriots out of a dangerous position on their own goal line at the end. There’s a huge difference between a kneel-down and an actual running play to run out the clock. Boyz, “acting white” is the way to go in that situation.

    http://www.breitbart.com/sports/2015/02/02/legion-of-bums-take-the-class-out-of-classic/

    • Replies: @Danindc
    Chance Belichick just froze and didn't call a timeout-99%
    What you said -1%

    Seattle won the Super Bowl last year because refs confused running into kicker vs roughing against San fran in NFc championship.

    Agreed- Seattle has some really dumb players who lacked composure and decency. Thank God New England won.
    , @Anonymous
    But that's the point. He was overthinking it.

    Ultimately football is like war, not chess. You have to have the killer instinct and go for the jugular when it counts. You have to ram it right down the gut of the Pats' line in that situation.
  96. @Brutusale
    Chess game, boys. Carroll was looking for Belichick to take that timeout. That would give him an extra shot at running, Seattle's strong suit, as he only had one timeout of his own left. Belichick forced his hand by not calling the timeout, so if they didn't score on that play, they'd have had to call their last timeout. Third down would have been it, whether they scored or not, as there would be no time left and no timeouts. Again, Belichick forced his rival out of his comfort zone.

    For all his alleged beastliness, the Crotch Grabber averaged fewer yards per carry than he did in the regular season. He did nothing in the first half, which is where Seattle really lost the game.

    To the weenie whining about fair play, did you see the game? The zebras didn't cover themselves up with glory. In the past 5-7 years, I've never seen a punter get hit in the plant leg and not have the 15-yard penalty call...until this game. Seattle also seems to have added the Bronco/Raven cut blocking schemes to their repertoire.

    To bring things full circle on this HBD blog, key to victory is knowing how to act. Baldwin's poop celebration gave the Patriots a shorter field at the end of the third quarter, and Bennett's stupid offside took the Patriots out of a dangerous position on their own goal line at the end. There's a huge difference between a kneel-down and an actual running play to run out the clock. Boyz, "acting white" is the way to go in that situation.

    http://www.breitbart.com/sports/2015/02/02/legion-of-bums-take-the-class-out-of-classic/

    Chance Belichick just froze and didn’t call a timeout-99%
    What you said -1%

    Seattle won the Super Bowl last year because refs confused running into kicker vs roughing against San fran in NFc championship.

    Agreed- Seattle has some really dumb players who lacked composure and decency. Thank God New England won.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Yeah, the most successful head coach in league history just "froze" at a key moment. How foolish of me to think otherwise.
  97. @Brutusale
    Chess game, boys. Carroll was looking for Belichick to take that timeout. That would give him an extra shot at running, Seattle's strong suit, as he only had one timeout of his own left. Belichick forced his hand by not calling the timeout, so if they didn't score on that play, they'd have had to call their last timeout. Third down would have been it, whether they scored or not, as there would be no time left and no timeouts. Again, Belichick forced his rival out of his comfort zone.

    For all his alleged beastliness, the Crotch Grabber averaged fewer yards per carry than he did in the regular season. He did nothing in the first half, which is where Seattle really lost the game.

    To the weenie whining about fair play, did you see the game? The zebras didn't cover themselves up with glory. In the past 5-7 years, I've never seen a punter get hit in the plant leg and not have the 15-yard penalty call...until this game. Seattle also seems to have added the Bronco/Raven cut blocking schemes to their repertoire.

    To bring things full circle on this HBD blog, key to victory is knowing how to act. Baldwin's poop celebration gave the Patriots a shorter field at the end of the third quarter, and Bennett's stupid offside took the Patriots out of a dangerous position on their own goal line at the end. There's a huge difference between a kneel-down and an actual running play to run out the clock. Boyz, "acting white" is the way to go in that situation.

    http://www.breitbart.com/sports/2015/02/02/legion-of-bums-take-the-class-out-of-classic/

    But that’s the point. He was overthinking it.

    Ultimately football is like war, not chess. You have to have the killer instinct and go for the jugular when it counts. You have to ram it right down the gut of the Pats’ line in that situation.

  98. Maybe Coach didn’t call it to Lynch because he didn’t want to allow the man additional leverage in off-season trade and money discussions.

  99. @Danindc
    Chance Belichick just froze and didn't call a timeout-99%
    What you said -1%

    Seattle won the Super Bowl last year because refs confused running into kicker vs roughing against San fran in NFc championship.

    Agreed- Seattle has some really dumb players who lacked composure and decency. Thank God New England won.

    Yeah, the most successful head coach in league history just “froze” at a key moment. How foolish of me to think otherwise.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    When you are watching on TV, clock management seems like the number one priority, but that's because you don't have anything else to do. I suspect Belichick was more concerned with getting his defense ready to stop the Seahawks by recognizing what play they were going to run.
  100. @Brutusale
    Yeah, the most successful head coach in league history just "froze" at a key moment. How foolish of me to think otherwise.

    When you are watching on TV, clock management seems like the number one priority, but that’s because you don’t have anything else to do. I suspect Belichick was more concerned with getting his defense ready to stop the Seahawks by recognizing what play they were going to run.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    http://53eig.ht/1LEnsuB

    He's the best coach but he either froze or blundered by not calling timeout. He's both great and lucky. What a combo!
  101. @Steve Sailer
    When you are watching on TV, clock management seems like the number one priority, but that's because you don't have anything else to do. I suspect Belichick was more concerned with getting his defense ready to stop the Seahawks by recognizing what play they were going to run.

    http://53eig.ht/1LEnsuB

    He’s the best coach but he either froze or blundered by not calling timeout. He’s both great and lucky. What a combo!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Did Napoleon says that an important attribute of a good general was luck?
  102. @Danindc
    http://53eig.ht/1LEnsuB

    He's the best coach but he either froze or blundered by not calling timeout. He's both great and lucky. What a combo!

    Did Napoleon says that an important attribute of a good general was luck?

    • Replies: @danindc
    Yes, Napoleon said he had plenty of clever generals wanted a lucky one. Interesting to see how lucky NE got- would they have gotten by Green Bay or even Dallas? I originally thought the de-facto super bowl was Ravens-Patriots. Now I think Seattle would have gotten by Baltimore. A lot of evenly matched teams this year.
  103. You know, what coaches really ought to have in situations like that is a program that tells them what is the best thing to do.

    I’ve worked through some of the scenarios in this particular situation, and they’re quite complex. Figuring out the best thing to do from the standpoint of likely best outcome is quite a mess. You have to consider the probability of success of a running play, of a pass play, of running out of time so that you have fewer plays to run if you’re Seattle, the likelihood that the Patriots would be able to get in field goal range if they have X amount of time to do so, etc. No human being can do those complex calculations in real time, but it would be pretty easy to program a computer to do so, and to spit out instructions as time winds down as to what the coach should be doing.

    I’d be surprised if there aren’t already programs to do this, but I wonder if coaches use them.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    In the past, they had laminated sheets with what to do in various situations, but the pads they hold now could handle more complexity.
  104. @Steve Sailer
    Did Napoleon says that an important attribute of a good general was luck?

    Yes, Napoleon said he had plenty of clever generals wanted a lucky one. Interesting to see how lucky NE got- would they have gotten by Green Bay or even Dallas? I originally thought the de-facto super bowl was Ravens-Patriots. Now I think Seattle would have gotten by Baltimore. A lot of evenly matched teams this year.

  105. Luck would NOT be having the scout team run that pass play in practice multiple times against the defense, Malcolm Butler getting beat on it, and D-coordinator Matt Patricia telling him to decoy then attack the ball. If he was scheming for the run, Steve, why did he have the perfect defense for the pass? Belichick said in his postgame presser that he didn’t have a true goal line defense in; I don’t see many teams with 3 corners in when they’re playing goal line. As a guy from ESPN pointed out, during the regular season and playoffs, when the ball was at the 1, there were 66 touchdown passes thrown (and 4 more on QB scrambles) and no interceptions…until Sunday night. Passes from the 1 actually scored touchdowns at a higher percentage than runs, 61% to 57%. So if you spend too much time at Five-Thirty-Eight and actually believe what they promulgate, passing was the way to go. That said, I think that the smarter play would have been to leave it in Wilson’s hands to freelance off a play fake. But maybe the decision that Wilson DID make says that maybe wasn’t the way to go, either.

    Being prepared for every eventuality isn’t lucky. Having your opponent NOT prepared is lucky. Drafting/signing players who can fit your system and THINK isn’t lucky; Malcolm Butler was a fry cook at Popeye’s last summer. Having the league changing rules and the way they call things because of your nefarious schemes isn’t luck. Having your opponents constantly wondering what YOU are going to do and almost always reacting to it isn’t luck.

    I was talking to a Denver fan at the gym Sunday morning, and he still can’t get over the fact that the Patriots were in the Super Bowl and his beloved Broncos were at home. He was wondering if anyone from NE other than Gronkowski and maybe Wilfork could start for the Broncos. Too many people still believe games are won on paper, though today they have to say they’re won on the computer screen.

    Any “luck” Belichick may have going for him is more than mitigated by the fact that everyone is trying to take him down. This has been happening for 15 years. How long until it’s not “luck” anymore?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "That said, I think that the smarter play would have been to leave it in Wilson’s hands to freelance off a play fake."

    Fake to Lynch left, bootleg option right.

    , @Danindc
    I agree with most everything you say here but that doesn't change fact that Carrol's blunder covered up his bigger clock mgmt blunder.
  106. “Russell Wilson” sounds like two jock straps had a kid.

    What do you mean? In which context would it not be cheating?

    The only context I can think of in which it wouldn’t be cheating is if it was understood by all the teams that deflating the balls was permissible. Is there any indication that this was the case?

    This isn’t hard to grasp if you’re neurotypical.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    For the neurotypical, the only context in which it wouldn’t be cheating is if it was understood by all the teams that deflating the balls was permissible, but there doesn't seem to be any indication that this is true.
  107. And yes, that’s what “wink-wink, nudge-nudge” means.

  108. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “Fox News: ’9/11 Truth’ Responsible for Seahawks’ Super Bowl Loss”

    “Fox News host Greg Gutfeld attempted to tie the Seattle Seahawks’ Super Bowl loss to coach Pete Carroll’s alleged questioning of 9/11 Monday during an episode of “The Five.””

    “Gutfeld argued that Carroll’s poor decision making was linked directly to his role as a “9/11 truther.”

    “Coach Pete Carroll is a 9/11 truther,” Gutfeld said. “He believes the government had something to do with what happened that ended up in the deaths of almost 3,000 people. So, I believe this is an inside job.” ”

    http://www.infowars.com/fox-news-911-truth-responsible-for-seahawks-super-bowl-loss-2/

  109. @Svigor
    "Russell Wilson" sounds like two jock straps had a kid.

    What do you mean? In which context would it not be cheating?

    The only context I can think of in which it wouldn’t be cheating is if it was understood by all the teams that deflating the balls was permissible. Is there any indication that this was the case?
     
    This isn't hard to grasp if you're neurotypical.

    For the neurotypical, the only context in which it wouldn’t be cheating is if it was understood by all the teams that deflating the balls was permissible, but there doesn’t seem to be any indication that this is true.

  110. @Brutusale
    Luck would NOT be having the scout team run that pass play in practice multiple times against the defense, Malcolm Butler getting beat on it, and D-coordinator Matt Patricia telling him to decoy then attack the ball. If he was scheming for the run, Steve, why did he have the perfect defense for the pass? Belichick said in his postgame presser that he didn't have a true goal line defense in; I don't see many teams with 3 corners in when they're playing goal line. As a guy from ESPN pointed out, during the regular season and playoffs, when the ball was at the 1, there were 66 touchdown passes thrown (and 4 more on QB scrambles) and no interceptions...until Sunday night. Passes from the 1 actually scored touchdowns at a higher percentage than runs, 61% to 57%. So if you spend too much time at Five-Thirty-Eight and actually believe what they promulgate, passing was the way to go. That said, I think that the smarter play would have been to leave it in Wilson's hands to freelance off a play fake. But maybe the decision that Wilson DID make says that maybe wasn't the way to go, either.

    Being prepared for every eventuality isn't lucky. Having your opponent NOT prepared is lucky. Drafting/signing players who can fit your system and THINK isn't lucky; Malcolm Butler was a fry cook at Popeye's last summer. Having the league changing rules and the way they call things because of your nefarious schemes isn't luck. Having your opponents constantly wondering what YOU are going to do and almost always reacting to it isn't luck.

    I was talking to a Denver fan at the gym Sunday morning, and he still can't get over the fact that the Patriots were in the Super Bowl and his beloved Broncos were at home. He was wondering if anyone from NE other than Gronkowski and maybe Wilfork could start for the Broncos. Too many people still believe games are won on paper, though today they have to say they're won on the computer screen.

    Any "luck" Belichick may have going for him is more than mitigated by the fact that everyone is trying to take him down. This has been happening for 15 years. How long until it's not "luck" anymore?

    “That said, I think that the smarter play would have been to leave it in Wilson’s hands to freelance off a play fake.”

    Fake to Lynch left, bootleg option right.

  111. @candid_observer
    You know, what coaches really ought to have in situations like that is a program that tells them what is the best thing to do.

    I've worked through some of the scenarios in this particular situation, and they're quite complex. Figuring out the best thing to do from the standpoint of likely best outcome is quite a mess. You have to consider the probability of success of a running play, of a pass play, of running out of time so that you have fewer plays to run if you're Seattle, the likelihood that the Patriots would be able to get in field goal range if they have X amount of time to do so, etc. No human being can do those complex calculations in real time, but it would be pretty easy to program a computer to do so, and to spit out instructions as time winds down as to what the coach should be doing.

    I'd be surprised if there aren't already programs to do this, but I wonder if coaches use them.

    In the past, they had laminated sheets with what to do in various situations, but the pads they hold now could handle more complexity.

  112. Granted the call was very strange, and that Wilson should have held the ball with the cornerback closing fast on the mark, but how did the rookie corner recognize the play so quickly? Did the Patriots intercept the call from the sideline?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I wondered that too: an absolutely perfect defensive read.
  113. @Neil Templeton
    Granted the call was very strange, and that Wilson should have held the ball with the cornerback closing fast on the mark, but how did the rookie corner recognize the play so quickly? Did the Patriots intercept the call from the sideline?

    I wondered that too: an absolutely perfect defensive read.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    The local press in Boston was all over that. The Patriots schemed for that play as part of their short-yardage package, so the coaching staff obviously saw that play as one to look for in short yardage. Butler said he got beat a couple times in practice, and D-coach Matt Patricia told him he had to decoy zone then be aggressive to the ball.

    Butler is the perfect example of a kid with great physical tools but nothing upstairs. The simple instruction on that play is perfect for someone like him, where his strength and quickness allows him to make a play.

  114. @Brutusale
    Luck would NOT be having the scout team run that pass play in practice multiple times against the defense, Malcolm Butler getting beat on it, and D-coordinator Matt Patricia telling him to decoy then attack the ball. If he was scheming for the run, Steve, why did he have the perfect defense for the pass? Belichick said in his postgame presser that he didn't have a true goal line defense in; I don't see many teams with 3 corners in when they're playing goal line. As a guy from ESPN pointed out, during the regular season and playoffs, when the ball was at the 1, there were 66 touchdown passes thrown (and 4 more on QB scrambles) and no interceptions...until Sunday night. Passes from the 1 actually scored touchdowns at a higher percentage than runs, 61% to 57%. So if you spend too much time at Five-Thirty-Eight and actually believe what they promulgate, passing was the way to go. That said, I think that the smarter play would have been to leave it in Wilson's hands to freelance off a play fake. But maybe the decision that Wilson DID make says that maybe wasn't the way to go, either.

    Being prepared for every eventuality isn't lucky. Having your opponent NOT prepared is lucky. Drafting/signing players who can fit your system and THINK isn't lucky; Malcolm Butler was a fry cook at Popeye's last summer. Having the league changing rules and the way they call things because of your nefarious schemes isn't luck. Having your opponents constantly wondering what YOU are going to do and almost always reacting to it isn't luck.

    I was talking to a Denver fan at the gym Sunday morning, and he still can't get over the fact that the Patriots were in the Super Bowl and his beloved Broncos were at home. He was wondering if anyone from NE other than Gronkowski and maybe Wilfork could start for the Broncos. Too many people still believe games are won on paper, though today they have to say they're won on the computer screen.

    Any "luck" Belichick may have going for him is more than mitigated by the fact that everyone is trying to take him down. This has been happening for 15 years. How long until it's not "luck" anymore?

    I agree with most everything you say here but that doesn’t change fact that Carrol’s blunder covered up his bigger clock mgmt blunder.

  115. @Anonymous
    Your sense of sportsmanship and fair play is non-existent.

    That is purest projection.

  116. @Steve Sailer
    I wondered that too: an absolutely perfect defensive read.

    The local press in Boston was all over that. The Patriots schemed for that play as part of their short-yardage package, so the coaching staff obviously saw that play as one to look for in short yardage. Butler said he got beat a couple times in practice, and D-coach Matt Patricia told him he had to decoy zone then be aggressive to the ball.

    Butler is the perfect example of a kid with great physical tools but nothing upstairs. The simple instruction on that play is perfect for someone like him, where his strength and quickness allows him to make a play.

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