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From my new column in Taki’s Magazine:

The FDA’s approval in 1990 of cochlear implants that enable some of the deaf to hear set off a political struggle. On one side were the hearing parents of deaf children, who tend to assume that five senses are better than four. On the other were deaf civil rights activists who saw technological fixes for an identity they didn’t view as needing repair as stigmatizing and even genocidal toward “Deaf culture.”

Curiously, this clear predecessor of the Great Awokening, the promotion of deafness as equal to hearing, has never quite taken off the way crazier manias such as transgenderism have. Sympathy for the deaf would seem natural, but other identity groups attract more allies these days.

The main example of Deaf Power you see these days is office-holders employing gesticulating sign language interpreters. But that seems more like lame momentum from the turn of the century than something of much moment to today’s youth.

The high points of deaf activism were the 1988 and 2006 student strikes at federally funded Gallaudet University for the deaf in Washington, D.C., over plans to appoint as president persons not fully fluent in American Sign Language.

In contrast to residential schools for Canadian Indians, which are now the worst thing ever, boarding schools for the deaf are prized by activists as the font of deaf culture because it’s where deaf children can talk to each other in sign language. Yet, deaf militance over the cochlear menace appears to have faded somewhat in recent years even at residential schools.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. Maybe because deaf people aren’t insane?

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Altai

    https://www.vice.com/en/article/939qbz/people-born-blind-are-mysteriously-protected-from-schizophrenia

    https://twitter.com/shayla__love/status/1227257970632855552

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Rob, @Altai

    , @Joe Walker
    @Altai

    They are certainly saner than the transgendered nutjobs.

    , @guest
    @Altai

    It’s simpler than that. The answer is sex.

    Deafness isn’t sexy. That’s why Beethoven died alone.

    Trannies aren’t sexy to most people either, but they are about sex. Which keeps people interested.

  2. It’s really simple; deafness isn’t connected to other humans sexual kinks.
    As for lesbians, they don’t have as many attractive members to put out as role models as gay men. And they aren’t as crazy as trannies.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Redneck farmer

    Well, you can spank someone in complete silence.

  3. Deaf people don’t seem to be connected to any particular ideological movement. That’s probably the reason.

    If more deaf people were posting on Twitter and opinion articles about how they were once ostracized or shouted at by White people blah blah blah I’m sure they’d be a part of the movement.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @It's Ovrer


    I’m sure they’d be a part of the movement.
     
    ... whether they want to or not. "Membership in our movement comes free and automatic with your driver's license. You can drive, can't you?"

    That reminds me, why couldn't Helen Keller drive?

    Because she was a woman.
    , @Corn
    @It's Ovrer

    If more deaf people were posting on Twitter and opinion articles about how they were once ostracized or shouted at by White people

    I don’t consider deaf people oppressed but kids being kids I suspect many were bullied growing up.

    My sister works in a field where she’s had multiple deaf coworkers and frequently encounters deaf people. Most deaf people are perfectly nice but sis said if you meet large numbers of deaf people it becomes clear a sizable number have a chip on their shoulder against hearing people.

    My sister was always patient, figuring they had dealt with alot of bullies or insensitive jerks, but it did grate on her, especially since she wished the deaf no harm.

    , @Known Fact
    @It's Ovrer


    Deaf people don’t seem to be connected to any particular ideological movement. That’s probably the reason.
     
    But ironically enough who is the most famous deaf person ever -- and the most prominent cochlear-implant recipent? Rush Limbaugh

    Replies: @gutta percha

  4. Deaf people actually have a problem. Duh.

    • Agree: Old and Grumpy
    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @J.Ross

    A friend took the whole list of ASL courses at a local CC. Her goal was signing and working with the deaf. Guess what? Identity and grievance was at of the core of the teaching approach.

    Audism.

    Ever heard of it? I hadn't, and I thought I'd heard every strange "ism" on earth. Apparently there's nothing wrong with deaf people and you shouldn't try to fix them. They're fine, whole human beings you know. Any problems that arise are solely the fault of society and our bigotry. Accept them and respect them, but most of all give jobs and benefits to those who advocate for them.

  5. I see the miitancy about having everyone in these positions know sign language or having it on TV and in press conferences as similar to the Indian name thing for the American Indians. OTHER people care, very badly, for reasons of not having a cause they like better to bitch, whine, and bully the rest of us about. I doubt the deaf care nearly as much.

    There are other reasons for this in addition to deaf people, like most Indians, not being a group of insane, bitchy whiners. Electronics, as much as I hate a lot of it, has helped them immensely. Closed-caption obviates the need for sign language. There are probably lots of phone “apps” that do a whole lot to help deaf people get by and converse.

    Having someone right next to you doing sign language while you give a speech is distracting to the entire crowd. Put the words out on whatever app. (That could be great for EVERYONE, if you get drowned out by yells and other noise of the ctrl-left anti-free-speech crowd too, BTW.)

    • Replies: @Recently Based
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Having someone right next to you doing sign language while you give a speech is distracting to the entire crowd. Put the words out on whatever app. (That could be great for EVERYONE, if you get drowned out by yells and other noise of the ctrl-left anti-free-speech crowd too, BTW.)
     
    That sounds like a fantastic idea, both in substance and in the likely effect of proposing it.
    , @Gamecock
    @Achmed E. Newman


    The main example of Deaf Power you see these days is office-holders employing gesticulating sign language interpreters. But that seems more like lame momentum from the turn of the century than something of much moment to today’s youth.
     
    Exactly. A blithering anachronism, right there on TV for the world to see. The sign language interpreters may as well be buggy whip makers.

    As Achmed said, closed-captioning killed the need.
    , @Undisclosed
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I love watching the dystopian down under stuff where some little lady leader is telling her subjects that if they behave really really really nicely she will let them out of their room for 20 minites to go potty - and next to her is a giant maori man violently banging at his chest in some sign language pantomine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Expletive Deleted
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Electronics, as much as I hate a lot of it, has helped them immensely.
     
    Electronics is, or more likely was, a lot of fun. Don't hate on the components.
    For me it went to schott with surface-mounts. Like trying to build a house out of bacteria.
    Not too much wrong with my ears, but my eyes these days ... 'nuff said.
    , @Anon7
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It's fun to watch Democrat politicians virtue signal with black sign language translators. Are they translating more than words? Are they also translating white political talk into black talk?

    Skip to 19:30 in the following video, to see white Detroit mayor Mike Duggan translated into black American sign language:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_sbtWpVIaA

    As you watch, the camera starts to focus more on the translator, who is much more interesting than white bread Duggan.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Rob
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Thing about closed-captioning is that a lot of people born deaf cannot read very well. Our language, as you know, is largely phonetic. It is difficult to learn to reaf if you have to learn that his combination of squiglies mean x and this other mean y, but don’t have this is pronounced “cat” and yhat is pronounced “dog” because the letters represent the sounds.... For deaf people for whom cochlear implants are not realistic, i womder if very “loud” bone conduction of vibration could give congenitcally deaf people a sense of “this letter feels lime...” they would srill be learning english as a foreign language, but at least it would be in a “phonetic” alphabet.

    Could be i don’t undrstand bone conduction of sound, it might be that bone conduction ar an intensity thst was felt as touch would sound like a freight teain and require too large a speaker to implant. If so, perhaps congenitally deaf people who cannot get cochlear implants could have a microelectrode array and translate sound coming from particular locations as electric impulse applied to the skin? Iguess that depends on how sensitive the skin is. Also whether you can apply an electrode array to one location consistentky. Does not have to be elecctric stimulation. It could be tiny vibrating motors.

    Congenitally deaf whites average 85 IQ. Congenitally deaf blacks average 70. Learning to read is hard ar 75 IQ or below, which is 16% of deaf whites and more than half of deaf blacks. Couple that with not having the benefit of spoken language having a correspondence with spoken language, and reading is difficult.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Peter Lund, @duncsbaby

  6. How do you carry on a monologue in your head without words? Granted, some people get by fine in life without talking to themselves silently. But, in general, it’s a necessary useful skill.

    See, I never understood why this is necessary. I read through that part in Julian Jaynes’ The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind and thought “of course you can think very well with no words, and it’s idiotic that one would have no consciousness (or something like that) without it”. Then he got to the part about animals having no conciousness, and I put that book down for good.

    Grate title, Steve!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Ethan Coen was philosophy major at Princeton when Princeton philosophy lecturer Julian Jaynes published his "Origin of Consciousness in the Bicameral Mind." About a decade later, the Coen Brothers picked as the name under which they'd jointly edit their movies "Roderick Jaynes," which I presume is, in part, a reference to Julian Jaynes' "Bicameral Mind."

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Whereismyhandle, @duncsbaby

    , @El Dato
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Have a gander:

    https://www.julianjaynes.org/pdf/dennett_jaynes-software-archeology.pdf


    "of course you can think very well with no words"
     
    Not sure. Symbol manipulation needs symbols. You may invent symbols for the stuff you need to think about (as is done commonly in any technical or mathematical endeavour) but you need some labels to put on "things". Maybe the labels need no vocalization.

    "Consciousness" is pretty much orthogonal to all of that.

    What is it? Nobody knows!

    animals having no conciousness
     
    That's a Descartian idea, it's shurely a continuum and depends on the complexity of the actions the animal is performing. The more complex, the more debugging is needed, the more you need a self-image to work on. Or something. The hell I know!

    Replies: @Rob, @Colin Wright

    , @James J O'Meara
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Does he really? My memories are vague on that book. But if so, he's simply confused consciousness with self-consciousness (or better, as it's less ambiguous, 'meta-consciousness').

    Many "professional" philosophers even today make that mistake, despite the fact that it's so fricking obvious. It may be because it helps them make their smug arguments for materialism. (Cartesians were the first to insist that if you were smart enough, you'd understand that animals were just like machines that screamed and squirmed when you cut them, so vivisection was OK) In fact, there's one guy, I can't be bothered to look him up, who publishes works like "Consciousness doesn't Exist" or "The Myth of Consciousness,"

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @guest

  7. There was never – ever – even at height – a “trans-auditory” movement. Unlike 2021-trans, deafness was/is always imposed. No one suspects a deaf person of being psychologically twisted or manipulated to embark on their trans-auditory journey. It follows that their politics are the politics of people, legitimately advancing their self-interests, that this is true pretty much for all of them, and most people will grant them that without so much as nodding a head.

    • Agree: Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @SimplePseudonymicHandle


    There was never – ever – even at height – a “trans-auditory” movement.
     
    I'm sure someone in history has fantasized about being deaf: people fantasize enough about being amputees to have their legs cut off, so it would seem "there are people for everything" as a Spanish friend of mine says a lot.

    But yeah, no movement. Hell, I've been completely deaf in one ear all my life, and I don't say I'm half-deaf with any sense of pride or community spirit. You can't hear in stereo or locate sounds, and it's really hard to converse in noisy environments. On the other hand, it's great for sleeping.

    Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle, @AndrewR, @slumber_j, @Twinkie, @Buzz Mohawk, @ho

    , @Jack D
    @SimplePseudonymicHandle

    The deaf equivalent to "trans-auditory" related not to the deaf themselves but to their children. The children of the deaf are often also born deaf because they inherit the same genetic defect from their parents. Cochlear implants can often alleviate this deafness and they work best if they are installed at an early age, while the child's brain is still forming - once your brain has missed that opportunity, you're never going to be able to speak or hear like a normal person. But the most militant deaf people resist giving their kids these implants because it would separate them from the deaf community.

    Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle

  8. Deafness is a disability that we should seek to cure, else Jesus was wrong to heal a deaf man (Mark 7).

    I do think it’s understandable that a community and culture would emerge, so it would seem hypocritical for nationalists to say that our group cohesion matters despite the efficiencies of globalization, but their group should surrender to the benefits of hearing.

    Maybe the answer is Sowell’s refrain that there are no solutions, only tradeoffs, and hearing is obviously worth the cost of this particular community (it makes other communities easier) — or that there is primacy with the social binds of biological kinship and geographical nearness, and no other ties come close.

    Regardless, Steve makes a good point, and I’m glad the lunatics of the left haven’t gone crazy with this subject, too.

    • Replies: @Stealth
    @Waylon Sisko

    Cochlear implants are not a cure for deafness. To give you an idea of what I mean, if a CI recipient manages to attain a seventy five percent speech comprehension score, that’s considered a success story. If I recall correctly, a lot of things can go wrong during the implant process, and these mishaps reduce the implant’s effectiveness. Rush Limbaugh occasionally talked about his own CI difficulties publicly. They had to switch off a number of electrodes in his initial implant because they were stimulating nerves they weren’t supposed to be affecting. The additional implant he received over a decade later apparently didn’t work well enough for him to comprehend speech at all, so if the original left side implant was switched off, the new one only provided him with environmental noise.

    Replies: @Waylon Sisko

  9. @Achmed E. Newman

    How do you carry on a monologue in your head without words? Granted, some people get by fine in life without talking to themselves silently. But, in general, it’s a necessary useful skill.
     
    See, I never understood why this is necessary. I read through that part in Julian Jaynes' The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind and thought "of course you can think very well with no words, and it's idiotic that one would have no consciousness (or something like that) without it". Then he got to the part about animals having no conciousness, and I put that book down for good.

    Grate title, Steve!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @El Dato, @James J O'Meara

    Ethan Coen was philosophy major at Princeton when Princeton philosophy lecturer Julian Jaynes published his “Origin of Consciousness in the Bicameral Mind.” About a decade later, the Coen Brothers picked as the name under which they’d jointly edit their movies “Roderick Jaynes,” which I presume is, in part, a reference to Julian Jaynes’ “Bicameral Mind.”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    Have you read that book, Steve?

    Replies: @Rob, @Steve Sailer

    , @Whereismyhandle
    @Steve Sailer

    I like the work not because I believe it but because it's out there.

    We could use more academic work that tries to fly off a cliff.

    , @duncsbaby
    @Steve Sailer

    I used to work with a very smart dude who was a big fan of "Bicameral Mind." He in a way also kinda introduced me to Steve Sailer.

    He kinda introduced me in that he was also a big fan of John Derbyshire and he used to lend me his NROs to read after he was done with them. After Derb was fired from NRO I then started reading his columns on Taki mag which then led me to seeing this Sailer guy's movie reviews and the rest is history.

    So I guess you could say Julian Jaynes's fandom led me to being an unrepentant Sailer stooge. Still haven't read the "Bicameral Mind," yet though and probably won't. I get the gist of it. It's an interesting idea but really can't be proven.

  10. @SimplePseudonymicHandle
    There was never - ever - even at height - a "trans-auditory" movement. Unlike 2021-trans, deafness was/is always imposed. No one suspects a deaf person of being psychologically twisted or manipulated to embark on their trans-auditory journey. It follows that their politics are the politics of people, legitimately advancing their self-interests, that this is true pretty much for all of them, and most people will grant them that without so much as nodding a head.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Jack D

    There was never – ever – even at height – a “trans-auditory” movement.

    I’m sure someone in history has fantasized about being deaf: people fantasize enough about being amputees to have their legs cut off, so it would seem “there are people for everything” as a Spanish friend of mine says a lot.

    But yeah, no movement. Hell, I’ve been completely deaf in one ear all my life, and I don’t say I’m half-deaf with any sense of pride or community spirit. You can’t hear in stereo or locate sounds, and it’s really hard to converse in noisy environments. On the other hand, it’s great for sleeping.

    • Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle
    @slumber_j

    Yeah - all those morose teens existentially lamenting how they were born into the wrong body - one with auditory powers!

    , @AndrewR
    @slumber_j

    Life often involves situations in which the ability to hear is detrimental. But, kore often than not, the ability to hear is beneficial. I have absolutely no sympathy for the activists who don't want a cure for deafness. And the ones who actually *want* babies to be born deaf... there is a cure for that that I won't mention

    , @slumber_j
    @slumber_j

    Bonus bullfighter/philosopher footnote... I just learned that the Andalusian expression "hay gente pa' to'" ("there's people for everything") is supposed to have been coined by the bullfighter Rafael "Guerrita" Guerra, who was sort of a Yogi Berra of the bullring.

    The story of the circumstances in which he supposedly first said it is very Berra-adjacent. At some point Guerrita was introduced to the philosopher José Ortega y Gasset and he responded, "Philosopher? What's that?" So the guy who'd just introduced them gave a long-winded explanation of the nature of a philosopher's work, with particular attention to Ortega y Gasset's interests.

    Finally the guy stopped talking. The bullfighter turned to the philosopher and said: "So you dedicate your life to thinking about stuff? "Hay gente pa' to'."

    Replies: @Wade Hampton, @G. Poulin

    , @Twinkie
    @slumber_j


    I’m sure someone in history has fantasized about being deaf
     
    I think they are called husbands or perhaps fathers of small children.
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @slumber_j


    I’ve been completely deaf in one ear all my life, and I don’t say I’m half-deaf with any sense of pride or community spirit.
     
    The eye surgeon who performed radial keratotomy on me in 1985 was blind in one eye.

    Thanks to him, I haven't needed to wear glasses for the past twenty years. (It took fifteen for the full correction to take place. All of that stuff was somewhat experimental back then, and he was very highly placed in his profession and well-connected.)

    I only learned about his monocular vision when I read his obituary in the New York Times a few years ago. Evidently he had some kind of accident as a child. I suspect that had something to do with his choosing eye surgery as a profession.

    He travelled the world saving people's eyesight. For example, when that Union Carbide chemical leak happened in Bhopal, India, he went there to work on people's eyes. That sort of thing.

    , @ho
    @slumber_j

    I’ve been completely deaf in one ear all my life, and I don’t say I’m half-deaf with any sense of pride or community spirit. You can’t hear in stereo or locate sounds, and it’s really hard to converse in noisy environments. On the other hand, it’s great for sleeping.

    I'm also half-deaf, since early childhood, and in addition to all the negatives --and positives --you mention, find that, in the last decade or two (I'm in my 60s) I hear voices in my head constantly, either blathering away in languages I don't know or talking absolute rubbish in the languages I do know, in funny voices. It's not really bothering me, and sometimes they are quite funny. I can ignore it, but even then it's ongoing... I assume it has something to do with my hearing....and not my sanity....

    Replies: @slumber_j

  11. @Steve Sailer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Ethan Coen was philosophy major at Princeton when Princeton philosophy lecturer Julian Jaynes published his "Origin of Consciousness in the Bicameral Mind." About a decade later, the Coen Brothers picked as the name under which they'd jointly edit their movies "Roderick Jaynes," which I presume is, in part, a reference to Julian Jaynes' "Bicameral Mind."

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Whereismyhandle, @duncsbaby

    Have you read that book, Steve?

    • Replies: @Rob
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Scott Alexander did a really interesting review. The Origin Of Consciousness In The Breakdown Of The Bicameral Mind

    Someone said something along the lines of, ‘Julian James either made the most brilliant leap of inference ever or it is pure, unadulterated rubbish.” Scott finds a very interesting middle ground.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    No. I may have flipped through it in a bookstore or at a friend's but, I haven't read Julian Jaynes' big book.

  12. • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @Almost Missouri

    Coalface? Is that like blackface?

    This must be weird word day.

    Replies: @Philip Neal, @duncsbaby

    , @El Dato
    @Almost Missouri

    Once the Internet is awash in AI (Artificial Insanity) pretending to be human to harvest clicks, this is only going to get worse.

    , @njguy73
    @Almost Missouri

    Pop star Billie Eilish was diagnosed with Tourette's as a child. I wouldn't be surprised if some girls wish they had it as well. Never underestimate the power of popularity.

    https://hollywoodlife.com/feature/billie-eilish-tourette-syndrome-4358494/

  13. The main example of Deaf Power you see these days is office-holders employing gesticulating sign language interpreters.

    Apart from Mandela’s funeral, by far the greatest example of this I’ve ever seen was Beto O’Rourke’s presidential campaign announcement in 2019, which he delivered in the round in what appeared to be an El Paso intersection, surrounded by a blackshirt squadron of signers all gleefully flailing. With his crouching and springing fake-Pentecostal delivery, the whole thing was more like modern dance than anything else.

    God, I really want that guy back in politics.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @slumber_j

    The "sign language" man at Mandela's funeral became something of a legend. He was just making up random gestures as he went along, obviously knowing no sign language. And he'd previously provided his services at other high profile functions, without suffering any consequences. He was a big muscular guy, and I read later that he had mental health issues. I can see why people were reluctant to confront him about his brazen charlatanry.

    Replies: @Mr Mox, @Anonymous, @hooodathunkit

    , @Twinkie
    @slumber_j


    surrounded by a blackshirt squadron of signers all gleefully flailing.
     
    They need some Korean boyband-style training - they are totally not synchronized.
    , @Abolish_public_education
    @slumber_j

    My hearing is normal. I never listen to anything those always-crooked & pro-public education politicians say.

    I'm so sick and tired of these DEM, government bureaucrat, certified sign language interpreters who follow the politicians around from empty speech to empty speech. (When will the entourage include non-English language signers?)

    , @Paperback Writer
    @slumber_j

    Beto is such a pathetic joke.

    A perfect example of the degeneration of the white man in US politics.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

  14. @It's Ovrer
    Deaf people don't seem to be connected to any particular ideological movement. That's probably the reason.

    If more deaf people were posting on Twitter and opinion articles about how they were once ostracized or shouted at by White people blah blah blah I'm sure they'd be a part of the movement.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Corn, @Known Fact

    I’m sure they’d be a part of the movement.

    … whether they want to or not. “Membership in our movement comes free and automatic with your driver’s license. You can drive, can’t you?”

    That reminds me, why couldn’t Helen Keller drive?

    [MORE]

    Because she was a woman.

  15. I’ve had little contact with dwarfs. They don’t seem to have been very active about their disability(-ies). Not since Billy Barty. Goodness, did I just commit heightism? There are several popular(?) reality shows about different dwarf individuals and families. Assuming any accuracy they seem pretty enlightening about their life challenges and solutions. So why do you suppose that community is staying so low key?

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    @John Henry

    Any contact with dwarfs is little. Duh!

  16. I lived just a few blocks from Gallaudet in 2006 and can only offer a few observations…one is that the students did not endear themselves to the surrounding neighborhood. Some of it is obviously college age students acting the part, but secondarily those that had cars loved to crank the music up so they could feel the vibration and would sit in them having conversations in sign language at all hours, and their first reaction when a sleep-deprived neighborhood resident would show up and indicate they were being too loud was usually to yell “f&ck you” or something similar. While Gallaudet was the center of the “Deaf” movement and to be frank it’s not where the brightest kids go. The school nearly lost its accreditation when I lived there due to the abysmal academic performance and graduation rates. The neighborhood was overwhelmingly black, but the one thing that brought us all together was intense dislike of the entitled deaf kids who lived amongst us, and whenever a group would band together to approach the university with out concerns the response was almost invariably “get lost, we don’t care.”

    • Thanks: 3g4me
    • Replies: @Seneca44
    @Arclight

    In my town we have Maryland School for the Deaf which embodies the old saw that there is nothing so immortal as a government agency. With the advent of Haemophilus Influenza vaccine in the 1980's with a subsequent near disappearance of H. flu meningitis and its frequent sequela of deafness, the number of deaf children in Maryland fell by over half. The budget for Maryland School for the Deaf, however, continues to rise arithmetically despite having many fewer students. Got to keep those government jobs coming!

    , @3g4me
    @Arclight

    @15 Arclight: Thank you for a more honest response than most of Sailer's lukewarm 'respectable' commentariat. The deaf activists are just as entitled and insane as any other activist, but since they're largely White and middle class they get no leverage or publicity. It's also very telling that I've never yet seen a report on the parent of a deaf child refusing cochlear implants, whereas there are often 'heartwarming' video clips of children hearing their mother's voice for the first time. Contrast this to the parents of Down Syndrome children who insist their offspring are 'perfect as they are' and rail against how few new such children are being born in the West. Down Syndrome has no 'cure,' where cochlear implants have dramatically shifted deafness from a lifelong disability to something that can be ameliorated if not eliminated. This terrifies most activists because it indicates, I would argue, what most parents would do were such a simple 'cure' discovered and effected for homosexuality or many other mental or physical abnormalities.

    As far as those commenters claiming the deaf aren't insane - my husband still gets enraged when he recalls reports of a deaf lesbian couple who deliberately sought a deaf sperm donor to insure their child would never hear. Whether this couple's insanity was more a result of their sexual abnormality or their physical disability is, of course, debatable. Point being that anyone who is significantly different from the norm in any noticeable way will agitate for the celebration of their difference (most often a physical or mental disability). It's simple and predictable biological leninism, or the triumph of the spiteful genetic mutants born from slothful, weak, and bloated humanity long overdue for a culling.

    , @Twinkie
    @Arclight


    the one thing that brought us all together was intense dislike of the entitled deaf kids
     
    Some years ago, after my wife worked with some deaf people at some NIH thing for a few months (including those at Gallaudet), she came up with this conclusion: “There seem to be two kinds of deaf people. One, those who are trying very hard to lead normal lives and whose disability seems to have made them empathetic and kind toward the suffering of others. Two, crybabies who throw tantrums whenever they don’t get their way.”

    I said to her, “So, they are just like… other people.”

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Arclight, @Philip Neal

    , @James J O'Meara
    @Arclight

    It just goes to show the human capacity, no matter what ones' handicap, to still strive to become a complete asshat. Schopenhauer must have something on this somewhere.

  17. @slumber_j

    The main example of Deaf Power you see these days is office-holders employing gesticulating sign language interpreters.
     
    Apart from Mandela's funeral, by far the greatest example of this I've ever seen was Beto O'Rourke's presidential campaign announcement in 2019, which he delivered in the round in what appeared to be an El Paso intersection, surrounded by a blackshirt squadron of signers all gleefully flailing. With his crouching and springing fake-Pentecostal delivery, the whole thing was more like modern dance than anything else.

    God, I really want that guy back in politics.

    https://youtu.be/yLNBOK5TBFM

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Twinkie, @Abolish_public_education, @Paperback Writer

    The “sign language” man at Mandela’s funeral became something of a legend. He was just making up random gestures as he went along, obviously knowing no sign language. And he’d previously provided his services at other high profile functions, without suffering any consequences. He was a big muscular guy, and I read later that he had mental health issues. I can see why people were reluctant to confront him about his brazen charlatanry.

    • Thanks: slumber_j
    • Replies: @Mr Mox
    @Rob McX

    He was a big muscular guy, and I read later that he had mental health issues. I can see why people were reluctant to confront him about his brazen charlatanry.

    They were probably afraid he would use his universal, knuckles only, hand sign for "Shut up!"

    , @Anonymous
    @Rob McX

    That is so Africa.

    , @hooodathunkit
    @Rob McX

    Thamsanqa Jantjie!
    How we love that man .... and if you don't you really should.

    It was Richard Poplak who nailed it, writing for the South Africa's Daily Maverick:
    "Fog donkey: the only honest man in a stadium of fools", IMO one of the reddest red pills for the Mandela-era and young boomer crowd. Poplack is vicious but funny all in one. Amazing piece.

    Article: https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/opinionista/2013-12-12-fog-donkey-the-only-honest-man-in-a-stadium-of-fools/

  18. @slumber_j
    @SimplePseudonymicHandle


    There was never – ever – even at height – a “trans-auditory” movement.
     
    I'm sure someone in history has fantasized about being deaf: people fantasize enough about being amputees to have their legs cut off, so it would seem "there are people for everything" as a Spanish friend of mine says a lot.

    But yeah, no movement. Hell, I've been completely deaf in one ear all my life, and I don't say I'm half-deaf with any sense of pride or community spirit. You can't hear in stereo or locate sounds, and it's really hard to converse in noisy environments. On the other hand, it's great for sleeping.

    Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle, @AndrewR, @slumber_j, @Twinkie, @Buzz Mohawk, @ho

    Yeah – all those morose teens existentially lamenting how they were born into the wrong body – one with auditory powers!

  19. OT: UK’s Prevent strategy ends up targeting way more “far right” activists than Muslim terrorists.

    It sounds like a snitch’s charter, whereby “professionals such as doctors, teachers and social workers” tip off the police about people they’re suspicious about. Surrounded by bloodthirsty Muslims, they still manage to focus on the irrelevant threat from “white supremacists”

    Serious reports are forwarded on to Prevent’s Channel stage, at which a panel of local police, healthcare specialists and social workers meeting monthly will consider the case.

    That’ll fix those Islamic terrorists.

    • LOL: El Dato
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Rob McX

    For "doctors, teachers and social workers", dobbing in a BadWhite is just par for the course, while dobbing in, say, a brown-skinned person is the sort of thing they think a BadWhite would do.

    To dob in a brown-skinned person themselves, well, they're not BadWhites so they don't do it. And besides, if they did and they were wrong, that would make them potentially Racist, perhaps a career-ending accusation.

    , @Charlotte
    @Rob McX

    That’ll fix those Islamic terrorists.

    Yep. The man who stabbed MP David Amess to death was a graduate, apparently. “Ali, the son of a former Somali diplomat who was born in Britain and raised in Croydon, was referred to the flagship anti-extremism scheme, Prevent, which aims to stop individuals becoming terrorists.”-from the Daily Mail

  20. @Achmed E. Newman
    I see the miitancy about having everyone in these positions know sign language or having it on TV and in press conferences as similar to the Indian name thing for the American Indians. OTHER people care, very badly, for reasons of not having a cause they like better to bitch, whine, and bully the rest of us about. I doubt the deaf care nearly as much.

    There are other reasons for this in addition to deaf people, like most Indians, not being a group of insane, bitchy whiners. Electronics, as much as I hate a lot of it, has helped them immensely. Closed-caption obviates the need for sign language. There are probably lots of phone "apps" that do a whole lot to help deaf people get by and converse.

    Having someone right next to you doing sign language while you give a speech is distracting to the entire crowd. Put the words out on whatever app. (That could be great for EVERYONE, if you get drowned out by yells and other noise of the ctrl-left anti-free-speech crowd too, BTW.)

    Replies: @Recently Based, @Gamecock, @Undisclosed, @Expletive Deleted, @Anon7, @Rob

    Having someone right next to you doing sign language while you give a speech is distracting to the entire crowd. Put the words out on whatever app. (That could be great for EVERYONE, if you get drowned out by yells and other noise of the ctrl-left anti-free-speech crowd too, BTW.)

    That sounds like a fantastic idea, both in substance and in the likely effect of proposing it.

  21. @Almost Missouri

    Coalface? Is that like blackface?

    This must be weird word day.

    • Replies: @Philip Neal
    @stillCARealist

    No. It refers to coal mines. Those who actually cut coal out of the rock, deep underground in danger of gas leaks, flooding, power failure and the roof falling in are said to work at the coal face.

    , @duncsbaby
    @stillCARealist

    I had to look it up but apparently "coalface" also has the meaning of a work site which I'm not sure is the exact meaning in this paragraph. Use of the word coalface for a workplace seems to be British in origin. I must say I find it somewhat problematic comparing a shrink working w/high school neurotics to working in a coal mine.

  22. Meanwhile, the author of the Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood is being canceled for Tweeting to mourn the loss of the word, “woman”:

    ‘Anti-trans dog whistle’: ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ author latest to be labeled transphobic over tweet on loss of the word ‘woman’

    https://www.rt.com/usa/537911-margaret-atwood-terf-twitter/

    You just love to see the animals eating each other.

    • Replies: @njguy73
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Margaret Atwood should be glad that you can't say "woman" anymore. Maybe that's the only way to prevent Gilead from becoming reality. De-recognize gender. You can't oppress that which you don't recognize.

  23. @J.Ross
    Deaf people actually have a problem. Duh.

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    A friend took the whole list of ASL courses at a local CC. Her goal was signing and working with the deaf. Guess what? Identity and grievance was at of the core of the teaching approach.

    Audism.

    Ever heard of it? I hadn’t, and I thought I’d heard every strange “ism” on earth. Apparently there’s nothing wrong with deaf people and you shouldn’t try to fix them. They’re fine, whole human beings you know. Any problems that arise are solely the fault of society and our bigotry. Accept them and respect them, but most of all give jobs and benefits to those who advocate for them.

  24. @It's Ovrer
    Deaf people don't seem to be connected to any particular ideological movement. That's probably the reason.

    If more deaf people were posting on Twitter and opinion articles about how they were once ostracized or shouted at by White people blah blah blah I'm sure they'd be a part of the movement.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Corn, @Known Fact

    If more deaf people were posting on Twitter and opinion articles about how they were once ostracized or shouted at by White people

    I don’t consider deaf people oppressed but kids being kids I suspect many were bullied growing up.

    My sister works in a field where she’s had multiple deaf coworkers and frequently encounters deaf people. Most deaf people are perfectly nice but sis said if you meet large numbers of deaf people it becomes clear a sizable number have a chip on their shoulder against hearing people.

    My sister was always patient, figuring they had dealt with alot of bullies or insensitive jerks, but it did grate on her, especially since she wished the deaf no harm.

  25. @Arclight
    I lived just a few blocks from Gallaudet in 2006 and can only offer a few observations...one is that the students did not endear themselves to the surrounding neighborhood. Some of it is obviously college age students acting the part, but secondarily those that had cars loved to crank the music up so they could feel the vibration and would sit in them having conversations in sign language at all hours, and their first reaction when a sleep-deprived neighborhood resident would show up and indicate they were being too loud was usually to yell "f&ck you" or something similar. While Gallaudet was the center of the "Deaf" movement and to be frank it's not where the brightest kids go. The school nearly lost its accreditation when I lived there due to the abysmal academic performance and graduation rates. The neighborhood was overwhelmingly black, but the one thing that brought us all together was intense dislike of the entitled deaf kids who lived amongst us, and whenever a group would band together to approach the university with out concerns the response was almost invariably "get lost, we don't care."

    Replies: @Seneca44, @3g4me, @Twinkie, @James J O'Meara

    In my town we have Maryland School for the Deaf which embodies the old saw that there is nothing so immortal as a government agency. With the advent of Haemophilus Influenza vaccine in the 1980’s with a subsequent near disappearance of H. flu meningitis and its frequent sequela of deafness, the number of deaf children in Maryland fell by over half. The budget for Maryland School for the Deaf, however, continues to rise arithmetically despite having many fewer students. Got to keep those government jobs coming!

  26. @slumber_j
    @SimplePseudonymicHandle


    There was never – ever – even at height – a “trans-auditory” movement.
     
    I'm sure someone in history has fantasized about being deaf: people fantasize enough about being amputees to have their legs cut off, so it would seem "there are people for everything" as a Spanish friend of mine says a lot.

    But yeah, no movement. Hell, I've been completely deaf in one ear all my life, and I don't say I'm half-deaf with any sense of pride or community spirit. You can't hear in stereo or locate sounds, and it's really hard to converse in noisy environments. On the other hand, it's great for sleeping.

    Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle, @AndrewR, @slumber_j, @Twinkie, @Buzz Mohawk, @ho

    Life often involves situations in which the ability to hear is detrimental. But, kore often than not, the ability to hear is beneficial. I have absolutely no sympathy for the activists who don’t want a cure for deafness. And the ones who actually *want* babies to be born deaf… there is a cure for that that I won’t mention

  27. I’ve never heard the term Deaf Replacement Theory but I’m all for it. As Steve said, five senses are better than four. If medical science can eradicate deafness in future generations, great.

    Just a random thought: I don’t know ASL but I think it would be interesting to learn. I also think in some ways learning ASL makes more sense than learning Spanish or a second spoken language.

    As a nationalist I think a person moving here permanently or for a long period should learn English, just a person headed to Brazil or France should learn Portuguese or French. There are millions of deaf in America, and most were born here and are countrymen. If we’re pushing bilingualism for our schoolkids I think English/ASL is more nationalistic and a better show of solidarity than English/Spanish or English/other spoken language.

  28. One possibility is that the deaf, due to their speech difficulties (not to mention their lack of musical ability), are not cool in the age of TikTok.

    Nice notice

  29. @Achmed E. Newman
    I see the miitancy about having everyone in these positions know sign language or having it on TV and in press conferences as similar to the Indian name thing for the American Indians. OTHER people care, very badly, for reasons of not having a cause they like better to bitch, whine, and bully the rest of us about. I doubt the deaf care nearly as much.

    There are other reasons for this in addition to deaf people, like most Indians, not being a group of insane, bitchy whiners. Electronics, as much as I hate a lot of it, has helped them immensely. Closed-caption obviates the need for sign language. There are probably lots of phone "apps" that do a whole lot to help deaf people get by and converse.

    Having someone right next to you doing sign language while you give a speech is distracting to the entire crowd. Put the words out on whatever app. (That could be great for EVERYONE, if you get drowned out by yells and other noise of the ctrl-left anti-free-speech crowd too, BTW.)

    Replies: @Recently Based, @Gamecock, @Undisclosed, @Expletive Deleted, @Anon7, @Rob

    The main example of Deaf Power you see these days is office-holders employing gesticulating sign language interpreters. But that seems more like lame momentum from the turn of the century than something of much moment to today’s youth.

    Exactly. A blithering anachronism, right there on TV for the world to see. The sign language interpreters may as well be buggy whip makers.

    As Achmed said, closed-captioning killed the need.

  30. @It's Ovrer
    Deaf people don't seem to be connected to any particular ideological movement. That's probably the reason.

    If more deaf people were posting on Twitter and opinion articles about how they were once ostracized or shouted at by White people blah blah blah I'm sure they'd be a part of the movement.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Corn, @Known Fact

    Deaf people don’t seem to be connected to any particular ideological movement. That’s probably the reason.

    But ironically enough who is the most famous deaf person ever — and the most prominent cochlear-implant recipent? Rush Limbaugh

    • Replies: @gutta percha
    @Known Fact

    "the most prominent cochlear-implant recipent? Rush Limbaugh"

    Maybe that's why deaf IP stalled out. When Rush became part of the sainted group (due probably to his opiate addiction,) the group lost its halo.

  31. @slumber_j
    @SimplePseudonymicHandle


    There was never – ever – even at height – a “trans-auditory” movement.
     
    I'm sure someone in history has fantasized about being deaf: people fantasize enough about being amputees to have their legs cut off, so it would seem "there are people for everything" as a Spanish friend of mine says a lot.

    But yeah, no movement. Hell, I've been completely deaf in one ear all my life, and I don't say I'm half-deaf with any sense of pride or community spirit. You can't hear in stereo or locate sounds, and it's really hard to converse in noisy environments. On the other hand, it's great for sleeping.

    Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle, @AndrewR, @slumber_j, @Twinkie, @Buzz Mohawk, @ho

    Bonus bullfighter/philosopher footnote… I just learned that the Andalusian expression “hay gente pa’ to’” (“there’s people for everything”) is supposed to have been coined by the bullfighter Rafael “Guerrita” Guerra, who was sort of a Yogi Berra of the bullring.

    The story of the circumstances in which he supposedly first said it is very Berra-adjacent. At some point Guerrita was introduced to the philosopher José Ortega y Gasset and he responded, “Philosopher? What’s that?” So the guy who’d just introduced them gave a long-winded explanation of the nature of a philosopher’s work, with particular attention to Ortega y Gasset’s interests.

    Finally the guy stopped talking. The bullfighter turned to the philosopher and said: “So you dedicate your life to thinking about stuff? “Hay gente pa’ to’.”

    • Thanks: Rob
    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Wade Hampton
    @slumber_j

    Did he mention dog house ownership?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oseqh7SMIvo

    Replies: @slumber_j

    , @G. Poulin
    @slumber_j

    Imagine a world that had fewer philosophers and more bullfighters. What a wonderful world it would be.

  32. @Achmed E. Newman
    I see the miitancy about having everyone in these positions know sign language or having it on TV and in press conferences as similar to the Indian name thing for the American Indians. OTHER people care, very badly, for reasons of not having a cause they like better to bitch, whine, and bully the rest of us about. I doubt the deaf care nearly as much.

    There are other reasons for this in addition to deaf people, like most Indians, not being a group of insane, bitchy whiners. Electronics, as much as I hate a lot of it, has helped them immensely. Closed-caption obviates the need for sign language. There are probably lots of phone "apps" that do a whole lot to help deaf people get by and converse.

    Having someone right next to you doing sign language while you give a speech is distracting to the entire crowd. Put the words out on whatever app. (That could be great for EVERYONE, if you get drowned out by yells and other noise of the ctrl-left anti-free-speech crowd too, BTW.)

    Replies: @Recently Based, @Gamecock, @Undisclosed, @Expletive Deleted, @Anon7, @Rob

    I love watching the dystopian down under stuff where some little lady leader is telling her subjects that if they behave really really really nicely she will let them out of their room for 20 minites to go potty – and next to her is a giant maori man violently banging at his chest in some sign language pantomine.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Undisclosed

    Maori Sign Language would be great.

  33. OFF TOPIC:
    Even the Mayo has to pay the Floydgeld

    University of Minnesota, Mayo win \$19.4 million grant to study heart health disparities

    Center will address heart disease in Minnesota’s communities of color.

    By Glenn Howatt Star Tribune OCTOBER 19, 2021 — 3:51PM

    The University of Minnesota and Mayo Clinic have received a \$19.4 million federal grant to start a new research center that will focus on racial disparities in cardiovascular health.

    Ok.

    “We are looking at cardiovascular disease, hypertension and obesity as chronic diseases that disproportionately affect BIPOC communities,” said Dr. Michele Allen, an associate professor at the U Medical School’s Department of Family Medicine. “We are trying to understand as one of those key drivers is racism at multiple levels and how it plays out in the development of chronic diseases and outcomes.”

    The five-year grant will be used to support clinical research on community and primary care approaches to diet, physical activity, smoking cessation and other factors that impact heart health.

    The new research center, known as the Center for Chronic Disease Reduction and Equity Promotion Across Minnesota, was one of nine initiatives to be funded.

  34. @Arclight
    I lived just a few blocks from Gallaudet in 2006 and can only offer a few observations...one is that the students did not endear themselves to the surrounding neighborhood. Some of it is obviously college age students acting the part, but secondarily those that had cars loved to crank the music up so they could feel the vibration and would sit in them having conversations in sign language at all hours, and their first reaction when a sleep-deprived neighborhood resident would show up and indicate they were being too loud was usually to yell "f&ck you" or something similar. While Gallaudet was the center of the "Deaf" movement and to be frank it's not where the brightest kids go. The school nearly lost its accreditation when I lived there due to the abysmal academic performance and graduation rates. The neighborhood was overwhelmingly black, but the one thing that brought us all together was intense dislike of the entitled deaf kids who lived amongst us, and whenever a group would band together to approach the university with out concerns the response was almost invariably "get lost, we don't care."

    Replies: @Seneca44, @3g4me, @Twinkie, @James J O'Meara

    @15 Arclight: Thank you for a more honest response than most of Sailer’s lukewarm ‘respectable’ commentariat. The deaf activists are just as entitled and insane as any other activist, but since they’re largely White and middle class they get no leverage or publicity. It’s also very telling that I’ve never yet seen a report on the parent of a deaf child refusing cochlear implants, whereas there are often ‘heartwarming’ video clips of children hearing their mother’s voice for the first time. Contrast this to the parents of Down Syndrome children who insist their offspring are ‘perfect as they are’ and rail against how few new such children are being born in the West. Down Syndrome has no ‘cure,’ where cochlear implants have dramatically shifted deafness from a lifelong disability to something that can be ameliorated if not eliminated. This terrifies most activists because it indicates, I would argue, what most parents would do were such a simple ‘cure’ discovered and effected for homosexuality or many other mental or physical abnormalities.

    As far as those commenters claiming the deaf aren’t insane – my husband still gets enraged when he recalls reports of a deaf lesbian couple who deliberately sought a deaf sperm donor to insure their child would never hear. Whether this couple’s insanity was more a result of their sexual abnormality or their physical disability is, of course, debatable. Point being that anyone who is significantly different from the norm in any noticeable way will agitate for the celebration of their difference (most often a physical or mental disability). It’s simple and predictable biological leninism, or the triumph of the spiteful genetic mutants born from slothful, weak, and bloated humanity long overdue for a culling.

  35. @Waylon Sisko
    Deafness is a disability that we should seek to cure, else Jesus was wrong to heal a deaf man (Mark 7).

    I do think it's understandable that a community and culture would emerge, so it would seem hypocritical for nationalists to say that our group cohesion matters despite the efficiencies of globalization, but their group should surrender to the benefits of hearing.

    Maybe the answer is Sowell's refrain that there are no solutions, only tradeoffs, and hearing is obviously worth the cost of this particular community (it makes other communities easier) -- or that there is primacy with the social binds of biological kinship and geographical nearness, and no other ties come close.

    Regardless, Steve makes a good point, and I'm glad the lunatics of the left haven't gone crazy with this subject, too.

    Replies: @Stealth

    Cochlear implants are not a cure for deafness. To give you an idea of what I mean, if a CI recipient manages to attain a seventy five percent speech comprehension score, that’s considered a success story. If I recall correctly, a lot of things can go wrong during the implant process, and these mishaps reduce the implant’s effectiveness. Rush Limbaugh occasionally talked about his own CI difficulties publicly. They had to switch off a number of electrodes in his initial implant because they were stimulating nerves they weren’t supposed to be affecting. The additional implant he received over a decade later apparently didn’t work well enough for him to comprehend speech at all, so if the original left side implant was switched off, the new one only provided him with environmental noise.

    • Replies: @Waylon Sisko
    @Stealth

    I had no idea, especially about Rush's struggles --I appreciate the info, thanks!

  36. Anon[411] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    The media thinks IQ is wonderfully useful and accurate if it belongs to a black murderer on death row.

    https://www.newsweek.com/who-willie-smith-alabama-death-row-inmate-iq-70s-set-executed-1640414

    His IQ is less than a standard deviation below the normal black IQ, so they’re essentially saying that 20 percent plus of blacks get a pass on capital punishment.

    • Replies: @Fun To Do Bad Things
    @Anon

    Even more OT:

    I seem to recall reading on here a year or two ago that some prosecutors were using this exact tactic in reverse: “Well, sure, the test says his IQ is 66, but these tests are racially biased, don’cha know. I bet if he were given a fair and unbiased test, we’d be able to see his real IQ is around 95. Let’s proceed with a capital murder trial!”

    Am I remembering right? Anyone have any sources on this?

  37. “How do you carry on a monologue in your head without words? ”

    Well some deaf people talk to themselves in sign language and from my experience learning something of a couple of sign languages (in different countries) most people misunderstand how signers think. AFAICT it’s gestural (think of mental limbs signing rather than a mental tongue moving around). It’s not seeing a mental signer it’s feeling yourself sign even though you’re not (if that makes sense).

    One of the reasons for deaf sign language positivity is that it creates a community (in the real, old fashioned sense). Deaf signing people are one of the few real organic communities left which is why many deaf people who might want the implants for practical purposes still hang out with other signers.

    You can’t create a community around thinks like trans or veganism (both of which are more like grotesque caricatures of communities) but signers include families and that makes a big difference.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @cliff arroyo

    "It’s not seeing a mental signer it’s feeling yourself sign even though you’re not (if that makes sense)."

    Thanks.

  38. We have a deaf school here in my hometown and I used to cover their games as a stringer for the local paper. Many deaf people settled here after graduation so that they could be part of a community and the games were a big social event for them. But over the last 20 years or so, with cochlear implants and mainstreaming, the enrollment has fallen off to almost nothing and most of the students who remain have other, very serious, handicaps and so the school does not have any more sports. For a while some of the older graduates got together and put a team in the local softball league. They were really bad for the first couple of years and then got better, but they were just competitive and now those people have aged out of being able to play. But that team was a substitute for the school’s games for that community, at least for a while. There is a retirement home here that was built with the deaf community in mind and I suppose that many will live out their lives there.

    A friend moved here so that his son could attend the deaf school, but he ended up mainstreaming the boy. They were still connected to that community and the boy eventually married a deaf girl but I really think the “deaf community” is dying out. It isn’t that difficult for them to function among the rest of society (he’s an electrician) and most are finding their way just fine.

  39. @Altai
    Maybe because deaf people aren't insane?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Joe Walker, @guest

    https://www.vice.com/en/article/939qbz/people-born-blind-are-mysteriously-protected-from-schizophrenia

    • Thanks: Bardon Kaldian, S. Anonyia
    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @MEH 0910

    Wow! I was just about to post something about reading years ago that deaf people are more subject to paranoia than blind people. It seems like it is more unnerving to see people around you and not be able to hear them, especially what they are saying, than it is to hear but not see them.

    , @Rob
    @MEH 0910

    That was an interesting article. Thank you for sharing it. What I found particularly interesting was the thing about people who were blindfolded for a few days developing visual hallucinations. Not all “psychosis” is the same. Most maybe the vast majority, though I’m too lazy to google, of schizophrenics never develop visual hallucinations. They develop auditory ones. Smells? Tastes? Touches? Also extremely rare for schizophrenics. “Do you hallucinate smells?” is a question on the psychiatric structured interview for people who may be faking schizophrenia. There are (rare) schizophrenics who do hallucinate smells, so there are a bunch more questions. Google it before you try to fake schizophrenia!

    My guess for why congenitally blind people never develop schizophrenia is hinted at by deafblind people occasionally developing schiz. In people who are congenitally blind, the auditory perceptual system is well-developed. People who are socially isolated sometimes hallucinate voices. Likely because the part of the brain that listens to voices “gets bored” without input, so it makes up some input. In blind people, the auditory system is used for more than voices, so it gets a better, more constant workout, in deafblind people, it does not, so the auditory system, being bored, supplies its own input. Socially isolated people without tv and magazines and such start to hallucinate faces, probably because pieces of the brain expect to see faces, and do it no matter what.

    The rubber hand test suggests an interesting experiment. There was a study where the researchers supplied people with an artificial Extra thumb On the pinky finger side, that was controlled by the toes. People got lots of utility out of it, like being able to open bottles one-handed. Their brain changed to include the thumb, though the brain effects wore off after a few weeks without the thumb. How would deaf people adjust to the extra thumb? What about schizophrenics? Deaf results would be confounded by not being able to see the extra thumb, so they might need to work out some sort of tactile feedback to the toes.

    People with congenital blindness sometimes develop spontaneously develop echolocation. There is/was a blind boy in India who could ride his bike. Maybe he’s been hit by a car since I read the article, though. Apparently, even more deaf babies begin “clicking” to “observe” their surroundings, but are discouraged by caretakers, because they don’t want the kids to be weird. Henry Harpending wrote in a post at Westhunt that when he was with bushmen in east Africa, they would walk around just fine in darkness that he could barely see in, talking the whole time. Talking the whole time in their language with lots of clicks. He thought they might have been echolocating without even knowing it. Would be very interesting to know if lone bushmen walking at night talk to themselves more often than lone bushmen during the day. Would be interesting to know that before the wild hunter-gatherers are lost to join the billions of third worlders languishing in burgeoning slums, where they will forget the hundreds of thousands of years of culture that let them be foragers. Who knows what we lose when cultures die. I am sure the special forces would love to teach soldiers how to echolocate.

    , @Altai
    @MEH 0910

    There's something to be said for the personality types associated with transness. All the surveys say anti-social and BPD massively over-represented among MtFs. (Which, together with the high autism profiles in males, suggests that trans people are just people who don't care about others opinions)

    Which also seems to indicate that while the online trans might be expected to be over-representative of those personality types (As social media generally has been a boon for such persons' malign social influence) they do, in fact, seem to be a good barometer of the community. How many of these profiles of trans 'women' that mentions how much of an asshole they used to be?

    FtM trans seem to be heavily BPD and often their desire is not to become male but to not be female due to a pathological fear or trauma from previous sexual assault. (Which, itself is likely to stem from the behaviours of BPDers and the toxic company they keep, particularly in adolescence)

    https://sci-hub.hkvisa.net/10.1080/00926239908403976

    All told, trans activism will always be crazy and toxic because that's who most of these people are as people and thus what the ethos of the community will become.

    Look at https://www.reddit.com/r/ftm and particularly https://www.reddit.com/r/FTMfemininity

    The latter is basically a subreddit for those who want to be considered men or 'non-binary' despite presenting as girls in every single way or more tragically, after removing their breasts, taking testosterone and growing beards and body hair. (100% of the users of the latter are BPD)

  40. @slumber_j
    @SimplePseudonymicHandle


    There was never – ever – even at height – a “trans-auditory” movement.
     
    I'm sure someone in history has fantasized about being deaf: people fantasize enough about being amputees to have their legs cut off, so it would seem "there are people for everything" as a Spanish friend of mine says a lot.

    But yeah, no movement. Hell, I've been completely deaf in one ear all my life, and I don't say I'm half-deaf with any sense of pride or community spirit. You can't hear in stereo or locate sounds, and it's really hard to converse in noisy environments. On the other hand, it's great for sleeping.

    Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle, @AndrewR, @slumber_j, @Twinkie, @Buzz Mohawk, @ho

    I’m sure someone in history has fantasized about being deaf

    I think they are called husbands or perhaps fathers of small children.

    • Agree: slumber_j
  41. @Achmed E. Newman

    How do you carry on a monologue in your head without words? Granted, some people get by fine in life without talking to themselves silently. But, in general, it’s a necessary useful skill.
     
    See, I never understood why this is necessary. I read through that part in Julian Jaynes' The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind and thought "of course you can think very well with no words, and it's idiotic that one would have no consciousness (or something like that) without it". Then he got to the part about animals having no conciousness, and I put that book down for good.

    Grate title, Steve!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @El Dato, @James J O'Meara

    Have a gander:

    https://www.julianjaynes.org/pdf/dennett_jaynes-software-archeology.pdf

    “of course you can think very well with no words”

    Not sure. Symbol manipulation needs symbols. You may invent symbols for the stuff you need to think about (as is done commonly in any technical or mathematical endeavour) but you need some labels to put on “things”. Maybe the labels need no vocalization.

    “Consciousness” is pretty much orthogonal to all of that.

    What is it? Nobody knows!

    animals having no conciousness

    That’s a Descartian idea, it’s shurely a continuum and depends on the complexity of the actions the animal is performing. The more complex, the more debugging is needed, the more you need a self-image to work on. Or something. The hell I know!

    • Replies: @Rob
    @El Dato

    When I am very tired, I sometimes see flashes of images before the words come to me. For example, I'll see a glass of water in my head, and then I'll think the words “I'm thirsty, I should get a glass of water” when I’m halfway to the kitchen. so, I have certainly had conscious thought without words. I assume that is how animal consciousness might work. They see flashes of images “in the mind's eye” then know to make that image real. Have you ever tried saying something, but just could not think of the word? If consciousness were purely verbal, how is it possible to have the concept without knowing the word?

    It is because so much of consciousness is nonverbal that someone else can say what you were thinking, but could not put it into words. Men, for example, are notorious for not being able to come up with a word for what they are feeling. But they are still experiencing the feeling.

    Those things said i find it difficult to fathom how people can go without an inner monologue. People say they read without an inner voice. Also, the ones who say that seem to be able to read much faster. I wonder if that’s a skill one can pick up in adulthood?

    That said, the Slate Star Codex review of Jaynes is well worth reading.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Colin Wright
    @El Dato

    '“of course you can think very well with no words”

    'Not sure...'

    I remember thinking about that rather earnestly in college in connection with some philosophy course.

    I came to the conclusion that I, at least, would have the insight first and fit words to it second.

    Of course one has to have words to communicate ideas, and to preserve them, but I'll take the position that in the beginning, there is the idea, and only subsequently, the words to describe it.

  42. @slumber_j

    The main example of Deaf Power you see these days is office-holders employing gesticulating sign language interpreters.
     
    Apart from Mandela's funeral, by far the greatest example of this I've ever seen was Beto O'Rourke's presidential campaign announcement in 2019, which he delivered in the round in what appeared to be an El Paso intersection, surrounded by a blackshirt squadron of signers all gleefully flailing. With his crouching and springing fake-Pentecostal delivery, the whole thing was more like modern dance than anything else.

    God, I really want that guy back in politics.

    https://youtu.be/yLNBOK5TBFM

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Twinkie, @Abolish_public_education, @Paperback Writer

    surrounded by a blackshirt squadron of signers all gleefully flailing.

    They need some Korean boyband-style training – they are totally not synchronized.

  43. @Almost Missouri

    Once the Internet is awash in AI (Artificial Insanity) pretending to be human to harvest clicks, this is only going to get worse.

  44. two deaf lesbians who are trying to find a congenitally deaf sperm donor to help one of them conceive a deaf child

    That’s so monumentally stupid for their own future welfare and just evil for the child’s.

    • Agree: 3g4me
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Ralph L

    These two beauties from London went for deaf babies and had two

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2008/mar/09/genetics.medicalresearch


    Like any other three-year-old child, Molly has brought joy to her parents. Bright-eyed and cheerful, Molly is also deaf - and that is an issue which vexes her parents, though not for the obvious reasons. Paula Garfield, a theatre director, and her partner, Tomato Lichy, an artist and designer, are also deaf and had hoped to have a child who could not hear.

    'We celebrated when we found out about Molly's deafness,' says Lichy. 'Being deaf is not about being disabled, or medically incomplete - it's about being part of a linguistic minority. We're proud, not of the medical aspect of deafness, but of the language we use and the community we live in.'

    Now the couple are hoping to have a second child, one they also wish to be deaf - and that desire has brought them into a sharp confrontation with Parliament. The government's Human Fertilisation and Embryology (HFE) bill, scheduled to go through the Commons this spring, will block any attempt by couples like Garfield and Lichy to use modern medical techniques to ensure their children are deaf.
     
    https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/commentators/dominic-lawson/dominic-lawson-of-course-a-deaf-couple-want-a-deaf-child-794001.html

    "Our view, on the other hand, is that being deaf is a positive thing, with many wonderful aspects. We don't view being deaf along the same lines as being blind or mentally retarded; we see it as paralleling being Jewish or black. We don't see members of those minority groups wanting to eliminate themselves."
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Buzz Mohawk

  45. @Arclight
    I lived just a few blocks from Gallaudet in 2006 and can only offer a few observations...one is that the students did not endear themselves to the surrounding neighborhood. Some of it is obviously college age students acting the part, but secondarily those that had cars loved to crank the music up so they could feel the vibration and would sit in them having conversations in sign language at all hours, and their first reaction when a sleep-deprived neighborhood resident would show up and indicate they were being too loud was usually to yell "f&ck you" or something similar. While Gallaudet was the center of the "Deaf" movement and to be frank it's not where the brightest kids go. The school nearly lost its accreditation when I lived there due to the abysmal academic performance and graduation rates. The neighborhood was overwhelmingly black, but the one thing that brought us all together was intense dislike of the entitled deaf kids who lived amongst us, and whenever a group would band together to approach the university with out concerns the response was almost invariably "get lost, we don't care."

    Replies: @Seneca44, @3g4me, @Twinkie, @James J O'Meara

    the one thing that brought us all together was intense dislike of the entitled deaf kids

    Some years ago, after my wife worked with some deaf people at some NIH thing for a few months (including those at Gallaudet), she came up with this conclusion: “There seem to be two kinds of deaf people. One, those who are trying very hard to lead normal lives and whose disability seems to have made them empathetic and kind toward the suffering of others. Two, crybabies who throw tantrums whenever they don’t get their way.”

    I said to her, “So, they are just like… other people.”

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Twinkie

    Autistics and bipolar people fit the same mold. It's just seems to be a bit more extreme: in both categories.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    , @Arclight
    @Twinkie

    I agree with your comment, but based on my experience Gallaudet has a lot of the latter type as opposed to the former, perhaps because my impression is it doesn't really attract top shelf students in the first place.

    To be sure there were definitely some nice kids that I encountered, but the share that were just flat out unpleasant definitely colored my views. As a side note, there is now a Starbucks on H Street NE that is apparently staffed entirely by deaf people. I dropped in a few years back and didn't realize it at first until I noticed the small dry erase clipboards and markers for communication.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Philip Neal
    @Twinkie

    An anecdote. Years ago, I was on my own in a pub looking at a page of Chinese characters I was trying to memorise.

    A man came up to me and - to cut a long story short - I learned that he was deaf from birth, passing through town, and curious to know if Chinese characters represent pure meaning. We held a conversation, partly in gestures and partly in written English. He wrote down his own name, which he had never heard, like a telephone number: it was Scottish, and he told me that he worked as a diver on North Sea oil platforms. After maybe half an hour, someone fluent in sign language but hearing, presumably a friend or contact of his, turned up and confirmed what I gathered the deaf man had said. He was plainly a tough, intelligent man with an incredible memory who would have gone far but for his deficit.

    Perhaps potential deaf leaders have better things to do than lead other deaf people.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Twinkie

  46. Nobody heard the cries of the deaf.

  47. Anon[374] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: ‘Gorilla Glue Girl’ Tessica Brown Is Set To Accept The Citizen Of Courage Award.

    It looks like complaining about a bad black hair day will win you an award these days.

    https://okmagazine.com/p/gorilla-glue-girl-tessica-brown-debuts-major-elegant-transformation-after-viral-video/?fr=operanews

    Her hair is still crap. It looks like it came out of a can of Silly String.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Anon

    I people producting "viral videos" would literally get COVIDAIDS our problems might soon be less.

  48. Walking past a school for the deaf at 23rd and 2nd in New York early one fall morning, I was treated to the sight of a group of kids kicking newspaper boxes off the curb into the street, then trying to kick them to pieces. They did this almost in silence, just the crashing sounds and a little grunting. I don’t remember if they were egging each other on with hand signs.

  49. Deafness is a real disability and transgenderism is a real delusion.

    You can make progress on a real problem, and deaf people do have improved access to things. The only progress transgenderists want is to force everyone else to pretend that their delusion reflects reality, which is never going to happen.

    So transgenderism is a sustainable racket for ‘activists,’ whereas the deaf have fewer obstacles than before, including, for some of them, deafness itself.

    • Agree: Rob McX
  50. @Twinkie
    @Arclight


    the one thing that brought us all together was intense dislike of the entitled deaf kids
     
    Some years ago, after my wife worked with some deaf people at some NIH thing for a few months (including those at Gallaudet), she came up with this conclusion: “There seem to be two kinds of deaf people. One, those who are trying very hard to lead normal lives and whose disability seems to have made them empathetic and kind toward the suffering of others. Two, crybabies who throw tantrums whenever they don’t get their way.”

    I said to her, “So, they are just like… other people.”

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Arclight, @Philip Neal

    Autistics and bipolar people fit the same mold. It’s just seems to be a bit more extreme: in both categories.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @nebulafox


    Autistics and bipolar people fit the same mold. It’s just seems to be a bit more extreme: in both categories.
     
    O/T but I recently binged both seasons of the Netflix reality show Love on the Spectrum, which chronicles the attempts of twentysomethings on the autism spectrum to date. (It's set in Australia, just thought I'd mention that).

    I hadn't really known anyone "on the spectrum" (I'm late Gen-X) and I find these people fascinating - albeit in a Jane Goodall watching apes through the bushes sort of way.

    They seem both fully human and somehow not at the same time. You're watching them try to feign emotions and reactions and vocalize them to one another and to the camera, and it's just really off somehow.

    Replies: @nebulafox

  51. @Twinkie
    @Arclight


    the one thing that brought us all together was intense dislike of the entitled deaf kids
     
    Some years ago, after my wife worked with some deaf people at some NIH thing for a few months (including those at Gallaudet), she came up with this conclusion: “There seem to be two kinds of deaf people. One, those who are trying very hard to lead normal lives and whose disability seems to have made them empathetic and kind toward the suffering of others. Two, crybabies who throw tantrums whenever they don’t get their way.”

    I said to her, “So, they are just like… other people.”

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Arclight, @Philip Neal

    I agree with your comment, but based on my experience Gallaudet has a lot of the latter type as opposed to the former, perhaps because my impression is it doesn’t really attract top shelf students in the first place.

    To be sure there were definitely some nice kids that I encountered, but the share that were just flat out unpleasant definitely colored my views. As a side note, there is now a Starbucks on H Street NE that is apparently staffed entirely by deaf people. I dropped in a few years back and didn’t realize it at first until I noticed the small dry erase clipboards and markers for communication.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Arclight


    based on my experience Gallaudet has a lot of the latter type as opposed to the former
     
    It's a sad fact of life that the depraved (or simply the discourteous and inconsiderate) outnumber the virtuous.

    Note the various selection effects at work: your experience was - literally - on the street while that of my wife was at a medical research project meant to help people. Those venues tend to select for different kinds of people, deaf or otherwise.

    Even then though, my wife's conclusion did not ascribe proportions to the two kinds of people. She simply said that there were, essentially, these two types.
  52. My recollection was that there were advocates way out on the bleeding edge of deafness advocacy who were taking the position that not only was deafness a culture worthy of respect, but that the children of deaf parents should be made to be deaf in order to preserve the deaf culture. I think in the beforetimes enough people felt comfortable to call this out as an obvious monstrosity, warning physicians about their Hippocratic oath and therefore it never really took off. I’d imagine that over time the improvements in implant technology really did take the starch out of the movement – kids were getting very good technological solutions to their hearing problems before they could be exposed to a crazy identitarian movement on a college campus.

    The high points of deaf activism were the 1988 and 2006 student strikes at federally funded Gallaudet University for the deaf in Washington, D.C., over plans to appoint as president persons not fully fluent in American Sign Language.

    My sense at the time was that – regardless of what one thinks about the wars that followed – September 11, 2001 was an event which reoriented both American foreign and domestic politics. I was on a campus when it occurred, and the appetite among normals for tolerating navel-gazing left wing advocacy was greatly diminished for years after. There was also a sense at the time that the fetish for diversity from the left was in large part a contributing factor in the attacks. So the cultural left really seemed to retrench for a while and when it reemerged its signature issue seemed to be advocacy for Muslims captured on the battlefield and a milquetoast anti-war movement. Recall that the Democrats’ 2002 midterm and 2004 Presidential year autopsies revealed voter dissatisfaction with the Democrats’ perceived weakness in matters of war and peace and losses among so-called “values voters.” One of the takeaways was that the Republicans didn’t play fair in 2004 because their operatives found a way to put gay marriage to a plebiscite in places like Ohio, and that taking one’s voters’ own side in the left’s never-ending cultural insurgency is a divisive act of forcing “wedge issues.” So I’d wager that deaf advocacy suffered a fate not unlike other identity movements after 9/11.

    • Replies: @byrresheim
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    And I thought "Republicans didn't play fair" referred to vote counting.

    Silly me.

  53. @Achmed E. Newman

    How do you carry on a monologue in your head without words? Granted, some people get by fine in life without talking to themselves silently. But, in general, it’s a necessary useful skill.
     
    See, I never understood why this is necessary. I read through that part in Julian Jaynes' The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind and thought "of course you can think very well with no words, and it's idiotic that one would have no consciousness (or something like that) without it". Then he got to the part about animals having no conciousness, and I put that book down for good.

    Grate title, Steve!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @El Dato, @James J O'Meara

    Does he really? My memories are vague on that book. But if so, he’s simply confused consciousness with self-consciousness (or better, as it’s less ambiguous, ‘meta-consciousness’).

    Many “professional” philosophers even today make that mistake, despite the fact that it’s so fricking obvious. It may be because it helps them make their smug arguments for materialism. (Cartesians were the first to insist that if you were smart enough, you’d understand that animals were just like machines that screamed and squirmed when you cut them, so vivisection was OK) In fact, there’s one guy, I can’t be bothered to look him up, who publishes works like “Consciousness doesn’t Exist” or “The Myth of Consciousness,”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @James J O'Meara

    James, I did a quick look at those definitions, but let me put it this way:

    On cats and dogs, Mr. Jaynes maintained that they are nothing but automatons that react so stimuli in a pre-programmed way. They do not know they are alive, basically, is what he says. I.e, they don't have any thoughts.

    His theory on people is that one side of the brain (can't remember which, even with BOTH sides right now) would "talk" to the other side, which blindly followed, as if the first side was a god-voice. Once they got together, as in, this divide was breached, only then did we become self-aware. Without language, there'd be no conscious thought - that's the part that made me put the book down, knowing this guy was full of it.

    Well, that was over 20 years ago. I might still have the book somewhere. As I wrote Rob, I'll read Mr. Alexander's review.

    , @guest
    @James J O'Meara

    The main thesis of the book requires that language be present for consciousness. Yes.

    But language is not sufficient. Because we go through a period during which we hallucinate another voice talking to us. This voice uses language, and we understand it that way. This is the period of the so-called bicameral mind.

    Later, after the “breakdown” of the hallucinatory system (however this happens; I forget), we no longer hear voices and develop consciousness through metaphor. Somehow. I forget.

    Point is that according to this book consciousness is not natural to the human mind. There is no consciousness without language. There is no consciousness even with language, so long as another element is missing.

    This element I cannot describe beyond being metaphorical. Not sure how to express this, but it’s like everything we said while we were hallucinating was practical as opposed to otherworldly or wishy -washy. For instance, gods were the voices inside our heads, not men in the clouds.

    Or, and I remember this example specifically, when characters died in the Iliad and their souls left their bodies, this meant their literal last breath. Or their last blood drippings.

    Later, after hallucinations stopped, through LANGUAGE we developed the METAPHOR of the immortal soul. Then we were finally conscious.

    That’s my memory of the book anyway.

  54. @Arclight
    I lived just a few blocks from Gallaudet in 2006 and can only offer a few observations...one is that the students did not endear themselves to the surrounding neighborhood. Some of it is obviously college age students acting the part, but secondarily those that had cars loved to crank the music up so they could feel the vibration and would sit in them having conversations in sign language at all hours, and their first reaction when a sleep-deprived neighborhood resident would show up and indicate they were being too loud was usually to yell "f&ck you" or something similar. While Gallaudet was the center of the "Deaf" movement and to be frank it's not where the brightest kids go. The school nearly lost its accreditation when I lived there due to the abysmal academic performance and graduation rates. The neighborhood was overwhelmingly black, but the one thing that brought us all together was intense dislike of the entitled deaf kids who lived amongst us, and whenever a group would band together to approach the university with out concerns the response was almost invariably "get lost, we don't care."

    Replies: @Seneca44, @3g4me, @Twinkie, @James J O'Meara

    It just goes to show the human capacity, no matter what ones’ handicap, to still strive to become a complete asshat. Schopenhauer must have something on this somewhere.

  55. @Arclight
    @Twinkie

    I agree with your comment, but based on my experience Gallaudet has a lot of the latter type as opposed to the former, perhaps because my impression is it doesn't really attract top shelf students in the first place.

    To be sure there were definitely some nice kids that I encountered, but the share that were just flat out unpleasant definitely colored my views. As a side note, there is now a Starbucks on H Street NE that is apparently staffed entirely by deaf people. I dropped in a few years back and didn't realize it at first until I noticed the small dry erase clipboards and markers for communication.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    based on my experience Gallaudet has a lot of the latter type as opposed to the former

    It’s a sad fact of life that the depraved (or simply the discourteous and inconsiderate) outnumber the virtuous.

    Note the various selection effects at work: your experience was – literally – on the street while that of my wife was at a medical research project meant to help people. Those venues tend to select for different kinds of people, deaf or otherwise.

    Even then though, my wife’s conclusion did not ascribe proportions to the two kinds of people. She simply said that there were, essentially, these two types.

  56. @MEH 0910
    @Altai

    https://www.vice.com/en/article/939qbz/people-born-blind-are-mysteriously-protected-from-schizophrenia

    https://twitter.com/shayla__love/status/1227257970632855552

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Rob, @Altai

    Wow! I was just about to post something about reading years ago that deaf people are more subject to paranoia than blind people. It seems like it is more unnerving to see people around you and not be able to hear them, especially what they are saying, than it is to hear but not see them.

  57. @Anon
    OT: 'Gorilla Glue Girl' Tessica Brown Is Set To Accept The Citizen Of Courage Award.

    It looks like complaining about a bad black hair day will win you an award these days.

    https://okmagazine.com/p/gorilla-glue-girl-tessica-brown-debuts-major-elegant-transformation-after-viral-video/?fr=operanews

    Her hair is still crap. It looks like it came out of a can of Silly String.

    Replies: @El Dato

    I people producting “viral videos” would literally get COVIDAIDS our problems might soon be less.

  58. @Redneck farmer
    It's really simple; deafness isn't connected to other humans sexual kinks.
    As for lesbians, they don't have as many attractive members to put out as role models as gay men. And they aren't as crazy as trannies.

    Replies: @El Dato

    Well, you can spank someone in complete silence.

  59. This makes me wonder why there isn’t a blind culture or a mute culture. It also makes me ponder the trend to treat autism as a higher state of being with TV shows about “autistic” individuals having super powers in some area of expertise. Maybe I’m an ignorant hillbilly but I have doubts about the whole “on the spectrum” business.

  60. Guess they never heard, nor can fully understand that the squeaky wheel gets the grease.

  61. @Rob McX
    @slumber_j

    The "sign language" man at Mandela's funeral became something of a legend. He was just making up random gestures as he went along, obviously knowing no sign language. And he'd previously provided his services at other high profile functions, without suffering any consequences. He was a big muscular guy, and I read later that he had mental health issues. I can see why people were reluctant to confront him about his brazen charlatanry.

    Replies: @Mr Mox, @Anonymous, @hooodathunkit

    He was a big muscular guy, and I read later that he had mental health issues. I can see why people were reluctant to confront him about his brazen charlatanry.

    They were probably afraid he would use his universal, knuckles only, hand sign for “Shut up!”

    • LOL: Rob McX
  62. @nebulafox
    @Twinkie

    Autistics and bipolar people fit the same mold. It's just seems to be a bit more extreme: in both categories.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Autistics and bipolar people fit the same mold. It’s just seems to be a bit more extreme: in both categories.

    O/T but I recently binged both seasons of the Netflix reality show Love on the Spectrum, which chronicles the attempts of twentysomethings on the autism spectrum to date. (It’s set in Australia, just thought I’d mention that).

    I hadn’t really known anyone “on the spectrum” (I’m late Gen-X) and I find these people fascinating – albeit in a Jane Goodall watching apes through the bushes sort of way.

    They seem both fully human and somehow not at the same time. You’re watching them try to feign emotions and reactions and vocalize them to one another and to the camera, and it’s just really off somehow.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    They have emotions and a conscience. They just aren't able to recognize and properly handle them innately, lacking the same filtering systems as normal people. It can be learned like a foreign language. And I have zero patience for people who are high functioning enough to do so, but prefer to use the label to get catered to.

    There are people out there that genuinely don't feel those things. They are called psychopaths. They often possess a glib charm that can take them far in superficial activity, but spend enough time around them, and you'll see cracks in the mask eventually. What you see underneath is often disturbing, even if the psychopath is not malicious.

  63. Is there a blind identity politics? or any other (insert a physical/sensory disability here ) identity politics?

  64. The Deaf Club in SF was a famous punk club.

    Charming to see bow-tied men and flouncy-dressed women fox-trotting while punks pogo-ed.

  65. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    Have you read that book, Steve?

    Replies: @Rob, @Steve Sailer

    Scott Alexander did a really interesting review. The Origin Of Consciousness In The Breakdown Of The Bicameral Mind

    Someone said something along the lines of, ‘Julian James either made the most brilliant leap of inference ever or it is pure, unadulterated rubbish.” Scott finds a very interesting middle ground.

  66. @Ralph L
    two deaf lesbians who are trying to find a congenitally deaf sperm donor to help one of them conceive a deaf child

    That's so monumentally stupid for their own future welfare and just evil for the child's.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    These two beauties from London went for deaf babies and had two

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2008/mar/09/genetics.medicalresearch

    Like any other three-year-old child, Molly has brought joy to her parents. Bright-eyed and cheerful, Molly is also deaf – and that is an issue which vexes her parents, though not for the obvious reasons. Paula Garfield, a theatre director, and her partner, Tomato Lichy, an artist and designer, are also deaf and had hoped to have a child who could not hear.

    ‘We celebrated when we found out about Molly’s deafness,’ says Lichy. ‘Being deaf is not about being disabled, or medically incomplete – it’s about being part of a linguistic minority. We’re proud, not of the medical aspect of deafness, but of the language we use and the community we live in.’

    Now the couple are hoping to have a second child, one they also wish to be deaf – and that desire has brought them into a sharp confrontation with Parliament. The government’s Human Fertilisation and Embryology (HFE) bill, scheduled to go through the Commons this spring, will block any attempt by couples like Garfield and Lichy to use modern medical techniques to ensure their children are deaf.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/commentators/dominic-lawson/dominic-lawson-of-course-a-deaf-couple-want-a-deaf-child-794001.html

    “Our view, on the other hand, is that being deaf is a positive thing, with many wonderful aspects. We don’t view being deaf along the same lines as being blind or mentally retarded; we see it as paralleling being Jewish or black. We don’t see members of those minority groups wanting to eliminate themselves.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @YetAnotherAnon

    The older one is 13. What does she have to say sign about it?

    I was going to ask whether he's "to-MAY-to" or "to-MAH-to", but it wouldn't seem to matter, would it? I bet, though, he can tell by lip reading, and will call you out on it.

    It's a fruity name, anyway.

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @YetAnotherAnon

    People are just nuts. God should send those parents straight to Hell. They remind me of Gypsies who willingly cripple their own children to turn them into beggars.

    Replies: @nebulafox

  67. @SimplePseudonymicHandle
    There was never - ever - even at height - a "trans-auditory" movement. Unlike 2021-trans, deafness was/is always imposed. No one suspects a deaf person of being psychologically twisted or manipulated to embark on their trans-auditory journey. It follows that their politics are the politics of people, legitimately advancing their self-interests, that this is true pretty much for all of them, and most people will grant them that without so much as nodding a head.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Jack D

    The deaf equivalent to “trans-auditory” related not to the deaf themselves but to their children. The children of the deaf are often also born deaf because they inherit the same genetic defect from their parents. Cochlear implants can often alleviate this deafness and they work best if they are installed at an early age, while the child’s brain is still forming – once your brain has missed that opportunity, you’re never going to be able to speak or hear like a normal person. But the most militant deaf people resist giving their kids these implants because it would separate them from the deaf community.

    • Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle
    @Jack D

    Educational, so thanks, but ... I'm not sure it quite rises to an "equivalent to 'trans-auditory'".

    Equivalent would be: children on non-deaf parents, morose and lamenting, feeling they were born in the wrong body and they attribute their moroseness and lamenting to the misfortune of being born with the power to hear, and on sharing this with school teachers and counselors, they are stewarded into a world of acting out being deaf, transitioning to deaf perhaps with mufflers of some kind while looking forward to surgery to permanently disable hearing, and doing so outside the knowledge of their parents, because some politically potent force in society was keyed up to make this whole enterprise possible.

    Another form it could take would also be with non-deaf parents, but in this form the parents themselves encourage the child's association of the morose feelings with their auditory powers and egg them on to permanently disable themselves.

  68. @slumber_j
    @SimplePseudonymicHandle


    There was never – ever – even at height – a “trans-auditory” movement.
     
    I'm sure someone in history has fantasized about being deaf: people fantasize enough about being amputees to have their legs cut off, so it would seem "there are people for everything" as a Spanish friend of mine says a lot.

    But yeah, no movement. Hell, I've been completely deaf in one ear all my life, and I don't say I'm half-deaf with any sense of pride or community spirit. You can't hear in stereo or locate sounds, and it's really hard to converse in noisy environments. On the other hand, it's great for sleeping.

    Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle, @AndrewR, @slumber_j, @Twinkie, @Buzz Mohawk, @ho

    I’ve been completely deaf in one ear all my life, and I don’t say I’m half-deaf with any sense of pride or community spirit.

    The eye surgeon who performed radial keratotomy on me in 1985 was blind in one eye.

    Thanks to him, I haven’t needed to wear glasses for the past twenty years. (It took fifteen for the full correction to take place. All of that stuff was somewhat experimental back then, and he was very highly placed in his profession and well-connected.)

    I only learned about his monocular vision when I read his obituary in the New York Times a few years ago. Evidently he had some kind of accident as a child. I suspect that had something to do with his choosing eye surgery as a profession.

    He travelled the world saving people’s eyesight. For example, when that Union Carbide chemical leak happened in Bhopal, India, he went there to work on people’s eyes. That sort of thing.

  69. @Achmed E. Newman
    I see the miitancy about having everyone in these positions know sign language or having it on TV and in press conferences as similar to the Indian name thing for the American Indians. OTHER people care, very badly, for reasons of not having a cause they like better to bitch, whine, and bully the rest of us about. I doubt the deaf care nearly as much.

    There are other reasons for this in addition to deaf people, like most Indians, not being a group of insane, bitchy whiners. Electronics, as much as I hate a lot of it, has helped them immensely. Closed-caption obviates the need for sign language. There are probably lots of phone "apps" that do a whole lot to help deaf people get by and converse.

    Having someone right next to you doing sign language while you give a speech is distracting to the entire crowd. Put the words out on whatever app. (That could be great for EVERYONE, if you get drowned out by yells and other noise of the ctrl-left anti-free-speech crowd too, BTW.)

    Replies: @Recently Based, @Gamecock, @Undisclosed, @Expletive Deleted, @Anon7, @Rob

    Electronics, as much as I hate a lot of it, has helped them immensely.

    Electronics is, or more likely was, a lot of fun. Don’t hate on the components.
    For me it went to schott with surface-mounts. Like trying to build a house out of bacteria.
    Not too much wrong with my ears, but my eyes these days … ’nuff said.

  70. @Steve Sailer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Ethan Coen was philosophy major at Princeton when Princeton philosophy lecturer Julian Jaynes published his "Origin of Consciousness in the Bicameral Mind." About a decade later, the Coen Brothers picked as the name under which they'd jointly edit their movies "Roderick Jaynes," which I presume is, in part, a reference to Julian Jaynes' "Bicameral Mind."

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Whereismyhandle, @duncsbaby

    I like the work not because I believe it but because it’s out there.

    We could use more academic work that tries to fly off a cliff.

  71. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Ralph L

    These two beauties from London went for deaf babies and had two

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2008/mar/09/genetics.medicalresearch


    Like any other three-year-old child, Molly has brought joy to her parents. Bright-eyed and cheerful, Molly is also deaf - and that is an issue which vexes her parents, though not for the obvious reasons. Paula Garfield, a theatre director, and her partner, Tomato Lichy, an artist and designer, are also deaf and had hoped to have a child who could not hear.

    'We celebrated when we found out about Molly's deafness,' says Lichy. 'Being deaf is not about being disabled, or medically incomplete - it's about being part of a linguistic minority. We're proud, not of the medical aspect of deafness, but of the language we use and the community we live in.'

    Now the couple are hoping to have a second child, one they also wish to be deaf - and that desire has brought them into a sharp confrontation with Parliament. The government's Human Fertilisation and Embryology (HFE) bill, scheduled to go through the Commons this spring, will block any attempt by couples like Garfield and Lichy to use modern medical techniques to ensure their children are deaf.
     
    https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/commentators/dominic-lawson/dominic-lawson-of-course-a-deaf-couple-want-a-deaf-child-794001.html

    "Our view, on the other hand, is that being deaf is a positive thing, with many wonderful aspects. We don't view being deaf along the same lines as being blind or mentally retarded; we see it as paralleling being Jewish or black. We don't see members of those minority groups wanting to eliminate themselves."
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Buzz Mohawk

    The older one is 13. What does she have to say sign about it?

    I was going to ask whether he’s “to-MAY-to” or “to-MAH-to”, but it wouldn’t seem to matter, would it? I bet, though, he can tell by lip reading, and will call you out on it.

    It’s a fruity name, anyway.

  72. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Ralph L

    These two beauties from London went for deaf babies and had two

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2008/mar/09/genetics.medicalresearch


    Like any other three-year-old child, Molly has brought joy to her parents. Bright-eyed and cheerful, Molly is also deaf - and that is an issue which vexes her parents, though not for the obvious reasons. Paula Garfield, a theatre director, and her partner, Tomato Lichy, an artist and designer, are also deaf and had hoped to have a child who could not hear.

    'We celebrated when we found out about Molly's deafness,' says Lichy. 'Being deaf is not about being disabled, or medically incomplete - it's about being part of a linguistic minority. We're proud, not of the medical aspect of deafness, but of the language we use and the community we live in.'

    Now the couple are hoping to have a second child, one they also wish to be deaf - and that desire has brought them into a sharp confrontation with Parliament. The government's Human Fertilisation and Embryology (HFE) bill, scheduled to go through the Commons this spring, will block any attempt by couples like Garfield and Lichy to use modern medical techniques to ensure their children are deaf.
     
    https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/commentators/dominic-lawson/dominic-lawson-of-course-a-deaf-couple-want-a-deaf-child-794001.html

    "Our view, on the other hand, is that being deaf is a positive thing, with many wonderful aspects. We don't view being deaf along the same lines as being blind or mentally retarded; we see it as paralleling being Jewish or black. We don't see members of those minority groups wanting to eliminate themselves."
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Buzz Mohawk

    People are just nuts. God should send those parents straight to Hell. They remind me of Gypsies who willingly cripple their own children to turn them into beggars.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Oh, I remember this...

    I saw this in China when I was a kid. The child beggar could not have been older than I was. He had a stump hand and had been burned with some kind of acid, big ugly marks all over his face. He was crying and trying to look as pitiful as possible, no doubt because he'd been coached to do so, and would answer for it if he failed to get money. Of course, they intentionally target foreigners with mutilated children because they know we will be more likely to give money.

    It ended when the police came over and beat the living crap out of them, him and a couple of other cripple beggars, one being an even smaller girl. Later on, I learned that this probably was because they (or more likely their criminal bosses) didn't pay them off, although bugging a visibly foreign minor also played a role.

  73. @MEH 0910
    @Altai

    https://www.vice.com/en/article/939qbz/people-born-blind-are-mysteriously-protected-from-schizophrenia

    https://twitter.com/shayla__love/status/1227257970632855552

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Rob, @Altai

    That was an interesting article. Thank you for sharing it. What I found particularly interesting was the thing about people who were blindfolded for a few days developing visual hallucinations. Not all “psychosis” is the same. Most maybe the vast majority, though I’m too lazy to google, of schizophrenics never develop visual hallucinations. They develop auditory ones. Smells? Tastes? Touches? Also extremely rare for schizophrenics. “Do you hallucinate smells?” is a question on the psychiatric structured interview for people who may be faking schizophrenia. There are (rare) schizophrenics who do hallucinate smells, so there are a bunch more questions. Google it before you try to fake schizophrenia!

    My guess for why congenitally blind people never develop schizophrenia is hinted at by deafblind people occasionally developing schiz. In people who are congenitally blind, the auditory perceptual system is well-developed. People who are socially isolated sometimes hallucinate voices. Likely because the part of the brain that listens to voices “gets bored” without input, so it makes up some input. In blind people, the auditory system is used for more than voices, so it gets a better, more constant workout, in deafblind people, it does not, so the auditory system, being bored, supplies its own input. Socially isolated people without tv and magazines and such start to hallucinate faces, probably because pieces of the brain expect to see faces, and do it no matter what.

    The rubber hand test suggests an interesting experiment. There was a study where the researchers supplied people with an artificial Extra thumb On the pinky finger side, that was controlled by the toes. People got lots of utility out of it, like being able to open bottles one-handed. Their brain changed to include the thumb, though the brain effects wore off after a few weeks without the thumb. How would deaf people adjust to the extra thumb? What about schizophrenics? Deaf results would be confounded by not being able to see the extra thumb, so they might need to work out some sort of tactile feedback to the toes.

    People with congenital blindness sometimes develop spontaneously develop echolocation. There is/was a blind boy in India who could ride his bike. Maybe he’s been hit by a car since I read the article, though. Apparently, even more deaf babies begin “clicking” to “observe” their surroundings, but are discouraged by caretakers, because they don’t want the kids to be weird. Henry Harpending wrote in a post at Westhunt that when he was with bushmen in east Africa, they would walk around just fine in darkness that he could barely see in, talking the whole time. Talking the whole time in their language with lots of clicks. He thought they might have been echolocating without even knowing it. Would be very interesting to know if lone bushmen walking at night talk to themselves more often than lone bushmen during the day. Would be interesting to know that before the wild hunter-gatherers are lost to join the billions of third worlders languishing in burgeoning slums, where they will forget the hundreds of thousands of years of culture that let them be foragers. Who knows what we lose when cultures die. I am sure the special forces would love to teach soldiers how to echolocate.

  74. Anonymous[156] • Disclaimer says:

    I had a gf in early 90s (awesome by the way, should have married her) who had a best friend who was deaf. She shared the following little tidbits of experience:

    1. The whole deaf culture thing.

    2. She visited her bf in school (regular school as friend was mainstreamed) and pretended to also be deaf. Teachers did all the usual tricks to try to catch her in hearing.

    3. She learned ESL (not ASL) and thought it was better. It helps with reading English. But the “deaf culture” types are anti-ESL, pro ASL.

    4. I learned a few words, especially “I love you”.

    5. Deaf girls have a tendency to be more “loose”. I.e. easier to get into bed.

    6. And my all time favorite: When you are at a party with deaf people, as they get drunk, they slur their signs!

    • Replies: @Corn
    @Anonymous

    5. Deaf girls have a tendency to be more “loose”. I.e. easier to get into bed.

    I wonder why that would be

    Replies: @Anonymous

  75. @Achmed E. Newman
    I see the miitancy about having everyone in these positions know sign language or having it on TV and in press conferences as similar to the Indian name thing for the American Indians. OTHER people care, very badly, for reasons of not having a cause they like better to bitch, whine, and bully the rest of us about. I doubt the deaf care nearly as much.

    There are other reasons for this in addition to deaf people, like most Indians, not being a group of insane, bitchy whiners. Electronics, as much as I hate a lot of it, has helped them immensely. Closed-caption obviates the need for sign language. There are probably lots of phone "apps" that do a whole lot to help deaf people get by and converse.

    Having someone right next to you doing sign language while you give a speech is distracting to the entire crowd. Put the words out on whatever app. (That could be great for EVERYONE, if you get drowned out by yells and other noise of the ctrl-left anti-free-speech crowd too, BTW.)

    Replies: @Recently Based, @Gamecock, @Undisclosed, @Expletive Deleted, @Anon7, @Rob

    It’s fun to watch Democrat politicians virtue signal with black sign language translators. Are they translating more than words? Are they also translating white political talk into black talk?

    Skip to 19:30 in the following video, to see white Detroit mayor Mike Duggan translated into black American sign language:

    As you watch, the camera starts to focus more on the translator, who is much more interesting than white bread Duggan.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon7

    She is animated, I'll give her that.

    I got it!! Million dollar idea here - how about bikini signers for the deaf? There's a girl down in Chile who'd be just perfect for a trial run:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNgAGKhWC_E

    I learned a little Spanish right there. What a stimulating dialect.

  76. @Achmed E. Newman
    I see the miitancy about having everyone in these positions know sign language or having it on TV and in press conferences as similar to the Indian name thing for the American Indians. OTHER people care, very badly, for reasons of not having a cause they like better to bitch, whine, and bully the rest of us about. I doubt the deaf care nearly as much.

    There are other reasons for this in addition to deaf people, like most Indians, not being a group of insane, bitchy whiners. Electronics, as much as I hate a lot of it, has helped them immensely. Closed-caption obviates the need for sign language. There are probably lots of phone "apps" that do a whole lot to help deaf people get by and converse.

    Having someone right next to you doing sign language while you give a speech is distracting to the entire crowd. Put the words out on whatever app. (That could be great for EVERYONE, if you get drowned out by yells and other noise of the ctrl-left anti-free-speech crowd too, BTW.)

    Replies: @Recently Based, @Gamecock, @Undisclosed, @Expletive Deleted, @Anon7, @Rob

    Thing about closed-captioning is that a lot of people born deaf cannot read very well. Our language, as you know, is largely phonetic. It is difficult to learn to reaf if you have to learn that his combination of squiglies mean x and this other mean y, but don’t have this is pronounced “cat” and yhat is pronounced “dog” because the letters represent the sounds…. For deaf people for whom cochlear implants are not realistic, i womder if very “loud” bone conduction of vibration could give congenitcally deaf people a sense of “this letter feels lime…” they would srill be learning english as a foreign language, but at least it would be in a “phonetic” alphabet.

    [MORE]

    Could be i don’t undrstand bone conduction of sound, it might be that bone conduction ar an intensity thst was felt as touch would sound like a freight teain and require too large a speaker to implant. If so, perhaps congenitally deaf people who cannot get cochlear implants could have a microelectrode array and translate sound coming from particular locations as electric impulse applied to the skin? Iguess that depends on how sensitive the skin is. Also whether you can apply an electrode array to one location consistentky. Does not have to be elecctric stimulation. It could be tiny vibrating motors.

    Congenitally deaf whites average 85 IQ. Congenitally deaf blacks average 70. Learning to read is hard ar 75 IQ or below, which is 16% of deaf whites and more than half of deaf blacks. Couple that with not having the benefit of spoken language having a correspondence with spoken language, and reading is difficult.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Rob

    Your orthography suggests your own Alexa or Siri is hard of hearing. That, or you're texting during rush hour.

    Replies: @Rob

    , @Peter Lund
    @Rob

    Balloons have been used to help deaf children learn spoken language. If somebody speaks close to the balloon, you can feel the vibrations with your finger tips (or cheek or mouth). The deaf children would thus try to mimic the way the vibrations feel when hearing people speak.

    Oscilloscopes and more modern waveform visualizers have also been used.

    , @duncsbaby
    @Rob

    It was hard reafing your initial paragraph. I srill womder how I got yhat far, let alone find out what's under the MORE tag. It's too bad because I think you have an interesting point to make.

    Replies: @Rob

  77. @Rob McX
    OT: UK's Prevent strategy ends up targeting way more "far right" activists than Muslim terrorists.

    It sounds like a snitch's charter, whereby "professionals such as doctors, teachers and social workers" tip off the police about people they're suspicious about. Surrounded by bloodthirsty Muslims, they still manage to focus on the irrelevant threat from "white supremacists"


    Serious reports are forwarded on to Prevent's Channel stage, at which a panel of local police, healthcare specialists and social workers meeting monthly will consider the case.
     
    That'll fix those Islamic terrorists.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Charlotte

    For “doctors, teachers and social workers”, dobbing in a BadWhite is just par for the course, while dobbing in, say, a brown-skinned person is the sort of thing they think a BadWhite would do.

    To dob in a brown-skinned person themselves, well, they’re not BadWhites so they don’t do it. And besides, if they did and they were wrong, that would make them potentially Racist, perhaps a career-ending accusation.

  78. @Rob McX
    @slumber_j

    The "sign language" man at Mandela's funeral became something of a legend. He was just making up random gestures as he went along, obviously knowing no sign language. And he'd previously provided his services at other high profile functions, without suffering any consequences. He was a big muscular guy, and I read later that he had mental health issues. I can see why people were reluctant to confront him about his brazen charlatanry.

    Replies: @Mr Mox, @Anonymous, @hooodathunkit

    That is so Africa.

  79. Because deaf people are mostly reasonable, and so they don’t generate much heat. What good is that?

    The “transgender” mania did not come up from the bottom, it was imposed on us from the top. The point is to outrage us, to have men using the women’s bathrooms and making this like a sacred human right is designed to troll us and distract us from things the rich really care about, like finance, and open-borders cheap-labor immigration, and rapacious medical billing….

    The whole thing about gay marriage seems to have been accepted, so the rich needed another issue to divide and conquer. If transgenderism does get widely accepted I suppose the next step is promoting pederasty. Although CRT “let’s all hate whitey” seems to be doing pretty well also, on the divide and conquer front.

  80. Bright side: fake sign interpreters have been good for a few belly laughs.

  81. @El Dato
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Have a gander:

    https://www.julianjaynes.org/pdf/dennett_jaynes-software-archeology.pdf


    "of course you can think very well with no words"
     
    Not sure. Symbol manipulation needs symbols. You may invent symbols for the stuff you need to think about (as is done commonly in any technical or mathematical endeavour) but you need some labels to put on "things". Maybe the labels need no vocalization.

    "Consciousness" is pretty much orthogonal to all of that.

    What is it? Nobody knows!

    animals having no conciousness
     
    That's a Descartian idea, it's shurely a continuum and depends on the complexity of the actions the animal is performing. The more complex, the more debugging is needed, the more you need a self-image to work on. Or something. The hell I know!

    Replies: @Rob, @Colin Wright

    When I am very tired, I sometimes see flashes of images before the words come to me. For example, I’ll see a glass of water in my head, and then I’ll think the words “I’m thirsty, I should get a glass of water” when I’m halfway to the kitchen. so, I have certainly had conscious thought without words. I assume that is how animal consciousness might work. They see flashes of images “in the mind’s eye” then know to make that image real. Have you ever tried saying something, but just could not think of the word? If consciousness were purely verbal, how is it possible to have the concept without knowing the word?

    It is because so much of consciousness is nonverbal that someone else can say what you were thinking, but could not put it into words. Men, for example, are notorious for not being able to come up with a word for what they are feeling. But they are still experiencing the feeling.

    Those things said i find it difficult to fathom how people can go without an inner monologue. People say they read without an inner voice. Also, the ones who say that seem to be able to read much faster. I wonder if that’s a skill one can pick up in adulthood?

    That said, the Slate Star Codex review of Jaynes is well worth reading.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Rob

    Rob, thank you for all the informative replies. I'll click on that link by Scott Anderson later on. Here's one thing I absolutely agree with you on:


    People say they read without an inner voice. Also, the ones who say that seem to be able to read much faster.
     
    I used to read with no inner voice, and it was a lot faster. I think it'd be hard as an adult to switch to that way. I would like to get it back, as my 10 y/o can read much faster than me. I'm sure he just reads with no narrator in his head.

    Replies: @Mr Mox

  82. @Anon
    OT

    The media thinks IQ is wonderfully useful and accurate if it belongs to a black murderer on death row.

    https://www.newsweek.com/who-willie-smith-alabama-death-row-inmate-iq-70s-set-executed-1640414

    His IQ is less than a standard deviation below the normal black IQ, so they're essentially saying that 20 percent plus of blacks get a pass on capital punishment.

    Replies: @Fun To Do Bad Things

    Even more OT:

    I seem to recall reading on here a year or two ago that some prosecutors were using this exact tactic in reverse: “Well, sure, the test says his IQ is 66, but these tests are racially biased, don’cha know. I bet if he were given a fair and unbiased test, we’d be able to see his real IQ is around 95. Let’s proceed with a capital murder trial!”

    Am I remembering right? Anyone have any sources on this?

  83. Deafness isn’t comorbid with mental disorders. Transgenderism is. This is a mere statement of fact, but we can infer from it that deaf people are likely a lot more agreeable.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Triteleia Laxa


    Deafness isn’t comorbid with mental disorders. Transgenderism is.
     
    Frank Lloyd was (W)right-- the country is tilted to the southwest, with everything loose winding up in California:



    https://twitter.com/i/status/1450891301826691074

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @CCZ, @Triteleia Laxa

  84. @slumber_j

    The main example of Deaf Power you see these days is office-holders employing gesticulating sign language interpreters.
     
    Apart from Mandela's funeral, by far the greatest example of this I've ever seen was Beto O'Rourke's presidential campaign announcement in 2019, which he delivered in the round in what appeared to be an El Paso intersection, surrounded by a blackshirt squadron of signers all gleefully flailing. With his crouching and springing fake-Pentecostal delivery, the whole thing was more like modern dance than anything else.

    God, I really want that guy back in politics.

    https://youtu.be/yLNBOK5TBFM

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Twinkie, @Abolish_public_education, @Paperback Writer

    My hearing is normal. I never listen to anything those always-crooked & pro-public education politicians say.

    I’m so sick and tired of these DEM, government bureaucrat, certified sign language interpreters who follow the politicians around from empty speech to empty speech. (When will the entourage include non-English language signers?)

  85. Why Has Deaf Identity Politics Stalled Out Compared to the Transgender Mania?

    It’s really very simple. Identity grievance centers around emoting and making complaints and demands, often on video or in protests, sit-ins or what have you. Deaf people are often bad at speaking and sound retarded. They can’t get traction because they can’t use the language effectively to “pull at the heart strings” or threaten people.

  86. Easy answer… Deafness is a real medical/physical condition, whereas transgenderism is rapidly evolving into a kind of bizarre neo-gnostic cult that anyone narcissistic and troubled enough can join.

  87. @Known Fact
    @It's Ovrer


    Deaf people don’t seem to be connected to any particular ideological movement. That’s probably the reason.
     
    But ironically enough who is the most famous deaf person ever -- and the most prominent cochlear-implant recipent? Rush Limbaugh

    Replies: @gutta percha

    “the most prominent cochlear-implant recipent? Rush Limbaugh”

    Maybe that’s why deaf IP stalled out. When Rush became part of the sainted group (due probably to his opiate addiction,) the group lost its halo.

  88. @Stealth
    @Waylon Sisko

    Cochlear implants are not a cure for deafness. To give you an idea of what I mean, if a CI recipient manages to attain a seventy five percent speech comprehension score, that’s considered a success story. If I recall correctly, a lot of things can go wrong during the implant process, and these mishaps reduce the implant’s effectiveness. Rush Limbaugh occasionally talked about his own CI difficulties publicly. They had to switch off a number of electrodes in his initial implant because they were stimulating nerves they weren’t supposed to be affecting. The additional implant he received over a decade later apparently didn’t work well enough for him to comprehend speech at all, so if the original left side implant was switched off, the new one only provided him with environmental noise.

    Replies: @Waylon Sisko

    I had no idea, especially about Rush’s struggles –I appreciate the info, thanks!

  89. @Altai
    Maybe because deaf people aren't insane?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Joe Walker, @guest

    They are certainly saner than the transgendered nutjobs.

  90. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @nebulafox


    Autistics and bipolar people fit the same mold. It’s just seems to be a bit more extreme: in both categories.
     
    O/T but I recently binged both seasons of the Netflix reality show Love on the Spectrum, which chronicles the attempts of twentysomethings on the autism spectrum to date. (It's set in Australia, just thought I'd mention that).

    I hadn't really known anyone "on the spectrum" (I'm late Gen-X) and I find these people fascinating - albeit in a Jane Goodall watching apes through the bushes sort of way.

    They seem both fully human and somehow not at the same time. You're watching them try to feign emotions and reactions and vocalize them to one another and to the camera, and it's just really off somehow.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    They have emotions and a conscience. They just aren’t able to recognize and properly handle them innately, lacking the same filtering systems as normal people. It can be learned like a foreign language. And I have zero patience for people who are high functioning enough to do so, but prefer to use the label to get catered to.

    There are people out there that genuinely don’t feel those things. They are called psychopaths. They often possess a glib charm that can take them far in superficial activity, but spend enough time around them, and you’ll see cracks in the mask eventually. What you see underneath is often disturbing, even if the psychopath is not malicious.

  91. @MEH 0910
    @Altai

    https://www.vice.com/en/article/939qbz/people-born-blind-are-mysteriously-protected-from-schizophrenia

    https://twitter.com/shayla__love/status/1227257970632855552

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Rob, @Altai

    There’s something to be said for the personality types associated with transness. All the surveys say anti-social and BPD massively over-represented among MtFs. (Which, together with the high autism profiles in males, suggests that trans people are just people who don’t care about others opinions)

    Which also seems to indicate that while the online trans might be expected to be over-representative of those personality types (As social media generally has been a boon for such persons’ malign social influence) they do, in fact, seem to be a good barometer of the community. How many of these profiles of trans ‘women’ that mentions how much of an asshole they used to be?

    FtM trans seem to be heavily BPD and often their desire is not to become male but to not be female due to a pathological fear or trauma from previous sexual assault. (Which, itself is likely to stem from the behaviours of BPDers and the toxic company they keep, particularly in adolescence)

    https://sci-hub.hkvisa.net/10.1080/00926239908403976

    All told, trans activism will always be crazy and toxic because that’s who most of these people are as people and thus what the ethos of the community will become.

    Look at https://www.reddit.com/r/ftm and particularly https://www.reddit.com/r/FTMfemininity

    The latter is basically a subreddit for those who want to be considered men or ‘non-binary’ despite presenting as girls in every single way or more tragically, after removing their breasts, taking testosterone and growing beards and body hair. (100% of the users of the latter are BPD)

  92. @stillCARealist
    @Almost Missouri

    Coalface? Is that like blackface?

    This must be weird word day.

    Replies: @Philip Neal, @duncsbaby

    No. It refers to coal mines. Those who actually cut coal out of the rock, deep underground in danger of gas leaks, flooding, power failure and the roof falling in are said to work at the coal face.

  93. @Buzz Mohawk
    @YetAnotherAnon

    People are just nuts. God should send those parents straight to Hell. They remind me of Gypsies who willingly cripple their own children to turn them into beggars.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    Oh, I remember this…

    I saw this in China when I was a kid. The child beggar could not have been older than I was. He had a stump hand and had been burned with some kind of acid, big ugly marks all over his face. He was crying and trying to look as pitiful as possible, no doubt because he’d been coached to do so, and would answer for it if he failed to get money. Of course, they intentionally target foreigners with mutilated children because they know we will be more likely to give money.

    It ended when the police came over and beat the living crap out of them, him and a couple of other cripple beggars, one being an even smaller girl. Later on, I learned that this probably was because they (or more likely their criminal bosses) didn’t pay them off, although bugging a visibly foreign minor also played a role.

  94. @slumber_j

    The main example of Deaf Power you see these days is office-holders employing gesticulating sign language interpreters.
     
    Apart from Mandela's funeral, by far the greatest example of this I've ever seen was Beto O'Rourke's presidential campaign announcement in 2019, which he delivered in the round in what appeared to be an El Paso intersection, surrounded by a blackshirt squadron of signers all gleefully flailing. With his crouching and springing fake-Pentecostal delivery, the whole thing was more like modern dance than anything else.

    God, I really want that guy back in politics.

    https://youtu.be/yLNBOK5TBFM

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Twinkie, @Abolish_public_education, @Paperback Writer

    Beto is such a pathetic joke.

    A perfect example of the degeneration of the white man in US politics.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Paperback Writer

    A perfect example of the degeneration of the white man in US politics

    The beto male.

  95. @Twinkie
    @Arclight


    the one thing that brought us all together was intense dislike of the entitled deaf kids
     
    Some years ago, after my wife worked with some deaf people at some NIH thing for a few months (including those at Gallaudet), she came up with this conclusion: “There seem to be two kinds of deaf people. One, those who are trying very hard to lead normal lives and whose disability seems to have made them empathetic and kind toward the suffering of others. Two, crybabies who throw tantrums whenever they don’t get their way.”

    I said to her, “So, they are just like… other people.”

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Arclight, @Philip Neal

    An anecdote. Years ago, I was on my own in a pub looking at a page of Chinese characters I was trying to memorise.

    A man came up to me and – to cut a long story short – I learned that he was deaf from birth, passing through town, and curious to know if Chinese characters represent pure meaning. We held a conversation, partly in gestures and partly in written English. He wrote down his own name, which he had never heard, like a telephone number: it was Scottish, and he told me that he worked as a diver on North Sea oil platforms. After maybe half an hour, someone fluent in sign language but hearing, presumably a friend or contact of his, turned up and confirmed what I gathered the deaf man had said. He was plainly a tough, intelligent man with an incredible memory who would have gone far but for his deficit.

    Perhaps potential deaf leaders have better things to do than lead other deaf people.

    • Thanks: Twinkie
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Philip Neal

    If you are really brave, being a diver on a North Sea oil platform is going pretty far in life.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @Philip Neal

    , @Twinkie
    @Philip Neal


    He was plainly a tough, intelligent man with an incredible memory who would have gone far but for his deficit.
     
    Keep in mind, though, that our suffering often makes what we are, goor or bad. It’s entirely possible that he acquired some of that grit from having to overcome the said “deficit.”

    Thanks for sharing the story.
  96. The main example of Deaf Power you see these days is office-holders employing gesticulating sign language interpreters.

    Are there non-gesticulating sign language interpreters?

  97. @Rob
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Thing about closed-captioning is that a lot of people born deaf cannot read very well. Our language, as you know, is largely phonetic. It is difficult to learn to reaf if you have to learn that his combination of squiglies mean x and this other mean y, but don’t have this is pronounced “cat” and yhat is pronounced “dog” because the letters represent the sounds.... For deaf people for whom cochlear implants are not realistic, i womder if very “loud” bone conduction of vibration could give congenitcally deaf people a sense of “this letter feels lime...” they would srill be learning english as a foreign language, but at least it would be in a “phonetic” alphabet.

    Could be i don’t undrstand bone conduction of sound, it might be that bone conduction ar an intensity thst was felt as touch would sound like a freight teain and require too large a speaker to implant. If so, perhaps congenitally deaf people who cannot get cochlear implants could have a microelectrode array and translate sound coming from particular locations as electric impulse applied to the skin? Iguess that depends on how sensitive the skin is. Also whether you can apply an electrode array to one location consistentky. Does not have to be elecctric stimulation. It could be tiny vibrating motors.

    Congenitally deaf whites average 85 IQ. Congenitally deaf blacks average 70. Learning to read is hard ar 75 IQ or below, which is 16% of deaf whites and more than half of deaf blacks. Couple that with not having the benefit of spoken language having a correspondence with spoken language, and reading is difficult.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Peter Lund, @duncsbaby

    Your orthography suggests your own Alexa or Siri is hard of hearing. That, or you’re texting during rush hour.

    • Replies: @Rob
    @Reg Cæsar

    Installed Grammarly. Forgot to run the check. I was just so excited to get my thoughts to the iSteve community!

  98. @Triteleia Laxa
    Deafness isn't comorbid with mental disorders. Transgenderism is. This is a mere statement of fact, but we can infer from it that deaf people are likely a lot more agreeable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Deafness isn’t comorbid with mental disorders. Transgenderism is.

    Frank Lloyd was (W)right– the country is tilted to the southwest, with everything loose winding up in California:

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Reg Cæsar

    'Frank Lloyd was (W)right– the country is tilted to the southwest, with everything loose winding up in California...'

    Have you ever spent some time in Hawaii?

    ...

    Of course, that's even further to the southwest, so the principle still works.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @CCZ
    @Reg Cæsar

    Best comment that I have seen on this one:

    https://twitter.com/Homsher_PhD/status/1450962707360927747

    , @Triteleia Laxa
    @Reg Cæsar

    It is like all of the feelings of modern Western men have been suppressed, then wrung out and injected into these few MtF transgenders. They're the foam of a coke bottle that has been shaken up and then kept with the lid too tight.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  99. If you want to see the fur fly, start a fake news story about there being a cure for blackness.

    It would seem doable. Slow melanin production or something. Liposuction for those lips. IQ enhancement…

  100. @Reg Cæsar
    @Triteleia Laxa


    Deafness isn’t comorbid with mental disorders. Transgenderism is.
     
    Frank Lloyd was (W)right-- the country is tilted to the southwest, with everything loose winding up in California:



    https://twitter.com/i/status/1450891301826691074

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @CCZ, @Triteleia Laxa

    ‘Frank Lloyd was (W)right– the country is tilted to the southwest, with everything loose winding up in California…’

    Have you ever spent some time in Hawaii?

    Of course, that’s even further to the southwest, so the principle still works.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Colin Wright


    Have you ever spent some time in Hawaii?

     

    Several grades of elementary school, a long time ago. The craziest person on the island in those days (other than Barry's mom) would have been Lucky Luck. We had no idea he was a mainlander. Oh, and this reminded me of Akuhead:



    https://youtu.be/a8ClgVWRURU


    https://youtu.be/fSD3nABjqcI

    Replies: @Colin Wright

  101. @El Dato
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Have a gander:

    https://www.julianjaynes.org/pdf/dennett_jaynes-software-archeology.pdf


    "of course you can think very well with no words"
     
    Not sure. Symbol manipulation needs symbols. You may invent symbols for the stuff you need to think about (as is done commonly in any technical or mathematical endeavour) but you need some labels to put on "things". Maybe the labels need no vocalization.

    "Consciousness" is pretty much orthogonal to all of that.

    What is it? Nobody knows!

    animals having no conciousness
     
    That's a Descartian idea, it's shurely a continuum and depends on the complexity of the actions the animal is performing. The more complex, the more debugging is needed, the more you need a self-image to work on. Or something. The hell I know!

    Replies: @Rob, @Colin Wright

    ‘“of course you can think very well with no words”

    ‘Not sure…’

    I remember thinking about that rather earnestly in college in connection with some philosophy course.

    I came to the conclusion that I, at least, would have the insight first and fit words to it second.

    Of course one has to have words to communicate ideas, and to preserve them, but I’ll take the position that in the beginning, there is the idea, and only subsequently, the words to describe it.

  102. @Reg Cæsar
    @Rob

    Your orthography suggests your own Alexa or Siri is hard of hearing. That, or you're texting during rush hour.

    Replies: @Rob

    Installed Grammarly. Forgot to run the check. I was just so excited to get my thoughts to the iSteve community!

  103. @slumber_j
    @slumber_j

    Bonus bullfighter/philosopher footnote... I just learned that the Andalusian expression "hay gente pa' to'" ("there's people for everything") is supposed to have been coined by the bullfighter Rafael "Guerrita" Guerra, who was sort of a Yogi Berra of the bullring.

    The story of the circumstances in which he supposedly first said it is very Berra-adjacent. At some point Guerrita was introduced to the philosopher José Ortega y Gasset and he responded, "Philosopher? What's that?" So the guy who'd just introduced them gave a long-winded explanation of the nature of a philosopher's work, with particular attention to Ortega y Gasset's interests.

    Finally the guy stopped talking. The bullfighter turned to the philosopher and said: "So you dedicate your life to thinking about stuff? "Hay gente pa' to'."

    Replies: @Wade Hampton, @G. Poulin

    Did he mention dog house ownership?

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Wade Hampton

    Great joke from a great man.

  104. @Reg Cæsar
    @Triteleia Laxa


    Deafness isn’t comorbid with mental disorders. Transgenderism is.
     
    Frank Lloyd was (W)right-- the country is tilted to the southwest, with everything loose winding up in California:



    https://twitter.com/i/status/1450891301826691074

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @CCZ, @Triteleia Laxa

    Best comment that I have seen on this one:

  105. @Reg Cæsar
    @Triteleia Laxa


    Deafness isn’t comorbid with mental disorders. Transgenderism is.
     
    Frank Lloyd was (W)right-- the country is tilted to the southwest, with everything loose winding up in California:



    https://twitter.com/i/status/1450891301826691074

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @CCZ, @Triteleia Laxa

    It is like all of the feelings of modern Western men have been suppressed, then wrung out and injected into these few MtF transgenders. They’re the foam of a coke bottle that has been shaken up and then kept with the lid too tight.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Triteleia Laxa

    It occurred to me that the Petitos could label Brian Laundrie a white supremacist. The FBI would find him before sunrise.

  106. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Reg Cæsar

    It is like all of the feelings of modern Western men have been suppressed, then wrung out and injected into these few MtF transgenders. They're the foam of a coke bottle that has been shaken up and then kept with the lid too tight.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    It occurred to me that the Petitos could label Brian Laundrie a white supremacist. The FBI would find him before sunrise.

  107. @Wade Hampton
    @slumber_j

    Did he mention dog house ownership?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oseqh7SMIvo

    Replies: @slumber_j

    Great joke from a great man.

  108. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    My recollection was that there were advocates way out on the bleeding edge of deafness advocacy who were taking the position that not only was deafness a culture worthy of respect, but that the children of deaf parents should be made to be deaf in order to preserve the deaf culture. I think in the beforetimes enough people felt comfortable to call this out as an obvious monstrosity, warning physicians about their Hippocratic oath and therefore it never really took off. I'd imagine that over time the improvements in implant technology really did take the starch out of the movement - kids were getting very good technological solutions to their hearing problems before they could be exposed to a crazy identitarian movement on a college campus.

    The high points of deaf activism were the 1988 and 2006 student strikes at federally funded Gallaudet University for the deaf in Washington, D.C., over plans to appoint as president persons not fully fluent in American Sign Language.
     
    My sense at the time was that - regardless of what one thinks about the wars that followed - September 11, 2001 was an event which reoriented both American foreign and domestic politics. I was on a campus when it occurred, and the appetite among normals for tolerating navel-gazing left wing advocacy was greatly diminished for years after. There was also a sense at the time that the fetish for diversity from the left was in large part a contributing factor in the attacks. So the cultural left really seemed to retrench for a while and when it reemerged its signature issue seemed to be advocacy for Muslims captured on the battlefield and a milquetoast anti-war movement. Recall that the Democrats' 2002 midterm and 2004 Presidential year autopsies revealed voter dissatisfaction with the Democrats' perceived weakness in matters of war and peace and losses among so-called "values voters." One of the takeaways was that the Republicans didn't play fair in 2004 because their operatives found a way to put gay marriage to a plebiscite in places like Ohio, and that taking one's voters' own side in the left's never-ending cultural insurgency is a divisive act of forcing "wedge issues." So I'd wager that deaf advocacy suffered a fate not unlike other identity movements after 9/11.

    Replies: @byrresheim

    And I thought “Republicans didn’t play fair” referred to vote counting.

    Silly me.

  109. Why all this tranny business?

  110. Anonymous[573] • Disclaimer says:

    Much of today’s idolatrous ‘woke’ culture is about narcissism + exhibitionism.

    Blind people can barely get around. Some can sing, but as the joke goes, “Have you seen Stevie Wonder’s new car? Neither has Stevie Wonder.”

    Deaf people are silent, which isn’t exactly eloquent. Jews and blacks are known for expressive use of hands, but they are also very vocal. Jews argue, blacks rap.

    Homos and trannies love to dress up and prance around. This makes for visual spectacle.

    American Indians don’t get much love either because they are like the ‘deaf/dumb’ Indian in Cuckoo’s Nest.

    Eddie Murphy said you gotta sing to get the women. At the very least, one has to talk and walk to be heard and to be seen. Loud is proud, mute is moot.

    Once talkies came around, silent cinema was doomed. People will generally choose more expression, not less.

    Trannies are flamboyant in their utter shamelessness. They get noticed.

    Some cultures are more vocal: Jews, blacks, homos, Italians.

    Some cultures are more mute: Swedes, Japanese, Mexicans.

  111. Deafness is inherent and subject to empirical testing. Duh.

  112. @Philip Neal
    @Twinkie

    An anecdote. Years ago, I was on my own in a pub looking at a page of Chinese characters I was trying to memorise.

    A man came up to me and - to cut a long story short - I learned that he was deaf from birth, passing through town, and curious to know if Chinese characters represent pure meaning. We held a conversation, partly in gestures and partly in written English. He wrote down his own name, which he had never heard, like a telephone number: it was Scottish, and he told me that he worked as a diver on North Sea oil platforms. After maybe half an hour, someone fluent in sign language but hearing, presumably a friend or contact of his, turned up and confirmed what I gathered the deaf man had said. He was plainly a tough, intelligent man with an incredible memory who would have gone far but for his deficit.

    Perhaps potential deaf leaders have better things to do than lead other deaf people.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Twinkie

    If you are really brave, being a diver on a North Sea oil platform is going pretty far in life.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Steve Sailer

    Yes, you work 6 months a year, get paid about £200,000 and do a crucial, complicated and high status job. This puts you easily in the top 1% of earners, easily in the top 1% of interesting jobs and gives you half of the year off. In exchange, you face genuine danger, but that's a sort of plus for some people.

    "Would have gone far but for his deficit"

    🤣

    "Just imagine if Obama wasn't black and hadn't had to work five times as hard for half of the success, how far would he have gone!"

    Replies: @Philip Neal

    , @Philip Neal
    @Steve Sailer

    I should perhaps have said "risen high". Yes, oil platform divers are very brave. My point is that it was not open to him to spend his life bullshitting his way into a sinecure, like.. . and... and... and...

  113. @Rob McX
    OT: UK's Prevent strategy ends up targeting way more "far right" activists than Muslim terrorists.

    It sounds like a snitch's charter, whereby "professionals such as doctors, teachers and social workers" tip off the police about people they're suspicious about. Surrounded by bloodthirsty Muslims, they still manage to focus on the irrelevant threat from "white supremacists"


    Serious reports are forwarded on to Prevent's Channel stage, at which a panel of local police, healthcare specialists and social workers meeting monthly will consider the case.
     
    That'll fix those Islamic terrorists.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Charlotte

    That’ll fix those Islamic terrorists.

    Yep. The man who stabbed MP David Amess to death was a graduate, apparently. “Ali, the son of a former Somali diplomat who was born in Britain and raised in Croydon, was referred to the flagship anti-extremism scheme, Prevent, which aims to stop individuals becoming terrorists.”-from the Daily Mail

  114. There is a whole series of these. One for Steve:

    [MORE]

  115. @Colin Wright
    @Reg Cæsar

    'Frank Lloyd was (W)right– the country is tilted to the southwest, with everything loose winding up in California...'

    Have you ever spent some time in Hawaii?

    ...

    Of course, that's even further to the southwest, so the principle still works.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Have you ever spent some time in Hawaii?

    Several grades of elementary school, a long time ago. The craziest person on the island in those days (other than Barry’s mom) would have been Lucky Luck. We had no idea he was a mainlander. Oh, and this reminded me of Akuhead:

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Reg Cæsar

    'Several grades of elementary school, a long time ago. The craziest person on the island in those days (other than Barry’s mom) would have been Lucky Luck...'

    We lived there for a year and a half recently. The 'locals' kind of make sense -- in their own way. You're not in Kansas any more, but...

    It's all the whites who have wound up there who are weird. I got used to people telling me earnestly about crystals, explaining that we all needed to move to Uruguay to get away from the radiation from Fukushima, discussing how Hillary Clinton was a tool of the Muslims, showing me the cool bubbles they could blow...

  116. @Reg Cæsar
    @Colin Wright


    Have you ever spent some time in Hawaii?

     

    Several grades of elementary school, a long time ago. The craziest person on the island in those days (other than Barry's mom) would have been Lucky Luck. We had no idea he was a mainlander. Oh, and this reminded me of Akuhead:



    https://youtu.be/a8ClgVWRURU


    https://youtu.be/fSD3nABjqcI

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘Several grades of elementary school, a long time ago. The craziest person on the island in those days (other than Barry’s mom) would have been Lucky Luck…’

    We lived there for a year and a half recently. The ‘locals’ kind of make sense — in their own way. You’re not in Kansas any more, but…

    It’s all the whites who have wound up there who are weird. I got used to people telling me earnestly about crystals, explaining that we all needed to move to Uruguay to get away from the radiation from Fukushima, discussing how Hillary Clinton was a tool of the Muslims, showing me the cool bubbles they could blow…

  117. @slumber_j
    @SimplePseudonymicHandle


    There was never – ever – even at height – a “trans-auditory” movement.
     
    I'm sure someone in history has fantasized about being deaf: people fantasize enough about being amputees to have their legs cut off, so it would seem "there are people for everything" as a Spanish friend of mine says a lot.

    But yeah, no movement. Hell, I've been completely deaf in one ear all my life, and I don't say I'm half-deaf with any sense of pride or community spirit. You can't hear in stereo or locate sounds, and it's really hard to converse in noisy environments. On the other hand, it's great for sleeping.

    Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle, @AndrewR, @slumber_j, @Twinkie, @Buzz Mohawk, @ho

    I’ve been completely deaf in one ear all my life, and I don’t say I’m half-deaf with any sense of pride or community spirit. You can’t hear in stereo or locate sounds, and it’s really hard to converse in noisy environments. On the other hand, it’s great for sleeping.

    I’m also half-deaf, since early childhood, and in addition to all the negatives –and positives –you mention, find that, in the last decade or two (I’m in my 60s) I hear voices in my head constantly, either blathering away in languages I don’t know or talking absolute rubbish in the languages I do know, in funny voices. It’s not really bothering me, and sometimes they are quite funny. I can ignore it, but even then it’s ongoing… I assume it has something to do with my hearing….and not my sanity….

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @ho

    Well, that's alarming--for you obviously, but in my case especially for me given that I'm in my mid-50s...

    Yikes. I guess I'll have to learn to love the voices.

  118. Interesting article; I learned a lot.

    If the deaf had more coolness, we wouldn’t be calling them “deaf” anymore. We’d be on to a third-generation euphemism by now. And using sign language would be mandatory in the way it’s mandatory to use people’s preferred pronouns.

  119. @Steve Sailer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Ethan Coen was philosophy major at Princeton when Princeton philosophy lecturer Julian Jaynes published his "Origin of Consciousness in the Bicameral Mind." About a decade later, the Coen Brothers picked as the name under which they'd jointly edit their movies "Roderick Jaynes," which I presume is, in part, a reference to Julian Jaynes' "Bicameral Mind."

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Whereismyhandle, @duncsbaby

    I used to work with a very smart dude who was a big fan of “Bicameral Mind.” He in a way also kinda introduced me to Steve Sailer.

    He kinda introduced me in that he was also a big fan of John Derbyshire and he used to lend me his NROs to read after he was done with them. After Derb was fired from NRO I then started reading his columns on Taki mag which then led me to seeing this Sailer guy’s movie reviews and the rest is history.

    So I guess you could say Julian Jaynes’s fandom led me to being an unrepentant Sailer stooge. Still haven’t read the “Bicameral Mind,” yet though and probably won’t. I get the gist of it. It’s an interesting idea but really can’t be proven.

  120. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    Have you read that book, Steve?

    Replies: @Rob, @Steve Sailer

    No. I may have flipped through it in a bookstore or at a friend’s but, I haven’t read Julian Jaynes’ big book.

  121. @Undisclosed
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I love watching the dystopian down under stuff where some little lady leader is telling her subjects that if they behave really really really nicely she will let them out of their room for 20 minites to go potty - and next to her is a giant maori man violently banging at his chest in some sign language pantomine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Maori Sign Language would be great.

  122. @cliff arroyo
    "How do you carry on a monologue in your head without words? "

    Well some deaf people talk to themselves in sign language and from my experience learning something of a couple of sign languages (in different countries) most people misunderstand how signers think. AFAICT it's gestural (think of mental limbs signing rather than a mental tongue moving around). It's not seeing a mental signer it's feeling yourself sign even though you're not (if that makes sense).

    One of the reasons for deaf sign language positivity is that it creates a community (in the real, old fashioned sense). Deaf signing people are one of the few real organic communities left which is why many deaf people who might want the implants for practical purposes still hang out with other signers.

    You can't create a community around thinks like trans or veganism (both of which are more like grotesque caricatures of communities) but signers include families and that makes a big difference.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    “It’s not seeing a mental signer it’s feeling yourself sign even though you’re not (if that makes sense).”

    Thanks.

  123. @Rob
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Thing about closed-captioning is that a lot of people born deaf cannot read very well. Our language, as you know, is largely phonetic. It is difficult to learn to reaf if you have to learn that his combination of squiglies mean x and this other mean y, but don’t have this is pronounced “cat” and yhat is pronounced “dog” because the letters represent the sounds.... For deaf people for whom cochlear implants are not realistic, i womder if very “loud” bone conduction of vibration could give congenitcally deaf people a sense of “this letter feels lime...” they would srill be learning english as a foreign language, but at least it would be in a “phonetic” alphabet.

    Could be i don’t undrstand bone conduction of sound, it might be that bone conduction ar an intensity thst was felt as touch would sound like a freight teain and require too large a speaker to implant. If so, perhaps congenitally deaf people who cannot get cochlear implants could have a microelectrode array and translate sound coming from particular locations as electric impulse applied to the skin? Iguess that depends on how sensitive the skin is. Also whether you can apply an electrode array to one location consistentky. Does not have to be elecctric stimulation. It could be tiny vibrating motors.

    Congenitally deaf whites average 85 IQ. Congenitally deaf blacks average 70. Learning to read is hard ar 75 IQ or below, which is 16% of deaf whites and more than half of deaf blacks. Couple that with not having the benefit of spoken language having a correspondence with spoken language, and reading is difficult.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Peter Lund, @duncsbaby

    Balloons have been used to help deaf children learn spoken language. If somebody speaks close to the balloon, you can feel the vibrations with your finger tips (or cheek or mouth). The deaf children would thus try to mimic the way the vibrations feel when hearing people speak.

    Oscilloscopes and more modern waveform visualizers have also been used.

  124. @stillCARealist
    @Almost Missouri

    Coalface? Is that like blackface?

    This must be weird word day.

    Replies: @Philip Neal, @duncsbaby

    I had to look it up but apparently “coalface” also has the meaning of a work site which I’m not sure is the exact meaning in this paragraph. Use of the word coalface for a workplace seems to be British in origin. I must say I find it somewhat problematic comparing a shrink working w/high school neurotics to working in a coal mine.

  125. @John Henry
    I've had little contact with dwarfs. They don't seem to have been very active about their disability(-ies). Not since Billy Barty. Goodness, did I just commit heightism? There are several popular(?) reality shows about different dwarf individuals and families. Assuming any accuracy they seem pretty enlightening about their life challenges and solutions. So why do you suppose that community is staying so low key?

    Replies: @duncsbaby

    Any contact with dwarfs is little. Duh!

  126. @slumber_j
    @slumber_j

    Bonus bullfighter/philosopher footnote... I just learned that the Andalusian expression "hay gente pa' to'" ("there's people for everything") is supposed to have been coined by the bullfighter Rafael "Guerrita" Guerra, who was sort of a Yogi Berra of the bullring.

    The story of the circumstances in which he supposedly first said it is very Berra-adjacent. At some point Guerrita was introduced to the philosopher José Ortega y Gasset and he responded, "Philosopher? What's that?" So the guy who'd just introduced them gave a long-winded explanation of the nature of a philosopher's work, with particular attention to Ortega y Gasset's interests.

    Finally the guy stopped talking. The bullfighter turned to the philosopher and said: "So you dedicate your life to thinking about stuff? "Hay gente pa' to'."

    Replies: @Wade Hampton, @G. Poulin

    Imagine a world that had fewer philosophers and more bullfighters. What a wonderful world it would be.

  127. @Rob
    @El Dato

    When I am very tired, I sometimes see flashes of images before the words come to me. For example, I'll see a glass of water in my head, and then I'll think the words “I'm thirsty, I should get a glass of water” when I’m halfway to the kitchen. so, I have certainly had conscious thought without words. I assume that is how animal consciousness might work. They see flashes of images “in the mind's eye” then know to make that image real. Have you ever tried saying something, but just could not think of the word? If consciousness were purely verbal, how is it possible to have the concept without knowing the word?

    It is because so much of consciousness is nonverbal that someone else can say what you were thinking, but could not put it into words. Men, for example, are notorious for not being able to come up with a word for what they are feeling. But they are still experiencing the feeling.

    Those things said i find it difficult to fathom how people can go without an inner monologue. People say they read without an inner voice. Also, the ones who say that seem to be able to read much faster. I wonder if that’s a skill one can pick up in adulthood?

    That said, the Slate Star Codex review of Jaynes is well worth reading.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Rob, thank you for all the informative replies. I’ll click on that link by Scott Anderson later on. Here’s one thing I absolutely agree with you on:

    People say they read without an inner voice. Also, the ones who say that seem to be able to read much faster.

    I used to read with no inner voice, and it was a lot faster. I think it’d be hard as an adult to switch to that way. I would like to get it back, as my 10 y/o can read much faster than me. I’m sure he just reads with no narrator in his head.

    • Replies: @Mr Mox
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I sometimes experience that "inner voice" during the first few paragraphs when I start reading a book or article, but pretty soon the inner voice is replaced by inner images (for lack of a better description), and it's smooth sailing from there.

  128. @James J O'Meara
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Does he really? My memories are vague on that book. But if so, he's simply confused consciousness with self-consciousness (or better, as it's less ambiguous, 'meta-consciousness').

    Many "professional" philosophers even today make that mistake, despite the fact that it's so fricking obvious. It may be because it helps them make their smug arguments for materialism. (Cartesians were the first to insist that if you were smart enough, you'd understand that animals were just like machines that screamed and squirmed when you cut them, so vivisection was OK) In fact, there's one guy, I can't be bothered to look him up, who publishes works like "Consciousness doesn't Exist" or "The Myth of Consciousness,"

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @guest

    James, I did a quick look at those definitions, but let me put it this way:

    On cats and dogs, Mr. Jaynes maintained that they are nothing but automatons that react so stimuli in a pre-programmed way. They do not know they are alive, basically, is what he says. I.e, they don’t have any thoughts.

    His theory on people is that one side of the brain (can’t remember which, even with BOTH sides right now) would “talk” to the other side, which blindly followed, as if the first side was a god-voice. Once they got together, as in, this divide was breached, only then did we become self-aware. Without language, there’d be no conscious thought – that’s the part that made me put the book down, knowing this guy was full of it.

    Well, that was over 20 years ago. I might still have the book somewhere. As I wrote Rob, I’ll read Mr. Alexander’s review.

  129. @Rob
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Thing about closed-captioning is that a lot of people born deaf cannot read very well. Our language, as you know, is largely phonetic. It is difficult to learn to reaf if you have to learn that his combination of squiglies mean x and this other mean y, but don’t have this is pronounced “cat” and yhat is pronounced “dog” because the letters represent the sounds.... For deaf people for whom cochlear implants are not realistic, i womder if very “loud” bone conduction of vibration could give congenitcally deaf people a sense of “this letter feels lime...” they would srill be learning english as a foreign language, but at least it would be in a “phonetic” alphabet.

    Could be i don’t undrstand bone conduction of sound, it might be that bone conduction ar an intensity thst was felt as touch would sound like a freight teain and require too large a speaker to implant. If so, perhaps congenitally deaf people who cannot get cochlear implants could have a microelectrode array and translate sound coming from particular locations as electric impulse applied to the skin? Iguess that depends on how sensitive the skin is. Also whether you can apply an electrode array to one location consistentky. Does not have to be elecctric stimulation. It could be tiny vibrating motors.

    Congenitally deaf whites average 85 IQ. Congenitally deaf blacks average 70. Learning to read is hard ar 75 IQ or below, which is 16% of deaf whites and more than half of deaf blacks. Couple that with not having the benefit of spoken language having a correspondence with spoken language, and reading is difficult.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Peter Lund, @duncsbaby

    It was hard reafing your initial paragraph. I srill womder how I got yhat far, let alone find out what’s under the MORE tag. It’s too bad because I think you have an interesting point to make.

    • Replies: @Rob
    @duncsbaby

    Once again, I blame Grammarly for not steppin’ up. I have to ask it every time. Uh. So unfair.

  130. @Steve Sailer
    @Philip Neal

    If you are really brave, being a diver on a North Sea oil platform is going pretty far in life.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @Philip Neal

    Yes, you work 6 months a year, get paid about £200,000 and do a crucial, complicated and high status job. This puts you easily in the top 1% of earners, easily in the top 1% of interesting jobs and gives you half of the year off. In exchange, you face genuine danger, but that’s a sort of plus for some people.

    “Would have gone far but for his deficit”

    🤣

    “Just imagine if Obama wasn’t black and hadn’t had to work five times as hard for half of the success, how far would he have gone!”

    • Replies: @Philip Neal
    @Triteleia Laxa

    I agree that he was a high achiever by any standards, but I was contrasting him with the status-seeking activists who were the subject of Steve's article.

  131. @Anon7
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It's fun to watch Democrat politicians virtue signal with black sign language translators. Are they translating more than words? Are they also translating white political talk into black talk?

    Skip to 19:30 in the following video, to see white Detroit mayor Mike Duggan translated into black American sign language:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_sbtWpVIaA

    As you watch, the camera starts to focus more on the translator, who is much more interesting than white bread Duggan.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    She is animated, I’ll give her that.

    I got it!! Million dollar idea here – how about bikini signers for the deaf? There’s a girl down in Chile who’d be just perfect for a trial run:

    I learned a little Spanish right there. What a stimulating dialect.

  132. @Jack D
    @SimplePseudonymicHandle

    The deaf equivalent to "trans-auditory" related not to the deaf themselves but to their children. The children of the deaf are often also born deaf because they inherit the same genetic defect from their parents. Cochlear implants can often alleviate this deafness and they work best if they are installed at an early age, while the child's brain is still forming - once your brain has missed that opportunity, you're never going to be able to speak or hear like a normal person. But the most militant deaf people resist giving their kids these implants because it would separate them from the deaf community.

    Replies: @SimplePseudonymicHandle

    Educational, so thanks, but … I’m not sure it quite rises to an “equivalent to ‘trans-auditory’”.

    Equivalent would be: children on non-deaf parents, morose and lamenting, feeling they were born in the wrong body and they attribute their moroseness and lamenting to the misfortune of being born with the power to hear, and on sharing this with school teachers and counselors, they are stewarded into a world of acting out being deaf, transitioning to deaf perhaps with mufflers of some kind while looking forward to surgery to permanently disable hearing, and doing so outside the knowledge of their parents, because some politically potent force in society was keyed up to make this whole enterprise possible.

    Another form it could take would also be with non-deaf parents, but in this form the parents themselves encourage the child’s association of the morose feelings with their auditory powers and egg them on to permanently disable themselves.

  133. @ho
    @slumber_j

    I’ve been completely deaf in one ear all my life, and I don’t say I’m half-deaf with any sense of pride or community spirit. You can’t hear in stereo or locate sounds, and it’s really hard to converse in noisy environments. On the other hand, it’s great for sleeping.

    I'm also half-deaf, since early childhood, and in addition to all the negatives --and positives --you mention, find that, in the last decade or two (I'm in my 60s) I hear voices in my head constantly, either blathering away in languages I don't know or talking absolute rubbish in the languages I do know, in funny voices. It's not really bothering me, and sometimes they are quite funny. I can ignore it, but even then it's ongoing... I assume it has something to do with my hearing....and not my sanity....

    Replies: @slumber_j

    Well, that’s alarming–for you obviously, but in my case especially for me given that I’m in my mid-50s…

    Yikes. I guess I’ll have to learn to love the voices.

  134. As a left-handed person, I find it amusing that we have no vocal lobby for equality. African-Americans are around 10% of Americans, so are lefties. I think a smart pundit like Steve should get some good data on handedness and compare to race. Like, do lefties become surgeons less than righties? And is the difference greater or less than the racial disparity between black and white in surgeons? One can easily imagine other fields that might have disparate impact on lefties. But hate can’t be the reason, can it?

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Old bad nurse

    As a left-handed person, I find it amusing that we have no vocal lobby for equality.

    Ask and ye shall receive ....
    https://spectatorworld.com/topic/colleges-woke-covid-right-handed-privilege-male-contractors/

  135. @Anonymous
    I had a gf in early 90s (awesome by the way, should have married her) who had a best friend who was deaf. She shared the following little tidbits of experience:

    1. The whole deaf culture thing.

    2. She visited her bf in school (regular school as friend was mainstreamed) and pretended to also be deaf. Teachers did all the usual tricks to try to catch her in hearing.

    3. She learned ESL (not ASL) and thought it was better. It helps with reading English. But the "deaf culture" types are anti-ESL, pro ASL.

    4. I learned a few words, especially "I love you".

    5. Deaf girls have a tendency to be more "loose". I.e. easier to get into bed.

    6. And my all time favorite: When you are at a party with deaf people, as they get drunk, they slur their signs!

    Replies: @Corn

    5. Deaf girls have a tendency to be more “loose”. I.e. easier to get into bed.

    I wonder why that would be

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Corn

    I'm assuming you're joking, but if not, it's basically to compensate.

    P.s. Tangential, but Steve with his move focus, may have seen this, involving males/females, competition, deaf girl, and office backstabbing:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Company_of_Men

  136. @Philip Neal
    @Twinkie

    An anecdote. Years ago, I was on my own in a pub looking at a page of Chinese characters I was trying to memorise.

    A man came up to me and - to cut a long story short - I learned that he was deaf from birth, passing through town, and curious to know if Chinese characters represent pure meaning. We held a conversation, partly in gestures and partly in written English. He wrote down his own name, which he had never heard, like a telephone number: it was Scottish, and he told me that he worked as a diver on North Sea oil platforms. After maybe half an hour, someone fluent in sign language but hearing, presumably a friend or contact of his, turned up and confirmed what I gathered the deaf man had said. He was plainly a tough, intelligent man with an incredible memory who would have gone far but for his deficit.

    Perhaps potential deaf leaders have better things to do than lead other deaf people.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Twinkie

    He was plainly a tough, intelligent man with an incredible memory who would have gone far but for his deficit.

    Keep in mind, though, that our suffering often makes what we are, goor or bad. It’s entirely possible that he acquired some of that grit from having to overcome the said “deficit.”

    Thanks for sharing the story.

  137. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Rob

    Rob, thank you for all the informative replies. I'll click on that link by Scott Anderson later on. Here's one thing I absolutely agree with you on:


    People say they read without an inner voice. Also, the ones who say that seem to be able to read much faster.
     
    I used to read with no inner voice, and it was a lot faster. I think it'd be hard as an adult to switch to that way. I would like to get it back, as my 10 y/o can read much faster than me. I'm sure he just reads with no narrator in his head.

    Replies: @Mr Mox

    I sometimes experience that “inner voice” during the first few paragraphs when I start reading a book or article, but pretty soon the inner voice is replaced by inner images (for lack of a better description), and it’s smooth sailing from there.

  138. @Paperback Writer
    @slumber_j

    Beto is such a pathetic joke.

    A perfect example of the degeneration of the white man in US politics.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    A perfect example of the degeneration of the white man in US politics

    The beto male.

  139. @Almost Missouri

    Pop star Billie Eilish was diagnosed with Tourette’s as a child. I wouldn’t be surprised if some girls wish they had it as well. Never underestimate the power of popularity.

    https://hollywoodlife.com/feature/billie-eilish-tourette-syndrome-4358494/

  140. @The Wild Geese Howard
    Meanwhile, the author of the Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood is being canceled for Tweeting to mourn the loss of the word, "woman":

    ‘Anti-trans dog whistle’: ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ author latest to be labeled transphobic over tweet on loss of the word ‘woman’

    https://www.rt.com/usa/537911-margaret-atwood-terf-twitter/


    You just love to see the animals eating each other.

    Replies: @njguy73

    Margaret Atwood should be glad that you can’t say “woman” anymore. Maybe that’s the only way to prevent Gilead from becoming reality. De-recognize gender. You can’t oppress that which you don’t recognize.

  141. @Triteleia Laxa
    @Steve Sailer

    Yes, you work 6 months a year, get paid about £200,000 and do a crucial, complicated and high status job. This puts you easily in the top 1% of earners, easily in the top 1% of interesting jobs and gives you half of the year off. In exchange, you face genuine danger, but that's a sort of plus for some people.

    "Would have gone far but for his deficit"

    🤣

    "Just imagine if Obama wasn't black and hadn't had to work five times as hard for half of the success, how far would he have gone!"

    Replies: @Philip Neal

    I agree that he was a high achiever by any standards, but I was contrasting him with the status-seeking activists who were the subject of Steve’s article.

  142. @Old bad nurse
    As a left-handed person, I find it amusing that we have no vocal lobby for equality. African-Americans are around 10% of Americans, so are lefties. I think a smart pundit like Steve should get some good data on handedness and compare to race. Like, do lefties become surgeons less than righties? And is the difference greater or less than the racial disparity between black and white in surgeons? One can easily imagine other fields that might have disparate impact on lefties. But hate can't be the reason, can it?

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    As a left-handed person, I find it amusing that we have no vocal lobby for equality.

    Ask and ye shall receive ….
    https://spectatorworld.com/topic/colleges-woke-covid-right-handed-privilege-male-contractors/

  143. @Steve Sailer
    @Philip Neal

    If you are really brave, being a diver on a North Sea oil platform is going pretty far in life.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @Philip Neal

    I should perhaps have said “risen high”. Yes, oil platform divers are very brave. My point is that it was not open to him to spend his life bullshitting his way into a sinecure, like.. . and… and… and…

  144. @duncsbaby
    @Rob

    It was hard reafing your initial paragraph. I srill womder how I got yhat far, let alone find out what's under the MORE tag. It's too bad because I think you have an interesting point to make.

    Replies: @Rob

    Once again, I blame Grammarly for not steppin’ up. I have to ask it every time. Uh. So unfair.

  145. @Corn
    @Anonymous

    5. Deaf girls have a tendency to be more “loose”. I.e. easier to get into bed.

    I wonder why that would be

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I’m assuming you’re joking, but if not, it’s basically to compensate.

    P.s. Tangential, but Steve with his move focus, may have seen this, involving males/females, competition, deaf girl, and office backstabbing:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Company_of_Men

  146. @Rob McX
    @slumber_j

    The "sign language" man at Mandela's funeral became something of a legend. He was just making up random gestures as he went along, obviously knowing no sign language. And he'd previously provided his services at other high profile functions, without suffering any consequences. He was a big muscular guy, and I read later that he had mental health issues. I can see why people were reluctant to confront him about his brazen charlatanry.

    Replies: @Mr Mox, @Anonymous, @hooodathunkit

    Thamsanqa Jantjie!
    How we love that man …. and if you don’t you really should.

    It was Richard Poplak who nailed it, writing for the South Africa’s Daily Maverick:
    Fog donkey: the only honest man in a stadium of fools“, IMO one of the reddest red pills for the Mandela-era and young boomer crowd. Poplack is vicious but funny all in one. Amazing piece.

    Article: https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/opinionista/2013-12-12-fog-donkey-the-only-honest-man-in-a-stadium-of-fools/

  147. Why Has Deaf Identity Politics Stalled Out Compared to the Transgender Mania?

    All identity politics must serve an end. There are basically two ends on the general: a) the ends for the identity in question and b) the ends for a larger elite who wish to exploit the identity through coalition or demagoguery.

    In the case of the deaf – arguably: the needs of the deaf are largely met
    In the case of the elite and coalitions: deaf no longer suffice to push over the 50.1% threshold

    It remains puzzling why deaf identity, like lesbianism, is not in fashion in a time of fervent identity politics.

    Not really.
    You can’t really choose to be deaf. And there’s no role for capital here.
    Trans is very psycho-somatic and subject to suggestion – with a huge role for capital in a rent-seeking financialized economy and if you are in the medical or psychological or legal or teaching profession and you are seeking rent, well …

    Much of the current transgender fad is enabled and even inflated by parents who think they are doing their children a favor. But, outside of a few hardcore deaf culture fanatics like Harden’s lesbians (and they are rare because a large majority of deaf children have hearing parents), most parents see deafness as a misfortune they wish to alleviate. And doctors can make honest money doing cochlear implants.

    Kind of feeds earlier pre-block point.
    Plus – elite demagoguery seeking a push-over-the-50.1% threshold.

    Capital.
    Look – this is driven by capital, all the claptrap from the usual sources about “the left, the left, the left”. Wrong – this is driven by capital.

    https://thefederalist.com/2021/10/22/how-global-capitals-social-credit-systems-force-corporate-america-to-lurch-left/

    Capital wants labor turned on itself. Capital doesn’t want us to talk about important dinner table subjects that matter that would lead to reform of our financialized economy, so capital funds things that make us want to wring each other’s neck.

    Trans – works for that!
    Deaf – not so much.

    Lastly:

    Much of the argument for spreading sign language would seemingly fit in well with current obsessions such as remodeling American society, the Spanish language, and…

    Spanish. It would be a tough road but: if the White Working Class learned Spanish – Woke would be over. Capishe. Done. Financialization would either get put on the run, or be forced to deploy nukes.

    But long odds that.

  148. @Altai
    Maybe because deaf people aren't insane?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Joe Walker, @guest

    It’s simpler than that. The answer is sex.

    Deafness isn’t sexy. That’s why Beethoven died alone.

    Trannies aren’t sexy to most people either, but they are about sex. Which keeps people interested.

  149. “the cochlear menace”

    I remember this coming up on House M.D. In which Dr. House cured a deaf kid who previously thought he was incurably deaf by implanting a device (or devices) without his knowledge while he was unconscious. Or without someone’s knowledge. I forget.

    Point was, the story turned to silly deaf politics no one cares about.

    This episode premiered in a different era of P.C. So I can’t compare it to what might be allowed on network television today. However, I bet there were a million angry fingers furiously typing away at the time on how the show got “Deaf Culture” wrong.

    Normal people when they see the disabled enabled don’t care about the “Culture” left behind. Join your new culture. Better culture. Hearing culture.

    It’s impossible o care about intentional cripples. Because we know the power of hearing.

  150. @James J O'Meara
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Does he really? My memories are vague on that book. But if so, he's simply confused consciousness with self-consciousness (or better, as it's less ambiguous, 'meta-consciousness').

    Many "professional" philosophers even today make that mistake, despite the fact that it's so fricking obvious. It may be because it helps them make their smug arguments for materialism. (Cartesians were the first to insist that if you were smart enough, you'd understand that animals were just like machines that screamed and squirmed when you cut them, so vivisection was OK) In fact, there's one guy, I can't be bothered to look him up, who publishes works like "Consciousness doesn't Exist" or "The Myth of Consciousness,"

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @guest

    The main thesis of the book requires that language be present for consciousness. Yes.

    But language is not sufficient. Because we go through a period during which we hallucinate another voice talking to us. This voice uses language, and we understand it that way. This is the period of the so-called bicameral mind.

    Later, after the “breakdown” of the hallucinatory system (however this happens; I forget), we no longer hear voices and develop consciousness through metaphor. Somehow. I forget.

    Point is that according to this book consciousness is not natural to the human mind. There is no consciousness without language. There is no consciousness even with language, so long as another element is missing.

    This element I cannot describe beyond being metaphorical. Not sure how to express this, but it’s like everything we said while we were hallucinating was practical as opposed to otherworldly or wishy -washy. For instance, gods were the voices inside our heads, not men in the clouds.

    Or, and I remember this example specifically, when characters died in the Iliad and their souls left their bodies, this meant their literal last breath. Or their last blood drippings.

    Later, after hallucinations stopped, through LANGUAGE we developed the METAPHOR of the immortal soul. Then we were finally conscious.

    That’s my memory of the book anyway.

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