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From a Mercatus study:

The least regulated state is South Dakota, with about 44,000 regulatory restrictions, while the most regulated state is California, with 395,000.

In California, everybody wants California to remain exactly the way it was on the day he arrived.

Hence the enormous number of regulations cracking down on change.

This is known as Progressivism.

 
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  1. Anon[388] • Disclaimer says:

    OT:

    https://www.news.vcu.edu/article/Kevin_Richardson_from_the_exonerated_Central_Park_Five_to_speak?fbclid=IwAR3jmEK7BM9-gOfue-xWGdGXz7wSZWM6arKD41FvvG7IIxEHOuLfkKk4dvQ

    Kevin Richardson, from the exonerated Central Park Five, to speak at VCU

    By Matthew Lovisa
    Division of Student Affairs
    804-828-1424
    [email protected]
    By Meghan Zapiec
    Activities Programming Board
    (804) 828-4005
    [email protected]
    Monday, Oct. 21, 2019

    Kevin Richardson, a member of the exonerated Central Park Five, will speak at Virginia Commonwealth University on Oct. 22.

    The event, “When They See Me,” will take place at 7 p.m. in the Commonwealth Ballroom of the University Student Commons, 907 Floyd Ave. Richardson’s talk is sponsored by VCU’s Activities Programming Board.

    The event is sold out. Media are invited to attend and may RSVP by contacting Meghan Zapiec or Matthew Lovisa in the Division of Student Affairs.

    Richardson was one of five black and Latino teenagers wrongly convicted of raping a white woman in New York City’s Central Park in 1989. The convictions were vacated in 2002. The five men are the subject of a Netflix series, “When They See Us,” that premiered in May.

  2. Neoconned says:

    Steve, if I recall you have a background in sales. Anyway been reading this book….about the atomization of American society and per the author’s thesis, it started with the marketing industrys move in the mid 1970s from mass marketing to targeted demographic marketing

    What’s your take?

  3. So, on a per-capita basis, that gives SD 20 restrictions per person and CA ~101 per person, so CA is only five times worse that SD.

    However, if you look at only citizens, then it is probably closer to 10 times worse.

    Now, if only I could choose which 100 restrictions apply to me!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  4. Diversity is Stringent

  5. Hey, Steve/all

    One of the contentions of the piece I’m going to link to below is that the “Great Replacement” is just a conspiracy theory.

    http://www.post-gazette.com/news/crime-courts/2019/10/21/White-nationalism-online-supremacy-Tree-of-life-shooting-Robert-Bowers-screw-your-optics/stories/201910040166

    Maybe you’d like to answer these questions for me: isn’t it the case that the left/elites/minorities/et al openly brag about the “Great Replacement”? Isn’t it also the case that our corporate overlords have marketing studies praising the “Great Replacement” as being good for business?

    Do any of our guys have collections of leftist opinion pieces bragging about the decline of white numbers? I feel as though I see this stuff all the time in the WaPo or NYT.

  6. J.Ross says:

    Billboard in Detroit: picture of a smiling behijabbed Muslima next to the words “Census means more money for our community.”

  7. El Dato says:

    I hear there is some fear that the San Andreas fault is becoming a bit slippery?

    California: Soon no longer a factor.

    • Replies: @Corn
    , @SunBakedSuburb
  8. Progressives are the true conservatives!

    We have closed the loop!

  9. vhrm says:

    I’m against a fair amount of the regulation here, but it’s the overall sentiment wrong?

    If you like SF as it is, it seems perfectly reasonable to me to not want to allow it to be turned into Manhattan.

  10. anonymous[128] • Disclaimer says:

    California has a lot of laws(and law enforcement) because its diversity makes it a low trust society.

    There are no informal agreements based on shared values or similar world views; every interaction must be spelled out in advance and enforced by third parties.

    This is also why California is so rigidly hierarchical and unequal..in the absence of strong, near dictatorial leadership, chaos would rule, as individual groups settled differences on their own.

  11. Thomm says:

    In California, everybody wants California to remain exactly the way it was on the day he arrived.

    At least Steve Sailer is honest about this being true of himself as well.

    Ron Unz is a very notable exception to the rule, however.

  12. Thomm says:
    @vhrm

    If you like SF as it is, it seems perfectly reasonable to me to not want to allow it to be turned into Manhattan.

    Then don’t complain about the homeless people.

    The ‘housing crisis’ in SF (and other parts of California) is due to unwillingness to build new supply. This stems from a) fear of change that is innate to weak, socialist people, and b) a desire to create extreme scarcity.

  13. Anonymous[179] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s time to call the newcomers ‘colonizers’.

  14. The Z Blog says: • Website

    Alternatively, the founding stock of California had a high percentage of Yankee reformers. The largest population was the timid Midwesterner, who could be easily bullied by the reformers, in the same way New England bullied the midlanders in the 19th century.

    California is a reminder that the world would be a better place if the Indians had slaughtered the first settlers in New England.

    • Replies: @Mike Zwick
  15. Anon7 says:
    @J.Ross

    More money to send overseas with impunity, that’s the real Muslim community:

    Detroit-area men who moved millions to Yemen spared prison

    Since 2018, federal prosecutors in Detroit have charged nine people in an investigation of cash transfers to Yemen. Bank accounts were opened in the names of shell businesses, then used to deposit and wire roughly $90 million over a seven-year period, according to plea agreements filed in court.

    “[The cash] was sent in a manner to conceal the true ownership of the currency, place it outside reach of law enforcement and evade income taxes,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Timothy Wyse said.

    One by one, [95 year old Jimmy Carter appointee] U.S. District Judge Avern Cohn declined to send them to prison, despite guidelines that call for a few years or more behind bars. He noted that Yemen’s financial system is a mess and its residents desperately need help. Defense lawyers have praised the judge for educating himself about the poorest country in the Arab world and understanding cultural traditions…

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  16. If the purpose of California’s political culture was to prevent change, then it would not be fostering the Great Replacement.

    No. The purpose of California’s political culture and its attendant regulations is to allow the Ruling Class to control the minutest details the lives of the proletariat. Movement toward this goal is what they call “progress”.

    Remember the motto of the California Democratic Party: “Everything not forbidden in compulsory.”

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  17. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    Do any of our guys have collections of leftist opinion pieces bragging about the decline of white numbers? I feel as though I see this stuff all the time in the WaPo or NYT.

    Replacement as the overt Democrat strategy for political dominance was laid out in the 2002 book The Emerging Democratic Majority, which became something of a Bible for Democrats. If you look for Dem pundits and operatives lauding the book, you’ll see about 15 years of crowing about how Republican-voting white people were dying off and being replaced by immigrants.

    Post-2016, of course, the Dems realized that prematurely dancing on the grave of the White majority hadn’t been the smartest political move. So now the Party Line is that if you remember the prior 15 years you are a “conspiracy theorist.” In other words, they are trying to turn down the temperature to keep the frog from jumping out of the pot.

  18. Whiskey says: • Website

    Steve, soon all White property will be seized in California to give to illegals and Blacks. Or Muslims. Or anyone sufficiently vibrant.

    Be forewarned.

    Nope, Steven Spielberg, Rob Reiner, Barbara Streisand, and Robert DeNiro are honorary non-White. So they are exempt.

    • Replies: @Tlotsi
  19. When the big one comes, may Steve and his loved ones be safe.

    All the rest of them can go down in flames. Ugh.

  20. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    How much of this is driven by white liberal pols tilting further to the left/woke in an attempt to hold on to power in an increasingly nonwhite state? You’d think that would open up space for a right-leaning Latino pol running on an anti-woke, pro-environmental, pro-worker, restrictionist platform. Could you get a majority of Californians behind a platform that included these planks?:

    – Higher minimum wage
    – Steep fines for employers violating labor/immigration laws
    – Eliminating “homelessness” by enforcing laws against vagrancy and giving bus tickets to offenders to a place with free housing, drug treatment, etc. far away in the sticks.
    – A Florida-style wealth tax.
    – Separate male and female bathrooms
    – Keeping strict standards in the university systems, but adding trade schools non college-track young people.

  21. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    See also:

    Peter Brown.
    _Minority Party: Why Democrats Face Defeat in 1992 and Beyond_.
    1991/09/01.
    Available as a used book.
    ISBN-10: 0895265303; ISBN-13: 978-0895265302

    Shows that Democrats thought that importing foreigners was the Democrat’s only hope of survival, even back in 1991.

    Counterinsurgency

    • Replies: @El Dato
  22. @vhrm

    If you like SF as it is, it seems perfectly reasonable to me to not want to allow it to be turned into Manhattan.

    Sure, so first step is deport all the foreigners so that the population of SF is the population that built it, right? You’re in favor of that?

    Counterinsurgency

  23. nebulafox says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Pushing nuclear power as an interim solution would be a great way of marrying environmental and economic concerns.

    Also: needs to be young to truly get a mass following going. The leadership of the GOP and the Democrats, on a state and national level, shares a notable problem that relatively few people bring up: they are getting increasingly geriatric. Biden, McConnell, Pelosi, Trump, Sanders, and Warren are all 70+. Schumer isn’t far behind at 68, with Pence ticking in as a relative spring chicken at 60. Not shockingly, there are times where it seems like they genuinely don’t grasp how different establishing your life is now.

    In California, it shouldn’t be shocking that state policy attempts to marry the concerns of aging, largely white Boomers (who can afford to live there because they bought houses long, long ago) with the concerns of big tech, and those of new immigrants of varying socioeconomic and legal status. Local Americans under the age of 50 are the ones who get screwed by the predictable resulting policies, from education to transportation. Probably the most explicitly affected area housing and family formation, because neighborhoods with good schools around are particularly unaffordable.

    What’s truly interesting is that 50-60 years ago, California was middle-of-the-pack when it came to living costs: not the cheapest state in the Union, but not particularly expensive, either. In the 1960s, the place really was as close to the middle-class postwar ideal that you’d expect. Shocking, huh?

    • Agree: The Anti-Gnostic
  24. There was a bumper sticker in the 1970s, “Don’t Californicate Colorado.” The idea was to keep open spaces, buy up land and block development. It worked to some extent, but the Californicators still came, with lots of cash from the sale of their overpriced homes, and Democrat party politics. Thus the state is now purple.

    The attempt to preserve Colorado did involve some regulations, and it was meant to keep things as they were. They even rejected the 1976 Winter Olympics, wisely, by referendum. Boulder, for another example, bought up as much land around itself as it could, and remains an expensive, White oasis, somewhat to the left of mainland China.

    But aren’t the majority of California government interferences concerned with things other than real estate? That is a beautiful picture of the California coast up there, but what, exactly, is wrong with it? Here is a Colorado equivalent, the result of strict zoning and public ownership of surrounding land:

  25. SafeNow says:

    One must factor-in whether regulations (and rules, etc.) apply to all. I recently took my in-person drivers license renewal test here in Southern California. There I was in the inner-sanctum testing room, no visitors allowed says the sign. I am seated at my computer and the fellow at the next computer is being assisted by his test-taking mentor, standing and peering over his shoulder and brazenly, in a loud (Spanish) voice instructing how to answer the questions. I might add that the knowledge material is not all that difficult, for example you do indeed yield to a train and a shoulder harness goes over the shoulder.

  26. @Dave Pinsen

    Dave, never quit being an optimist.

  27. El Dato says:

    O.T.: Facebook is under pressure to stop a repeat of the 2016 presidential election in the U.S.

    I bet they are.

  28. Anon[120] • Disclaimer says:

    There is a big difference between states that had a natural but slow trickle-in of settlement, such as South Dakota, and California. California was settled in a massive gold rush, and it filled up with wildcatters, ne’er-do-wells, and anyone looking to make a quick buck. This is the founding population of the state, and most of the inhabitants living there today are descended from these dubious people. There’s also a subset of founders who moved to the state hoping to strike it rich in the movie industry, and a third subset of ne’er-do-wells who moved in during the ’30s because they couldn’t hack in their own states during the Great Depression.

    California, in the 1980s, decided to make itself into an ultra-massive boomtown with a boomtown type-economy (akin to what happened in the oil sands of North Dakota), that produced massive economic price distortions. Housing prices skyrocketed along with salaries as California voted for uncontrolled economic growth. The housing market became a bit of a Ponzi scheme, where you made out well as long as you could leave the next sucker after you holding the bag (the house). A founding population (the 49ers) who wanted to get rich quick had a lot of descendants who were mentally and emotionally a chip off the old block, and they have been voting for any social, political, and economic policy that promises to make them rich ever since.

    California today is run exactly the way you would expect if you had a large founding population of greedy wildcatters and ne’er-do-wells. This is the distinctive Californian culture of today.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  29. Because anyone who was anyone, and a whole lot of nobodies too, took massive doses of LSD in the 1970s.

  30. ricpic says:

    So wouldn’t the most effective single measure to keep things as they were be a strictly enforced ban on the Mestizo invasion?

    • Replies: @Hail
  31. Dr. X says:

    Shhhhh… don’t tell anybody this, ’cause if people find out they’ll ruin it. But South Dakota has no gun laws to speak of and no state income tax. If you can handle the winters, it might be a good bolt-hole when the boogaloo starts…

    • Replies: @Barnard
  32. Uh, SB-54 isn’t the way California used to be.

  33. Hail says: • Website
    @Neoconned

    Breaking Up America

    From the title, it sounds that book is a call for dissolution/partition.

    From your description of the contents, the title seems an odd fit.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
  34. istevefan says:

    In California, everybody wants California to remain exactly the way it was on the day he arrived.

    Did 1970 era population wish to maintain CA as it was? Or were they overridden?

  35. Hail says: • Website
    @ricpic

    Mestizo

    The wealthy California elite don’t much deal with Mestizos, except compliant ones in service roles. Gated-Community Progressivism.

  36. Hodag says:

    Where in the hell is that photo? It reminds me of the Cabots.

    Dave Ensler has been trying to make a course north of Bandon called Pacific Gailes happen for half a decade. The land is stunning but the permit process is impossible.

    Dave Ensler has not made a lot of courses but I love every single one he has made. Black Sheep was a field, flat Illinois land. It is special. He resurrected a Ross at Ravisloe. And made a great templatey course at Mt Prospect muni (which may have the best true Road Hole in Illinois.)

  37. @J.Ross

    Billboard in Detroit: picture of a smiling behijabbed Muslima next to the words “Census means more money for our community.”

    There should be a counter billboard that reads:

    “STOP FEEDING THE ANIMALS”

  38. @216

    The comments under that article reek of Boomerposting cluelessness, as usual.

    Eliminating excess retail space, closing unprofitable locations, and reducing work hours are precisely what the doctored ordered for economies like Japan and America. The immigration argument would be settled in a single stroke once the chattering classes realize that “we do not need any more workers” implies “we do not need any more foreign workers,” which is probably why they skillfully avoid allowing the proposition to come into consciousness.

    • Replies: @216
  39. vinny says:
    @vinny

    The real answer is that it’s a state that faced tragedy of the commons problems very quickly and early, plus a bunch of Yankee do-gooderism, plus hydrological tyranny

  40. Neoconned says:
    @Hail

    *shrugs*

    Search me.

    If you click on the picture it takes you to a review on Amazon, if youre interested….

  41. @Peripatetic Commenter

    Now, if only I could choose which 100 restrictions apply to me!

    Humor aside, for the moment, that’s what The State LUVS LUVS LUVS about having millions of regulations. If they want to get you for something that’s not against the law – say you’re one of those agitators – The State can find something that applies to you, Peripatetic Commenter.

    Great short post, Steve, with a good point. Wasn’t California a much more wonderful place with 20 million people? Yeah, that was just rhetorical. We all know it was.

  42. @Thomm

    California is hilariously under-developed, but the notion that people are homeless because San Francisco government keeps developers from building is not a serious one. You could pave over the whole peninsula, erect buildings 40-stories high by 20 across and subdivide them into 650 sq ft studios, and you’d still have homelessness.

    You can come to my city and watch the steel canyons going up all over the place, and we still have homeless people on every block. Same thing with roads: we’ve been building them since the 1960’s and they are as congested as ever. These are not supply-side problems.

    Fresno median home value is $240K. Can’t people move there?

    Homelessness in the US is a mental illness/substance abuse problem, not a housing problem. And if you drive down housing prices to the point where $500K will get you a whole stadium like in Pontiac, Michigan, then the affluent capitalists and their high-class wives will just move away to another expensive, highly regulated city and pull up the drawbridge after themselves.

    • Replies: @Thomm
    , @RadicalCenter
  43. @216

    Seven-Eleven Japan to end some 24-hour operations amid labor crunch

    I remember when Seven-Elevens were actually open from 7 to 11.

  44. El Dato says:
    @Counterinsurgency

    Correlated with the fall of the Soviet Union and the moment when certain Israeli realized the US could do the heavy lifting in the Middle East.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  45. 216 says: • Website
    @Intelligent Dasein

    There are cases in Japan where 7/11 are literally across the street from each other.

    Locally, there are many cases in Cleveland/Akron where older office buildings have been converted into residential units.

    Presumably Japan could convert these empty sites into larger apartments that would ease family formation.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
  46. Thomm says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Some are homeless by choice (mainly because shelters don’t allow people to do drugs within them).

    But others actually live in vans and RVs because they can’t (or don’t want to) pay exorbitant rent. They have jobs in the area, so can’t move to Fresno.

    • Replies: @Hail
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
  47. @Neoconned

    Hire an agency to run a microtargeting ad campaign about a breakup of the United States

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  48. Hail says: • Website
    @Thomm

    Some are homeless by choice

    American by Birth
    Homeless by Choice
    Antifa by the Grace of God

  49. Barnard says:
    @Dr. X

    South Dakota has been getting its fair share of glorious diversity thanks to the very good people at Lutheran Social Services. Most of them live in Sioux Falls and the surrounding area, but some smaller town farm operations are bringing in cheap labor too. The Black Hills is beautiful with slightly milder winters than the rest of the state most years.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
  50. Lagertha says:

    Crime families moved out there in the 50-70’s so they knew how to turn CA into Sicily and Taormina. It is what it is 😉

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Lagertha
  51. @Thomm

    That’s like me complaining that the price of Ferraris is too damned high–those greedy Italians should be making more of them! San Francisco is on a peninsula inhabited by a lot of very wealthy people. If you’re not one of them, no Ferrari for you. It’s relative.

  52. anonymous[105] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thomm

    Yeah, but the current homelessness in SF is not due to any housing crisis. Unless by “housing crisis” you mean “hardcore criminal drug users from around the country attracted by lax enforcement of vagrancy and burglary laws and a huge metastisizing degenerate lifestyle scene.”

    The people who are down on their luck and living in a van or taking their family to the food bank are not the ones who have recently proliferated in the city of SF (or LA, Seattle, Denver, etc…)

  53. @Thomm

    The ‘housing crisis’ in SF (and other parts of California) is due to unwillingness to build new supply. This stems from a) fear of change that is innate to weak, socialist people, and b) a desire to create extreme scarcity.

    The housing crisis is mostly because of immigration. Though some Americans would have moved there anyway–California’s climate and scenery are nice–California’s population has doubled since 1970 while native American fertility has been sub-replacement.

    And, of course, most of the homeless issue does not revolve around the cost of housing–as big a crisis as it is.

    Bottom line: because of suicidal immigration policy parts of America have stopped being Ben Franklin’s America of cheap land and dear labor and have turned into … Asia.

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Alden
  54. Lagertha says:
    @Barnard

    I left the Lutheran Church 5 years ago due to their idiocy.

    • Replies: @Hail
  55. Alden says:
    @AnotherDad

    The homeless problem in San Francisco is due to massive massive Chinese immigration and 20-25 Chinese living in a 1,000 sq ft house over a 1,000 garage that’s also some kind of poultry slaughter house, sewing factory, food prep for the restaurant whatever.

    Only housing can be built is to tear down all those little 3 bedroom row houses and build Hong Kong brutalist style 60 story high rises full of the tiny apartments Chinese love to crowd into.

    When we were looking at houses I looked at one one. 12 rooms if you counted the sunrooms abd kitchen. 5 medium size bedrooms up stairs. 4 rooms plus kitchen on the first floor. 2 sunrooms about 10 fr wide. 14 ft ceilings on the first floor. 12 ft ceilings on the 2nd floor

    Can you guess why Chinese love tall ceilings???
    Because they can put triple bunk bed in a room with a tall ceiling.

    Anyway, I could hear sewing machines whirring in the basement. Living room, 7 sets of triple bunks. Dining room, 6 sets of triple bunks, library office, 4 sets of triple bunks, multipurpose room in the back same size as the living room, 7 sets of triple bunks. All 5 bedrooms had triple bunk beds. So did the sunrooms.
    I counted 78 beds in that house. Plus the sewing machine noise from the basement. The operators may have slept in the work shop or up stairs.

    The bunks had steel rails. Big S hooks hung from the rails held bags of clothes and personal belongs. Those S hooks hung from bed rails are standard in China.

    San Francisco is 47 square miles. No one knows how many people live in the city. Chinese just don’t answer the census or any government forms except for the SSI, Medicare Medicaid free van service free bus passes, free meals, free food handouts at the churches that Chinese with ID claiming they are 65 get fixed up with within a week of their arrival.

    Social worker/translators take groups of them in senior citizen vans to social security and welfare offices.

    47 sq miles is a small city It was planned for small yards, flats and row houses and big and small parks and public spaces all over town. The Sunset district has a nice feature, a little 1/4 acre toddler park every few blocks. In Chinese terms, it’s wasted space and a perfect site for a 60 story high rise.

    To house the who knows how many people actually live in San Francisco now, and the Chinese who plan to mover here for the next hundred years; we’ll have to tear down every residential building, destroy every park and open space, even school playgrounds and erect 60 story high rises full of 600 sq ft apartments.

    And the Chinese legals and illegals will continue pouring in to the Golden Mountain. The old ones come because there’s no decent pension system in China. But every age group seems determined to invade and overwhelm San Francisco.

    Homeless people are homeless because they have no place to live. Massive immigration is the problem.

    78 beds in a medium sized 9 room house with 2 1/2 bathrooms.

  56. Alden says:
    @Lagertha

    No mafia ever in N California. Very small Jewish mafia operation in Los Angeles. The Jewish mafia was gone by 1960.

  57. Hail says: • Website
    @Lagertha

    Well, there is no ‘The’ Lutheran Church. Some of the church bodies are less idiotic than others. Some significant ones tend to be led by what might be called idiots, or a worse appellation. But every Western society today is led by much the same type. All the churches are downstream of culture.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  58. @Neoconned

    about the atomization of American society and per the author’s thesis, it started with the marketing industrys move in the mid 1970s from mass marketing to targeted demographic marketing

    This bizarre naming of “generations” didn’t take off until the late 1980s. Before that, a boomer was weaponry, peaking during wartime, and millennial was a religious persuasion. Ngram can date Tom Brokaw’s stupid book title precisely.

    Baby boom,boomer,baby boomer

    Millennium,millennial

    Generation x, Gen x, GenX

    Silent generation

    Greatest Generation

  59. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hail

    They tell me the Missouri Synod is pretty conservative.

  60. @Steve in Greensboro

    ‘…If the purpose of California’s political culture was to prevent change, then it would not be fostering the Great Replacement.

    No. The purpose of California’s political culture and its attendant regulations is to allow the Ruling Class to control the minutest details the lives of the proletariat. Movement toward this goal is what they call “progress”…’

    Politics in California no more has a purpose than the homeless guy with the three shopping carts piled high with garbage is building a collection.

    In both cases, it’s a manifestation of mental illness, not a purposeful activity.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  61. @vhrm

    Neoliberal YIMBYist, Matthew Yglesias, wants to do just that.

  62. @Alden

    ‘No mafia ever in N California. ‘

    I’m skeptical of that.

    Sure enough: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco_crime_family

    • Replies: @Alden
  63. @Hodag

    My guess is Santa Barbara County north of Point Concepcion and south of Jalama Beach. The whole area is gorgeous oceanfront property largely preserved except for the occasional cattle ranch.

  64. @Alden

    No mafia ever in N California.

    There is Chinese organized crime and both the Nortenos and Surenos are quite active in San Francisco.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Alden
  65. @vinny

    Lee Marvin turned down a starring role in “The Wild Bunch” to star in “Paint Your Wagon.”

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  66. @Anon

    So, the mid-80s song “Welcome To The Boomtown” is about California?

    • Replies: @res
  67. Anonymous[405] • Disclaimer says:

    Except, of course, when it comes to massive uncontrolled third world immigration.

    *THAT* is the ‘exceptionalism’ which is the sine non qua *THE* fundamental governing rule and constant of all modern western governance.

  68. eah says:

    Speaking of ‘progressive’ — Germany generally comes out at or near the top of (dumb) surveys of the most “popular” (admired) countries — eg see this BBC article.

    The reality is that soon Germans will have to work/wait until they are 70 to receive their meager state pensions.

  69. Hey, the Mexicans tried, but not hard enough. We should make them work harder to take it back:

    1818

    American Joseph Chapman is shipwrecked at San Pedro and arrested as a pirate. After a brief jail term, he chooses to stay in El Pueblo and becomes an active member of the community. He becomes the first American and English-speaking person to settle in Los Angeles. After repeated floods, El Pueblo moves to a higher location. The Avila Adobe is built.

    1826

    A party of American trappers led by Jebediah S. Smith arrives in El Pueblo from the Salt Lake Valley in Utah. They are the first Americans to arrive in California overland. They are ordered to leave by the authorities, but Smith later returns. The first priest permanently assigned to Los Angeles arrives.

    [MORE]

    1836

    A census counts 2,230 residents within the Los Angeles jurisdiction, 555 of whom are Indian and 50 foreigners. A local civil war breaks out between northern and southern California. Indian forced labor is initiated. The Mexican government takes the first official census of Los Angeles. The population is fixed at 2,228. This includes 603 men, 421 women, 651 children and 553 “domesticated Indians.” Among Los Angeles residents are 29 Americans, 4 Britons, 3 Portuguese, 2 Africans, and a Canadian, Irishman, Italian, German, Scot, Norwegian, and Curacao. The first vigilante committee forms in Los Angeles to seize a man and woman from the authorities accused of murdering the woman’s husband. The pair are executed by the “committee.”

    1839

    Governor Alvarado exiles all foreigners who would not become Mexican citizens.. The first multi-story home is built on the Plaza.

    1844

    A census counts 2,497 residents within the Los Angeles jurisdiction, 650 of whom are Indian and 55 foreigners.

    1845

    The local California civil war ends with the battle of Cahuenga Pass. The casualties are one horse and one mule. Pio Pico is made governor of all of California and Los Angeles is finally recognized as the provincial capital. Rancho Encino is established.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  70. @The Alarmist

    In the Battle of Cahuenga Pass in my neighborhood between Mexicans and Californios, the responsibility for firing the one cannon on each side was delegated to Americanos. Eventually, the two Yankees who were doing all the fighting recognized each other from their days on the East Coast and called the battle off.

    Seven years later, California was an American state.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  71. @Steve Sailer

    I guess that’s what you get for hiring foreigners to do the work you don’t want to do.

  72. @eah

    rMy vague impression is that Germans are surprisingly poor.

    • Replies: @eah
    , @MC
  73. eah says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Per the ‘Bund der Steuerzahler’, so-called ‘Tax Freedom Day’ for Germans in 2018 was July 18 — in most published accounts, Germans have personal wealth (Vermögen) lower than many other EU countries (eg Italy and France) — Germans are taxed into poverty: “in die Armut regiert”.

  74. @Clifford Brown

    An Italian-American high school friend of mine was the son of a prominent Los Angeles bookie, who was in and out of jail. A couple of other Italian-Americans friends were big sports bettors and had their bookie threatening to have their legs broken when they owed him $800 in the early 1970s.

  75. @Hodag

    I typed “Hollister Ranch” into the search engine. That’s the long stretch of coastline west of Santa Barbara, west of where the 101 freeway turns north over the Santa Ynez mountains. Only a few zillionaires own the land. Surfers have been fighting a long battle with the rich guys to get them to open access to their beaches like the state laws says.

    Heck, the part of this coast closer to Santa Barbara that’s serviced by the freeway has practically no inhabitants and just one golf course, Sandpiper by Billy Bell Jr. Even though he was a pretty terrible golf course designer who got his jobs because his dad was George “Riviera” Thomas’s right hand man, Sandpiper is still pretty awesome because who couldn’t design a golf course on that kind of land?

    As I may have have mentioned once or twice, the land northwest of Santa Monica — the 140 miles from Malibu to Point Concepcion — is remarkably underpopulated.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  76. @Hodag

    I typed “Hollister Ranch” into the search engine. That’s the long stretch of coastline west of Santa Barbara, west of where the 101 freeway turns north over the Santa Ynez mountains. Only a few zillionaires own the land. Surfers have been fighting a long battle with the rich guys to get them to open access to their beaches like the state laws says.

    Heck, the part of this coast closer to Santa Barbara that’s serviced by the freeway has practically no inhabitants and just one golf course, Sandpiper by Billy Bell Jr. Even though he was a pretty terrible golf course designer who got his jobs because his dad was George “Riviera” Thomas’s right hand man, Sandpiper is still pretty awesome because who couldn’t design a golf course on that kind of land?

    As I may have have mentioned once or twice, the land northwest of Santa Monica — the 140 miles from Malibu to Point Concepcion — is remarkably underpopulated.

    • Replies: @indocon
  77. Corn says:
    @El Dato

    Don’t get your hopes up.

    I remember as a child in the late ‘80s seeing a news report that predicted massive earthquakes would render California underwater and a chain of islands by 2000.

  78. J.Ross says:
    @Anon7

    There’s another billboard in Detroit, up for years, specifically advertising a transfer service to send money to Yemen. It has the tagline “that’s better” (than sending good wishes?) and is from a major service like Western Union. So these guys got into trouble for the way they went about it but there is huge and openly advertised hawala to Yemen going on.

  79. @216

    Ha, ha. Agree with your “rotting in X” riff on Steve, but Japan has the highest vacancy rate in the world. It’s not small apartments preventing family formation.

  80. Anonymous[243] • Disclaimer says:
    @eah

    I thought all those ‘Syrians’ and Syrian impersonators whom Merkel invited in were supposed to ‘pay for German pensions’.

    • Replies: @eah
  81. @216

    yes, as I’ve predicted on this website before, Abe is the Invade/Invite PM, and Japan is slowly embracing anti-anti-immigrant views, like the US. The last time I addressed this, I mentioned that opinion formation here is top-down and inside to outside. The media reporting on “hot dogs rotting in 7/11” is not left-vs-right, like the US, but the middle aligning with the top.

  82. The irony is Californians vote for progressives who want to flood their state with ever more people, which is hardly good for the environment. I imagine what life might be like living in CA in the 50’s, where so much of SoCal living was not about sitting in traffic, and the sight of concrete in neighborhoods was less common.

  83. @The Anti-Gnostic

    And how do most people get the down payment for that house that costs “only” $250,000? People in this country are worse off than folks seem to think.

    You seem right that homelessness is mostly a problem of mental illness and substance abuse, but it IS getting harder and harder for a hardworking couple — even with college degrees and decent-paying full time jobs with benefits — to save for a house. Especially one in a safe, civilized place with suitable schools.

    If you don’t inherit a house or live with relatives cheaply, you can work hard your whole life and never own a home in a growing number of places in “our” country.

  84. indocon says:
    @Steve Sailer

    San Luis Obispo County, up 101 a little further is perhaps the last place in CA that still looks like CA of 60’s and 70’s.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Old Palo Altan
  85. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    Following is a transcript of a note on the office wall of one Mark Potok, former SPLC “hate group expert,” shown in the docu Alt-Right: Age of Rage (2018) without comment:

    USA population
    Non-Hispanic Whites

    1920—-90%
    1940—-90%
    1960—-85%
    1965—-83%
    1980—-79%
    2000—69%
    2012—-64%
    2014—-63%
    2015—-62%

  86. @vinny

    Paint Your Wagon came out in 1969. I wonder if Lee Marvin was a fan of the Allman Brothers?

  87. “In California, everybody wants California to remain exactly the way it was on the day he arrived.

    Hence the enormous number of regulations cracking down on change.

    This is known as Progressivism.”

    But, this is also true of Florida, yet it hasn’t turned as reliably “progressive” as California has. Why the difference?

    And I wonder what impact the huge numbers on immigrants have on both states.

  88. J1234 says:

    The least regulated state is South Dakota

    I was in South Dakota on a business trip in the late 1980’s or early ’90’s. One of the people I chatted with told me he’d bought a brand new Corvette. His total bill from the South Dakota DMV – all taxes, fees and everything: $25. (In fact, there may not have been any taxes involved in buying the car.)

    At the time, buying a new, but ordinary (non-sports, non-luxury) car in my state would’ve set you back an additional $1000 in charges from our DMV. Triple that now. Because of this atmosphere of unobtrusive state government, I think there’s been an influx of some white people into SD. I personally know of three families who’ve moved there in the last several years. Hopefully this tendency will counter some of the Lutheran Church related diversity in the eastern part of the state that Barnard mentioned.

  89. @El Dato

    When it happens I’ll be drinking margaritas with Warren Zevon at the Hollywood Hawaiian Hotel.

  90. MC says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Huh…..Based on how many of them you find vacationing in national parks in the American West, I always assumed they had a lot more disposable income than other Euros.

    I mean, it’s like several times the number of tourists from all other European countries combined. But maybe they just like the American West.

    • Replies: @eah
  91. @Colin Wright

    “it’s a manifestation of mental illness”

    The same could apply to the Democratic Party as a whole. Here in the Golden State we are trying to survive the leadership of Governor Gavin Newsom (Getty). He destroyed San Francisco and now the entire state. He and his first partner, Hecate, have their eyes on the White House. Newsom is the reincarnation of Nero. He is also a vampire.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  92. @Harry Baldwin

    Sam Peckinpah directing Lee Marvin would have been too perfect. Although a drunken gun battle between the two probably would’ve shut down production.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  93. eagles says:

    Give California back to Mexico

    • Replies: @Cortes
  94. res says:
    @Redneck farmer

    So, the mid-80s song “Welcome To The Boomtown” is about California?

    Are you joking? That was very much an LA-based album (and song).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boomtown_(David_%26_David_album)

  95. @eah

    Americans being totally deaf, dumb and blind regarding the nut-house otherwise known as Germany.
    Deutschland the one place on planet earth where the majority of their population is driven and motivated to exist by their rabid hate and revulsion for the US Republican party, the place where BO is worshipped as a deity and viewed as the most intelligent human to have ever set foot on planet mirth.
    Germany the home of the beloved “Meldepflicht”, the oppressive big-brother law requiring that each and every citizen report their new address to the local “Meldeamt” upon changing residence.

    Germany the psychotic zone in which they apparently think that they had indeed won the war and they are called upon to dictate internal US politics as reflected in their relentless media drive to see the US eliminate the second amendment so as to match the restrictive German gun ownership code.
    Then on to their media demanding the elimination of the US electoral college, which caused their liebling HC to lose to the most hated man in German : DT.
    And then on to the movement by the Greens (who actually set the national political tone ) to forbid the private ownership of automobiles.

    I could go on and on with the list of German abberations starting with communism, ( yeah Marx was a Jew) , Antifa, Heroin, authority-worship. ( to be continued)

    Authenticjazzman “Mensa” qualified since 1973, airborne trained US Army vet, and pro jazz performer.

  96. @The Z Blog

    Ronald Reagan was from Illinois. Was he one of the timid Midwesterners?

  97. eah says:
    @Anonymous

    Yeah, well, some guy actually said this — pension not before 70 — back in 2015 — the reason he gave was the integration costs for refugees:

  98. eah says:
    @MC

    Look, a typical German gets 30 days of (paid) vacation — for a small family (the vast majority of German families are small), especially one with two incomes (which is most), a vacation in the US is easily affordable.

    But let me tell you an anecdote: a German friend of mine knows someone who works at the pension office — people approaching retirement can come in and get info — and my German friend told me that this person in the pension office said whenever it turns out that the calculation shows someone will get €1000+ euros/month (this is brutto = before taxes + health insurance + other deductions) as a pension, this gets great notice all around the office because it is so rare — so you can work a lifetime and have significantly less than €1k/month to live on when you retire — as a percentage of your (averaged over a number of years) last income level, the German state pension payout is among the lowest in Europe.

    Above I said 2018 ‘Tax Freedom Day’ in DE was Jul 18 — and keep in mind DE has no military to speak of — it is not a fighting force — so where does all that money go?

    • Replies: @Cortes
  99. Cortes says:

    The conservatism of recent arrivals to California is mirrored in many small communities in the UK to which the middle classes repair in search of relatively cheap housing, clean environment, picturesque scenery and absence of immigrants. The “blow-ins” aka “White Settlers” vehemently oppose many improvements which locals want. The classic example is street lighting – a boon in tiny villages located where there’s no more than 5 decent hours of daylight November to February. Our clocks “go back” Saturday coming and sunset on Sunday is 16:49… much later than the tiny villages further north affected by the incomers’ resistance to change.

  100. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    This got a tiny amount of attention at the time but seems to have been largely forgotten. Just call it gentle genocide. I’m surprised they have this on his Wikipedia page.

    In 2007, [Tom, the ex-Mr Jane Fonda] Hayden made news for his speech at the wedding of his son Troy, where, as Hilton Als wrote in The New Yorker, he “said that he was especially happy about his son’s union with actress Simone Bent, who is black, because, among other things, it was ‘another step in a long-term goal of mine: the peaceful, non-violent disappearance of the white race’”.[16]

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  101. Cortes says:
    @eah

    Consider me a sceptic:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pensions_in_Germany

    It’s not entirely accidental that many of the delightful places in southern countries of the EU are little havens of Kaffee und Kuchen for retirees from the Vaterland who enjoy their holiday homes for a break from the tedium of having to interact with Merkel’s millions.

    • Replies: @eah
  102. eah says:
    @Cortes

    Exactly what are you skeptical about? — what am I supposed to get out of your link? — Germans can, if they choose, invest their after tax money in other pension-like schemes (something similar to an annuity), which will give them additional income when they retire (the general term is private Altersvorsorge — these are fairly heavily advertised, and there are a number of different types) — but in general there is no “matching” by an employer, like eg a typical 401-K — some large companies still offer a Betriebspension, but it is typically very small, because the employees also (must) contribute to the state pension system (gesetzliche Rentenversicherung).

    Germans are not well paid; even educated technical workers, eg engineers — look at the PDF at this link –> link — it gives the monthly salary for the various levels (Tarifstufe) for workers represented by IG Metall (a trade union) — note: these tables are valid also for engineers, whose salaries are generally not individually negotiated: you are at some Tarifstufe, and this is what you get until you are moved up to the next one — look at the table: the highest level in Bayern, generally Germany’s costliest state, EG 17, is only €6k/month — so you could be a HW or SW engineer, and unless your employer decides to reward you with a special contract outside the tarif structure (uncommon), you will never make more than €72k/year even in München, where the cost of living is very high — compare that to engineering salaries in the US — it is, on average, very significantly less than what engineers in the US make.

    And most Germans make a lot less than an engineer — I once saw a graphic about Berlin that said if your gross salary was > €3800/month (or so), then you were in the top 10% of earners in Berlin.

    • Replies: @danand
  103. Corvinus says:

    “In California, everybody wants California to remain exactly the way it was on the day he arrived. Hence the enormous number of regulations cracking down on change.”

    False premise followed by non sequitur.

    “This is known as Progressivism.”

    No, this is known as Progressivism.

    http://www-personal.umd.umich.edu/~ppennock/Progressive%20Reforms.htm

    Double bogey for Mr. Sailer. Make sure you mark it down on your scorecard.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  104. In California, everybody wants California to remain exactly the way it was on the day he arrived.

    Then why are Californians always shaming people who live in colder climates into moving there?

  105. Alden says:
    @Colin Wright

    Never heard of them in 27 years in San Francisco County Criminal Courts.

  106. Alden says:
    @Clifford Brown

    I’m very aware of the San Francisco Tongs and have posted about them. Neither Chinese nor Hispanics are Italian. Hispanics are mostly based in Salinas Watsonville

  107. Alden says:
    @indocon

    There’s a Mosque in St Louis Obispo. The university seems the only university in California that’s mostly White.

  108. @SunBakedSuburb

    Oddly enough, in 1966, Lee Marvin starred in the excellent, less-bloody The Professionals.

  109. @Dave Pinsen

    a right-leaning Latino pol running on an anti-woke, pro-environmental, pro-worker, restrictionist platform.

    No such person exists. In particular, a pro-environment Latino? A SWPL fantasy.

    • Replies: @danand
  110. @Corvinus

    Now now, little one, stop hyperventilating so much, you’ll give yourself a heart attack!

  111. Anonymous[160] • Disclaimer says:
    @Malcolm X-Lax

    That sounds passive-aggressive. I’m not sure it’s something his son would have liked to hear.

    It reminds me of my grandmother, who would sometimes praise people for not bothering her with phonecalls and visits.

  112. danand says:
    @eah

    Eah,

    I’ve always found it, for lack of a better term, “odd” that Germany, holding its place as the most productive of the large european nations, is still so ”poor“ relative to the US.

    GDP by country 2019

  113. danand says:
    @David Davenport

    David, maybe Dave is right? Maybe somebody from the Eastside.

    Maybe Halsey, she’s a populists. Opps, my bad, she’s popular, and obviously talented too.

  114. @Steve Sailer

    Some of my relations were at school (the Cate School) with various of the Hollisters. I think they’ve mostly sold up by now. I later knew well a man who was the heir of the Santa Barbara Ranch itself: the combined total of his family’s holdings ultimately reached over half a million acres.
    I don’t see at all why anyone should begrudge these people their ranches: they run them superbly, and keep an entire section of the most beautiful coast-line on earth unspoilt.

    Long may it continue, and long may the scruffy time-wasting surfers be kept in their place, which should be confined to Malibu and places south.

  115. @indocon

    I always stop in or near San Luis Obispo on my way north or south from Pebble Beach to Holmby Hills

    But it too has changed: the fine second hand bookshops are mostly gone, and replaced by shoe and dress shops: all the usual effluvia of the mindless products of our useless, indeed actively pernicious, educational system. But, yes, at least the kids are white. Clean-cut too, at least in comparison to most other places.
    But travel just a few miles either way, or inland, and the old California spreads itself luxuriously before one’s admiring and nostalgic gaze.

  116. @SunBakedSuburb

    “He is also a vampire”.

    Please elaborate.

    • Replies: @danand
  117. danand says:
    @Old Palo Altan

    ““He is also a vampire”.”

    Old Palo Altan, perhaps SunBakedSurburb is refering Gavin Newsom’s affinity for “vampire facial treatments”. Governor Newsom’s office put out an advisory/warning concerning a vampire treatment spa located in Albuquerque, New Mexico a while back: some of the clients may have been exposed to HIV. Good chance Newsom was aware of the spa as a result of his dealings/connections with that world?

    “The blood is then centrifuged, meaning it’s processed in a centrifuge machine where it’s spun around real fast,” said Dr. Ehsan Ali, a board-certified internal medicine physician known as the Beverly Hills Concierge Doctor.
    Next, “the plasma is then extracted. The plasma is what has all the nutrients, the growth factors, and the protein that helps stimulate new skin, new collagen, and that’s essentially what’s providing all the benefit,” he said.
    The plasma is then layered on top of the face and re-injected into the skin using a tool called a micro-needling pen, which creates tiny punctures in the skin with miniature fine needles.

    Ali, who was not involved in the New Mexico case, said that if the micro-needling pen or any other equipment is not properly disposed of or sterilized between facials, that could expose patients to potential blood-borne infections, as what was seen in New Mexico. That could occur if micro-needling tips or syringes were reused, or if another patient’s blood was used to perform the facial, for instance.
    If interested in a vampire facial, Ali advised that patients make sure they see practitioners opening new syringes to draw blood, as well as changing the micro-needling pen before performing the procedure.

    I any event, I’d say there’s a good chance in a decade or so America/Twitter will follow a president Newsom. He deserves it, he’s had to overcome a lot:

    “Newsom attended third through fifth grades at Notre Dame des Victoires, where he was placed in remedial reading classes. His dyslexia has made it difficult for him to write, spell, read and work with numbers.”

    Not to mention having to come up and under the 3 suit change per day, boogie nightin’, San Francisco original treat, Super Slick – Willie Brown. Willie loved those young lookers like Gavin & Kamela, and they gave him some lovin’ back.

    boys together

    Kamey

    “”Newsom’s first political experience came when he volunteered for Willie Brown’s successful campaign for mayor in 1995. Newsom hosted a private fundraiser at his PlumpJack Café.[11] In 1996, Brown appointed Newsom to a vacant seat on the Parking and Traffic Commission, and he was later elected president of the commission. In 1997, Brown appointed him to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors seat vacated by Kevin Shelley. At the time, he became the youngest member of San Francisco’s board of supervisors and also, like Shelley before him, the board’s only white heterosexual male.

  118. Thank you very much (truly), but somehow I feel that’s more than I needed to know.

  119. I take it then that Californians are an updated version of character Tancredi from the film The Leopard. Instead of

    “If we want things to stay as they are, things will have to change.”

    they say

    “If we want things to stay as they are, REGULATIONS will have to change.”

  120. @El Dato

    Correlated with the fall of the Soviet Union and the moment when certain Israeli realized the US could do the heavy lifting in the Middle East.

    Early 1990s were about the time the Democratic Party and its constituencies sort of branched off and formed an entity completely separate from the United States. _Minority Party_ was an attempt to stop that.

    Counterinsurgency

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