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Why L.A. Used to Not Have Many Homeless People
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Other than drunks on skid row downtown, Los Angeles didn’t have many homeless people in the postwar era. That was largely because of the immense Camarillo State Mental Hospital, which had 7,000 residents/inmates/patients or whatever you want to call them in 1957. For example, Charlie Parker recorded “Relaxin’ at Camarillo” after his six restful months there in 1946 following a series of unfortunate events such as setting his hotel room on fire and playing his saxophone naked in the lobby.

But then progressive geniuses like Erving Goffman and Michel Foucault decided that locking people up just for being lunatics and out-of-control addicts was a mistake. So, now the old asylum is the very pleasant campus of Cal State Channel Islands.

And the lunatics and addicts camp on the sidewalks at Venice Beach.

 
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  1. Neil Diamond wrote: LA’s fine, sunshine most of the time
    The feeling is laid back
    Palm trees grow and the rents are low ..

    LA used to be an affordable place to live. Before Jimmy Carter, a Beverly Hills home could be had for ~$50K.

  2. Remember that Geraldo documentary?

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Willowbrook was for the developmentally disabled, mentally retarded to use the term at the time, not the mentally ill.
    Today the College of Staten Island occupies the site.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  3. • Thanks: Charon, Triteleia Laxa
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I like "Americans first" over "America first."

    Replies: @Anon, @JR Ewing

    , @Foreign Expert
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I prefer a fifty year moratorium.

    , @Paul Jolliffe
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Oh I agree with Representative Gosar, but if his bill actually gains traction, then I hope he’s got his life insurance paid up.

    (Pro tip: don’t fly on his flights, and don’t share a taxi with him.Unfortunate “accidents”, and all that . . . See everyone connected with Jeffrey Epstein, for example.)

  4. “the very pleasant campus of Cal State Channel Islands.” So it’s still a lunatic asylum ?

    • LOL: Voltarde, Yancey Ward
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @donut


    So it’s still a lunatic asylum ?
     
    If you’re in arrears with the bursar, you get the ol’ electroshocky

    https://youtu.be/rPgnuXNWN90?t=20

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

  5. Or filling up Central Valley mental health crisis centers and emergency services at the hospitals. All MediCal (taxpayer) covered of course.

  6. That’s the biggest factor behind homelessness that libs don’t want to acknowledge.

  7. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/RepGosar/status/1418674579837435906

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Foreign Expert, @Paul Jolliffe

    I like “Americans first” over “America first.”

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    You mean to say that the guy who arrived from Nigeria a couple of years ago and now drives an Uber isn't an American? What are you, a racist?

    , @JR Ewing
    @Steve Sailer

    I noticed the same thing.

    One thing that I absolutely cannot understand, unless I infer nefarious intent, and then it's easy to understand, is the idea that the blessings of "America" belongs to anyone in the world who decides they may want it.

    America belongs to Americans.

  8. @JohnnyWalker123
    Remember that Geraldo documentary?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lWDt5IE8RPI

    Replies: @prosa123

    Willowbrook was for the developmentally disabled, mentally retarded to use the term at the time, not the mentally ill.
    Today the College of Staten Island occupies the site.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @prosa123

    “Today the College of Staten Island occupies the site.” So it’s still a lunatic asylum ?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  9. We’re running out of people who can speak from first hand experience of what adult life was like in California in the 1950’s but my impression was that drug abuse was not so prevalent and what drugs as were available were less likely to cause permanent brain damage. While alcohol has always had the ability to reduce some people to a totally degraded state, American society had long coped with the limited number of non functional alcoholics even it was only to park them on skid row or the police ‘drunk tank’.

    There were also stronger social norms and family ties even in a rapidly growing California. Police had vagrancy laws they could enforce so you just weren’t allowed to live on a downtown sidewalk much less defecate on them. I used to see madmen wandering down Market St in the 1970’s and, as I’ve mentioned before, friends would even request I take them there to view them. While the madman may have had an obvious mental issue as he stormed down the street muttering his intent to kill some unidentified person surprisingly he was usually fairly well groomed and not wearing rags. They did not appear to sleep on the sidewalk at night though I did wonder where they lived.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @UNIT472

    I can recall that there was some kind of controversy over a 1977 movie review of "Annie Hall" that said that Diane Keaton dressed like a "bag lady." But I didn't know what a bag lady was, and even when it was explained to me, I wasn't familiar with homeless women who carried their possessions around in shopping bags.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    , @Mark G.
    @UNIT472


    We’re running out of people who can speak from first hand experience of what adult life was like in California in the 1950’s but my impression was that drug abuse was not so prevalent and what drugs as were available were less likely to cause permanent brain damage.
     
    The fact that we are running out of people who can remember a less dysfunctional pre-sixties America is making things worse. They both know and can point out to others that many of the problems now considered unsolvable actually were more or less solved at some point in the past. The same solutions that worked then could be reapplied today.

    I lived in San Diego, California as a seven year old in 1963 while my dad was working on a Master's degree in astronomy at a university there. This was the Beach Boys era and I can remember watching the surfers at the beach. The city was mostly clean, safe and peaceful. I would imagine some existed but I never saw a homeless person that I can remember. When I watch an old Hitchcock movie from that period like Vertigo or The Birds I can see that California.

    I had a cousin from California visit me here in Indianapolis a few years back. We were talking and he said the California I remember no longer exists. He told me about the large numbers of homeless people in California now doing things like defecating on the sidewalk or shooting up in public. He also said road building has not kept up with population increases with the result it can take forever to drive someplace because of crowded roads. I think I just want to keep my memories of California as it was in 1963 and not ever go back there.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    , @anonymous
    @UNIT472

    I get the impression that law enforcement in coastal California between the late 60's and and early 00's was pretty laid back but perfectly willing and had been given license to swing the Hammer of The Gods on any truly disruptive fuck-ups and predators ruining it for everybody else.

  10. Quite true, and state hospitals were good things, and they were destroyed by liberals confused opinions about “freedom,” one of the most abused words in the English language (like as if the free market is free).

    On the other hand, nowadays is different. Sure, there are plenty of homeless insane. But the majority of homeless nowadays are A. not insane, and B. white. And nearly half of them have jobs. It’s just not like it used to be, either post-or pre-Camarillo. The rents are too high.

    As usual, the lede has been buried. Everything said in this article is true. As far as it goes. But it omits the key ingredient. The deliberate disenfranchisement, immiseration, and bum’s-rushing of normal, law-abiding American citizens who don’t get any publicity because they are not as obvious or public as the insane homeless. Many are back in the bushes, not out on the streets. But I assure you, they are legion.

    Apparently you people don’t like a world where jobs are plentiful and rents are low. That would be too un-American for you.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @obwandiyag


    Apparently you people don’t like a world where jobs are plentiful and rents are low. That would be too un-American for you.
     
    Speak for yourself.

    The way you move toward "jobs are plentiful and rents are low" is to stop immigration. I'd say 95% of the folks here get that (supply and demand aren't rocket science concepts) though there are a few with some bizarro Asian fetish.
  11. Ronald Reagan was central to the closing of mental institutions and in blocking any community mental health centers. Reagan signed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act,, which closed the large centralised mental health institutes in favor of smaller, more local community based institutions. In 1980 Jimmy Carter funded these community centers on the national level and in 1981, Reagan cut this funding. Reagan gets the L, not Foucault.

    So many of our current problems reach back to Ronald Reagan and boomer conservatives. Reagan sided with Big Ag and crushed Cesar Chavez by opening the floodgates to Mexican immigration. Reagan crushed US labor, opening the floodgates to capital flight, financialisation, and later the factories being shipped to China. It’s one thing to be totally wrong about everything, to admit it, and to accept responsibility. But to blame Foucault over Reagan is boomer cope. Nothing has been learned. Reagan, Milton Friedman, Ayn Rand, and boatloads of autistic libertarians are primarily responsible for the disaster in the US is in right now.

    And just to remind the younger generation of what has been lost primarily by autistic libertarians. Here is a video of glorious white harmony, goodwhites and badwhites loving each other and celebrating their eternal healthy and beautiful whiteness. This is what young white activists have to aim for after the US splits and their job will be in rebuilding the future white region of America.

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Torn and Frayed

    And when did Reagan stop being Governor of California? When did he stop being President?
    Note none of the "Reagan done it" crowd really ever tries to reverse things. Or anything done by any other President they bitch about, for that matter.

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Torn and Frayed


    This is what young white activists have to aim for after the US splits
     
    First, it’s gonna be lit

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h62RmIsx6MA

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Faraday's Bobcat
    @Torn and Frayed


    Ronald Reagan was central to the closing of mental institutions and in blocking any community mental health centers. Reagan signed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act,, which closed the large centralised mental health institutes in favor of smaller, more local community based institutions. In 1980 Jimmy Carter funded these community centers on the national level and in 1981, Reagan cut this funding. Reagan gets the L, not Foucault.
     
    LPS was passed with a veto-proof majority, so don't blame it on Reagan.

    The only cure for homelessness is a federally run Temporary Residence in every county over 100,000 population. The Temporary Residence will receive $5 million per year for each resident and will be required to have a proportionate staff of social workers, equity officers, intersectionality supervisors, transgender advisors, BIPOC advocates and indigenous nutritionists, and diversity pooh-bahs. Those hired will have their student loans forgiven and will receive 10 hours of paid leave a week to engage in approved activism that will be exempt from the Hatch Act. They will have to join a new Temporary Residence Workers' Union.

    If they did that, the city politicians would suddenly start talking about how we need to empower the community to strongly encourage the homeless to avail themselves of the Temporary Residence. You'd be walking down the street to the coffee shop and three plainclothes agents would douse you with dirt, roll you around on the sidewalk until your clothes started to fray, and stuff a crack pipe in your pocket, then haul you off to the Temporary Residence.
    , @Anonymous
    @Torn and Frayed

    That video is from Oakland in 1977. It’s amazing how America has changed.

    I remember Lynyrd Skynyrd (and especially Freebird) being more of a guy thing. I’m surprised at the enthusiasm of the girls.

    , @John Johnson
    @Torn and Frayed

    Ronald Reagan was central to the closing of mental institutions and in blocking any community mental health centers. Reagan signed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act,, which closed the large centralised mental health institutes in favor of smaller, more local community based institutions.

    Oh God not that lame excuse. That is what California libs use to try and deflect responsibility onto Republicans of the past.

    That was a bipartisan bill signed in 1967.

    Democrats have a supermajority and could reverse the law. Please stop encouraging liberals by repeating these lame excuses.

    Reagan, Milton Friedman, Ayn Rand, and boatloads of autistic libertarians are primarily responsible for the disaster in the US is in right now.

    I'm certainly not a fan of that group of globalist liars but the left is more responsible. The "war on poverty" (welfare) was far more destructive. Libertarians mostly make excuses for the capitalist status quo and amoral greed. Democrats tried to fix the racial problem with half a trillion of new spending and now blame their failures on Whites. Remaining Libertarians are completely deluded but at least don't believe that Whites are somehow responsible for their failures.

    As for California that was wrecked by left-wing Democrats. They looked the other way on immigration and passed billions of their own race-denial based welfare spending. There have been a few Republican governors but they mostly twiddled their thumbs with a Dem house.

    , @Alden
    @Torn and Frayed

    Neither Carter nor Regean had anything to do with it. It was done by the satanic Supreme Court. In 1975, when Ford was still president, the uS Supreme Court ordered every state mental hospital in the country be closed.

    O’Connor vs Donaldson USSC 1975.

    Within weeks, the state mental hospitals put bewildered patients on Greyhound buses for the nearest city.

    Although the ex patients were obviously disabled and unable to care for themselves, it was very difficult to navigate the disability application process at the time.

    So there they were, at the downtown bus station nowhere to go, no place to live, no money nothing.

    It was done by the ACLU Dundee by ADL AJC all the usual suspects. Ford Carter and Regeab had nothing to do with the closing of the state mental hospitals. It was the Supreme Court obeying its liberal masters, ACLU ADL.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  12. ‘And the lunatics and addicts camp on the sidewalks at Venice Beach.’

    The difficulty with that theory is that now there are a lot more than seven thousand of them.

  13. @UNIT472
    We're running out of people who can speak from first hand experience of what adult life was like in California in the 1950's but my impression was that drug abuse was not so prevalent and what drugs as were available were less likely to cause permanent brain damage. While alcohol has always had the ability to reduce some people to a totally degraded state, American society had long coped with the limited number of non functional alcoholics even it was only to park them on skid row or the police 'drunk tank'.

    There were also stronger social norms and family ties even in a rapidly growing California. Police had vagrancy laws they could enforce so you just weren't allowed to live on a downtown sidewalk much less defecate on them. I used to see madmen wandering down Market St in the 1970's and, as I've mentioned before, friends would even request I take them there to view them. While the madman may have had an obvious mental issue as he stormed down the street muttering his intent to kill some unidentified person surprisingly he was usually fairly well groomed and not wearing rags. They did not appear to sleep on the sidewalk at night though I did wonder where they lived.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mark G., @anonymous

    I can recall that there was some kind of controversy over a 1977 movie review of “Annie Hall” that said that Diane Keaton dressed like a “bag lady.” But I didn’t know what a bag lady was, and even when it was explained to me, I wasn’t familiar with homeless women who carried their possessions around in shopping bags.

    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Steve Sailer

    Was it Carol Burnett who was in some "Bag Lady" TV movie back then? Like the "disease of the week" movies they had on. I remember there was the usual "tut-tutting" about this "danger" any woman faced, one small step wrong and BOOM! you'd be a bag lady. This was apparently a big fear.

    I assume this was part of the whole "street people/homeless/bag ladies/bums/hobos are people just like you, Joe Sixpack and Jane Chardonnay" psy/op. Of course, they weren't, and aren't: they're drug addicts or mentally ill.

    This ran in parallel to the "This random black street person could have been a Supreme Court justice but not for racism" psy/op.

    Ironically, lots of women did wind up on the streets, thanks to feminism, marrying a black guy to be anti-racist, and other psy/ops. Or rather than bag ladies, they became cat ladies.

    Being unmarried, childless, and with an irritating personality is an excellent recipe for homelessness, since it leaves you with no support network.

  14. @obwandiyag
    Quite true, and state hospitals were good things, and they were destroyed by liberals confused opinions about "freedom," one of the most abused words in the English language (like as if the free market is free).

    On the other hand, nowadays is different. Sure, there are plenty of homeless insane. But the majority of homeless nowadays are A. not insane, and B. white. And nearly half of them have jobs. It's just not like it used to be, either post-or pre-Camarillo. The rents are too high.

    As usual, the lede has been buried. Everything said in this article is true. As far as it goes. But it omits the key ingredient. The deliberate disenfranchisement, immiseration, and bum's-rushing of normal, law-abiding American citizens who don't get any publicity because they are not as obvious or public as the insane homeless. Many are back in the bushes, not out on the streets. But I assure you, they are legion.

    Apparently you people don't like a world where jobs are plentiful and rents are low. That would be too un-American for you.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    Apparently you people don’t like a world where jobs are plentiful and rents are low. That would be too un-American for you.

    Speak for yourself.

    The way you move toward “jobs are plentiful and rents are low” is to stop immigration. I’d say 95% of the folks here get that (supply and demand aren’t rocket science concepts) though there are a few with some bizarro Asian fetish.

    • Agree: Charon, Buzz Mohawk
  15. Disagree. If the asylum population as it was in 1955 had increase pari passu with population, there would be 1.7 million inmates today. You don’t have 1.6 million vagrants in this country, you have perhaps 600,000, and many of them would not have been candidates for the asylum in 1955.

  16. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:

    Homeless, or as they once were called, hobos, did not used to be tolerated. Here’s a warning posted by the Los Angeles Police Department in the first decade of the 20th century:

    Chief of Police Edward Kern, who had served under General George Crook in the campaign against Geronimo, was described in a 1906 LA Times profile as being at age 46 “a great, broad-shouldered giant, with a grip like a steel vise.” He became addicted to alcohol and committed suicide in a hotel bathroom in 1912.

  17. a series of unfortunate events such as setting his hotel room on fire and playing his saxophone naked in the lobby.

    I hate it when that happens.

  18. @Torn and Frayed
    Ronald Reagan was central to the closing of mental institutions and in blocking any community mental health centers. Reagan signed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act,, which closed the large centralised mental health institutes in favor of smaller, more local community based institutions. In 1980 Jimmy Carter funded these community centers on the national level and in 1981, Reagan cut this funding. Reagan gets the L, not Foucault.

    So many of our current problems reach back to Ronald Reagan and boomer conservatives. Reagan sided with Big Ag and crushed Cesar Chavez by opening the floodgates to Mexican immigration. Reagan crushed US labor, opening the floodgates to capital flight, financialisation, and later the factories being shipped to China. It's one thing to be totally wrong about everything, to admit it, and to accept responsibility. But to blame Foucault over Reagan is boomer cope. Nothing has been learned. Reagan, Milton Friedman, Ayn Rand, and boatloads of autistic libertarians are primarily responsible for the disaster in the US is in right now.

    And just to remind the younger generation of what has been lost primarily by autistic libertarians. Here is a video of glorious white harmony, goodwhites and badwhites loving each other and celebrating their eternal healthy and beautiful whiteness. This is what young white activists have to aim for after the US splits and their job will be in rebuilding the future white region of America.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxIWDmmqZzY&ab_channel=LynyrdSkynyrdonMV

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Faraday's Bobcat, @Anonymous, @John Johnson, @Alden

    And when did Reagan stop being Governor of California? When did he stop being President?
    Note none of the “Reagan done it” crowd really ever tries to reverse things. Or anything done by any other President they bitch about, for that matter.

  19. @donut
    "the very pleasant campus of Cal State Channel Islands." So it's still a lunatic asylum ?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    So it’s still a lunatic asylum ?

    If you’re in arrears with the bursar, you get the ol’ electroshocky

    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Still the funniest/stupidest moment in movie history.

  20. The government of the State of California has been in control of four connected families since 1958 except for the eight years that Ronald Reagan was governor (1967-1975.)

    The four families of Pat Brown, William Newsom II, John Pelosi, and J. Paul Getty have dominated California politics for over sixty years.

    The current governor Gavin Newsom is the son of Ron Pelosi the brother of Nancy Pelosi’s husband.

    Kamala Harris, Maxine Waters, Adam Schiff, and Dianne Feinstein are all sponsored and closely connected with these families.

    The story starts with the election of Pat Brown as governor of California in 1959. He was sponsored by a wealthy man named William Newsom II. Governor Pat Brown awarded the contract to operate the Squaw Valley Resorts to William Newsom III and his partner John Pelosi. The state of California paid all of the cost to establish these resorts and received no income from the operations.

    Pat Brown’s son Jerry Brown ran and won the governorship in 1974. His closest friend was William Newsom III who became wealthy from the Squaw Valley Concessions …

    https://henrymakow.com/2021/07/california-controlled-by-four-crime.html

    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    @brabantian

    Thanks, very interesting.

    Here's another post concerning the financial activities of the Pelosis:

    https://unusualwhales.com/i_am_the_senate/pelosi

    How very convenient it must be to not only have ready access to insider information, but also to have a pivotal role in crafting legislation that massively influences the market. Communists? I think not.

    , @Alden
    @brabantian

    Governor Bill Newsom is not the son of Ron Pelosi brother of Paul Pelosi husband of Nancy Pelosi.

    Governor Bill Newsom is the son of Bill Newsom, brother of Barbara Newsom Pelosi ex wife of Ron Pelosi.

    Henry Makow is wrong about the governor’s father and so is the rest of his article. He neglected to mention the husband of Senator Dianne Feinstein, Richard Blum who was heavily involved in opening factories in China several years before the Nixon Kissinger opening to China and became a multi billionaire because of his Chinese factories and other endeavors.

    Squaw Valley was built in the late 1950s for the 1960 Olympics. A lot has happened since then. Like the population of the state has tripled. Plus the insatiable appetite of our major industry, agriculture for cheap planters and pickers.

    Henry Makow really.

    , @Hibernian
    @brabantian


    The current governor Gavin Newsom is the son of Ron Pelosi the brother of Nancy Pelosi’s husband.
     
    He's the son of Gavin Newsom II. Ron Pelosi is his uncle. Unless you're starting a wild rumor.
  21. @prosa123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Willowbrook was for the developmentally disabled, mentally retarded to use the term at the time, not the mentally ill.
    Today the College of Staten Island occupies the site.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    “Today the College of Staten Island occupies the site.” So it’s still a lunatic asylum ?

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    So it’s still a lunatic asylum ?
     
    If you’re in arrears with the bursar, you get the ol’ electroshocky

    https://youtu.be/rPgnuXNWN90?t=20
  22. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @prosa123

    “Today the College of Staten Island occupies the site.” So it’s still a lunatic asylum ?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    So it’s still a lunatic asylum ?

    If you’re in arrears with the bursar, you get the ol’ electroshocky

  23. Many years ago, I was treated to a 72-hour hold in mental-health facilities.

    I had made the mistake of telling my county mental health counselor that I was thinking about sticking the barrel of my Smith & Wesson revolver in my mouth and pulling the trigger. Two cops showed up at my door. An ambulance drove me to a mental hospital.

    The food was downright criminal. Boiled hot dogs and iceberg lettuce salad of zero nutritional value wheeled to us crazy people by a big, fat guy. (Was that Ignatious J. Reilly?) Fortunately for me, my girlfriend stopped by with a hot, fresh pizza she had picked up along the way. I shared it with the other crazies in the TV room. The observers gave me high marks that day.

    The next day, I was transported to a halfway house. A young resident there opened her bedroom door and promptly stripped off her clothes. As she was getting on her bed, she said to me, “I have been waiting 5,000 years for you!” Rather than quench her 5,000 year old thirst, I went downstairs and reported the incident to whatever unfortunate soul was in charge of the place.

    That day happened to be the 20th anniversary of the first moon landing, and one TV station played the whole moonwalk. Naturally, I was the only person in that house interested, so I watched Neil and Buzz in grainy video by myself in the living room. As I was doing so, one crazy man with a long beard walked in, looked at the TV and exclaimed, “That’s terrible reception! That’s an awful picture!”

    The next day, my 72 hours were up, and I was allowed to go home. I didn’t shoot myself, but I enjoyed an experience few of us here have. What is life for, after all?

    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Buzz Mohawk

    When and if you suffer a bout of mental illness, you imagine that the "experts" will help. At least that's what you think, the first time.

    , @joe_mama
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Luckily Myrna Minkoff showed up in time, so Ignatius was able to avoid your same fate. Hope you enjoyed the Twelve Inches of Paradise, haha.

    , @Austin Slater
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I thought my 4-hour experience in a ghetto ER after an edible-pot-induced panic attack was unique (I saw some seriously fucked up things and people, which is the last thing you want to see when you perpetually think you're 15 seconds away from dying). But wow, that really takes the cake.

    Thanks for sharing.

    Replies: @black sea

  24. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I like "Americans first" over "America first."

    Replies: @Anon, @JR Ewing

    You mean to say that the guy who arrived from Nigeria a couple of years ago and now drives an Uber isn’t an American? What are you, a racist?

  25. @Torn and Frayed
    Ronald Reagan was central to the closing of mental institutions and in blocking any community mental health centers. Reagan signed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act,, which closed the large centralised mental health institutes in favor of smaller, more local community based institutions. In 1980 Jimmy Carter funded these community centers on the national level and in 1981, Reagan cut this funding. Reagan gets the L, not Foucault.

    So many of our current problems reach back to Ronald Reagan and boomer conservatives. Reagan sided with Big Ag and crushed Cesar Chavez by opening the floodgates to Mexican immigration. Reagan crushed US labor, opening the floodgates to capital flight, financialisation, and later the factories being shipped to China. It's one thing to be totally wrong about everything, to admit it, and to accept responsibility. But to blame Foucault over Reagan is boomer cope. Nothing has been learned. Reagan, Milton Friedman, Ayn Rand, and boatloads of autistic libertarians are primarily responsible for the disaster in the US is in right now.

    And just to remind the younger generation of what has been lost primarily by autistic libertarians. Here is a video of glorious white harmony, goodwhites and badwhites loving each other and celebrating their eternal healthy and beautiful whiteness. This is what young white activists have to aim for after the US splits and their job will be in rebuilding the future white region of America.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxIWDmmqZzY&ab_channel=LynyrdSkynyrdonMV

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Faraday's Bobcat, @Anonymous, @John Johnson, @Alden

    This is what young white activists have to aim for after the US splits

    First, it’s gonna be lit

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    First, it’s gonna be lit
     
    1969 was so innocent. Lighting candles at concerts started with Melanie. Melanie!


    Woodstock Remembered: ‘It Was Magical!’ Says Singer-Songwriter Melanie
  26. @Buzz Mohawk
    Many years ago, I was treated to a 72-hour hold in mental-health facilities.

    I had made the mistake of telling my county mental health counselor that I was thinking about sticking the barrel of my Smith & Wesson revolver in my mouth and pulling the trigger. Two cops showed up at my door. An ambulance drove me to a mental hospital.

    The food was downright criminal. Boiled hot dogs and iceberg lettuce salad of zero nutritional value wheeled to us crazy people by a big, fat guy. (Was that Ignatious J. Reilly?) Fortunately for me, my girlfriend stopped by with a hot, fresh pizza she had picked up along the way. I shared it with the other crazies in the TV room. The observers gave me high marks that day.

    The next day, I was transported to a halfway house. A young resident there opened her bedroom door and promptly stripped off her clothes. As she was getting on her bed, she said to me, "I have been waiting 5,000 years for you!" Rather than quench her 5,000 year old thirst, I went downstairs and reported the incident to whatever unfortunate soul was in charge of the place.

    That day happened to be the 20th anniversary of the first moon landing, and one TV station played the whole moonwalk. Naturally, I was the only person in that house interested, so I watched Neil and Buzz in grainy video by myself in the living room. As I was doing so, one crazy man with a long beard walked in, looked at the TV and exclaimed, "That's terrible reception! That's an awful picture!"

    The next day, my 72 hours were up, and I was allowed to go home. I didn't shoot myself, but I enjoyed an experience few of us here have. What is life for, after all?

    Replies: @Polistra, @joe_mama, @Austin Slater

    When and if you suffer a bout of mental illness, you imagine that the “experts” will help. At least that’s what you think, the first time.

  27. Anonymous[320] • Disclaimer says:

    Some are sent to San Francisco. Some go down to New Orleans. Others are kept in Camarillo picking beans.

  28. @Steve Sailer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I like "Americans first" over "America first."

    Replies: @Anon, @JR Ewing

    I noticed the same thing.

    One thing that I absolutely cannot understand, unless I infer nefarious intent, and then it’s easy to understand, is the idea that the blessings of “America” belongs to anyone in the world who decides they may want it.

    America belongs to Americans.

  29. Much compassion. So woke.

  30. https://twitter.com/razibkhan/status/1418751682456997888?s=20

    “Our” how? Like “our” on a clock? What time are you saying it is?

  31. @Torn and Frayed
    Ronald Reagan was central to the closing of mental institutions and in blocking any community mental health centers. Reagan signed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act,, which closed the large centralised mental health institutes in favor of smaller, more local community based institutions. In 1980 Jimmy Carter funded these community centers on the national level and in 1981, Reagan cut this funding. Reagan gets the L, not Foucault.

    So many of our current problems reach back to Ronald Reagan and boomer conservatives. Reagan sided with Big Ag and crushed Cesar Chavez by opening the floodgates to Mexican immigration. Reagan crushed US labor, opening the floodgates to capital flight, financialisation, and later the factories being shipped to China. It's one thing to be totally wrong about everything, to admit it, and to accept responsibility. But to blame Foucault over Reagan is boomer cope. Nothing has been learned. Reagan, Milton Friedman, Ayn Rand, and boatloads of autistic libertarians are primarily responsible for the disaster in the US is in right now.

    And just to remind the younger generation of what has been lost primarily by autistic libertarians. Here is a video of glorious white harmony, goodwhites and badwhites loving each other and celebrating their eternal healthy and beautiful whiteness. This is what young white activists have to aim for after the US splits and their job will be in rebuilding the future white region of America.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxIWDmmqZzY&ab_channel=LynyrdSkynyrdonMV

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Faraday's Bobcat, @Anonymous, @John Johnson, @Alden

    Ronald Reagan was central to the closing of mental institutions and in blocking any community mental health centers. Reagan signed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act,, which closed the large centralised mental health institutes in favor of smaller, more local community based institutions. In 1980 Jimmy Carter funded these community centers on the national level and in 1981, Reagan cut this funding. Reagan gets the L, not Foucault.

    LPS was passed with a veto-proof majority, so don’t blame it on Reagan.

    The only cure for homelessness is a federally run Temporary Residence in every county over 100,000 population. The Temporary Residence will receive $5 million per year for each resident and will be required to have a proportionate staff of social workers, equity officers, intersectionality supervisors, transgender advisors, BIPOC advocates and indigenous nutritionists, and diversity pooh-bahs. Those hired will have their student loans forgiven and will receive 10 hours of paid leave a week to engage in approved activism that will be exempt from the Hatch Act. They will have to join a new Temporary Residence Workers’ Union.

    If they did that, the city politicians would suddenly start talking about how we need to empower the community to strongly encourage the homeless to avail themselves of the Temporary Residence. You’d be walking down the street to the coffee shop and three plainclothes agents would douse you with dirt, roll you around on the sidewalk until your clothes started to fray, and stuff a crack pipe in your pocket, then haul you off to the Temporary Residence.

  32. Anonymous[326] • Disclaimer says:
    @Torn and Frayed
    Ronald Reagan was central to the closing of mental institutions and in blocking any community mental health centers. Reagan signed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act,, which closed the large centralised mental health institutes in favor of smaller, more local community based institutions. In 1980 Jimmy Carter funded these community centers on the national level and in 1981, Reagan cut this funding. Reagan gets the L, not Foucault.

    So many of our current problems reach back to Ronald Reagan and boomer conservatives. Reagan sided with Big Ag and crushed Cesar Chavez by opening the floodgates to Mexican immigration. Reagan crushed US labor, opening the floodgates to capital flight, financialisation, and later the factories being shipped to China. It's one thing to be totally wrong about everything, to admit it, and to accept responsibility. But to blame Foucault over Reagan is boomer cope. Nothing has been learned. Reagan, Milton Friedman, Ayn Rand, and boatloads of autistic libertarians are primarily responsible for the disaster in the US is in right now.

    And just to remind the younger generation of what has been lost primarily by autistic libertarians. Here is a video of glorious white harmony, goodwhites and badwhites loving each other and celebrating their eternal healthy and beautiful whiteness. This is what young white activists have to aim for after the US splits and their job will be in rebuilding the future white region of America.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxIWDmmqZzY&ab_channel=LynyrdSkynyrdonMV

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Faraday's Bobcat, @Anonymous, @John Johnson, @Alden

    That video is from Oakland in 1977. It’s amazing how America has changed.

    I remember Lynyrd Skynyrd (and especially Freebird) being more of a guy thing. I’m surprised at the enthusiasm of the girls.

  33. Anon[162] • Disclaimer says:

    Santa Monica started getting a lot of homeless mental cases circa 1980. But they disappeared somewhere after dark.

    I think the big problem was the development of cheap, high quality camping gear. At the margin there are a lot of people who will desperately try to avoid living in a cardboard box, but think it’s kind of cool to do the urban camping thing.

    The new threat is the homeless van dweller. There are lots of YouTube channels for this. They live in converted white high roof windowless contractor vans, solar panels hidden by ladder racks, with a variety of fake magnetic logo signs.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Anon

    The new threat is the homeless van dweller.

    I've wondered about this. Are people living in their vehicles counted as homeless? I can see how it would apply if a family were living in a Toyota Corolla, but one or two people in a converted van? That's some people's retirement dream, at least for a year or so.

    When I was a young guy, I had a Datsun pick up with a camper shell. I slept in it may nights while driving cross country. Sometimes I'd stay in a commercial campground to get cleaned up. This wasn't homelessness, but if I'd had to do so due to lack of viable alternatives, I suppose it would have been seen as such.

    Replies: @John Johnson

  34. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975) was a propaganda film–we were supposed to believe that all the mentally ill were just misunderstood geniuses like Jack Nicholson’s character in the film.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Spud Boy

    Yes. It was definitely predictive programming. There were a few other similar films at the time.
    One if the worst propaganda lies was a San Francisco newspaper article a couple years before O’Connor vs Donaldson USSC 1975.

    It was about a very very old Chinese man who had been wrongly incarcerated at Napa State Hospital for decades. Supposedly he’d been wrongfully committed because he didn’t speak English only what the shrinks called gibberish. Suddenly about 1974 it was discovered he spoke Cantonese!!!!!!! After all those years. Such a lie. My 11 year old brother in law figured it out as well as every adult in the family.

    A hospital only about 8o miles from San Francisco which had a significant Chinese population since it was the Spanish settlement of Yerba Buena. And for 40 years no one wondered if the language spoken by a Chinese man was a Chinese language.

    , @John Johnson
    @Spud Boy

    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975) was a propaganda film–we were supposed to believe that all the mentally ill were just misunderstood geniuses like Jack Nicholson’s character in the film.

    It's a well done movie but yes it is propaganda and I remember reading that it had a lot of influence on people. Lobotomies had pretty much been abandoned when the book was written. No surprise that the writer was a leftist hippie.

    All you have to do is talk to someone that has worked in one of those institutions.

    You won't hear any stories about people that shouldn't be there.

  35. You can’t just blame everything you don’t like on “Michel Foucault”. Your Boomerism is showing, Steve.

  36. I haven’t spent much time in LA but Hollywood has taught me that LA used to be very tough with the homeless.

  37. @UNIT472
    We're running out of people who can speak from first hand experience of what adult life was like in California in the 1950's but my impression was that drug abuse was not so prevalent and what drugs as were available were less likely to cause permanent brain damage. While alcohol has always had the ability to reduce some people to a totally degraded state, American society had long coped with the limited number of non functional alcoholics even it was only to park them on skid row or the police 'drunk tank'.

    There were also stronger social norms and family ties even in a rapidly growing California. Police had vagrancy laws they could enforce so you just weren't allowed to live on a downtown sidewalk much less defecate on them. I used to see madmen wandering down Market St in the 1970's and, as I've mentioned before, friends would even request I take them there to view them. While the madman may have had an obvious mental issue as he stormed down the street muttering his intent to kill some unidentified person surprisingly he was usually fairly well groomed and not wearing rags. They did not appear to sleep on the sidewalk at night though I did wonder where they lived.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mark G., @anonymous

    We’re running out of people who can speak from first hand experience of what adult life was like in California in the 1950’s but my impression was that drug abuse was not so prevalent and what drugs as were available were less likely to cause permanent brain damage.

    The fact that we are running out of people who can remember a less dysfunctional pre-sixties America is making things worse. They both know and can point out to others that many of the problems now considered unsolvable actually were more or less solved at some point in the past. The same solutions that worked then could be reapplied today.

    I lived in San Diego, California as a seven year old in 1963 while my dad was working on a Master’s degree in astronomy at a university there. This was the Beach Boys era and I can remember watching the surfers at the beach. The city was mostly clean, safe and peaceful. I would imagine some existed but I never saw a homeless person that I can remember. When I watch an old Hitchcock movie from that period like Vertigo or The Birds I can see that California.

    I had a cousin from California visit me here in Indianapolis a few years back. We were talking and he said the California I remember no longer exists. He told me about the large numbers of homeless people in California now doing things like defecating on the sidewalk or shooting up in public. He also said road building has not kept up with population increases with the result it can take forever to drive someplace because of crowded roads. I think I just want to keep my memories of California as it was in 1963 and not ever go back there.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Mark G.

    In other words, you're a refugee. A sad tale. I recall seeing California in the 80s, and how exciting and promising of the future it was.

    Now it's a prelude of the future, but it doesn't excite me, unless I imagine The Road Warrior.

  38. California’s homeless population isn’t larger just by the number that would have been kept at that and other California asylums. California also hosts people who would have been locked up in other states’ asylums.

    That said, I’m uneasy about giving my government the power to lock up “the insane”, given the current nature of that government.

    • Replies: @Currahee
    @International Jew

    ...and then there was the Soviet Union treatment, still...

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @International Jew

    Florida also hosts a huge number of mentally ill people from other states.

    Either they migrate southwards in search of warmer weather for sleeping out in the winter, or they graduate towards retired parents who moved to Florida to get away from them as well as to avoid state income taxes and icy sidewalks in retirement.

  39. Mass immigration makes everything harder, or impossible. The US government should house and feed all mad and homeless people in the US. It could easily foot the bill, as it would probably save the same money on policing. The problem, though, is that with mass immigration, it would be setting itself up to be San Francisco writ large, as every vagrant in the world would arrive precisely to upgrade their lifestyle.

    Were I ruler of Britain, I would just send them all over in chartered jets.

  40. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/RepGosar/status/1418674579837435906

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Foreign Expert, @Paul Jolliffe

    I prefer a fifty year moratorium.

  41. @Torn and Frayed
    Ronald Reagan was central to the closing of mental institutions and in blocking any community mental health centers. Reagan signed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act,, which closed the large centralised mental health institutes in favor of smaller, more local community based institutions. In 1980 Jimmy Carter funded these community centers on the national level and in 1981, Reagan cut this funding. Reagan gets the L, not Foucault.

    So many of our current problems reach back to Ronald Reagan and boomer conservatives. Reagan sided with Big Ag and crushed Cesar Chavez by opening the floodgates to Mexican immigration. Reagan crushed US labor, opening the floodgates to capital flight, financialisation, and later the factories being shipped to China. It's one thing to be totally wrong about everything, to admit it, and to accept responsibility. But to blame Foucault over Reagan is boomer cope. Nothing has been learned. Reagan, Milton Friedman, Ayn Rand, and boatloads of autistic libertarians are primarily responsible for the disaster in the US is in right now.

    And just to remind the younger generation of what has been lost primarily by autistic libertarians. Here is a video of glorious white harmony, goodwhites and badwhites loving each other and celebrating their eternal healthy and beautiful whiteness. This is what young white activists have to aim for after the US splits and their job will be in rebuilding the future white region of America.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxIWDmmqZzY&ab_channel=LynyrdSkynyrdonMV

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Faraday's Bobcat, @Anonymous, @John Johnson, @Alden

    Ronald Reagan was central to the closing of mental institutions and in blocking any community mental health centers. Reagan signed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act,, which closed the large centralised mental health institutes in favor of smaller, more local community based institutions.

    Oh God not that lame excuse. That is what California libs use to try and deflect responsibility onto Republicans of the past.

    That was a bipartisan bill signed in 1967.

    Democrats have a supermajority and could reverse the law. Please stop encouraging liberals by repeating these lame excuses.

    Reagan, Milton Friedman, Ayn Rand, and boatloads of autistic libertarians are primarily responsible for the disaster in the US is in right now.

    I’m certainly not a fan of that group of globalist liars but the left is more responsible. The “war on poverty” (welfare) was far more destructive. Libertarians mostly make excuses for the capitalist status quo and amoral greed. Democrats tried to fix the racial problem with half a trillion of new spending and now blame their failures on Whites. Remaining Libertarians are completely deluded but at least don’t believe that Whites are somehow responsible for their failures.

    As for California that was wrecked by left-wing Democrats. They looked the other way on immigration and passed billions of their own race-denial based welfare spending. There have been a few Republican governors but they mostly twiddled their thumbs with a Dem house.

  42. @International Jew
    California's homeless population isn't larger just by the number that would have been kept at that and other California asylums. California also hosts people who would have been locked up in other states' asylums.

    That said, I'm uneasy about giving my government the power to lock up "the insane", given the current nature of that government.

    Replies: @Currahee, @Jonathan Mason

    …and then there was the Soviet Union treatment, still…

  43. @brabantian

    The government of the State of California has been in control of four connected families since 1958 except for the eight years that Ronald Reagan was governor (1967-1975.)

    The four families of Pat Brown, William Newsom II, John Pelosi, and J. Paul Getty have dominated California politics for over sixty years.

    The current governor Gavin Newsom is the son of Ron Pelosi the brother of Nancy Pelosi's husband.

    Kamala Harris, Maxine Waters, Adam Schiff, and Dianne Feinstein are all sponsored and closely connected with these families.

    The story starts with the election of Pat Brown as governor of California in 1959. He was sponsored by a wealthy man named William Newsom II. Governor Pat Brown awarded the contract to operate the Squaw Valley Resorts to William Newsom III and his partner John Pelosi. The state of California paid all of the cost to establish these resorts and received no income from the operations.

    Pat Brown's son Jerry Brown ran and won the governorship in 1974. His closest friend was William Newsom III who became wealthy from the Squaw Valley Concessions ...
     
    https://henrymakow.com/2021/07/california-controlled-by-four-crime.html

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @Alden, @Hibernian

    Thanks, very interesting.

    Here’s another post concerning the financial activities of the Pelosis:

    https://unusualwhales.com/i_am_the_senate/pelosi

    How very convenient it must be to not only have ready access to insider information, but also to have a pivotal role in crafting legislation that massively influences the market. Communists? I think not.

  44. It is interesting that in the online debate about the conservatorship of Britney Spears, the same ideas that mentally ill or insane people should not be oppressed or supervised in any way still have numerous adherents.

    Nobody has the faintest idea of what Spears is mental state is like, or what she might do if unsupervised, but that doesn’t stop anybody from having an opinion about her rights to do exactly what she wants.

    • Agree: Yancey Ward
  45. @International Jew
    California's homeless population isn't larger just by the number that would have been kept at that and other California asylums. California also hosts people who would have been locked up in other states' asylums.

    That said, I'm uneasy about giving my government the power to lock up "the insane", given the current nature of that government.

    Replies: @Currahee, @Jonathan Mason

    Florida also hosts a huge number of mentally ill people from other states.

    Either they migrate southwards in search of warmer weather for sleeping out in the winter, or they graduate towards retired parents who moved to Florida to get away from them as well as to avoid state income taxes and icy sidewalks in retirement.

  46. Scientists are people too with their own prejudices. If it takes pandering to those prejudices to get competent people in charge there are worse ways to suck.

    • Replies: @Mark G.
    @Desiderius


    Scientists are people too with their own prejudices.

     

    Scientists and others in the medical field mostly try to do the right thing but you have to be aware that they often have financial incentives to push more expensive treatments over cheaper ones. They make more money that way. I had Covid a month ago. I was sick for a week and a half before I went in the hospital and really wished there had been some early treatment options that might have kept me out of the hospital. The ones that show some evidence of being effective like HCQ were discouraged by the mainstream of the medical profession and many doctors won't give a prescription for it. It wasn't until after my illness that I found out there are actually organizations that will give you a name of a local doctor who would provide it. I ended up having a very expensive drug, remdesivir, given to me and it was done by IV which required a expensive five day hospital stay. About half the studies showed HCQ worked and half showed it didn't and it seems like no one impartial just went through all the studies and tried to figure out why it worked sometimes and not others.
  47. @Steve Sailer
    @UNIT472

    I can recall that there was some kind of controversy over a 1977 movie review of "Annie Hall" that said that Diane Keaton dressed like a "bag lady." But I didn't know what a bag lady was, and even when it was explained to me, I wasn't familiar with homeless women who carried their possessions around in shopping bags.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon

    Was it Carol Burnett who was in some “Bag Lady” TV movie back then? Like the “disease of the week” movies they had on. I remember there was the usual “tut-tutting” about this “danger” any woman faced, one small step wrong and BOOM! you’d be a bag lady. This was apparently a big fear.

    I assume this was part of the whole “street people/homeless/bag ladies/bums/hobos are people just like you, Joe Sixpack and Jane Chardonnay” psy/op. Of course, they weren’t, and aren’t: they’re drug addicts or mentally ill.

    This ran in parallel to the “This random black street person could have been a Supreme Court justice but not for racism” psy/op.

    Ironically, lots of women did wind up on the streets, thanks to feminism, marrying a black guy to be anti-racist, and other psy/ops. Or rather than bag ladies, they became cat ladies.

    Being unmarried, childless, and with an irritating personality is an excellent recipe for homelessness, since it leaves you with no support network.

  48. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @donut


    So it’s still a lunatic asylum ?
     
    If you’re in arrears with the bursar, you get the ol’ electroshocky

    https://youtu.be/rPgnuXNWN90?t=20

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

    Still the funniest/stupidest moment in movie history.

  49. @Torn and Frayed
    Ronald Reagan was central to the closing of mental institutions and in blocking any community mental health centers. Reagan signed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act,, which closed the large centralised mental health institutes in favor of smaller, more local community based institutions. In 1980 Jimmy Carter funded these community centers on the national level and in 1981, Reagan cut this funding. Reagan gets the L, not Foucault.

    So many of our current problems reach back to Ronald Reagan and boomer conservatives. Reagan sided with Big Ag and crushed Cesar Chavez by opening the floodgates to Mexican immigration. Reagan crushed US labor, opening the floodgates to capital flight, financialisation, and later the factories being shipped to China. It's one thing to be totally wrong about everything, to admit it, and to accept responsibility. But to blame Foucault over Reagan is boomer cope. Nothing has been learned. Reagan, Milton Friedman, Ayn Rand, and boatloads of autistic libertarians are primarily responsible for the disaster in the US is in right now.

    And just to remind the younger generation of what has been lost primarily by autistic libertarians. Here is a video of glorious white harmony, goodwhites and badwhites loving each other and celebrating their eternal healthy and beautiful whiteness. This is what young white activists have to aim for after the US splits and their job will be in rebuilding the future white region of America.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxIWDmmqZzY&ab_channel=LynyrdSkynyrdonMV

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Faraday's Bobcat, @Anonymous, @John Johnson, @Alden

    Neither Carter nor Regean had anything to do with it. It was done by the satanic Supreme Court. In 1975, when Ford was still president, the uS Supreme Court ordered every state mental hospital in the country be closed.

    O’Connor vs Donaldson USSC 1975.

    Within weeks, the state mental hospitals put bewildered patients on Greyhound buses for the nearest city.

    Although the ex patients were obviously disabled and unable to care for themselves, it was very difficult to navigate the disability application process at the time.

    So there they were, at the downtown bus station nowhere to go, no place to live, no money nothing.

    It was done by the ACLU Dundee by ADL AJC all the usual suspects. Ford Carter and Regeab had nothing to do with the closing of the state mental hospitals. It was the Supreme Court obeying its liberal masters, ACLU ADL.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Alden

    Why was ADL hostile to mental hospitals?

  50. anon[179] • Disclaimer says:

    Actual CDC link here. Note the recommendation to labs to use some other combination of tests for determining presence of SARS-2. What if those other methods had been in use for the last 18 months?

    https://www.cdc.gov/csels/dls/locs/2021/07-21-2021-lab-alert-Changes_CDC_RT-PCR_SARS-CoV-2_Testing_1.html

    PCR test emergency use began in Feb. 2020.
    Some things happen in 2020, including an election in November.
    PCR test emergency use ends Dec. 31, 2021.

    Pure coincidence, I am sure.

  51. @brabantian

    The government of the State of California has been in control of four connected families since 1958 except for the eight years that Ronald Reagan was governor (1967-1975.)

    The four families of Pat Brown, William Newsom II, John Pelosi, and J. Paul Getty have dominated California politics for over sixty years.

    The current governor Gavin Newsom is the son of Ron Pelosi the brother of Nancy Pelosi's husband.

    Kamala Harris, Maxine Waters, Adam Schiff, and Dianne Feinstein are all sponsored and closely connected with these families.

    The story starts with the election of Pat Brown as governor of California in 1959. He was sponsored by a wealthy man named William Newsom II. Governor Pat Brown awarded the contract to operate the Squaw Valley Resorts to William Newsom III and his partner John Pelosi. The state of California paid all of the cost to establish these resorts and received no income from the operations.

    Pat Brown's son Jerry Brown ran and won the governorship in 1974. His closest friend was William Newsom III who became wealthy from the Squaw Valley Concessions ...
     
    https://henrymakow.com/2021/07/california-controlled-by-four-crime.html

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @Alden, @Hibernian

    Governor Bill Newsom is not the son of Ron Pelosi brother of Paul Pelosi husband of Nancy Pelosi.

    Governor Bill Newsom is the son of Bill Newsom, brother of Barbara Newsom Pelosi ex wife of Ron Pelosi.

    Henry Makow is wrong about the governor’s father and so is the rest of his article. He neglected to mention the husband of Senator Dianne Feinstein, Richard Blum who was heavily involved in opening factories in China several years before the Nixon Kissinger opening to China and became a multi billionaire because of his Chinese factories and other endeavors.

    Squaw Valley was built in the late 1950s for the 1960 Olympics. A lot has happened since then. Like the population of the state has tripled. Plus the insatiable appetite of our major industry, agriculture for cheap planters and pickers.

    Henry Makow really.

  52. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:

    1. steve is claiming that the 70% of LA’s homeless who are from out of state would formerly have been locked up in loony bins (in LA or in their home states?), because el salvador and turkmenistan are hot on the tail of the US incarceration rate.

    2. steve is blaming the closing of the asylums on liberals while IN FACT it was reagan’s intiative.

    anon doesn’t know whether to feel sorry for steve or to send steve to the GULAG for ten years without right of correspondence.

    • Replies: @UNIT472
    @anon

    Its apparent that diamond is not the hardest substance. It is you head. Numerous comments on this thread have pointed out that the Governor of California did not and could not have closed California's mental hospitals but you are so simple minded a 50 year old political lie still resonates in what passes for your brain.

    Why don't you go drool and mouth breathe somewhere else.

    , @Alden
    @anon

    It wasn’t Regean. It was the US Supreme Court O’Connor vs Donaldson 1975. When Regean was neither governor president or any other government official.

    Regean did some bad things such as amnesty. But he didn’t close down the state mental hospitals. That was the Supreme Court obeying its masters, ACLU ADL.

  53. @Buzz Mohawk
    Many years ago, I was treated to a 72-hour hold in mental-health facilities.

    I had made the mistake of telling my county mental health counselor that I was thinking about sticking the barrel of my Smith & Wesson revolver in my mouth and pulling the trigger. Two cops showed up at my door. An ambulance drove me to a mental hospital.

    The food was downright criminal. Boiled hot dogs and iceberg lettuce salad of zero nutritional value wheeled to us crazy people by a big, fat guy. (Was that Ignatious J. Reilly?) Fortunately for me, my girlfriend stopped by with a hot, fresh pizza she had picked up along the way. I shared it with the other crazies in the TV room. The observers gave me high marks that day.

    The next day, I was transported to a halfway house. A young resident there opened her bedroom door and promptly stripped off her clothes. As she was getting on her bed, she said to me, "I have been waiting 5,000 years for you!" Rather than quench her 5,000 year old thirst, I went downstairs and reported the incident to whatever unfortunate soul was in charge of the place.

    That day happened to be the 20th anniversary of the first moon landing, and one TV station played the whole moonwalk. Naturally, I was the only person in that house interested, so I watched Neil and Buzz in grainy video by myself in the living room. As I was doing so, one crazy man with a long beard walked in, looked at the TV and exclaimed, "That's terrible reception! That's an awful picture!"

    The next day, my 72 hours were up, and I was allowed to go home. I didn't shoot myself, but I enjoyed an experience few of us here have. What is life for, after all?

    Replies: @Polistra, @joe_mama, @Austin Slater

    Luckily Myrna Minkoff showed up in time, so Ignatius was able to avoid your same fate. Hope you enjoyed the Twelve Inches of Paradise, haha.

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
  54. @Anon
    Santa Monica started getting a lot of homeless mental cases circa 1980. But they disappeared somewhere after dark.

    I think the big problem was the development of cheap, high quality camping gear. At the margin there are a lot of people who will desperately try to avoid living in a cardboard box, but think it's kind of cool to do the urban camping thing.

    The new threat is the homeless van dweller. There are lots of YouTube channels for this. They live in converted white high roof windowless contractor vans, solar panels hidden by ladder racks, with a variety of fake magnetic logo signs.

    Replies: @black sea

    The new threat is the homeless van dweller.

    I’ve wondered about this. Are people living in their vehicles counted as homeless? I can see how it would apply if a family were living in a Toyota Corolla, but one or two people in a converted van? That’s some people’s retirement dream, at least for a year or so.

    When I was a young guy, I had a Datsun pick up with a camper shell. I slept in it may nights while driving cross country. Sometimes I’d stay in a commercial campground to get cleaned up. This wasn’t homelessness, but if I’d had to do so due to lack of viable alternatives, I suppose it would have been seen as such.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @black sea

    I’ve wondered about this. Are people living in their vehicles counted as homeless? I can see how it would apply if a family were living in a Toyota Corolla, but one or two people in a converted van?

    People living in a car counts but not an RV. A converted van would be a gray area. If they were looking for housing then they would count.

    The cities really just count them by having volunteers walk around with flashlights. So someone couch surfing or sleeping hidden in a car wouldn't be counted. They ask them questions about whether or not they are looking for housing.

    When I was a young guy, I had a Datsun pick up with a camper shell. I slept in it may nights while driving cross country. Sometimes I’d stay in a commercial campground to get cleaned up. This wasn’t homelessness, but if I’d had to do so due to lack of viable alternatives, I suppose it would have been seen as such.

    Surf bums do that all the time. They spend the summer in a vehicle and then go back to work in the fall. I wouldn't consider them homeless. They party and have a great time.

    There are also snow bums. They live out of a vehicle with a season pass and shower at parties/hotels. No one thinks it is a big deal and people help them out.

    In both cases they certainly get more women than most single guys. A lot of these bitter incels should quit their jobs and surf or snowboard.

  55. @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/RealCandaceO/status/1418936608213110787?s=20

    Scientists are people too with their own prejudices. If it takes pandering to those prejudices to get competent people in charge there are worse ways to suck.

    Replies: @Mark G.

    Scientists are people too with their own prejudices.

    Scientists and others in the medical field mostly try to do the right thing but you have to be aware that they often have financial incentives to push more expensive treatments over cheaper ones. They make more money that way. I had Covid a month ago. I was sick for a week and a half before I went in the hospital and really wished there had been some early treatment options that might have kept me out of the hospital. The ones that show some evidence of being effective like HCQ were discouraged by the mainstream of the medical profession and many doctors won’t give a prescription for it. It wasn’t until after my illness that I found out there are actually organizations that will give you a name of a local doctor who would provide it. I ended up having a very expensive drug, remdesivir, given to me and it was done by IV which required a expensive five day hospital stay. About half the studies showed HCQ worked and half showed it didn’t and it seems like no one impartial just went through all the studies and tried to figure out why it worked sometimes and not others.

  56. @Spud Boy
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975) was a propaganda film--we were supposed to believe that all the mentally ill were just misunderstood geniuses like Jack Nicholson's character in the film.

    Replies: @Alden, @John Johnson

    Yes. It was definitely predictive programming. There were a few other similar films at the time.
    One if the worst propaganda lies was a San Francisco newspaper article a couple years before O’Connor vs Donaldson USSC 1975.

    It was about a very very old Chinese man who had been wrongly incarcerated at Napa State Hospital for decades. Supposedly he’d been wrongfully committed because he didn’t speak English only what the shrinks called gibberish. Suddenly about 1974 it was discovered he spoke Cantonese!!!!!!! After all those years. Such a lie. My 11 year old brother in law figured it out as well as every adult in the family.

    A hospital only about 8o miles from San Francisco which had a significant Chinese population since it was the Spanish settlement of Yerba Buena. And for 40 years no one wondered if the language spoken by a Chinese man was a Chinese language.

  57. @anon
    1. steve is claiming that the 70% of LA's homeless who are from out of state would formerly have been locked up in loony bins (in LA or in their home states?), because el salvador and turkmenistan are hot on the tail of the US incarceration rate.

    2. steve is blaming the closing of the asylums on liberals while IN FACT it was reagan's intiative.

    anon doesn't know whether to feel sorry for steve or to send steve to the GULAG for ten years without right of correspondence.

    Replies: @UNIT472, @Alden

    Its apparent that diamond is not the hardest substance. It is you head. Numerous comments on this thread have pointed out that the Governor of California did not and could not have closed California’s mental hospitals but you are so simple minded a 50 year old political lie still resonates in what passes for your brain.

    Why don’t you go drool and mouth breathe somewhere else.

  58. @anon
    1. steve is claiming that the 70% of LA's homeless who are from out of state would formerly have been locked up in loony bins (in LA or in their home states?), because el salvador and turkmenistan are hot on the tail of the US incarceration rate.

    2. steve is blaming the closing of the asylums on liberals while IN FACT it was reagan's intiative.

    anon doesn't know whether to feel sorry for steve or to send steve to the GULAG for ten years without right of correspondence.

    Replies: @UNIT472, @Alden

    It wasn’t Regean. It was the US Supreme Court O’Connor vs Donaldson 1975. When Regean was neither governor president or any other government official.

    Regean did some bad things such as amnesty. But he didn’t close down the state mental hospitals. That was the Supreme Court obeying its masters, ACLU ADL.

  59. @brabantian

    The government of the State of California has been in control of four connected families since 1958 except for the eight years that Ronald Reagan was governor (1967-1975.)

    The four families of Pat Brown, William Newsom II, John Pelosi, and J. Paul Getty have dominated California politics for over sixty years.

    The current governor Gavin Newsom is the son of Ron Pelosi the brother of Nancy Pelosi's husband.

    Kamala Harris, Maxine Waters, Adam Schiff, and Dianne Feinstein are all sponsored and closely connected with these families.

    The story starts with the election of Pat Brown as governor of California in 1959. He was sponsored by a wealthy man named William Newsom II. Governor Pat Brown awarded the contract to operate the Squaw Valley Resorts to William Newsom III and his partner John Pelosi. The state of California paid all of the cost to establish these resorts and received no income from the operations.

    Pat Brown's son Jerry Brown ran and won the governorship in 1974. His closest friend was William Newsom III who became wealthy from the Squaw Valley Concessions ...
     
    https://henrymakow.com/2021/07/california-controlled-by-four-crime.html

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @Alden, @Hibernian

    The current governor Gavin Newsom is the son of Ron Pelosi the brother of Nancy Pelosi’s husband.

    He’s the son of Gavin Newsom II. Ron Pelosi is his uncle. Unless you’re starting a wild rumor.

  60. I read today that pedestrian deaths almost doubled this century. The author believes that deteriorated plastic headlight covers bear some of the blame, as 75% happen at night and half in the large sunbelt states where sun damage is more common. I pointed out they also have more homeless for the mild winters and more people walking at night because it’s too hot during the day.

  61. @Buzz Mohawk
    Many years ago, I was treated to a 72-hour hold in mental-health facilities.

    I had made the mistake of telling my county mental health counselor that I was thinking about sticking the barrel of my Smith & Wesson revolver in my mouth and pulling the trigger. Two cops showed up at my door. An ambulance drove me to a mental hospital.

    The food was downright criminal. Boiled hot dogs and iceberg lettuce salad of zero nutritional value wheeled to us crazy people by a big, fat guy. (Was that Ignatious J. Reilly?) Fortunately for me, my girlfriend stopped by with a hot, fresh pizza she had picked up along the way. I shared it with the other crazies in the TV room. The observers gave me high marks that day.

    The next day, I was transported to a halfway house. A young resident there opened her bedroom door and promptly stripped off her clothes. As she was getting on her bed, she said to me, "I have been waiting 5,000 years for you!" Rather than quench her 5,000 year old thirst, I went downstairs and reported the incident to whatever unfortunate soul was in charge of the place.

    That day happened to be the 20th anniversary of the first moon landing, and one TV station played the whole moonwalk. Naturally, I was the only person in that house interested, so I watched Neil and Buzz in grainy video by myself in the living room. As I was doing so, one crazy man with a long beard walked in, looked at the TV and exclaimed, "That's terrible reception! That's an awful picture!"

    The next day, my 72 hours were up, and I was allowed to go home. I didn't shoot myself, but I enjoyed an experience few of us here have. What is life for, after all?

    Replies: @Polistra, @joe_mama, @Austin Slater

    I thought my 4-hour experience in a ghetto ER after an edible-pot-induced panic attack was unique (I saw some seriously fucked up things and people, which is the last thing you want to see when you perpetually think you’re 15 seconds away from dying). But wow, that really takes the cake.

    Thanks for sharing.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Austin Slater

    "My thumbs have gone weird."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHi4CfWuzdg

    Replies: @Austin Slater

  62. He has the right prejudices. It’s not performative.

  63. @Austin Slater
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I thought my 4-hour experience in a ghetto ER after an edible-pot-induced panic attack was unique (I saw some seriously fucked up things and people, which is the last thing you want to see when you perpetually think you're 15 seconds away from dying). But wow, that really takes the cake.

    Thanks for sharing.

    Replies: @black sea

    “My thumbs have gone weird.”

    • Replies: @Austin Slater
    @black sea

    LOL. Pretty much.

  64. Anonymous[319] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden
    @Torn and Frayed

    Neither Carter nor Regean had anything to do with it. It was done by the satanic Supreme Court. In 1975, when Ford was still president, the uS Supreme Court ordered every state mental hospital in the country be closed.

    O’Connor vs Donaldson USSC 1975.

    Within weeks, the state mental hospitals put bewildered patients on Greyhound buses for the nearest city.

    Although the ex patients were obviously disabled and unable to care for themselves, it was very difficult to navigate the disability application process at the time.

    So there they were, at the downtown bus station nowhere to go, no place to live, no money nothing.

    It was done by the ACLU Dundee by ADL AJC all the usual suspects. Ford Carter and Regeab had nothing to do with the closing of the state mental hospitals. It was the Supreme Court obeying its liberal masters, ACLU ADL.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Why was ADL hostile to mental hospitals?

  65. @black sea
    @Austin Slater

    "My thumbs have gone weird."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHi4CfWuzdg

    Replies: @Austin Slater

    LOL. Pretty much.

  66. Leftist do-gooders have reversed civilization by putting everyone in an insane asylum.

  67. @black sea
    @Anon

    The new threat is the homeless van dweller.

    I've wondered about this. Are people living in their vehicles counted as homeless? I can see how it would apply if a family were living in a Toyota Corolla, but one or two people in a converted van? That's some people's retirement dream, at least for a year or so.

    When I was a young guy, I had a Datsun pick up with a camper shell. I slept in it may nights while driving cross country. Sometimes I'd stay in a commercial campground to get cleaned up. This wasn't homelessness, but if I'd had to do so due to lack of viable alternatives, I suppose it would have been seen as such.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    I’ve wondered about this. Are people living in their vehicles counted as homeless? I can see how it would apply if a family were living in a Toyota Corolla, but one or two people in a converted van?

    People living in a car counts but not an RV. A converted van would be a gray area. If they were looking for housing then they would count.

    The cities really just count them by having volunteers walk around with flashlights. So someone couch surfing or sleeping hidden in a car wouldn’t be counted. They ask them questions about whether or not they are looking for housing.

    When I was a young guy, I had a Datsun pick up with a camper shell. I slept in it may nights while driving cross country. Sometimes I’d stay in a commercial campground to get cleaned up. This wasn’t homelessness, but if I’d had to do so due to lack of viable alternatives, I suppose it would have been seen as such.

    Surf bums do that all the time. They spend the summer in a vehicle and then go back to work in the fall. I wouldn’t consider them homeless. They party and have a great time.

    There are also snow bums. They live out of a vehicle with a season pass and shower at parties/hotels. No one thinks it is a big deal and people help them out.

    In both cases they certainly get more women than most single guys. A lot of these bitter incels should quit their jobs and surf or snowboard.

  68. [MORE]

  69. @Spud Boy
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975) was a propaganda film--we were supposed to believe that all the mentally ill were just misunderstood geniuses like Jack Nicholson's character in the film.

    Replies: @Alden, @John Johnson

    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975) was a propaganda film–we were supposed to believe that all the mentally ill were just misunderstood geniuses like Jack Nicholson’s character in the film.

    It’s a well done movie but yes it is propaganda and I remember reading that it had a lot of influence on people. Lobotomies had pretty much been abandoned when the book was written. No surprise that the writer was a leftist hippie.

    All you have to do is talk to someone that has worked in one of those institutions.

    You won’t hear any stories about people that shouldn’t be there.

  70. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Torn and Frayed


    This is what young white activists have to aim for after the US splits
     
    First, it’s gonna be lit

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h62RmIsx6MA

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    First, it’s gonna be lit

    1969 was so innocent. Lighting candles at concerts started with Melanie. Melanie!

    Woodstock Remembered: ‘It Was Magical!’ Says Singer-Songwriter Melanie

  71. anonymous[252] • Disclaimer says:
    @UNIT472
    We're running out of people who can speak from first hand experience of what adult life was like in California in the 1950's but my impression was that drug abuse was not so prevalent and what drugs as were available were less likely to cause permanent brain damage. While alcohol has always had the ability to reduce some people to a totally degraded state, American society had long coped with the limited number of non functional alcoholics even it was only to park them on skid row or the police 'drunk tank'.

    There were also stronger social norms and family ties even in a rapidly growing California. Police had vagrancy laws they could enforce so you just weren't allowed to live on a downtown sidewalk much less defecate on them. I used to see madmen wandering down Market St in the 1970's and, as I've mentioned before, friends would even request I take them there to view them. While the madman may have had an obvious mental issue as he stormed down the street muttering his intent to kill some unidentified person surprisingly he was usually fairly well groomed and not wearing rags. They did not appear to sleep on the sidewalk at night though I did wonder where they lived.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Mark G., @anonymous

    I get the impression that law enforcement in coastal California between the late 60’s and and early 00’s was pretty laid back but perfectly willing and had been given license to swing the Hammer of The Gods on any truly disruptive fuck-ups and predators ruining it for everybody else.

  72. @Mark G.
    @UNIT472


    We’re running out of people who can speak from first hand experience of what adult life was like in California in the 1950’s but my impression was that drug abuse was not so prevalent and what drugs as were available were less likely to cause permanent brain damage.
     
    The fact that we are running out of people who can remember a less dysfunctional pre-sixties America is making things worse. They both know and can point out to others that many of the problems now considered unsolvable actually were more or less solved at some point in the past. The same solutions that worked then could be reapplied today.

    I lived in San Diego, California as a seven year old in 1963 while my dad was working on a Master's degree in astronomy at a university there. This was the Beach Boys era and I can remember watching the surfers at the beach. The city was mostly clean, safe and peaceful. I would imagine some existed but I never saw a homeless person that I can remember. When I watch an old Hitchcock movie from that period like Vertigo or The Birds I can see that California.

    I had a cousin from California visit me here in Indianapolis a few years back. We were talking and he said the California I remember no longer exists. He told me about the large numbers of homeless people in California now doing things like defecating on the sidewalk or shooting up in public. He also said road building has not kept up with population increases with the result it can take forever to drive someplace because of crowded roads. I think I just want to keep my memories of California as it was in 1963 and not ever go back there.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    In other words, you’re a refugee. A sad tale. I recall seeing California in the 80s, and how exciting and promising of the future it was.

    Now it’s a prelude of the future, but it doesn’t excite me, unless I imagine The Road Warrior.

  73. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/RepGosar/status/1418674579837435906

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Foreign Expert, @Paul Jolliffe

    Oh I agree with Representative Gosar, but if his bill actually gains traction, then I hope he’s got his life insurance paid up.

    (Pro tip: don’t fly on his flights, and don’t share a taxi with him.Unfortunate “accidents”, and all that . . . See everyone connected with Jeffrey Epstein, for example.)

  74. This is a subject that has fascinated me since I first got to tour the depths of the Ypsi State Hospital before it was shuttered and demolished.

    SE Michigan had around 20,000 psych beds between Eloise (Detriot), Pontiac, Northville, and Ypsi. There were others serving the central and western parts of the State.

    20,000 is a metric shit-ton of crazy.

    Lots of historical looks into these places:

    https://opacity.us/site102_ypsilanti_state_hospital.htm

    https://opacity.us/site194_northville_state_hospital.htm

    https://www.michiganradio.org/post/photos-life-eloise-former-psychiatric-hospital

    I talked with staff (maintenance guys so no bullshit) and the degree of crazy is what really struck me. Where are we housing the poop-flingers and poop-eaters today? The absolute most dangerous ones are in a special state prison while those who can’t be tried and yet are too dangerous to release are in a small compound next to the former Ypsi hospital site.

    https://www.michigan.gov/corrections/0,4551,7-119-68854_1381_1385-215183–,00.html

    https://www.michigan.gov/mdhhs/0,5885,7-339-71550_2941_4868_4896_92486-495570–,00.html

    SO: From 20,000 beds in 1950 to barely over 600 beds in 2021. They are obviously still among us. What’s the homeless population again?

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