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Whose Rock Star RIP Post Would Get the Most Comments? Sir Mick or Sir Paul?
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So far, I’ve gotten 422 comments on my post entitled “Ric Ocasek, RIP” about the frontman of the late 1970s band The Cars.

An anonymous commenter writes:

This post must be good for at least another fifty comments. Even if they aren’t related to The Cars or supermodels or even Rolex watches please keep them coming.

I’m thinking Paul Walker fiery death numbers of comments. R.I.P.

Man, I should have done an “Eddie Money, RIP” post. I saw Eddie in Houston in 1978. He was good.

In the unlikely event that I outlive him, my post entitled “Sir Mick Jagger, RIP” will get 2,000 comments.

Whose RIP post would get the most comments?

Sir Mick or Sir Paul?

Mick or Keith?

Jimmy or Robert?

Bob or Bruce? (“Bob” can be either Dylan or Seger or Geldof or Mould depending upon your taste.)

Debbie or Chrissie?

 
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  1. Everybody knows knows that the real Paul McCartney died in 1966, LOL! There are hundreds of web pages and YouTube videos supporting the theory that Paul was replaced by a doppelganger after in death, dubbed “Faul”, by the true believers.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    And we all know that Keith Richards continues to perform as a dead person, and we love him for that.

    http://betrending.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/3-4.jpg
    , @Mister.Baseball
    The iamaphoney conspiracy is a real hoot

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-SbryPixG9M

    It's mostly died out, but there were a period of years where this guy single-handedly brought back the "Paul is Dead" conspiracy, at least for the internet age.

    There has long been a rumor that Sir Paul has been behind the whole thing as a lark. Or at least blessed it and let the late Neil Aspinall run it through Standby films, owned by Apple Corps [the Beatles version] in which he was an executive until shortly before his passing.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    See, BB, now this is how these rumors get started! I suppose that the last 80,000 posts under iSteve were written by an imposter ever since that defective version of Safari interpreted the HTML backwards and showed "Steve is dead", right?
    , @Anonymous
    There was 'Paul is Dead' and 'Elvis is Alive'.

    Could the 60s thing happened if internet existed back then?

    Maybe everyone would have stayed home to watch it online than go to Woodstock.

    Biggest death news back then would have been Brian Jones, Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, and Jimi Hendrix.

    Best career move for rockers is to die at their peak or just before their artistic decline.

    If they die at the peak, people ponder what-might-have-been had they lived longer.
    If they die before the sure decline, people don't get tired of them.

    Stones would have done best to die in a plane crash after Exile on Main Street, maybe their peak. Or after Tattoo You, the last output when they still mattered as a force in music.



    https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/nik-cohn-i-was-right-the-stones-after-the-age-of-30-didn-t-create-anything-good-1.2505387
    , @Reg Cæsar
    Paul didn't die, just his taste.
  2. I still laugh when I think of a Carlin show where just blurted out–from absolutely no transition and with no follow up–“Ya know, the wrong two Beatles died first.”

    • Replies: @Prester John
    Somewhere G. Harrison is smiling while thinking "Yoko should have gone with 'em."
  3. Paul over Mick. Mick over Keith. Jimmy over Robert (although might should be Robert, god knows he did a good job staying active compared to Jimmy). Bob over Bruce.

    And all I know is Debbie deserves more attention.

    • Replies: @Magic Dirt Resident
    Agree with all of that. Jimmy vs Eric Clapton would be a close one too, I bet.
  4. @BB753
    Everybody knows knows that the real Paul McCartney died in 1966, LOL! There are hundreds of web pages and YouTube videos supporting the theory that Paul was replaced by a doppelganger after in death, dubbed "Faul", by the true believers.

    https://youtu.be/I8D0NdHkH8g

    And we all know that Keith Richards continues to perform as a dead person, and we love him for that.

    • LOL: BB753, Old Prude
  5. Everyone should stop talking about these hideous rock and roll degenerates and watch this ‘Country Music’ docu series.

    Skip the first episode or at least fast forward through it. There’s some interesting stuff in it, but Burns has to insert the usual bullcrap about how blacks don’t get enough credit for country music blah blah blah.

    The second episode was great, though, and I suspect the rest will all be quite good.

    • Replies: @poolside

    There’s some interesting stuff in it, but Burns has to insert the usual bullcrap
     
    I know Burns loves jazz, but still ... Wynton Marsalis gets three quotes in the first two episodes, and every 10 minutes or so Louis Armstrong or Charlie Parker is mentioned?

    Did Burns interview Alan Jackson or Waylon Jennings for his jazz documentary?
    , @Anonymous

    There’s some interesting stuff in it, but Burns has to insert the usual bullcrap about how blacks don’t get enough credit for country music blah blah blah.
     
    I once read an article about Faith Hill in which she claimed she was influenced by black music (I can’t remember how she phrased it - perhaps she said influenced by Motown). When I read that I immediately wondered if popular musicians were required by their music companies to say they were influenced by black musicians, regardless of whether or not they actually were.
    , @bruce county
    Burns is a cuck... good film maker tho...I don't know where America would be with out the magical negro. Is there anything they havent invented or done. I love the great beautification plan they have for Baltimore and Detroit.
    We owe them so soo much.
    , @Alfa158
    All the episodes spend about 1/3 of the content on the contributions of Black music to Country. There actually was a lot of cross-pollination, but curiously, or maybe not so curiously, there is no mention of the reciprocal being at least as true.
    It may be pretty subjective, but judge for yourself and listen to the musical structure and instruments developed by Europeans, and those developed by Africans, then compare them to the music of African-Americans. There would have been no Jazz or Blues as we know them without the European contribution. Good luck waiting for a documentary that will point that out.
    , @Old Prude
    Music should be listened to, or played. Even talking (or posting iSteve comments) about it with knowledgeable and passionate people is worthwhile. Watching a PBS documentary about it seems very far down the list of activities that would improve your appreciation of a genre with which one is deeply familiar. I intend to skip the Burns production.

    (FWIW, I have had a number of people tell me about watching the Burns Vietnam show, and their observations and thoughts were so cringe-worthy in ignorance and simple-mindedness that it made me think his production was just polished propaganda).
    , @James Braxton
    I had to quit watching halfway through the first episode. It could have been called "Country Music: It's a black thing. You wouldn't understand."

    Also, I am sick of always hearing how the banjo came from Africa.

    When the fiddle came from Europe, it was the same fiddle we play today. The "banjo" from Africa was a dried out gourd which bore little resemblance in sound or appearance to the modern banjo. Give me a break.
    , @obwandiyag
    Typical Unz asshole. Has to bring in the "blacks are inferior" thing at every juncture.

    You know nothing about "country" music or any other music, you total ignoramus.
    , @Morris Applebaum IV
    Burns is a great filmmaker, but his extreme left wing bias is agonizing (thank God he did the Civil War in the 80s or it would be much worse and wouldn't include Shelby Foote).

    Furthermore, he knows very little about his subject matter. The more you know about a subject, the more frustrating his documentaries are. I'm still wondering if anyone has informed him about this guy named Mike Schmidt. I'm pretty sure if I made a documentary about basket weaving, I'd at least try to figure out who the best basket weaver of each decade was.

    Ken Burns has a brilliant ear for music, which is so crucial in making a good film.
  6. I was going to say: Paul is alive, it’s Keef who’s dead…

  7. Nipsey Hustle.

    • LOL: mmack
    • Replies: @snorlax
    Tay-Tay
  8. Keith Richards is alive?

    • Replies: @Jim bob Lassiter
    Yep. He's currently taking bids on his corpse from medical schools.
    , @Kylie
    Reanimated.
  9. @TWS
    Keith Richards is alive?

    Yep. He’s currently taking bids on his corpse from medical schools.

  10. Ric Ocasek and Eddie Money were hit machines but let’s be real, they made bubble gum music for 17 year olds to hit beach balls around to. It’s not like they were Billy Corgan, Kevin Shields, or Jeff Tweedy or anything.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    "It's not like they were Billy Corgan, Kevin Shields, or Jeff Tweedy or anything."

    Rock turned doomy and gloomy in the grungy 90s. The Cars were one of those bands of my 80s youth; they will always be on the playlist. 80s rock was more inventive and fun than that which followed in 90s. I like 90s stuff too: the doomiest and gloomiest of the Seattle bands Alice and Chains being my favorite.
    , @rickv404
    "It’s not like they were Billy Corgan, Kevin Shields, or Jeff Tweedy or anything."

    No, they were bigger, because their names are widely known. Who knows these three you named except those that consider Rock or Pop music art, which is very few.
  11. Speaking of Altamont (Steve’s clip) my sister was there. She and her friends were not near the stage and had no idea that a Hell’s Angel stabbed and killed somebody. Probably hardly anybody in the audience knew.

    She whined and complained so much about moving away from California the year before that my father flew her back to be with her friends that 1969 summer. She was all of 16, spoiled, and had already given birth to a girl who was adopted and is now my 51-year-old niece somewhere now if still living.

    Just another boomer story for the kids here.

    • Replies: @Jack CLT
    Steve has yet to expound on his musings on Vatican II and the massive "changes" in the West since the 60's.

    Altamont, Woodstock etc, were what the old true Catholic Church would have condemned as occasions of sin, and absolutely forbidden to attend. The giant rock festivals and concerts were essentially black masses.

    By the later 60's, not a peep from the prelates.
  12. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Everyone should stop talking about these hideous rock and roll degenerates and watch this 'Country Music' docu series.

    Skip the first episode or at least fast forward through it. There's some interesting stuff in it, but Burns has to insert the usual bullcrap about how blacks don't get enough credit for country music blah blah blah.

    The second episode was great, though, and I suspect the rest will all be quite good.

    There’s some interesting stuff in it, but Burns has to insert the usual bullcrap

    I know Burns loves jazz, but still … Wynton Marsalis gets three quotes in the first two episodes, and every 10 minutes or so Louis Armstrong or Charlie Parker is mentioned?

    Did Burns interview Alan Jackson or Waylon Jennings for his jazz documentary?

    • Agree: bruce county
  13. @BB753
    Everybody knows knows that the real Paul McCartney died in 1966, LOL! There are hundreds of web pages and YouTube videos supporting the theory that Paul was replaced by a doppelganger after in death, dubbed "Faul", by the true believers.

    https://youtu.be/I8D0NdHkH8g

    The iamaphoney conspiracy is a real hoot

    It’s mostly died out, but there were a period of years where this guy single-handedly brought back the “Paul is Dead” conspiracy, at least for the internet age.

    There has long been a rumor that Sir Paul has been behind the whole thing as a lark. Or at least blessed it and let the late Neil Aspinall run it through Standby films, owned by Apple Corps [the Beatles version] in which he was an executive until shortly before his passing.

  14. How do you keep remembering all of the stuff you mention? You saw X in Houston in 1978. I can barely remember my pre-HS classmates, let alone specific incidents. Is it an age thing, where being older means less brain plasticity but better recall? Or maybe I am just dumb. My technical memory seems fine, but the stuff of anecdotes and memories is where I fail.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    In his eighties, my father told me he was remembering things he had forgotten long before. I half-seriously worried that he would remember awful things I had said or done as an angry young man. If he did, he never let on.

    People have different kinds of memories. I can recall all kinds of specific events from as long as half a century ago, with almost movie-like imagery and sound. Interspersed are voids. I've forgotten the names of half the women I dated, but I can picture them all.
    , @MEH 0910

    How do you keep remembering all of the stuff you mention? You saw X in Houston in 1978.
     
    https://www.amazon.com/Press-Photo-Houstons-University-College/dp/B07QX2G6HM

    1979 Press Photo Houston's Rice University team on College Bowl Quiz radio show

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/615klJgWGcL._SL1000_.jpg
    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51UnKFL-odL._SL1000_.jpg
  15. Paul of Amaganssett…….

    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    Although Paul of Amagansett’s melodies were most substandard to the most BEAUTIFULL melody of all time....which is:WHITE POWER!!!!....by the late...great English Composer Ian Stuart Donaldson, founder of the Pop Band SKREWDRIVER!!!!!!!!....
    , @Bugg
    Dear friend of mine who became a Wall St BSD was neighbors with Sir Paul for several years in Amagansett. He socialized with him occasionally, and found him to be a very decent guy and a good neighbor.
  16. @BB753
    Everybody knows knows that the real Paul McCartney died in 1966, LOL! There are hundreds of web pages and YouTube videos supporting the theory that Paul was replaced by a doppelganger after in death, dubbed "Faul", by the true believers.

    https://youtu.be/I8D0NdHkH8g

    See, BB, now this is how these rumors get started! I suppose that the last 80,000 posts under iSteve were written by an imposter ever since that defective version of Safari interpreted the HTML backwards and showed “Steve is dead”, right?

  17. @War for Blair Mountain
    Paul of Amaganssett.......

    Although Paul of Amagansett’s melodies were most substandard to the most BEAUTIFULL melody of all time….which is:WHITE POWER!!!!….by the late…great English Composer Ian Stuart Donaldson, founder of the Pop Band SKREWDRIVER!!!!!!!!….

    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    Ian Stuart

    WE MISS YOU COMRADE

    RIP

    Paul...John...George....Ringo....did a circle jerk together in 1963...yelling out Gina Lollabrigida....girly boy degenerates ....

    Ian.....you fought for OUR PEOPLE.....”We Miss You Comrade” crushes “Let it be”

    True story:A few years ago Sir Paul was riding his bike downtown Amaganssett...his son James McCartney riding a bike next to him....here is what I can report from a visual inspection:Sir Paul’s son James looks like a short, balding, fat bastard....Paul and Linda produced a subhuman mutant....was it the chromatin rearranging effects of ingesting LSD?
  18. • Replies: @Known Fact
    "Arwa Mahdawi is a Palestinian/British writer and brand strategist based in New York. She writes about pop culture, marketing, race, technology, and women's issues." And Ivanka's hair.

    At least she's fairly attractive for an op-ed harpy. She has nice hair but apparently harbors some resentment based on other factors

    , @BB753
    Very simple explanation: Ivanka is pushing forty and few women look good with long hair past 35 years old.
    , @R.G. Camara
    These corporate media folks have tinfoil-hat conspiracy theorizing disease. Historians will read these bizarre newspaper stories and watch these insane CNN/MSNBC pundit shows and wonder how such madness became so universal in the press.

    These people either need to get on some meds or get off the meds they're already on. Or stop mixing them with alcohol.
  19. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:
    @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Everyone should stop talking about these hideous rock and roll degenerates and watch this 'Country Music' docu series.

    Skip the first episode or at least fast forward through it. There's some interesting stuff in it, but Burns has to insert the usual bullcrap about how blacks don't get enough credit for country music blah blah blah.

    The second episode was great, though, and I suspect the rest will all be quite good.

    There’s some interesting stuff in it, but Burns has to insert the usual bullcrap about how blacks don’t get enough credit for country music blah blah blah.

    I once read an article about Faith Hill in which she claimed she was influenced by black music (I can’t remember how she phrased it – perhaps she said influenced by Motown). When I read that I immediately wondered if popular musicians were required by their music companies to say they were influenced by black musicians, regardless of whether or not they actually were.

  20. Seger over Springsteen. Mainly too many of my fellow Gen-Xers posting, “He wasn’t as bad as I thought.”

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    I never had a bad thought about Seger. When Springsteen started mouthing off about politics I took my entire Springsteen CD collection to Strawberry's and donated the $ to the RNC. Haven't listened to the man since.

    When he started putting overt politics in his songs, starting with the album Ghost of Tom Joad, it was ham-handed and the songs were absurdly bad. Rodney Crowell has gone down the same path, from a craftsman to a crappy scold writing laughably silly lyrics to mediocre music.
  21. @War for Blair Mountain
    Although Paul of Amagansett’s melodies were most substandard to the most BEAUTIFULL melody of all time....which is:WHITE POWER!!!!....by the late...great English Composer Ian Stuart Donaldson, founder of the Pop Band SKREWDRIVER!!!!!!!!....

    Ian Stuart

    WE MISS YOU COMRADE

    RIP

    Paul…John…George….Ringo….did a circle jerk together in 1963…yelling out Gina Lollabrigida….girly boy degenerates ….

    Ian…..you fought for OUR PEOPLE…..”We Miss You Comrade” crushes “Let it be”

    True story:A few years ago Sir Paul was riding his bike downtown Amaganssett…his son James McCartney riding a bike next to him….here is what I can report from a visual inspection:Sir Paul’s son James looks like a short, balding, fat bastard….Paul and Linda produced a subhuman mutant….was it the chromatin rearranging effects of ingesting LSD?

    • Replies: @simple_pseudonymic_handle

    Sir Paul’s son James looks like a short, balding, fat bastard
     
    Being born with that much is a horrible handicap. > 99% of human excellence directly comes out of motivation and effort. The traditional British workaround is they send them to boarding school where the older boys bugger 'em. Even that is still a crapshoot. What happens if they enjoy it?
  22. Mick over Paul, but parallel world where internet arrived 30 years sooner John’s post would have beat them all.

    Savvy Steve readers know that McCartney is a pioneering soft rock impresario (I am damning him here with fai t praise) but the Stones were the real deal rock and roll band.

  23. The amazing, wonderful Angus Young. The most non-degenerate star of all.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Best member of that band died long ago.
  24. @Anonymous
    I still laugh when I think of a Carlin show where just blurted out--from absolutely no transition and with no follow up--"Ya know, the wrong two Beatles died first."

    Somewhere G. Harrison is smiling while thinking “Yoko should have gone with ’em.”

  25. @snorlax
    Let's talk about Ivanka Trump's hair! https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/sep/18/why-ivanka-trumps-new-haircut-should-make-us-very-afraid

    “Arwa Mahdawi is a Palestinian/British writer and brand strategist based in New York. She writes about pop culture, marketing, race, technology, and women’s issues.” And Ivanka’s hair.

    At least she’s fairly attractive for an op-ed harpy. She has nice hair but apparently harbors some resentment based on other factors

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    “Arwa Mahdawi is a Palestinian/British writer and brand strategist based in New York. "

    And she mostly writes just how you'd expect, although she keeps well away from the third rail which a Palestinian might be particularly tempted to poke.

    Occasionally she writes about something iSteveish, or perhaps Dalrockian.

    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/commentisfree/2019/sep/11/marriage-women-earnings-income-feminism

    " The fact women are struggling to find suitable husbands has caused glee in conservative circles. US shock-jock Rush Limbaugh says this story shows feminism has come back to bite women “in the butt”. “They’re earning money, but they still have the same attitude about marriage,” he crowed.

    I hate to say this, but Limbaugh does have a very tiny point. I’m struck by how many empowered women regress to the 1950s when it comes to marriage. They fight for equality at work, but still have traditional expectations when it comes to men proposing with expensive diamond rings. "
     
    Back on topic, what's with the Debbie Harry fetish? She's just not in the same musical league as Big Miss Muffett, and unless there's a lot I don't know about her (quite possible), her life's not been anywhere near as interesting (in the Chinese curse sense).
    , @SFG
    You know, this is a huge blindspot the older generation of right-wing guys has. They are way too susceptible to a pretty face. Remember Sarah Palin?

    There are quite a few feminists who are physically attractive, and they are no less hateful for it.
  26. Manson? Polanski? Brian Wilson?

  27. Dylan by a mile.

    McCartney was once super-talented but never interesting as personality like Lennon.

    Mick is more interesting as personality but mainly as playboy charmer.

    Brian Wilson is more interesting but his steep decline since 67 makes it all seem so sad.

    • Replies: @Steve in Greensboro
    You are right. The only musician of those Steve listed that had any lasting impact on music is of course Bob Dylan. His music was worth it, and his promotion of The Band both count for a lot.

    (I didn't see Brian Wilson's name in Steve's list. He was a giant as well.)
    , @Robert Dolan
    Dylan sucks. I saw him in concert a few years ago and it was a waste of money. The concert was simply noise. You couldn't hear anything he said. Just pure noise.

    Most of the rockers are cucks. Morons. Globalist tools. That includes Mick and Paul, Bono, etc.

    They are just like movie stars and they are owned just like movie stars.

    Their political views reflect the views of the hostile elite they serve.
  28. All possible Paul RIP comments were made in 1966.

  29. Bob or Bruce? (“Bob” can be either Dylan or Seger or Geldof or Mould depending upon your taste.)

    So many Bobs and Billys in the R&R world, but where are the Dicks? The all went Rick or, heaven help us, “Ric”.

    • Replies: @Lot
    “but where are the Dicks?”

    Dick Dale died in March this year.
  30. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Everyone should stop talking about these hideous rock and roll degenerates and watch this 'Country Music' docu series.

    Skip the first episode or at least fast forward through it. There's some interesting stuff in it, but Burns has to insert the usual bullcrap about how blacks don't get enough credit for country music blah blah blah.

    The second episode was great, though, and I suspect the rest will all be quite good.

    Burns is a cuck… good film maker tho…I don’t know where America would be with out the magical negro. Is there anything they havent invented or done. I love the great beautification plan they have for Baltimore and Detroit.
    We owe them so soo much.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  31. “Sir Mick or Sir Paul?”

    I vote for Sir Pork of Loin.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    Nice Bugs Bunny reference! Also "Sir Ohsis of Liver".
  32. (((Bob))) gets the biggest RIP thread, and it wouldn’t even be close.

    People with strong negative feelings about the Beatles/Stones are mostly older than them and will be mostly dead or too old and tired to keep a RIP thread going. Younger people have no view, or are just mildly positive.

    Sir Elton or Billy Joel would be more controversial than than Beatles: conservative (for the times) music from a fabulous gay and another Jew.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    Billy Joel and Elton John did a joint concert at the Sydney Cricket Grounds circa 1998/1999 (I can't remember exactly). They may have done others, I'm not sure. I was in town for business and one of my clients invited me to go.

    I'm far from an expert on music, but even to my untrained ears Elton John was orders of magnitude better than Joel, particularly as a pianist. They each did a couple of the other's songs: Elton did Elton's songs better than Billy Joel did, and he did Billy Joel's songs better than Billy Joel did. Piano Man by Elton John is way better than any other version I've heard!

    I remember wondering if Joel was in any way embarrassed by it.
    , @donut
    No way man , not if you're just counting words or comment's . They're celebrities . An actor will get the no. one spot . But if you want to limit it to musicians it'll be Michael Jackson .
    , @R.G. Camara
    Elton played Rush Limbaugh's last wedding only a few years ago. Despite his degenerative sexual behavior and silly stage outfits, on the whole I think he's quite old fashioned on the rest. He's patriotic to the U.K. and his music can be enjoyed by straights without any hint of the gay. He strikes me as a Noel Coward kind of gay, just with a Liberace stage flair.
    , @donut
    Sorry Lot if it's just Steve's thing you're still wrong I think but probably close . I asked a couple of friends of mine to give me their Top Ten list of the 60's . You try it's impossible .
  33. Everyone should boycott this thread to motivate Steve to stay away from such obvious clickbait.

  34. @Reg Cæsar

    Bob or Bruce? (“Bob” can be either Dylan or Seger or Geldof or Mould depending upon your taste.)
     
    So many Bobs and Billys in the R&R world, but where are the Dicks? The all went Rick or, heaven help us, "Ric".

    “but where are the Dicks?”

    Dick Dale died in March this year.

  35. @snorlax
    Let's talk about Ivanka Trump's hair! https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/sep/18/why-ivanka-trumps-new-haircut-should-make-us-very-afraid

    Very simple explanation: Ivanka is pushing forty and few women look good with long hair past 35 years old.

    • Replies: @Alden
    Exactly right. Anne Coulter’s pushing 60 and still has long hair. Also lives with a black man and approves of affirmative action.
  36. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Everyone should stop talking about these hideous rock and roll degenerates and watch this 'Country Music' docu series.

    Skip the first episode or at least fast forward through it. There's some interesting stuff in it, but Burns has to insert the usual bullcrap about how blacks don't get enough credit for country music blah blah blah.

    The second episode was great, though, and I suspect the rest will all be quite good.

    All the episodes spend about 1/3 of the content on the contributions of Black music to Country. There actually was a lot of cross-pollination, but curiously, or maybe not so curiously, there is no mention of the reciprocal being at least as true.
    It may be pretty subjective, but judge for yourself and listen to the musical structure and instruments developed by Europeans, and those developed by Africans, then compare them to the music of African-Americans. There would have been no Jazz or Blues as we know them without the European contribution. Good luck waiting for a documentary that will point that out.

    • Agree: bruce county
    • Replies: @Mr. Grey
    Ken Burns and everyone else seems to adhere to the one-drop rule in music. I grudgingly admit I enjoyed the 1st episode of the Country documentary and there were black people who were involved, the first star of the Grand Ol' Opry was black. But the black community as a whole gets a lot more credit here than European influences get credit in jazz. Notice how the banjo is continually mentioned as an African instrument. When it comes to discussing Blues music nobody ever goes on about the guitar being a European instrument and the European roots of Blues music.
    , @Old Prude
    The only black contribution to country music I am aware of is Charlie Pride.

    After Obama took office I got a glimpse of the CMA awards at it was pretty obvious they wanted to try to make Country Music more diverse. They've managed to crap up modern Country so much that its the next logical step.
    , @R.G. Camara
    Jimmy Rodgers, who is literally the singer who started country music, had a big influence on black jazz/blues folk in his day. Howlin' Wolf Burnett and Muddy Waters owe a lot to him, as is documented.

    But the commie narrative of "blacks are super-creative, whites are boring and bland" is a lie they will push forever.
    , @Curmudgeon

    listen to the musical structure and instruments developed by Europeans,
     
    I find it interesting that the Asians, particularly the Chinese and Japanese, generally acknowledge that European music and it instruments are the apex of the music development, yet there is a European fascination with the "contributions" of Africans on European/American music.
    I recall being at a friend's place, in the late 60s, watching a variety TV show when a Black Gospel Choir was singing and shaking. My friend's father, who was born in England, said matter-of-factly, "There is something very primitive there."
    Rock and Roll, no doubt, has been influenced by Blacks, and with it the notion that "Blacks have rythm". However, a music teacher pointed out that it is not rythm, it is beat. A jig has rythm, as do waltzs, polkas, sea shanties, and all European music in general. Asian music has some rythm, but African and American Indian music is beat. Country music is not beat, it is rythm.
  37. @Romanian
    How do you keep remembering all of the stuff you mention? You saw X in Houston in 1978. I can barely remember my pre-HS classmates, let alone specific incidents. Is it an age thing, where being older means less brain plasticity but better recall? Or maybe I am just dumb. My technical memory seems fine, but the stuff of anecdotes and memories is where I fail.

    In his eighties, my father told me he was remembering things he had forgotten long before. I half-seriously worried that he would remember awful things I had said or done as an angry young man. If he did, he never let on.

    People have different kinds of memories. I can recall all kinds of specific events from as long as half a century ago, with almost movie-like imagery and sound. Interspersed are voids. I’ve forgotten the names of half the women I dated, but I can picture them all.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    Thanks for the response. Maybe I will be lucky enough to live long enough to see for myself. Also, very subtle humblebrag ;)
  38. @Lot
    (((Bob))) gets the biggest RIP thread, and it wouldn’t even be close.

    People with strong negative feelings about the Beatles/Stones are mostly older than them and will be mostly dead or too old and tired to keep a RIP thread going. Younger people have no view, or are just mildly positive.

    Sir Elton or Billy Joel would be more controversial than than Beatles: conservative (for the times) music from a fabulous gay and another Jew.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxEPV4kolz0

    Billy Joel and Elton John did a joint concert at the Sydney Cricket Grounds circa 1998/1999 (I can’t remember exactly). They may have done others, I’m not sure. I was in town for business and one of my clients invited me to go.

    I’m far from an expert on music, but even to my untrained ears Elton John was orders of magnitude better than Joel, particularly as a pianist. They each did a couple of the other’s songs: Elton did Elton’s songs better than Billy Joel did, and he did Billy Joel’s songs better than Billy Joel did. Piano Man by Elton John is way better than any other version I’ve heard!

    I remember wondering if Joel was in any way embarrassed by it.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    Billy and Elton did eight tours together from 1994 to 2010, although only once did they make it down to Australia. They played Sydney in March 1998.
    , @Old Prude
    Joel is probably pretty comfortable knowing he is more than twice the man Elton is.
    , @R.G. Camara
    Elton and Joel have toured together many times. They grew friendly for a bit, then became estranged.

    Joel has said that while he was touring with Elton that his (e.e. Joel's) alcoholism got really bad, and Joel even interrupted several joint concerts with his mayhem, pissing off Elton. One night Joel got so drunk he was just nonsensically shouting the names of Civil War battles while they were playing e.g.: "Antietam! Bull Run!"

    So its possible Elton is just better than Joel, but its also possible you saw Joel at his alcoholic worst, hence his subpar play.

    , @Father O'Hara
    I'd guess yes.
  39. @RichardTaylor
    Paul over Mick. Mick over Keith. Jimmy over Robert (although might should be Robert, god knows he did a good job staying active compared to Jimmy). Bob over Bruce.

    And all I know is Debbie deserves more attention.

    Agree with all of that. Jimmy vs Eric Clapton would be a close one too, I bet.

  40. @Buzz Mohawk
    In his eighties, my father told me he was remembering things he had forgotten long before. I half-seriously worried that he would remember awful things I had said or done as an angry young man. If he did, he never let on.

    People have different kinds of memories. I can recall all kinds of specific events from as long as half a century ago, with almost movie-like imagery and sound. Interspersed are voids. I've forgotten the names of half the women I dated, but I can picture them all.

    Thanks for the response. Maybe I will be lucky enough to live long enough to see for myself. Also, very subtle humblebrag 😉

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
  41. @Alfa158
    All the episodes spend about 1/3 of the content on the contributions of Black music to Country. There actually was a lot of cross-pollination, but curiously, or maybe not so curiously, there is no mention of the reciprocal being at least as true.
    It may be pretty subjective, but judge for yourself and listen to the musical structure and instruments developed by Europeans, and those developed by Africans, then compare them to the music of African-Americans. There would have been no Jazz or Blues as we know them without the European contribution. Good luck waiting for a documentary that will point that out.

    Ken Burns and everyone else seems to adhere to the one-drop rule in music. I grudgingly admit I enjoyed the 1st episode of the Country documentary and there were black people who were involved, the first star of the Grand Ol’ Opry was black. But the black community as a whole gets a lot more credit here than European influences get credit in jazz. Notice how the banjo is continually mentioned as an African instrument. When it comes to discussing Blues music nobody ever goes on about the guitar being a European instrument and the European roots of Blues music.

    • Replies: @Bugg
    Burns' whole MO, be it country or rock music or the Central Park Five or baseball or Vietnam is whitey is screwing the poor downtrodden black man. And without black people the country would be without a soul. Knowing a great deal about the Central Park Five "professionally", he left half the story, that is, anything having to do with the great work of NYPD, on the cutting room floor. Anything he produces is suspect propaganda. In his rock n roll show, it kept coming back to the wonders of black people, on not Jimmie Hendrix, but the "bluesmen" nonsense. Yes, the now wrinkly British guitar guys were influenced by the blues, but guitar rock so far exceeds that starting point it's beyond ridiculous.Half think Clapton and his ilk wax poetic about "the blues" not because it's true, but because it's good for business. Bring BB King on tour with you and fill his retirement fund and you're a good guy.

    Pop music since the 1950s evolved into 2 different genres, one mostly white and one mostly black. When they come together, it's mostly marketing. Burns presented the Beastie Boys as some kind of watershed. In reality they were a failed punk band who, with Rick Rubin, figured out how to mass market rap to white suburbanite teens.
    , @Alden
    Burns is just another anti White liberal. There’s some hour long things on video about the father of the Carter family and his collections of what he called old timey music Not a word or sight of a black.

    just listen to old timey country music and you can hear the Scots and even more Irish roots.

    Get you a copper kettle
    Get you a copper coil
    Get you some new made corn mash
    And never more will you toil
    My Pappy made whiskey
    Grandpappy did too
    We ain’t paid no Whiskey tax
    (Loudly) since 1792
  42. Absolutely has to be Paul McCartney. Sure Paul has done a lot of silly and stupid love songs over the years but he was in the Beatles. The Rolling Stones are a great band but the Beatles exist on another realm. The Stones aren’t even the working class bad boys everyone thinks they are, that’s the Beatles. When you are a lad from Liverpool with no other prospects, you do what you have to to make it to the top. When you are a middle-class business school major you can dress tough and play rough, after of course the Beatles have paved the way for you.

  43. Thanks for including that clip.

    You know, there are thousands of live clips of the Stones out there, most of them from recent years, but the playing/music doesn’t seem nearly as good in these recent clips (anything going back 30 years) as those fifty year old clips. It’s not just that Keith’s playing skills have deteriorated a little (and Ronnie Wood is NO match for the Mick Taylor) it’s the “quality” of the live sound too. Nowadays there is lots of whiz bank technology to project live electric sound in enormous arenas but something has been lost in the development. In the old days, a good portion of the sound amplification was provided by the amplifiers themselves, with the captured sound miked through a relatively rudimentary PA system (and forget about PA’ing all the drums). There was distortion, but there was also grit and fire. Nowadays the entire onstage amplification ensemble just serves as a pre-amp for the PA system, and the amped down stage sound is projected through a very powerful and enormous PA system, and despite all this whiz bang, the sound, though louder, seems more muddled, less clear and lame in comparison. And who wants to hear massively amped up tom-tom drums? Maybe it’s just my ears, but the sound was better in the old days.

    • Replies: @bruce county
    Ahhhh the good ol' days of walls of Altec speakers and horns and stacks of tube amps.. The Dead made it work quite fine.
  44. At the minute mark a Hell’s Angel wearing a coyote or wolf head walks into view. Awesome. Yes, the 60s were cool.

  45. As these deaths of moldy old rock and rollers will be occurring with ever greater frequency, can I suggest we just set up a quarterly Dead Rockers Digest post so we can all have a regular place to vent our sorry ass boomer memories about that time we saw the Moody Blues in Madison Square Garden from the cheap seats?

    BTW, Spotify sends me emails about upcoming concerts in my area based on my play lists. Amazingly, Mott the Hoople is touring. As is Boz Scaggs. Can somebody pass a law making it illegal for anyone to play live rock after the age of 60?

    • LOL: BB753
    • Replies: @Prof. Woland
    I saw Deep Purple play recently. They weren't bad bu Ian Gillian's voice is kaput and Steve Morse is no Ritchie Blackmore. Like to Stones, their bass / drums is pretty solid and I think when a rock band dies, those are the last organs (no pun intended) to go.
  46. @europeasant
    "Sir Mick or Sir Paul?"

    I vote for Sir Pork of Loin.

    Nice Bugs Bunny reference! Also “Sir Ohsis of Liver”.

  47. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Everyone should stop talking about these hideous rock and roll degenerates and watch this 'Country Music' docu series.

    Skip the first episode or at least fast forward through it. There's some interesting stuff in it, but Burns has to insert the usual bullcrap about how blacks don't get enough credit for country music blah blah blah.

    The second episode was great, though, and I suspect the rest will all be quite good.

    Music should be listened to, or played. Even talking (or posting iSteve comments) about it with knowledgeable and passionate people is worthwhile. Watching a PBS documentary about it seems very far down the list of activities that would improve your appreciation of a genre with which one is deeply familiar. I intend to skip the Burns production.

    (FWIW, I have had a number of people tell me about watching the Burns Vietnam show, and their observations and thoughts were so cringe-worthy in ignorance and simple-mindedness that it made me think his production was just polished propaganda).

  48. @William Badwhite
    Billy Joel and Elton John did a joint concert at the Sydney Cricket Grounds circa 1998/1999 (I can't remember exactly). They may have done others, I'm not sure. I was in town for business and one of my clients invited me to go.

    I'm far from an expert on music, but even to my untrained ears Elton John was orders of magnitude better than Joel, particularly as a pianist. They each did a couple of the other's songs: Elton did Elton's songs better than Billy Joel did, and he did Billy Joel's songs better than Billy Joel did. Piano Man by Elton John is way better than any other version I've heard!

    I remember wondering if Joel was in any way embarrassed by it.

    Billy and Elton did eight tours together from 1994 to 2010, although only once did they make it down to Australia. They played Sydney in March 1998.

  49. @Redneck farmer
    Seger over Springsteen. Mainly too many of my fellow Gen-Xers posting, "He wasn't as bad as I thought."

    I never had a bad thought about Seger. When Springsteen started mouthing off about politics I took my entire Springsteen CD collection to Strawberry’s and donated the $ to the RNC. Haven’t listened to the man since.

    When he started putting overt politics in his songs, starting with the album Ghost of Tom Joad, it was ham-handed and the songs were absurdly bad. Rodney Crowell has gone down the same path, from a craftsman to a crappy scold writing laughably silly lyrics to mediocre music.

  50. @Alfa158
    All the episodes spend about 1/3 of the content on the contributions of Black music to Country. There actually was a lot of cross-pollination, but curiously, or maybe not so curiously, there is no mention of the reciprocal being at least as true.
    It may be pretty subjective, but judge for yourself and listen to the musical structure and instruments developed by Europeans, and those developed by Africans, then compare them to the music of African-Americans. There would have been no Jazz or Blues as we know them without the European contribution. Good luck waiting for a documentary that will point that out.

    The only black contribution to country music I am aware of is Charlie Pride.

    After Obama took office I got a glimpse of the CMA awards at it was pretty obvious they wanted to try to make Country Music more diverse. They’ve managed to crap up modern Country so much that its the next logical step.

  51. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Everyone should stop talking about these hideous rock and roll degenerates and watch this 'Country Music' docu series.

    Skip the first episode or at least fast forward through it. There's some interesting stuff in it, but Burns has to insert the usual bullcrap about how blacks don't get enough credit for country music blah blah blah.

    The second episode was great, though, and I suspect the rest will all be quite good.

    I had to quit watching halfway through the first episode. It could have been called “Country Music: It’s a black thing. You wouldn’t understand.”

    Also, I am sick of always hearing how the banjo came from Africa.

    When the fiddle came from Europe, it was the same fiddle we play today. The “banjo” from Africa was a dried out gourd which bore little resemblance in sound or appearance to the modern banjo. Give me a break.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    Roy Clark boasted the banjo was the only instrument made in America because we were the only country that had the nerve. I reckon it was invented in the backwoods with corn liquor involved. Drums are possibly the only instrument of African origin.
    , @Old Prude
    Is there a more cracker-white instrument than the banjo? When I think "guitar", Robert Johnson or Jimi Hendrix, or BB King, or Robert Cray might come to mind. When I think "banjo", Earl Scruggs, Roy Clark, Steve Martin, Bella Fleck, and Deliverance. Nothing darker than a sun tan, if even.
  52. @Alfa158
    All the episodes spend about 1/3 of the content on the contributions of Black music to Country. There actually was a lot of cross-pollination, but curiously, or maybe not so curiously, there is no mention of the reciprocal being at least as true.
    It may be pretty subjective, but judge for yourself and listen to the musical structure and instruments developed by Europeans, and those developed by Africans, then compare them to the music of African-Americans. There would have been no Jazz or Blues as we know them without the European contribution. Good luck waiting for a documentary that will point that out.

    Jimmy Rodgers, who is literally the singer who started country music, had a big influence on black jazz/blues folk in his day. Howlin’ Wolf Burnett and Muddy Waters owe a lot to him, as is documented.

    But the commie narrative of “blacks are super-creative, whites are boring and bland” is a lie they will push forever.

  53. @William Badwhite
    Billy Joel and Elton John did a joint concert at the Sydney Cricket Grounds circa 1998/1999 (I can't remember exactly). They may have done others, I'm not sure. I was in town for business and one of my clients invited me to go.

    I'm far from an expert on music, but even to my untrained ears Elton John was orders of magnitude better than Joel, particularly as a pianist. They each did a couple of the other's songs: Elton did Elton's songs better than Billy Joel did, and he did Billy Joel's songs better than Billy Joel did. Piano Man by Elton John is way better than any other version I've heard!

    I remember wondering if Joel was in any way embarrassed by it.

    Joel is probably pretty comfortable knowing he is more than twice the man Elton is.

  54. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Everyone should stop talking about these hideous rock and roll degenerates and watch this 'Country Music' docu series.

    Skip the first episode or at least fast forward through it. There's some interesting stuff in it, but Burns has to insert the usual bullcrap about how blacks don't get enough credit for country music blah blah blah.

    The second episode was great, though, and I suspect the rest will all be quite good.

    Typical Unz asshole. Has to bring in the “blacks are inferior” thing at every juncture.

    You know nothing about “country” music or any other music, you total ignoramus.

    • Replies: @James Braxton
    Lighten up Francis.
  55. ED BUCK FINALLY ARRESTED
    AUTHORITIES NEEDED SOMEONE ELSE TO DIE SO THEY COULD BE SUPER DUPER EXTRA CERTAIN
    As lefties still defame Kavanaugh for things that never happened and Trump for impossibly grabbing an internal organ (when he was clearly metaphorically describing the reversal of normal expectations), Democrat donors and party functionaries continue to illustrate E. Michael Jones’ argument about leftist ideology proceeding from sexual dysfunction. If being moral means giving up my fetish (and some of that all-important self-expression), then it must be morality itself that is wrong.
    Quibble: I don’t know that Buck fetishizes undocumented pharmaceutical dispensing. It’s a much simpler explanation that Buck harvests marginal, desperate, homeless men, who are all but guaranteed to be addicts, so the drugs are just a payment. But there is unquestionably the same power imbalance seen with Epstein and NXIVM and the secret baby picture folder and screaming Skippy and, for that matter, Touchy Joe.
    The women Trump goes after are stone foxes who would lose nothing by rejecting him with a laugh and they know it. The Democrat’s preference is for something which cannot fight back.
    https://www.breitbart.com/crime/2019/09/18/ed-buck-arrested-drug-fetish-nearly-killed-third-victim/

  56. Sir Paul or Sir Mick? Depends on how they die since they have roughly comparable fame. Any unintended death related to sex, drugs, or falling off a stage while performing would be the most noteworthy way to go.

    Interesting how both developed a persona opposite of who they were. In a complete inversion, Paul posed as the middle class good boy while Mick posed as the working class bad boy. But Mick came from an upper middle class home, earning a degree from the London school of economics while Paul came from a working class back ground, didn’t get a college degree, and nearly burned down his flat in Hamburg when he lit on fire a condom he had nailed to the sitting room wall.

  57. Sir Paul is good for a couple thousand comments on his death and another couple thousand on which of his two deaths is the real death.

    BTW, most people think John Lennon hinted at Sir Paul’s death with the line “Those freaks was right when they said you was dead” in How do you Sleep, but the real clue was the line, “The only thing you’ve done was Yesterday.”

  58. @Romanian
    How do you keep remembering all of the stuff you mention? You saw X in Houston in 1978. I can barely remember my pre-HS classmates, let alone specific incidents. Is it an age thing, where being older means less brain plasticity but better recall? Or maybe I am just dumb. My technical memory seems fine, but the stuff of anecdotes and memories is where I fail.

    How do you keep remembering all of the stuff you mention? You saw X in Houston in 1978.

    https://www.amazon.com/Press-Photo-Houstons-University-College/dp/B07QX2G6HM

    1979 Press Photo Houston’s Rice University team on College Bowl Quiz radio show

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/BvUZijEuNDQ/maxresdefault.jpg
    , @MEH 0910

    Currently unavailable.
     
    Somebody bought the photo.
  59. @War for Blair Mountain
    Paul of Amaganssett.......

    Dear friend of mine who became a Wall St BSD was neighbors with Sir Paul for several years in Amagansett. He socialized with him occasionally, and found him to be a very decent guy and a good neighbor.

    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    That’s what I’ve heard....McCartney likes to take his little sailboat out into the Peconic Bay...I know he has gone to the Lobster Roll with Chevy Chase and Paul Simon....I have never seen him there...

    And now for some War for Blair Mountain name dropping:Night before a big Family Wedding at the Montauk Yacht Club...We went to Steven’s Talkhouse in Amagansett after we were tipped off by the bartender at Gurney’s(pre-wedding Party) that Jimmy Buffet was tunning up for his Concert Tour at Steven’s Talkhouse.....Standing next to me at Steven’s Talkhouse was Paul McCartney......
  60. @Anonymous
    Dylan by a mile.

    McCartney was once super-talented but never interesting as personality like Lennon.

    Mick is more interesting as personality but mainly as playboy charmer.

    Brian Wilson is more interesting but his steep decline since 67 makes it all seem so sad.

    You are right. The only musician of those Steve listed that had any lasting impact on music is of course Bob Dylan. His music was worth it, and his promotion of The Band both count for a lot.

    (I didn’t see Brian Wilson’s name in Steve’s list. He was a giant as well.)

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Even though Dylan is ways past his peak and has faded, his is the kind of music that one age with, for Dylan and his fans. His stuff was more personal and reflective. In contrast, Jagger looks stupid acting like a teenager in his 70s.
    , @Anonymous

    You are right. The only musician of those Steve listed that had any lasting impact on music is of course Bob Dylan.
     
    Maybe not. I wish Dylan's impact was bigger but it has eroded over the years, esp beginning with disco 70s and New Wave 80s. Dylan's blend of reverence(folk roots) and rebellion(rock) fell out of favor. Punk was pure nihilism with no respect for anything. Disco was about the dance floor and nothing else. 80s was about MTV and glitz. Springsteen became popular for his blend of Dylanesque lyricism and Elvisy energy, but even he has fallen out of favor except as an institution. People don't seek meaning in any serious way.

    Sure, there has always been the alternative scene, but even most the alternative music scene seems to be into 'i worship gay'. Cold Play is talented, but its message seems to be 'gay gay gay' even though the members are probably not homo.

    In the end, black beat and 'gay' flair seem to define most of pop, and in that sense, Michael Jackson who was black and fruity may be the most influential pop star of the past 50 yrs.
  61. Off-topic,

    The HBO WATCHMEN series is going to be really anti-YT:

    “There’s also this legislation that’s passed, Victims Against Racial Violence, which is a form of reparations that are colloquially known as ‘Redford-ations.’ It’s a lifetime tax exemption for victims of, and the direct descendants of, designated areas of racial injustice throughout America’s history, the most important of which, as it relates to our show, is the Tulsa massacre of 1921. That legislation had a ripple effect into another piece of legalization, DoPA, the Defense of Police Act, which allows police to hide their face behind masks because they were being targeted by terrorist organizations for protecting the victims of the initial act.

    https://www.tor.com/2019/09/18/damon-lindelof-reveals-lots-of-worldbuilding-details-in-new-watchmen-show/

    • Replies: @peterike

    The HBO WATCHMEN series is going to be really anti-YT

     

    "Lindelof's mother is Jewish, whereas his father was of Scandinavian descent."

    Wow, what a one-two combo. Somebody needs to do a study over who is more toxic: Half-Jews with Jewish mothers, or half-Jews with Jewish fathers. It certainly seems like the nation-wrecking anti-majoritarian impulses of Jews doesn't wash out at all with a 50/50 mix.

    Lindelof is that very modern thing, a "showrunner." I think a lot of the previous and the current generations of Jewish talent went into things like "showrunning" or some form or other of TV-movies-music (get rich, get laid), rather than say into medicine or science. Which may be why Jews seem to have increasingly less impact on those things, while having ever more toxic impacts on culture.
  62. Someone who accused Kevin Spacey of sexual abuse has died. No, it’s not an old headline, I checked the date. Oh, I know what you’re thinking. You’re remembering that other guy who accused Kevin Spacey of sexual abuse and then died. Different guy. He was hit by a truck. We don’t yet know how this one died.
    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/kevin-spacey-accuser-dies-midst-sexual-assault-lawsuit-1240716

  63. The Ocasek post got so many comments in part because it was the last post Steve made for a while. It held the pole position for much longer than the average post.

  64. Anonymous[232] • Disclaimer says:
    @BB753
    Everybody knows knows that the real Paul McCartney died in 1966, LOL! There are hundreds of web pages and YouTube videos supporting the theory that Paul was replaced by a doppelganger after in death, dubbed "Faul", by the true believers.

    https://youtu.be/I8D0NdHkH8g

    There was ‘Paul is Dead’ and ‘Elvis is Alive’.

    Could the 60s thing happened if internet existed back then?

    Maybe everyone would have stayed home to watch it online than go to Woodstock.

    Biggest death news back then would have been Brian Jones, Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, and Jimi Hendrix.

    Best career move for rockers is to die at their peak or just before their artistic decline.

    If they die at the peak, people ponder what-might-have-been had they lived longer.
    If they die before the sure decline, people don’t get tired of them.

    Stones would have done best to die in a plane crash after Exile on Main Street, maybe their peak. Or after Tattoo You, the last output when they still mattered as a force in music.

    https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/nik-cohn-i-was-right-the-stones-after-the-age-of-30-didn-t-create-anything-good-1.2505387

    • Replies: @BB753
    As Steve has written many times, both in the arts and in science, after 32 years old your best creative and productive years are behind. Sadly, we were all born to die young.
  65. @Mr. Grey
    Ken Burns and everyone else seems to adhere to the one-drop rule in music. I grudgingly admit I enjoyed the 1st episode of the Country documentary and there were black people who were involved, the first star of the Grand Ol' Opry was black. But the black community as a whole gets a lot more credit here than European influences get credit in jazz. Notice how the banjo is continually mentioned as an African instrument. When it comes to discussing Blues music nobody ever goes on about the guitar being a European instrument and the European roots of Blues music.

    Burns’ whole MO, be it country or rock music or the Central Park Five or baseball or Vietnam is whitey is screwing the poor downtrodden black man. And without black people the country would be without a soul. Knowing a great deal about the Central Park Five “professionally”, he left half the story, that is, anything having to do with the great work of NYPD, on the cutting room floor. Anything he produces is suspect propaganda. In his rock n roll show, it kept coming back to the wonders of black people, on not Jimmie Hendrix, but the “bluesmen” nonsense. Yes, the now wrinkly British guitar guys were influenced by the blues, but guitar rock so far exceeds that starting point it’s beyond ridiculous.Half think Clapton and his ilk wax poetic about “the blues” not because it’s true, but because it’s good for business. Bring BB King on tour with you and fill his retirement fund and you’re a good guy.

    Pop music since the 1950s evolved into 2 different genres, one mostly white and one mostly black. When they come together, it’s mostly marketing. Burns presented the Beastie Boys as some kind of watershed. In reality they were a failed punk band who, with Rick Rubin, figured out how to mass market rap to white suburbanite teens.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Indeed.
    , @Mr. Grey
    The Central Park 5 doc is a horrible piece of white-guilt propaganda. That then inspired the racist Ava Duvernay and her Netflix show, and who knows how many deaths because "white people have it coming".
  66. Especially if Ringo dies first, Paul’s passing will be the biggest cultural milestone, as it will mark the complete end of the Beatles and everything that signifies.

    The Beatles hit the world during the sweet spot after technology created a world pop culture, but before it fractionated that culture into a million niche sub-channels. So it’s probably impossible for any group to have the same cultural dominance ever again.

    Perhaps Paul and Mick will be like Jefferson and Adams, and die within hours of each other.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The Beatles started out as a niche band. They appealed to young girls but few others. (Boys were usually hostile or indifferent.) They were the first 'boy band'.
  67. @syonredux
    Off-topic,

    The HBO WATCHMEN series is going to be really anti-YT:

    “There’s also this legislation that’s passed, Victims Against Racial Violence, which is a form of reparations that are colloquially known as ‘Redford-ations.’ It’s a lifetime tax exemption for victims of, and the direct descendants of, designated areas of racial injustice throughout America’s history, the most important of which, as it relates to our show, is the Tulsa massacre of 1921. That legislation had a ripple effect into another piece of legalization, DoPA, the Defense of Police Act, which allows police to hide their face behind masks because they were being targeted by terrorist organizations for protecting the victims of the initial act.
     
    https://www.tor.com/2019/09/18/damon-lindelof-reveals-lots-of-worldbuilding-details-in-new-watchmen-show/

    The HBO WATCHMEN series is going to be really anti-YT

    “Lindelof’s mother is Jewish, whereas his father was of Scandinavian descent.”

    Wow, what a one-two combo. Somebody needs to do a study over who is more toxic: Half-Jews with Jewish mothers, or half-Jews with Jewish fathers. It certainly seems like the nation-wrecking anti-majoritarian impulses of Jews doesn’t wash out at all with a 50/50 mix.

    Lindelof is that very modern thing, a “showrunner.” I think a lot of the previous and the current generations of Jewish talent went into things like “showrunning” or some form or other of TV-movies-music (get rich, get laid), rather than say into medicine or science. Which may be why Jews seem to have increasingly less impact on those things, while having ever more toxic impacts on culture.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    >Half-Jews with Jewish mothers
    >Half
    Hmmm. You mean they're Jews but not religiously Jewish?
    I don't know how old showrunning is. The reason the early Simpsons had episodes about snow, a boondoggle monorail (like the nearly one-block-covering People Mover), and a local news anchorman who resembled Bill Bonds was their showrunner and writer, Detroiter Al Jean (who has a Jewish mother). Everything the tall bald producer is seen doing in the Dick Van Dyle Show roughly overlaps with showrunning.
  68. @Daniel H
    Thanks for including that clip.

    You know, there are thousands of live clips of the Stones out there, most of them from recent years, but the playing/music doesn't seem nearly as good in these recent clips (anything going back 30 years) as those fifty year old clips. It's not just that Keith's playing skills have deteriorated a little (and Ronnie Wood is NO match for the Mick Taylor) it's the "quality" of the live sound too. Nowadays there is lots of whiz bank technology to project live electric sound in enormous arenas but something has been lost in the development. In the old days, a good portion of the sound amplification was provided by the amplifiers themselves, with the captured sound miked through a relatively rudimentary PA system (and forget about PA'ing all the drums). There was distortion, but there was also grit and fire. Nowadays the entire onstage amplification ensemble just serves as a pre-amp for the PA system, and the amped down stage sound is projected through a very powerful and enormous PA system, and despite all this whiz bang, the sound, though louder, seems more muddled, less clear and lame in comparison. And who wants to hear massively amped up tom-tom drums? Maybe it's just my ears, but the sound was better in the old days.

    Ahhhh the good ol’ days of walls of Altec speakers and horns and stacks of tube amps.. The Dead made it work quite fine.

  69. I no longer care about either of them because they support open borders.

  70. @Known Fact
    "Arwa Mahdawi is a Palestinian/British writer and brand strategist based in New York. She writes about pop culture, marketing, race, technology, and women's issues." And Ivanka's hair.

    At least she's fairly attractive for an op-ed harpy. She has nice hair but apparently harbors some resentment based on other factors

    “Arwa Mahdawi is a Palestinian/British writer and brand strategist based in New York. “

    And she mostly writes just how you’d expect, although she keeps well away from the third rail which a Palestinian might be particularly tempted to poke.

    Occasionally she writes about something iSteveish, or perhaps Dalrockian.

    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/commentisfree/2019/sep/11/marriage-women-earnings-income-feminism

    ” The fact women are struggling to find suitable husbands has caused glee in conservative circles. US shock-jock Rush Limbaugh says this story shows feminism has come back to bite women “in the butt”. “They’re earning money, but they still have the same attitude about marriage,” he crowed.

    I hate to say this, but Limbaugh does have a very tiny point. I’m struck by how many empowered women regress to the 1950s when it comes to marriage. They fight for equality at work, but still have traditional expectations when it comes to men proposing with expensive diamond rings. “

    Back on topic, what’s with the Debbie Harry fetish? She’s just not in the same musical league as Big Miss Muffett, and unless there’s a lot I don’t know about her (quite possible), her life’s not been anywhere near as interesting (in the Chinese curse sense).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Deb was bigger at Blondie’s peak and has had a longer career, Chrissie has been steadier in the public eye though. She’s a very much more confident stage performer but not as good looking. A fifty year vegetarian diet has made her age less well too, at least appearance wise. D looks pretty good for her age.

    We’ll know more in a few weeks when the Debbie Harry autobio hits the shelves. Chrissie put hers out a couple of years ago and it revealed a lot. Such as her being gangbanged by Hells Angels in their clubhouse. D also has a rape story, with the line “the stolen guitars hurt me more”. She doesn’t even play guitar.
  71. McCartney** or Jagger dying suddenly is the kind of news that would knock Brexit or Trump off the main headlines.* Keith, not so much. Nor Dylan, but in his case every media arts correspondent in the world would be expected to write something.

    Led Zep aren’t in the same league, and the others aren’t in their league.

    *But supposing they live another twenty years? Will “passing of 1960s rock singer” seem like a big deal in 2040?

    **People who make tee-heeing comments about “Paul is dead” should be made to spend an afternoon in some public place walking up and down with a placard apologising for being tiresome.

  72. @peterike
    As these deaths of moldy old rock and rollers will be occurring with ever greater frequency, can I suggest we just set up a quarterly Dead Rockers Digest post so we can all have a regular place to vent our sorry ass boomer memories about that time we saw the Moody Blues in Madison Square Garden from the cheap seats?

    BTW, Spotify sends me emails about upcoming concerts in my area based on my play lists. Amazingly, Mott the Hoople is touring. As is Boz Scaggs. Can somebody pass a law making it illegal for anyone to play live rock after the age of 60?

    I saw Deep Purple play recently. They weren’t bad bu Ian Gillian’s voice is kaput and Steve Morse is no Ritchie Blackmore. Like to Stones, their bass / drums is pretty solid and I think when a rock band dies, those are the last organs (no pun intended) to go.

    • Replies: @Darth Plastic
    Like Sir Paul,Gillians voice is shot and Steve Morse is no Ritchie Blackmore.....he's better.....pick up some Dixie Dregs and educate yourself my good man!
  73. @Liza
    The amazing, wonderful Angus Young. The most non-degenerate star of all.

    Best member of that band died long ago.

    • Replies: @Liza
    Best member of that band died long ago.

    No kidding. They broke the mould when they made Bon. We will not see his likes again. He was the Roy Orbison of heavy rock.
  74. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Everyone should stop talking about these hideous rock and roll degenerates and watch this 'Country Music' docu series.

    Skip the first episode or at least fast forward through it. There's some interesting stuff in it, but Burns has to insert the usual bullcrap about how blacks don't get enough credit for country music blah blah blah.

    The second episode was great, though, and I suspect the rest will all be quite good.

    Burns is a great filmmaker, but his extreme left wing bias is agonizing (thank God he did the Civil War in the 80s or it would be much worse and wouldn’t include Shelby Foote).

    Furthermore, he knows very little about his subject matter. The more you know about a subject, the more frustrating his documentaries are. I’m still wondering if anyone has informed him about this guy named Mike Schmidt. I’m pretty sure if I made a documentary about basket weaving, I’d at least try to figure out who the best basket weaver of each decade was.

    Ken Burns has a brilliant ear for music, which is so crucial in making a good film.

  75. @Anon
    Ric Ocasek and Eddie Money were hit machines but let's be real, they made bubble gum music for 17 year olds to hit beach balls around to. It's not like they were Billy Corgan, Kevin Shields, or Jeff Tweedy or anything.

    “It’s not like they were Billy Corgan, Kevin Shields, or Jeff Tweedy or anything.”

    Rock turned doomy and gloomy in the grungy 90s. The Cars were one of those bands of my 80s youth; they will always be on the playlist. 80s rock was more inventive and fun than that which followed in 90s. I like 90s stuff too: the doomiest and gloomiest of the Seattle bands Alice and Chains being my favorite.

  76. The bigger question is: when the time comes will the networks interrupt regular programming to announce the death of Paul McCartney?

    What about Bob Dylan? Is he considered important enough that his death would warrant breaking into regular programming with the news flash?

    • Replies: @Joe S. Walker
    McCartney: maybe if it happened very suddenly or dramatically, i.e. Michael Jackson/Princess Diana style.

    Dylan: I don't think so. But his obits will be massive as arts coverage goes.
  77. Off topic:

    Steve

    The highly RACIALIZED Fascist Leader of India…President Modi….is comming to Houston to meet with 50 thousand highly RACIALIZED Indian “Americans” in a stadium for a Hindu Race Power Rally….which will include a call for massively increasing the scale of the H-1 B …L-1 B VISA Program……POTUS Trump will be meeting with POI Modi to discuss increasing job opportunities for India’s Youth Population…via the H-1B…L-1B PROGRAMS…

    Steve…You really need to make a post about this…YOU HAVE A DIVINE EDICT TO MAKE A POST ABOUT THIS!!!

    Question for Steve’s Readers:What is the probability that the ANTIFA will show up in Houston to protest this public display of Hindu Racism-Facism?

  78. @BenKenobi
    Slightly OT: Ed Buck’s done it again!

    https://ktla.com/2019/09/17/dem-donor-ed-buck-arrested-after-3rd-mans-overdose-charged-with-operating-west-hollywood-drug-house/

    Ed Buck and Adam Schiff belong to the same network.

  79. @Desiderius
    Best member of that band died long ago.

    Best member of that band died long ago.

    No kidding. They broke the mould when they made Bon. We will not see his likes again. He was the Roy Orbison of heavy rock.

  80. The Jefferson Airplane gig showed the problem, the failure of their ideology the best:

    “You got to keep your bodies from each other unless you intent love”

    Way to go, Grace! That’ll teach ‘m!

  81. It was all over by 73 for them. Watch footage of the early shows of the STP tour in 72 and then in 73. The decline is alarming.

    But the number one culprit to them as a live band, far and away, is the end of Richard’s stray cat harmonies. That alone is 30 percent of the Stones sound. Just watch any clips of Jagger’s singing after that tour. His voice just wanders mealymouthed with no definition or real punch. He is completely lost as a singer without a harmony part. They finally got the memo in the 90’s when they finally hired backup singers and the songs started sounding like the Stones again. That’s also when they lifted their virtual ban on pre-Beggar’s Banquet material (Satsifaction excepted- that’s the moneymaker)- the ban I presume being because the harmonizing was even more central to the sound in the early days. One reason I refused to see them was because of their disrespect for their own work. I wanted to hear The Last Time, 19th Nervous Breakdown, and Under My Thumb. I didn’t need to hear 70’s filler like Fingerprint File.

    For those who like watching slo-mo decadence, you can find on youtube the documentary of the STP tour that goes by a name that I won’t repeat here. Warning: you can’t unsee it.

  82. @Anonymous
    Dylan by a mile.

    McCartney was once super-talented but never interesting as personality like Lennon.

    Mick is more interesting as personality but mainly as playboy charmer.

    Brian Wilson is more interesting but his steep decline since 67 makes it all seem so sad.

    Dylan sucks. I saw him in concert a few years ago and it was a waste of money. The concert was simply noise. You couldn’t hear anything he said. Just pure noise.

    Most of the rockers are cucks. Morons. Globalist tools. That includes Mick and Paul, Bono, etc.

    They are just like movie stars and they are owned just like movie stars.

    Their political views reflect the views of the hostile elite they serve.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Dylan sucks. I saw him in concert a few years ago and it was a waste of money. The concert was simply noise. You couldn’t hear anything he said. Just pure noise.
     
    He's way past his prime. I stopped caring about Dylan in the 80s though he did quality work with Time out of Mind. We are talking of Dylan when he mattered.

    Most of the rockers are cucks. Morons. Globalist tools. That includes Mick and Paul, Bono, etc.
     
    They are vain and want to be part of the circle. Rich have always been like that. Are most GOP politicians all that different? Granted, Bonehead is especially insufferable. But then, rich guys like him can play god about the natives in Africa while unrich white boys in Ireland get beaten up by stronger blacks. Bonehead has African kids at his feet while average Irish boy has the black fist in his face.

    http://static.becomegorgeous.com/img/arts/2014/11/10-most-charitable-celebrities/embedded_bono_charity.jpg
  83. @Lot
    (((Bob))) gets the biggest RIP thread, and it wouldn’t even be close.

    People with strong negative feelings about the Beatles/Stones are mostly older than them and will be mostly dead or too old and tired to keep a RIP thread going. Younger people have no view, or are just mildly positive.

    Sir Elton or Billy Joel would be more controversial than than Beatles: conservative (for the times) music from a fabulous gay and another Jew.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxEPV4kolz0

    No way man , not if you’re just counting words or comment’s . They’re celebrities . An actor will get the no. one spot . But if you want to limit it to musicians it’ll be Michael Jackson .

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    Michael Jackson has been quite dead for several years.

    Unless he and Elvis are hanging in a roadside bar outside Memphis.
  84. @William Badwhite
    Billy Joel and Elton John did a joint concert at the Sydney Cricket Grounds circa 1998/1999 (I can't remember exactly). They may have done others, I'm not sure. I was in town for business and one of my clients invited me to go.

    I'm far from an expert on music, but even to my untrained ears Elton John was orders of magnitude better than Joel, particularly as a pianist. They each did a couple of the other's songs: Elton did Elton's songs better than Billy Joel did, and he did Billy Joel's songs better than Billy Joel did. Piano Man by Elton John is way better than any other version I've heard!

    I remember wondering if Joel was in any way embarrassed by it.

    Elton and Joel have toured together many times. They grew friendly for a bit, then became estranged.

    Joel has said that while he was touring with Elton that his (e.e. Joel’s) alcoholism got really bad, and Joel even interrupted several joint concerts with his mayhem, pissing off Elton. One night Joel got so drunk he was just nonsensically shouting the names of Civil War battles while they were playing e.g.: “Antietam! Bull Run!”

    So its possible Elton is just better than Joel, but its also possible you saw Joel at his alcoholic worst, hence his subpar play.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    Interesting, I did not know that about the alcoholism, thanks.

    One thing I remember clearly is that Joel was pretty fat. They played on this 3-level stage and at one point Joel jumped from the highest level to the second highest, then to the lowest (closest to the crowd), then had to get on all fours to hoist himself back up each successive level. The Aussies were having a field day laughing at him, "have another donut Billy!" etc.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    ...pissing off Elton.
     
    War opened for Elton in the early '70s and the crowd was so impressed they called for encore after encore. Elton was said to be quite steamed about the delay.
    , @Intelligent Dasein

    One night Joel got so drunk he was just nonsensically shouting the names of Civil War battles while they were playing e.g.: “Antietam! Bull Run!”
     
    An astute critic would notice that this is simply the manner in which Billy Joel's corrupted Jewish mind works. The alcohol my have allowed his thoughts to flow freely without the hindrance of self-censorship, but it did not alter their fundamental nature. Think of the song "We Didn't Start the Fire". That's exactly what it is. It's just a concatenation of outbursts, a random litany of blurbs, namedropping, and headline items with nothing to connect them. I think the intended effect, as well as the spirit in which Billy Joel wrote the song, is supposed to be a smug sense of superiority as one surveys the fast-flowing collage, a sort of "Look at the crazy times we live in" humblebrag as one congratulates oneself on being above it all.

    Furthermore, think of how many Billy Joel songs feature some variant of the "You may be wrong/You may be right" motiff. It's a characteristically Jewish phrase, the sort of thing you could picture Tevye mumbling in Fiddler on the Roof. Billy Joel thinks that to naive goyish ears, this sounds like some sort of deep wisdom born of millennia of persecution. That's the ruse he's trying to pull, but the fact is that most white people simply ignore this line. It is nothing more to them than a generic verbal filler, and for all intents and purposes he might as well be singing "do wah diddy diddy dum diddy do." But in reality it is a peculiar Jewish obsession that Billy Joel cannot help kvetching about in his lyrics. The Jew wonders intently if the opinion of the man across from him is wrong or right, if this stranger (another Joelism!) just might be the prophet sent to him to pronounce victory or defeat, fortune or misery. Against this all important question, all the South Pacifics and Walter Winchells in the world are just so many "signs and wonders," i.e. mysterious alchemical configurations meant to redound to the benefit of the faithful while befuddling the unchosen. We Didn't Start the Fire is a veritable Talmud comprising both a vernacular and an esoteric interpretation. To the goyim it is "Wow, look at the headlines". To Billy Joel it is "All things work together for the good of those (like me) who are special".

    Once you see this you will not unsee it. Everywhere you look in Billy Joel you will find the litanies, the smugness, and the absolute insistence upon a special election. Billy Joe's superiority does not depend on any qualities he may or may not possess. He is chosen just because he is. It is the Jewish mind at work.
  85. @Lot
    (((Bob))) gets the biggest RIP thread, and it wouldn’t even be close.

    People with strong negative feelings about the Beatles/Stones are mostly older than them and will be mostly dead or too old and tired to keep a RIP thread going. Younger people have no view, or are just mildly positive.

    Sir Elton or Billy Joel would be more controversial than than Beatles: conservative (for the times) music from a fabulous gay and another Jew.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxEPV4kolz0

    Elton played Rush Limbaugh’s last wedding only a few years ago. Despite his degenerative sexual behavior and silly stage outfits, on the whole I think he’s quite old fashioned on the rest. He’s patriotic to the U.K. and his music can be enjoyed by straights without any hint of the gay. He strikes me as a Noel Coward kind of gay, just with a Liberace stage flair.

    • Replies: @Jokah Macpherson
    He's got that straight guy that writes nearly all of his lyrics, so that definitely helps.
    , @Jim Don Bob

    Elton played Rush Limbaugh’s last wedding only a few years ago.
     
    Rush paid Elton a million dollars to sing at his wedding, and said he was a complete gentleman. Good for them both.
  86. @donut
    No way man , not if you're just counting words or comment's . They're celebrities . An actor will get the no. one spot . But if you want to limit it to musicians it'll be Michael Jackson .

    Michael Jackson has been quite dead for several years.

    Unless he and Elvis are hanging in a roadside bar outside Memphis.

    • Replies: @donut
    Never the less Michael Jackson just got mentioned three times .
  87. @snorlax
    Let's talk about Ivanka Trump's hair! https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/sep/18/why-ivanka-trumps-new-haircut-should-make-us-very-afraid

    These corporate media folks have tinfoil-hat conspiracy theorizing disease. Historians will read these bizarre newspaper stories and watch these insane CNN/MSNBC pundit shows and wonder how such madness became so universal in the press.

    These people either need to get on some meds or get off the meds they’re already on. Or stop mixing them with alcohol.

  88. The Beatles were very boring compared to the Rolling Stones. Mick was/is more interesting than Paul and has lead a more interesting life. My guess is they are equally popular these days, going by they can still fill stadiums/

  89. @Bugg
    Burns' whole MO, be it country or rock music or the Central Park Five or baseball or Vietnam is whitey is screwing the poor downtrodden black man. And without black people the country would be without a soul. Knowing a great deal about the Central Park Five "professionally", he left half the story, that is, anything having to do with the great work of NYPD, on the cutting room floor. Anything he produces is suspect propaganda. In his rock n roll show, it kept coming back to the wonders of black people, on not Jimmie Hendrix, but the "bluesmen" nonsense. Yes, the now wrinkly British guitar guys were influenced by the blues, but guitar rock so far exceeds that starting point it's beyond ridiculous.Half think Clapton and his ilk wax poetic about "the blues" not because it's true, but because it's good for business. Bring BB King on tour with you and fill his retirement fund and you're a good guy.

    Pop music since the 1950s evolved into 2 different genres, one mostly white and one mostly black. When they come together, it's mostly marketing. Burns presented the Beastie Boys as some kind of watershed. In reality they were a failed punk band who, with Rick Rubin, figured out how to mass market rap to white suburbanite teens.

    Indeed.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    TOtallly ridiculous stupid lying ignorant nonsense. You people are not only without souls. You are without minds. Don't tell me about IQ you ignorant hapless boob.
  90. @Lot
    (((Bob))) gets the biggest RIP thread, and it wouldn’t even be close.

    People with strong negative feelings about the Beatles/Stones are mostly older than them and will be mostly dead or too old and tired to keep a RIP thread going. Younger people have no view, or are just mildly positive.

    Sir Elton or Billy Joel would be more controversial than than Beatles: conservative (for the times) music from a fabulous gay and another Jew.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxEPV4kolz0

    Sorry Lot if it’s just Steve’s thing you’re still wrong I think but probably close . I asked a couple of friends of mine to give me their Top Ten list of the 60’s . You try it’s impossible .

  91. @War for Blair Mountain
    Ian Stuart

    WE MISS YOU COMRADE

    RIP

    Paul...John...George....Ringo....did a circle jerk together in 1963...yelling out Gina Lollabrigida....girly boy degenerates ....

    Ian.....you fought for OUR PEOPLE.....”We Miss You Comrade” crushes “Let it be”

    True story:A few years ago Sir Paul was riding his bike downtown Amaganssett...his son James McCartney riding a bike next to him....here is what I can report from a visual inspection:Sir Paul’s son James looks like a short, balding, fat bastard....Paul and Linda produced a subhuman mutant....was it the chromatin rearranging effects of ingesting LSD?

    Sir Paul’s son James looks like a short, balding, fat bastard

    Being born with that much is a horrible handicap. > 99% of human excellence directly comes out of motivation and effort. The traditional British workaround is they send them to boarding school where the older boys bugger ’em. Even that is still a crapshoot. What happens if they enjoy it?

  92. @R.G. Camara
    Michael Jackson has been quite dead for several years.

    Unless he and Elvis are hanging in a roadside bar outside Memphis.

    Never the less Michael Jackson just got mentioned three times .

  93. @Hypnotoad666
    Especially if Ringo dies first, Paul's passing will be the biggest cultural milestone, as it will mark the complete end of the Beatles and everything that signifies.

    The Beatles hit the world during the sweet spot after technology created a world pop culture, but before it fractionated that culture into a million niche sub-channels. So it's probably impossible for any group to have the same cultural dominance ever again.

    Perhaps Paul and Mick will be like Jefferson and Adams, and die within hours of each other.

    The Beatles started out as a niche band. They appealed to young girls but few others. (Boys were usually hostile or indifferent.) They were the first ‘boy band’.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Sinatra had a teen girl audience in 1945: my late mother-in-law was a bobbysoxer who worshipped Frank when she was 15.

    Teen girls actually had good taste in guy performers with huge potential (Sinatra, Beatles, Stones) up until some point at which the music industry figured out how to reverse engineer boy bands.

    , @Anonymous

    The Beatles started out as a niche band. They appealed to young girls but few others.
     
    Not true. Early Beatles were rougher and more into hard rock n roll. They wore leather jackets and played in rough joints. Guys and girls alike came to appreciate them. Before fame, they were a pretty big act in Liverpool.

    It was only when Brian Epstein groomed them into a neat act that they became something closer to a band with special appeal to teenage girls. But this was from late 63 to 64. By 65, a lot of guys came to appreciate them as a real force in rock music.
  94. @R.G. Camara
    Elton played Rush Limbaugh's last wedding only a few years ago. Despite his degenerative sexual behavior and silly stage outfits, on the whole I think he's quite old fashioned on the rest. He's patriotic to the U.K. and his music can be enjoyed by straights without any hint of the gay. He strikes me as a Noel Coward kind of gay, just with a Liberace stage flair.

    He’s got that straight guy that writes nearly all of his lyrics, so that definitely helps.

    • Replies: @Feryl
    85% of the time, gays have to reined in by straights. There are exceptions, however (Rob Halford of Judas Priest made the band's image tougher, while Micheal Stipe is probably gay but chose to be earnestly adult instead of childishly campy with his role in REM)
  95. @peterike

    The HBO WATCHMEN series is going to be really anti-YT

     

    "Lindelof's mother is Jewish, whereas his father was of Scandinavian descent."

    Wow, what a one-two combo. Somebody needs to do a study over who is more toxic: Half-Jews with Jewish mothers, or half-Jews with Jewish fathers. It certainly seems like the nation-wrecking anti-majoritarian impulses of Jews doesn't wash out at all with a 50/50 mix.

    Lindelof is that very modern thing, a "showrunner." I think a lot of the previous and the current generations of Jewish talent went into things like "showrunning" or some form or other of TV-movies-music (get rich, get laid), rather than say into medicine or science. Which may be why Jews seem to have increasingly less impact on those things, while having ever more toxic impacts on culture.

    >Half-Jews with Jewish mothers
    >Half
    Hmmm. You mean they’re Jews but not religiously Jewish?
    I don’t know how old showrunning is. The reason the early Simpsons had episodes about snow, a boondoggle monorail (like the nearly one-block-covering People Mover), and a local news anchorman who resembled Bill Bonds was their showrunner and writer, Detroiter Al Jean (who has a Jewish mother). Everything the tall bald producer is seen doing in the Dick Van Dyle Show roughly overlaps with showrunning.

  96. @TWS
    Keith Richards is alive?

    Reanimated.

  97. The answer to your question might depend on whether Paul dies before or after Ringo. Pretty much everyone secretly hopes Paul is the last one to go, since it wouldn’t seem right for the least important Beatle to be the one who gets the glory of being the last one to pass and reap all the Beatles’ retrospectives.

  98. @Anonymous
    The Beatles started out as a niche band. They appealed to young girls but few others. (Boys were usually hostile or indifferent.) They were the first 'boy band'.

    Sinatra had a teen girl audience in 1945: my late mother-in-law was a bobbysoxer who worshipped Frank when she was 15.

    Teen girls actually had good taste in guy performers with huge potential (Sinatra, Beatles, Stones) up until some point at which the music industry figured out how to reverse engineer boy bands.

    • Replies: @keypusher
    In fact, I think he was the first performer to have teenage girls screaming/crying/fainting at his concerts, which caused a lot of concerned commentary. Rightly, I guess. It's weird, isn't it?
  99. I like Mick and the love the classic Stones, but I respect, admire and love Paul much more.

  100. @Bugg
    Dear friend of mine who became a Wall St BSD was neighbors with Sir Paul for several years in Amagansett. He socialized with him occasionally, and found him to be a very decent guy and a good neighbor.

    That’s what I’ve heard….McCartney likes to take his little sailboat out into the Peconic Bay…I know he has gone to the Lobster Roll with Chevy Chase and Paul Simon….I have never seen him there…

    And now for some War for Blair Mountain name dropping:Night before a big Family Wedding at the Montauk Yacht Club…We went to Steven’s Talkhouse in Amagansett after we were tipped off by the bartender at Gurney’s(pre-wedding Party) that Jimmy Buffet was tunning up for his Concert Tour at Steven’s Talkhouse…..Standing next to me at Steven’s Talkhouse was Paul McCartney……

  101. Anonymous[232] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    The Beatles started out as a niche band. They appealed to young girls but few others. (Boys were usually hostile or indifferent.) They were the first 'boy band'.

    The Beatles started out as a niche band. They appealed to young girls but few others.

    Not true. Early Beatles were rougher and more into hard rock n roll. They wore leather jackets and played in rough joints. Guys and girls alike came to appreciate them. Before fame, they were a pretty big act in Liverpool.

    It was only when Brian Epstein groomed them into a neat act that they became something closer to a band with special appeal to teenage girls. But this was from late 63 to 64. By 65, a lot of guys came to appreciate them as a real force in rock music.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    In their early days the Beatles were constantly getting into fights with guys who thought they were a bunch of nancies. (Suart Sutcliffe died as a result of one of these altercations.) Their male following came slowly and had to be earned.
  102. Peter Green (Greenbaum).

    Way better than Clapton or Jimmy.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  103. Teen girls actually had good taste in guy performers with huge potential (Sinatra, Beatles, Stones) up until some point at which the music industry figured out how to reverse engineer boy bands.

    That seems like a rather cynical view of the people who run the music business scene.

    Van Morrison might be inclined to agree with you about the kinds of people involved in the shady music business scene.

    Big Time Operators:

  104. @Steve in Greensboro
    You are right. The only musician of those Steve listed that had any lasting impact on music is of course Bob Dylan. His music was worth it, and his promotion of The Band both count for a lot.

    (I didn't see Brian Wilson's name in Steve's list. He was a giant as well.)

    Even though Dylan is ways past his peak and has faded, his is the kind of music that one age with, for Dylan and his fans. His stuff was more personal and reflective. In contrast, Jagger looks stupid acting like a teenager in his 70s.

  105. @MEH 0910

    How do you keep remembering all of the stuff you mention? You saw X in Houston in 1978.
     
    https://www.amazon.com/Press-Photo-Houstons-University-College/dp/B07QX2G6HM

    1979 Press Photo Houston's Rice University team on College Bowl Quiz radio show

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/615klJgWGcL._SL1000_.jpg
    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51UnKFL-odL._SL1000_.jpg

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    I might just break down and cry when Weird Al dies.
  106. Anonymous[232] • Disclaimer says:
    @Robert Dolan
    Dylan sucks. I saw him in concert a few years ago and it was a waste of money. The concert was simply noise. You couldn't hear anything he said. Just pure noise.

    Most of the rockers are cucks. Morons. Globalist tools. That includes Mick and Paul, Bono, etc.

    They are just like movie stars and they are owned just like movie stars.

    Their political views reflect the views of the hostile elite they serve.

    Dylan sucks. I saw him in concert a few years ago and it was a waste of money. The concert was simply noise. You couldn’t hear anything he said. Just pure noise.

    He’s way past his prime. I stopped caring about Dylan in the 80s though he did quality work with Time out of Mind. We are talking of Dylan when he mattered.

    Most of the rockers are cucks. Morons. Globalist tools. That includes Mick and Paul, Bono, etc.

    They are vain and want to be part of the circle. Rich have always been like that. Are most GOP politicians all that different? Granted, Bonehead is especially insufferable. But then, rich guys like him can play god about the natives in Africa while unrich white boys in Ireland get beaten up by stronger blacks. Bonehead has African kids at his feet while average Irish boy has the black fist in his face.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    rich guys like him can play god about the natives in Africa while unrich white boys in Ireland get beaten up by stronger blacks. Bonehead has African kids at his feet while average Irish boy has the black fist in his face

    Blacks are not stronger than whites. And there aren't many blacks in Ireland.
    , @Bugg
    "Ironic a socialist doesn't want to pay taxes". Roger Daltrey, former union sheet metal worker and Brexit advocate, about Bono.
  107. @Bugg
    Burns' whole MO, be it country or rock music or the Central Park Five or baseball or Vietnam is whitey is screwing the poor downtrodden black man. And without black people the country would be without a soul. Knowing a great deal about the Central Park Five "professionally", he left half the story, that is, anything having to do with the great work of NYPD, on the cutting room floor. Anything he produces is suspect propaganda. In his rock n roll show, it kept coming back to the wonders of black people, on not Jimmie Hendrix, but the "bluesmen" nonsense. Yes, the now wrinkly British guitar guys were influenced by the blues, but guitar rock so far exceeds that starting point it's beyond ridiculous.Half think Clapton and his ilk wax poetic about "the blues" not because it's true, but because it's good for business. Bring BB King on tour with you and fill his retirement fund and you're a good guy.

    Pop music since the 1950s evolved into 2 different genres, one mostly white and one mostly black. When they come together, it's mostly marketing. Burns presented the Beastie Boys as some kind of watershed. In reality they were a failed punk band who, with Rick Rubin, figured out how to mass market rap to white suburbanite teens.

    The Central Park 5 doc is a horrible piece of white-guilt propaganda. That then inspired the racist Ava Duvernay and her Netflix show, and who knows how many deaths because “white people have it coming”.

  108. @jcd1974
    The bigger question is: when the time comes will the networks interrupt regular programming to announce the death of Paul McCartney?

    What about Bob Dylan? Is he considered important enough that his death would warrant breaking into regular programming with the news flash?

    McCartney: maybe if it happened very suddenly or dramatically, i.e. Michael Jackson/Princess Diana style.

    Dylan: I don’t think so. But his obits will be massive as arts coverage goes.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    McCartney: maybe if it happened very suddenly or dramatically, i.e. Michael Jackson/Princess Diana style.

    The media will feel obligated to make a big fuss, and there will be many official statements. He's such a big figure.

    But within the rock community, he was never much liked. For many serious rockers, Lennon was the Beatle that mattered. Even George Harrison was more interesting as a personality than McCartney. Even Ringo. McCartney was devilishly talented and has a pretty amazing post-Beatle career for about a decade(no mean feat) though it came nowhere near his output in the 60s. And he was the prettiest Beatle. But his personality was blah, and he had nothing to say, and when he said it, no one took it seriously. People remember "Imagine", not "Give Ireland back to the Irish". People were fascinated with Lennon and drugs but didn't much care for McCartney coming out for pot.

    Now, personally, I don't care if a pop star has something to say. I rather laud McCartney for sticking to his strengths as a pop star than straining to be an artist or save-the-worlder. Though Lennon was naturally more artistic, his forte was also as a pop musician and he should have stuck with that mode than making a fool of himself under Yoko's influence(and by trying to imitate Dylan, a true all-out artist).

    What really surprised me about McCartney was after his wife died. I always thought he was the sane rational one whereas Lennon, though more interesting, was kinda nuts. But when billionaire Paul married a crazy one-legged woman after Linda's death, I realized he was a closet-nutter even nuttier than Lennon.
  109. Anonymous[232] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve in Greensboro
    You are right. The only musician of those Steve listed that had any lasting impact on music is of course Bob Dylan. His music was worth it, and his promotion of The Band both count for a lot.

    (I didn't see Brian Wilson's name in Steve's list. He was a giant as well.)

    You are right. The only musician of those Steve listed that had any lasting impact on music is of course Bob Dylan.

    Maybe not. I wish Dylan’s impact was bigger but it has eroded over the years, esp beginning with disco 70s and New Wave 80s. Dylan’s blend of reverence(folk roots) and rebellion(rock) fell out of favor. Punk was pure nihilism with no respect for anything. Disco was about the dance floor and nothing else. 80s was about MTV and glitz. Springsteen became popular for his blend of Dylanesque lyricism and Elvisy energy, but even he has fallen out of favor except as an institution. People don’t seek meaning in any serious way.

    Sure, there has always been the alternative scene, but even most the alternative music scene seems to be into ‘i worship gay’. Cold Play is talented, but its message seems to be ‘gay gay gay’ even though the members are probably not homo.

    In the end, black beat and ‘gay’ flair seem to define most of pop, and in that sense, Michael Jackson who was black and fruity may be the most influential pop star of the past 50 yrs.

  110. Porn star Jessica Jaymes has been found dead — she had been inactive online for a week so a “business partner” went to check on her apartment and found her body. No good information yet but very likely to be overdosing on painkillers.

  111. @Anonymous

    The Beatles started out as a niche band. They appealed to young girls but few others.
     
    Not true. Early Beatles were rougher and more into hard rock n roll. They wore leather jackets and played in rough joints. Guys and girls alike came to appreciate them. Before fame, they were a pretty big act in Liverpool.

    It was only when Brian Epstein groomed them into a neat act that they became something closer to a band with special appeal to teenage girls. But this was from late 63 to 64. By 65, a lot of guys came to appreciate them as a real force in rock music.

    In their early days the Beatles were constantly getting into fights with guys who thought they were a bunch of nancies. (Suart Sutcliffe died as a result of one of these altercations.) Their male following came slowly and had to be earned.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    In their early days the Beatles were constantly getting into fights with guys who thought they were a bunch of nancies.


    A lot of that had to do with John Lennon being a very aggressive and nasty teddy boy prick. He insulted a lot of people, and some went after him.
  112. @obwandiyag
    Typical Unz asshole. Has to bring in the "blacks are inferior" thing at every juncture.

    You know nothing about "country" music or any other music, you total ignoramus.

    Lighten up Francis.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  113. @R.G. Camara
    Elton and Joel have toured together many times. They grew friendly for a bit, then became estranged.

    Joel has said that while he was touring with Elton that his (e.e. Joel's) alcoholism got really bad, and Joel even interrupted several joint concerts with his mayhem, pissing off Elton. One night Joel got so drunk he was just nonsensically shouting the names of Civil War battles while they were playing e.g.: "Antietam! Bull Run!"

    So its possible Elton is just better than Joel, but its also possible you saw Joel at his alcoholic worst, hence his subpar play.

    Interesting, I did not know that about the alcoholism, thanks.

    One thing I remember clearly is that Joel was pretty fat. They played on this 3-level stage and at one point Joel jumped from the highest level to the second highest, then to the lowest (closest to the crowd), then had to get on all fours to hoist himself back up each successive level. The Aussies were having a field day laughing at him, “have another donut Billy!” etc.

  114. @BB753
    Everybody knows knows that the real Paul McCartney died in 1966, LOL! There are hundreds of web pages and YouTube videos supporting the theory that Paul was replaced by a doppelganger after in death, dubbed "Faul", by the true believers.

    https://youtu.be/I8D0NdHkH8g

    Paul didn’t die, just his taste.

  115. @William Badwhite
    Billy Joel and Elton John did a joint concert at the Sydney Cricket Grounds circa 1998/1999 (I can't remember exactly). They may have done others, I'm not sure. I was in town for business and one of my clients invited me to go.

    I'm far from an expert on music, but even to my untrained ears Elton John was orders of magnitude better than Joel, particularly as a pianist. They each did a couple of the other's songs: Elton did Elton's songs better than Billy Joel did, and he did Billy Joel's songs better than Billy Joel did. Piano Man by Elton John is way better than any other version I've heard!

    I remember wondering if Joel was in any way embarrassed by it.

    I’d guess yes.

  116. @Anonymous

    Dylan sucks. I saw him in concert a few years ago and it was a waste of money. The concert was simply noise. You couldn’t hear anything he said. Just pure noise.
     
    He's way past his prime. I stopped caring about Dylan in the 80s though he did quality work with Time out of Mind. We are talking of Dylan when he mattered.

    Most of the rockers are cucks. Morons. Globalist tools. That includes Mick and Paul, Bono, etc.
     
    They are vain and want to be part of the circle. Rich have always been like that. Are most GOP politicians all that different? Granted, Bonehead is especially insufferable. But then, rich guys like him can play god about the natives in Africa while unrich white boys in Ireland get beaten up by stronger blacks. Bonehead has African kids at his feet while average Irish boy has the black fist in his face.

    http://static.becomegorgeous.com/img/arts/2014/11/10-most-charitable-celebrities/embedded_bono_charity.jpg

    rich guys like him can play god about the natives in Africa while unrich white boys in Ireland get beaten up by stronger blacks. Bonehead has African kids at his feet while average Irish boy has the black fist in his face

    Blacks are not stronger than whites. And there aren’t many blacks in Ireland.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    There are far, far too many blacks in Ireland.
    , @Alden
    Check out Irish savant blog to learn about the black savages in Ireland. There aren’t that many blacks in America either, 12% but they commit most of the crime including many many assaults on Whites.

    As per usual, the blacks in Ireland roam in packs when hunting Whites. Hard for one to fight off five. Harder still for a 100 pd 12 year old to fight off 4 160 pd 16 year olds
  117. Moving away from music, I would say that the media coverage of George H.W. Bush’s death ten months ago will be greatly overshadowed by the coverage Jimmy Carter will get.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    You said something there brother. Consider: Teddy Kennedy's death and all the hoopla surrounding it was being broadcast live in Dunkin Donuts in Westbrook, Maine at midnight on a Saturday. I remember. I was there. I was in gobstruck, in bilious disbelief. I wish we had a live Webcam at the gates of hell...
    , @Neil Templeton
    Nah, Lefties aren't that loyal.
  118. @Anonymous

    Dylan sucks. I saw him in concert a few years ago and it was a waste of money. The concert was simply noise. You couldn’t hear anything he said. Just pure noise.
     
    He's way past his prime. I stopped caring about Dylan in the 80s though he did quality work with Time out of Mind. We are talking of Dylan when he mattered.

    Most of the rockers are cucks. Morons. Globalist tools. That includes Mick and Paul, Bono, etc.
     
    They are vain and want to be part of the circle. Rich have always been like that. Are most GOP politicians all that different? Granted, Bonehead is especially insufferable. But then, rich guys like him can play god about the natives in Africa while unrich white boys in Ireland get beaten up by stronger blacks. Bonehead has African kids at his feet while average Irish boy has the black fist in his face.

    http://static.becomegorgeous.com/img/arts/2014/11/10-most-charitable-celebrities/embedded_bono_charity.jpg

    “Ironic a socialist doesn’t want to pay taxes”. Roger Daltrey, former union sheet metal worker and Brexit advocate, about Bono.

  119. Anonymous[232] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    In their early days the Beatles were constantly getting into fights with guys who thought they were a bunch of nancies. (Suart Sutcliffe died as a result of one of these altercations.) Their male following came slowly and had to be earned.


    In their early days the Beatles were constantly getting into fights with guys who thought they were a bunch of nancies.

    A lot of that had to do with John Lennon being a very aggressive and nasty teddy boy prick. He insulted a lot of people, and some went after him.

  120. Anonymous[232] • Disclaimer says:
    @Joe S. Walker
    McCartney: maybe if it happened very suddenly or dramatically, i.e. Michael Jackson/Princess Diana style.

    Dylan: I don't think so. But his obits will be massive as arts coverage goes.

    McCartney: maybe if it happened very suddenly or dramatically, i.e. Michael Jackson/Princess Diana style.

    The media will feel obligated to make a big fuss, and there will be many official statements. He’s such a big figure.

    But within the rock community, he was never much liked. For many serious rockers, Lennon was the Beatle that mattered. Even George Harrison was more interesting as a personality than McCartney. Even Ringo. McCartney was devilishly talented and has a pretty amazing post-Beatle career for about a decade(no mean feat) though it came nowhere near his output in the 60s. And he was the prettiest Beatle. But his personality was blah, and he had nothing to say, and when he said it, no one took it seriously. People remember “Imagine”, not “Give Ireland back to the Irish”. People were fascinated with Lennon and drugs but didn’t much care for McCartney coming out for pot.

    Now, personally, I don’t care if a pop star has something to say. I rather laud McCartney for sticking to his strengths as a pop star than straining to be an artist or save-the-worlder. Though Lennon was naturally more artistic, his forte was also as a pop musician and he should have stuck with that mode than making a fool of himself under Yoko’s influence(and by trying to imitate Dylan, a true all-out artist).

    What really surprised me about McCartney was after his wife died. I always thought he was the sane rational one whereas Lennon, though more interesting, was kinda nuts. But when billionaire Paul married a crazy one-legged woman after Linda’s death, I realized he was a closet-nutter even nuttier than Lennon.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    "when billionaire Paul married a crazy one-legged woman after Linda’s death, I realized he was a closet-nutter even nuttier than Lennon"

    Nah, I'm sure he saw a bird with a broken wing. He got suckered, but everyone's allowed one mistake.

    You have to grudgingly admire Ms Mills for not letting a little thing like a missing leg stand in the way of ambition.

    Paul seems to have come through being one of the most famous, wealthy and desired guys in a world full of drugs and excess, with his sanity still pretty intact. His kids seem relatively sane, considering.
  121. 118 comments and Ctrl F reveals no mention of Ozzy Osborn?

    Who else bit the head off of a bat???

  122. @MEH 0910
    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/BvUZijEuNDQ/maxresdefault.jpg

    I might just break down and cry when Weird Al dies.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I might just break down and cry when Weird Al dies.
     
    Al learned of his parents' death in a household accident just before a performance. He went on stage anyway. "Process" it later. Folks paid for tickets.
  123. Whose RIP post would get the most comments?

    Sir Mick or Sir Paul?

    Mick or Keith?

    Jimmy or Robert?

    Bob or Bruce? (“Bob” can be either Dylan or Seger or Geldof or Mould depending upon your taste.)

    Debbie or Chrissie?

    Answers:
    Paul, Mick, Jimmy, Bob, and Debbie.

  124. @BB753
    Very simple explanation: Ivanka is pushing forty and few women look good with long hair past 35 years old.

    Exactly right. Anne Coulter’s pushing 60 and still has long hair. Also lives with a black man and approves of affirmative action.

    • Replies: @dfordoom

    Anne Coulter’s pushing 60 and still has long hair. Also lives with a black man and approves of affirmative action.
     
    Coulter talks like a conservative and lives like a liberal.

    When it comes to hypocrisy conservatives leave liberals in the dust.
  125. @James Braxton
    I had to quit watching halfway through the first episode. It could have been called "Country Music: It's a black thing. You wouldn't understand."

    Also, I am sick of always hearing how the banjo came from Africa.

    When the fiddle came from Europe, it was the same fiddle we play today. The "banjo" from Africa was a dried out gourd which bore little resemblance in sound or appearance to the modern banjo. Give me a break.

    Roy Clark boasted the banjo was the only instrument made in America because we were the only country that had the nerve. I reckon it was invented in the backwoods with corn liquor involved. Drums are possibly the only instrument of African origin.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The banjo as we know it is British, dating from perhaps the 1850s, popular in later Victorian times. It had pretty well died out by the time Dixieland Jazz brought it back and again when bluegrass was invented by Bill Monroe who hired Earl Scruggs. Pete Seeger kept the old timer frailing and claw hammer styles alive and wrote a hugely successful book (as did Scruggs). It never dies completely but widely swings in popularity.
  126. @Mr. Grey
    Ken Burns and everyone else seems to adhere to the one-drop rule in music. I grudgingly admit I enjoyed the 1st episode of the Country documentary and there were black people who were involved, the first star of the Grand Ol' Opry was black. But the black community as a whole gets a lot more credit here than European influences get credit in jazz. Notice how the banjo is continually mentioned as an African instrument. When it comes to discussing Blues music nobody ever goes on about the guitar being a European instrument and the European roots of Blues music.

    Burns is just another anti White liberal. There’s some hour long things on video about the father of the Carter family and his collections of what he called old timey music Not a word or sight of a black.

    just listen to old timey country music and you can hear the Scots and even more Irish roots.

    Get you a copper kettle
    Get you a copper coil
    Get you some new made corn mash
    And never more will you toil
    My Pappy made whiskey
    Grandpappy did too
    We ain’t paid no Whiskey tax
    (Loudly) since 1792

  127. anon[176] • Disclaimer says:

    Someone found an old yearbook photo of Justin Trudeau. Great stuff. Will he be canceled or not? On the one hand, he’s Castro’s boy one way or another, on the other hand it is the current year.

    https://apnews.com/74aaf4cf7ef148fdb75dfe977b99eb3c

    Let’s see if this pic comes through. That’s not blackface, that’s brownface, btw.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EEyetKpXkAA1GwH?format=jpg&name=small

  128. Where the hell is Ray Davies?!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    OK, Townshend or Davies?
    , @syonredux
    He's keeping the village green safe:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lc7dmu4G8oc
  129. @prosa123
    Moving away from music, I would say that the media coverage of George H.W. Bush's death ten months ago will be greatly overshadowed by the coverage Jimmy Carter will get.

    You said something there brother. Consider: Teddy Kennedy’s death and all the hoopla surrounding it was being broadcast live in Dunkin Donuts in Westbrook, Maine at midnight on a Saturday. I remember. I was there. I was in gobstruck, in bilious disbelief. I wish we had a live Webcam at the gates of hell…

  130. “In the unlikely event that I outlive him…”

    …would seem to ascribe some magik and devilishness to the subject. “You know, when a magic man like this comes along, the only thing you can really do is follow him and become his willing servant.”

  131. @Buzz Mohawk
    Speaking of Altamont (Steve's clip) my sister was there. She and her friends were not near the stage and had no idea that a Hell's Angel stabbed and killed somebody. Probably hardly anybody in the audience knew.

    She whined and complained so much about moving away from California the year before that my father flew her back to be with her friends that 1969 summer. She was all of 16, spoiled, and had already given birth to a girl who was adopted and is now my 51-year-old niece somewhere now if still living.

    Just another boomer story for the kids here.

    Steve has yet to expound on his musings on Vatican II and the massive “changes” in the West since the 60’s.

    Altamont, Woodstock etc, were what the old true Catholic Church would have condemned as occasions of sin, and absolutely forbidden to attend. The giant rock festivals and concerts were essentially black masses.

    By the later 60’s, not a peep from the prelates.

  132. @Jokah Macpherson
    He's got that straight guy that writes nearly all of his lyrics, so that definitely helps.

    85% of the time, gays have to reined in by straights. There are exceptions, however (Rob Halford of Judas Priest made the band’s image tougher, while Micheal Stipe is probably gay but chose to be earnestly adult instead of childishly campy with his role in REM)

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Michael Stipe is probably gay but chose to be earnestly adult instead of childishly campy with his role in REM

    https://78.media.tumblr.com/8b2e61a0d8231b6c1486678916efc81c/tumblr_nt7fadDj4L1sbf4sbo1_500.gif
  133. @Anon
    Ric Ocasek and Eddie Money were hit machines but let's be real, they made bubble gum music for 17 year olds to hit beach balls around to. It's not like they were Billy Corgan, Kevin Shields, or Jeff Tweedy or anything.

    “It’s not like they were Billy Corgan, Kevin Shields, or Jeff Tweedy or anything.”

    No, they were bigger, because their names are widely known. Who knows these three you named except those that consider Rock or Pop music art, which is very few.

  134. @Steve Sailer
    Indeed.

    TOtallly ridiculous stupid lying ignorant nonsense. You people are not only without souls. You are without minds. Don’t tell me about IQ you ignorant hapless boob.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    You've got pepper, my friend.
  135. Now I’m going to teach you poor pathetic ignoramuses.

    Hillbilly music sounds nothing like Scottish English and Irish folk music.

    Why?

    There is no other possible answer. The answer is blacks.

    The fact that blacks adopted all sorts of European styles songs and methods goes without saying.

    Chords are pure European. So are saxophones.

    But you fucking idiots always want to suppress the truth when country music isn’t even a real term. It’s a fake term made up by marketeers.

    Originally, before businessmen and marketing plans, black and white bands in roadhouses and on porches and at picnics and county fairs all over the US played exactly the same songs, the same style, and used the same methods.

    And they all called it “music.” Period.

    Grow up and read a damn book.

    • Replies: @Mr. Grey
    The complaint isn't that black people weren't making music, or that the pioneers of hillbilly/country music didn't have influences from black people. The point is that people like Ken Burns and most music critics fawn over black influences while glossing over European contributions. A fetish for black culture is a plus in progressive circles, while the European culture that made this country possible is ignored, for it is simply the water we swim in and is unrecognizable to the ignorant. We all have heard how Blues musicians weren't compensated for their music, but the same was true for Hillbilly songwriters who couldn't get their songs licensed by music publishers in New York. That's why BMI was created, to be able to pay songwriters and musicians that ASCAP would not represent. Rock n Roll supposedly was a black thing, nobody mentions how Chuck Berry was called Hillbilly for his musical influences and his first hit record, Maybellene, was a reworking of a Bob Willis song, "Ida Red". As for the claim that Hillbilly music sounds nothing like old world music, that is ridiculous. The music style evolved, but there are still plenty of old time songs being performed. Listen to Anita Carter's "Satan's Child" written in the early 60's. Try to find the Zimbabwaen influences in that one.
    , @Alden
    Instead of reading books, I listen. Mr Carter of whom you obviously never heard was born in the late 19th century and was interested in what was then called Old timey music, straight from 17th 18th century Scotland and Ireland.

    17th 18th 19th century old timey music had little black influence because the blacks lived with their wealthy and middle class owners far from the Whites who lived in the mountains forests and frontier far from the settled part of the country.

    You wrote about your ignorant opinions of late 20th 21th century country and country pop music. I write about 17th to late 19th century old timey American peasant and prole music collected by Mr Carter in his travels all over the parts of the south where few blacks lived.

    Listen to Irish music and Bluegrass. Same tunes and music. Listen even to country pop produced in 2019. If you’ve ever heard Irish and Scotch music it’s obvious it’s the same genre.

    The most obvious is a confederate song “ Rally to the Bonnie Blue Flag. “. That Royal Blue flag with a white star was the national flag of the Confederate States of America. That red one with the blue X was the battle flag, not the flag of the Confederate Nation. The battle flag by the way came straight from Scotland.

    Anyway, the music, the tune of Rally to the Bonnie Blue is identical to an old Irish tune. I forget the name of the Irish song but the music of both songs is identical.

    Start listening to Irish Scots and old timey country music. The similarities are obvious ignorant one.

    So many ignorant bigots on this site spouting their ignorance and bigotry. Ken Burns isn’t a historian, he’s just another anti White propagandist.
  136. For a guy with boy-band cheekbones Justin Trudeau sure has trouble taking an appropriate photograph. OTOH it’s clear now that high school yearbooks, when not Current, are the tool of the divil

  137. @prosa123
    Moving away from music, I would say that the media coverage of George H.W. Bush's death ten months ago will be greatly overshadowed by the coverage Jimmy Carter will get.

    Nah, Lefties aren’t that loyal.

  138. @Jim Don Bob
    Where the hell is Ray Davies?!

    OK, Townshend or Davies?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    OK, Townshend or Davies?
     
    Manilow or Bolton?

    Petula or Olivia?

    Donny or Marie?

    , @Jim Don Bob
    Townsend will be a bigger media deal when he dies because everybody has heard of The Who, but Davies produced far more interesting and varied work than Townsend.
  139. @Jim Don Bob
    Where the hell is Ray Davies?!

    He’s keeping the village green safe:

  140. In the vein of Debbie vs Chrissie (or Carly or whomever): Taylor Swift has just announced that nothing is worse than white supremacists. All of the “Nazi Barbie” name- calling against the girl has taken maximum effect.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    One could see this coming. Consider Ms. Swift was becoming a pin-up for White Women Beauty, her photo coming up on Heartiste, for example, on a regular basis. Given the zeitgeist, she could become an object of mass media/internet driven hate, or just go along with the game and start hating whitey. She's just a pretty ditzy girl. What else would you expect her to do?
  141. @prosa123
    rich guys like him can play god about the natives in Africa while unrich white boys in Ireland get beaten up by stronger blacks. Bonehead has African kids at his feet while average Irish boy has the black fist in his face

    Blacks are not stronger than whites. And there aren't many blacks in Ireland.

    There are far, far too many blacks in Ireland.

  142. @MEH 0910

    How do you keep remembering all of the stuff you mention? You saw X in Houston in 1978.
     
    https://www.amazon.com/Press-Photo-Houstons-University-College/dp/B07QX2G6HM

    1979 Press Photo Houston's Rice University team on College Bowl Quiz radio show

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/615klJgWGcL._SL1000_.jpg
    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51UnKFL-odL._SL1000_.jpg

    Currently unavailable.

    Somebody bought the photo.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I just bought it. Thanks.
  143. @MEH 0910

    Currently unavailable.
     
    Somebody bought the photo.

    I just bought it. Thanks.

    • Agree: MEH 0910
  144. @Redneck farmer
    I might just break down and cry when Weird Al dies.

    I might just break down and cry when Weird Al dies.

    Al learned of his parents’ death in a household accident just before a performance. He went on stage anyway. “Process” it later. Folks paid for tickets.

  145. @obwandiyag
    Now I'm going to teach you poor pathetic ignoramuses.

    Hillbilly music sounds nothing like Scottish English and Irish folk music.

    Why?

    There is no other possible answer. The answer is blacks.

    The fact that blacks adopted all sorts of European styles songs and methods goes without saying.

    Chords are pure European. So are saxophones.

    But you fucking idiots always want to suppress the truth when country music isn't even a real term. It's a fake term made up by marketeers.

    Originally, before businessmen and marketing plans, black and white bands in roadhouses and on porches and at picnics and county fairs all over the US played exactly the same songs, the same style, and used the same methods.

    And they all called it "music." Period.

    Grow up and read a damn book.

    The complaint isn’t that black people weren’t making music, or that the pioneers of hillbilly/country music didn’t have influences from black people. The point is that people like Ken Burns and most music critics fawn over black influences while glossing over European contributions. A fetish for black culture is a plus in progressive circles, while the European culture that made this country possible is ignored, for it is simply the water we swim in and is unrecognizable to the ignorant. We all have heard how Blues musicians weren’t compensated for their music, but the same was true for Hillbilly songwriters who couldn’t get their songs licensed by music publishers in New York. That’s why BMI was created, to be able to pay songwriters and musicians that ASCAP would not represent. Rock n Roll supposedly was a black thing, nobody mentions how Chuck Berry was called Hillbilly for his musical influences and his first hit record, Maybellene, was a reworking of a Bob Willis song, “Ida Red”. As for the claim that Hillbilly music sounds nothing like old world music, that is ridiculous. The music style evolved, but there are still plenty of old time songs being performed. Listen to Anita Carter’s “Satan’s Child” written in the early 60’s. Try to find the Zimbabwaen influences in that one.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    No it isn't, you fool. You know nothing. What happened for a century was ignorant bohunks like you ignored and suppressed the simple and obvious fact that American music, so-called "country" music, is blackwhite.

    You have a really really fine filter if you think the world is full of people screaming "country is black." In fact, you have no filter. You are just an idiot.
  146. Morrissey. All of your closet Latinx fans will come out of the woodwork to grieve.

  147. forget rock stars…Willie Nelson’s death will be Theeeee sad day for many people, well, some of us. I adore him and will miss him once that day arrives.

    He does not want to move outta TX much, these days, which has, hahhahhahhaa, always been the case for the last few years.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    When Merle Haggard died, surely Willie started looking over his shoulder for the grim reaper. Jones, Owens, Jennings, Twitty... No one gets out of here alive. Guy Clark's recent passing was a real shock for me. I just adored that man's song writing, which stayed strong even though the years took a toll on his voice.

    I find it interesting how some singer's voices stay sweet and clear, Dolly Parton comes to mind in particular, while others grow old, and rough and cause a fright. And Dolly and Reba have plastic surgeons who do excellent work. Wynonna Judd? Yikes.
    , @Marty
    According to Don Nelson, the retired basketball coach, Willie is a regular (and something of a pigeon) in poker games at Don’s place in Maui.
    , @Anonymous
    Every time I see Willie with that piece of shit guitar he insists on playing I cringe. It sounds like crap.
    And his phrasing has declined radically from the halfway decent records he made when Chet Atkins at RCA kept him from thinking he could swing it like Sinatra. Sinatra could do it on a good night when he wasn't loaded. Willie never could.
  148. @R.G. Camara
    Elton and Joel have toured together many times. They grew friendly for a bit, then became estranged.

    Joel has said that while he was touring with Elton that his (e.e. Joel's) alcoholism got really bad, and Joel even interrupted several joint concerts with his mayhem, pissing off Elton. One night Joel got so drunk he was just nonsensically shouting the names of Civil War battles while they were playing e.g.: "Antietam! Bull Run!"

    So its possible Elton is just better than Joel, but its also possible you saw Joel at his alcoholic worst, hence his subpar play.

    …pissing off Elton.

    War opened for Elton in the early ’70s and the crowd was so impressed they called for encore after encore. Elton was said to be quite steamed about the delay.

  149. @R.G. Camara
    Elton and Joel have toured together many times. They grew friendly for a bit, then became estranged.

    Joel has said that while he was touring with Elton that his (e.e. Joel's) alcoholism got really bad, and Joel even interrupted several joint concerts with his mayhem, pissing off Elton. One night Joel got so drunk he was just nonsensically shouting the names of Civil War battles while they were playing e.g.: "Antietam! Bull Run!"

    So its possible Elton is just better than Joel, but its also possible you saw Joel at his alcoholic worst, hence his subpar play.

    One night Joel got so drunk he was just nonsensically shouting the names of Civil War battles while they were playing e.g.: “Antietam! Bull Run!”

    An astute critic would notice that this is simply the manner in which Billy Joel’s corrupted Jewish mind works. The alcohol my have allowed his thoughts to flow freely without the hindrance of self-censorship, but it did not alter their fundamental nature. Think of the song “We Didn’t Start the Fire”. That’s exactly what it is. It’s just a concatenation of outbursts, a random litany of blurbs, namedropping, and headline items with nothing to connect them. I think the intended effect, as well as the spirit in which Billy Joel wrote the song, is supposed to be a smug sense of superiority as one surveys the fast-flowing collage, a sort of “Look at the crazy times we live in” humblebrag as one congratulates oneself on being above it all.

    Furthermore, think of how many Billy Joel songs feature some variant of the “You may be wrong/You may be right” motiff. It’s a characteristically Jewish phrase, the sort of thing you could picture Tevye mumbling in Fiddler on the Roof. Billy Joel thinks that to naive goyish ears, this sounds like some sort of deep wisdom born of millennia of persecution. That’s the ruse he’s trying to pull, but the fact is that most white people simply ignore this line. It is nothing more to them than a generic verbal filler, and for all intents and purposes he might as well be singing “do wah diddy diddy dum diddy do.” But in reality it is a peculiar Jewish obsession that Billy Joel cannot help kvetching about in his lyrics. The Jew wonders intently if the opinion of the man across from him is wrong or right, if this stranger (another Joelism!) just might be the prophet sent to him to pronounce victory or defeat, fortune or misery. Against this all important question, all the South Pacifics and Walter Winchells in the world are just so many “signs and wonders,” i.e. mysterious alchemical configurations meant to redound to the benefit of the faithful while befuddling the unchosen. We Didn’t Start the Fire is a veritable Talmud comprising both a vernacular and an esoteric interpretation. To the goyim it is “Wow, look at the headlines”. To Billy Joel it is “All things work together for the good of those (like me) who are special”.

    Once you see this you will not unsee it. Everywhere you look in Billy Joel you will find the litanies, the smugness, and the absolute insistence upon a special election. Billy Joe’s superiority does not depend on any qualities he may or may not possess. He is chosen just because he is. It is the Jewish mind at work.

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    One night Joel got so drunk he was just nonsensically shouting the names of Civil War battles while they were playing e.g.: “Antietam! Bull Run!”

    An astute critic would notice that this is simply the manner in which Billy Joel’s corrupted Jewish mind works.

    Obviously, nothing is more stereotypically Jewish than getting blind drunk and shouting the names of Civil War battlefields. Weren't there a half-dozen Seinfeld and Curb Your Enthusiasm episodes about that?

    , @Bugg
    Joel in concert says he hates performing "..Fire". In the album track he barely takes a breath, not fun to do in one take in front of 18,000 people, because sober or with a few pops you will screw it up unless you slow it down a bit. At the same time, well known he thinks Michael Stipe and REM ripped off that song with "It's The End of The World As We Know It" and he should get a writing credit for it.

    At a loss what it has to do with booze or Judaism.
  150. @Steve Sailer
    OK, Townshend or Davies?

    OK, Townshend or Davies?

    Manilow or Bolton?

    Petula or Olivia?

    Donny or Marie?

  151. Bosh with a cherry on top.

    Why were there no darkened lights and massive numbers of posts when the First Boomer Superstar, David Cassidy. drank himself to death?

    Sorry. My bad. Just couldn’t control the urge to heave everytime people get bent into pretzels over these overpaid nobodies.

  152. Anonymous[160] • Disclaimer says:
    @Old Prude
    Roy Clark boasted the banjo was the only instrument made in America because we were the only country that had the nerve. I reckon it was invented in the backwoods with corn liquor involved. Drums are possibly the only instrument of African origin.

    The banjo as we know it is British, dating from perhaps the 1850s, popular in later Victorian times. It had pretty well died out by the time Dixieland Jazz brought it back and again when bluegrass was invented by Bill Monroe who hired Earl Scruggs. Pete Seeger kept the old timer frailing and claw hammer styles alive and wrote a hugely successful book (as did Scruggs). It never dies completely but widely swings in popularity.

  153. https:/youtu.be/LsbrTSdcYSU

  154. @Mr. Grey
    The complaint isn't that black people weren't making music, or that the pioneers of hillbilly/country music didn't have influences from black people. The point is that people like Ken Burns and most music critics fawn over black influences while glossing over European contributions. A fetish for black culture is a plus in progressive circles, while the European culture that made this country possible is ignored, for it is simply the water we swim in and is unrecognizable to the ignorant. We all have heard how Blues musicians weren't compensated for their music, but the same was true for Hillbilly songwriters who couldn't get their songs licensed by music publishers in New York. That's why BMI was created, to be able to pay songwriters and musicians that ASCAP would not represent. Rock n Roll supposedly was a black thing, nobody mentions how Chuck Berry was called Hillbilly for his musical influences and his first hit record, Maybellene, was a reworking of a Bob Willis song, "Ida Red". As for the claim that Hillbilly music sounds nothing like old world music, that is ridiculous. The music style evolved, but there are still plenty of old time songs being performed. Listen to Anita Carter's "Satan's Child" written in the early 60's. Try to find the Zimbabwaen influences in that one.

    No it isn’t, you fool. You know nothing. What happened for a century was ignorant bohunks like you ignored and suppressed the simple and obvious fact that American music, so-called “country” music, is blackwhite.

    You have a really really fine filter if you think the world is full of people screaming “country is black.” In fact, you have no filter. You are just an idiot.

    • Replies: @Alden
    Okay folks, see what happens when anti White propagandists like Ken Burns put their propaganda on TV? Idiots believe his propaganda. Oooga booga has probably never heard a country song in his life but he saw Burns lying propaganda and is now an expert. Or maybe he just read the comment by someone who saw the Burns show
  155. Whose RIP post would get the most comments?

    Sir Mick or Sir Paul?

    Mick or Keith?

    Jimmy or Robert?

    Bob or Bruce? (“Bob” can be either Dylan or Seger or Geldof or Mould depending upon your taste.)

    Debbie or Chrissie?

    This is what we sound like now:

    Whose band was better, Glenn Miller or Benny Goodman?

    What about the colored bands – Ellington or Basie?

    Who is the best crooner – Sinatra or Martin?

    You don’t think it’s the same, but it is.

  156. Anonymous[160] • Disclaimer says:
    @YetAnotherAnon
    “Arwa Mahdawi is a Palestinian/British writer and brand strategist based in New York. "

    And she mostly writes just how you'd expect, although she keeps well away from the third rail which a Palestinian might be particularly tempted to poke.

    Occasionally she writes about something iSteveish, or perhaps Dalrockian.

    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/commentisfree/2019/sep/11/marriage-women-earnings-income-feminism

    " The fact women are struggling to find suitable husbands has caused glee in conservative circles. US shock-jock Rush Limbaugh says this story shows feminism has come back to bite women “in the butt”. “They’re earning money, but they still have the same attitude about marriage,” he crowed.

    I hate to say this, but Limbaugh does have a very tiny point. I’m struck by how many empowered women regress to the 1950s when it comes to marriage. They fight for equality at work, but still have traditional expectations when it comes to men proposing with expensive diamond rings. "
     
    Back on topic, what's with the Debbie Harry fetish? She's just not in the same musical league as Big Miss Muffett, and unless there's a lot I don't know about her (quite possible), her life's not been anywhere near as interesting (in the Chinese curse sense).

    Deb was bigger at Blondie’s peak and has had a longer career, Chrissie has been steadier in the public eye though. She’s a very much more confident stage performer but not as good looking. A fifty year vegetarian diet has made her age less well too, at least appearance wise. D looks pretty good for her age.

    We’ll know more in a few weeks when the Debbie Harry autobio hits the shelves. Chrissie put hers out a couple of years ago and it revealed a lot. Such as her being gangbanged by Hells Angels in their clubhouse. D also has a rape story, with the line “the stolen guitars hurt me more”. She doesn’t even play guitar.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    "Deb was bigger at Blondie’s peak and has had a longer career"

    She might have been 'bigger' at Blondie's peak, but so what? If that's the criterion I look forward to the Justin Bieber vs Michael Buble debates to come.

    Have Blondie had a longer career? They've split and reformed, whereas Big Miss Muffett just goes on and on. "I'll Stand By You" is much better than "Maria".

    Good looks aren't everything, or Janis Joplin would be totally forgotten while Maria Muldaur, Carly Simon and Judy Tzuke were still played.
    , @Alden
    Meh I’ve noticed that just about every woman entertainment industry celebrity claims some kind of real rape or child molestation story.

    I doubt those stories.
  157. if you live too long, people start to not care. so probably none of the guys Steve mentioned.

    if taylor swift got killed tomorrow half the country would stop. similar to how it was for kurt cobain. if bob dylan died, few people would care.

    and then there’s the audience factor. people here wouldn’t care that much if jay-z bit the dust.

  158. @obwandiyag
    TOtallly ridiculous stupid lying ignorant nonsense. You people are not only without souls. You are without minds. Don't tell me about IQ you ignorant hapless boob.

    You’ve got pepper, my friend.

  159. @Russ
    In the vein of Debbie vs Chrissie (or Carly or whomever): Taylor Swift has just announced that nothing is worse than white supremacists. All of the "Nazi Barbie" name- calling against the girl has taken maximum effect.

    One could see this coming. Consider Ms. Swift was becoming a pin-up for White Women Beauty, her photo coming up on Heartiste, for example, on a regular basis. Given the zeitgeist, she could become an object of mass media/internet driven hate, or just go along with the game and start hating whitey. She’s just a pretty ditzy girl. What else would you expect her to do?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Where I work everyone has been calling her Taydolf Swiftler for, well, ever.
  160. @Lagertha
    forget rock stars...Willie Nelson's death will be Theeeee sad day for many people, well, some of us. I adore him and will miss him once that day arrives.

    He does not want to move outta TX much, these days, which has, hahhahhahhaa, always been the case for the last few years.

    When Merle Haggard died, surely Willie started looking over his shoulder for the grim reaper. Jones, Owens, Jennings, Twitty… No one gets out of here alive. Guy Clark’s recent passing was a real shock for me. I just adored that man’s song writing, which stayed strong even though the years took a toll on his voice.

    I find it interesting how some singer’s voices stay sweet and clear, Dolly Parton comes to mind in particular, while others grow old, and rough and cause a fright. And Dolly and Reba have plastic surgeons who do excellent work. Wynonna Judd? Yikes.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    Naomi, not Wynonna.
    , @Curmudgeon

    Dolly and Reba have plastic surgeons who do excellent work.
     
    Dolly says it costs a lot of money to look cheap.
  161. @Anonymous
    McCartney: maybe if it happened very suddenly or dramatically, i.e. Michael Jackson/Princess Diana style.

    The media will feel obligated to make a big fuss, and there will be many official statements. He's such a big figure.

    But within the rock community, he was never much liked. For many serious rockers, Lennon was the Beatle that mattered. Even George Harrison was more interesting as a personality than McCartney. Even Ringo. McCartney was devilishly talented and has a pretty amazing post-Beatle career for about a decade(no mean feat) though it came nowhere near his output in the 60s. And he was the prettiest Beatle. But his personality was blah, and he had nothing to say, and when he said it, no one took it seriously. People remember "Imagine", not "Give Ireland back to the Irish". People were fascinated with Lennon and drugs but didn't much care for McCartney coming out for pot.

    Now, personally, I don't care if a pop star has something to say. I rather laud McCartney for sticking to his strengths as a pop star than straining to be an artist or save-the-worlder. Though Lennon was naturally more artistic, his forte was also as a pop musician and he should have stuck with that mode than making a fool of himself under Yoko's influence(and by trying to imitate Dylan, a true all-out artist).

    What really surprised me about McCartney was after his wife died. I always thought he was the sane rational one whereas Lennon, though more interesting, was kinda nuts. But when billionaire Paul married a crazy one-legged woman after Linda's death, I realized he was a closet-nutter even nuttier than Lennon.

    “when billionaire Paul married a crazy one-legged woman after Linda’s death, I realized he was a closet-nutter even nuttier than Lennon”

    Nah, I’m sure he saw a bird with a broken wing. He got suckered, but everyone’s allowed one mistake.

    You have to grudgingly admire Ms Mills for not letting a little thing like a missing leg stand in the way of ambition.

    Paul seems to have come through being one of the most famous, wealthy and desired guys in a world full of drugs and excess, with his sanity still pretty intact. His kids seem relatively sane, considering.

  162. @Old Prude
    One could see this coming. Consider Ms. Swift was becoming a pin-up for White Women Beauty, her photo coming up on Heartiste, for example, on a regular basis. Given the zeitgeist, she could become an object of mass media/internet driven hate, or just go along with the game and start hating whitey. She's just a pretty ditzy girl. What else would you expect her to do?

    Where I work everyone has been calling her Taydolf Swiftler for, well, ever.

    • LOL: JMcG
    • Replies: @Old Prude
    If I had it do all over again, I'd be Taylor Swift.
  163. @James Braxton
    I had to quit watching halfway through the first episode. It could have been called "Country Music: It's a black thing. You wouldn't understand."

    Also, I am sick of always hearing how the banjo came from Africa.

    When the fiddle came from Europe, it was the same fiddle we play today. The "banjo" from Africa was a dried out gourd which bore little resemblance in sound or appearance to the modern banjo. Give me a break.

    Is there a more cracker-white instrument than the banjo? When I think “guitar”, Robert Johnson or Jimi Hendrix, or BB King, or Robert Cray might come to mind. When I think “banjo”, Earl Scruggs, Roy Clark, Steve Martin, Bella Fleck, and Deliverance. Nothing darker than a sun tan, if even.

  164. @Anonymous
    Where I work everyone has been calling her Taydolf Swiftler for, well, ever.

    If I had it do all over again, I’d be Taylor Swift.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    If I had it do all over again, I’d be Taylor Swift.

    Dude, it's the current year! Everyone gets a mulligan . Look at Caitlyn or Jennifer Pritzker. I say go for it.
  165. @Old Prude
    When Merle Haggard died, surely Willie started looking over his shoulder for the grim reaper. Jones, Owens, Jennings, Twitty... No one gets out of here alive. Guy Clark's recent passing was a real shock for me. I just adored that man's song writing, which stayed strong even though the years took a toll on his voice.

    I find it interesting how some singer's voices stay sweet and clear, Dolly Parton comes to mind in particular, while others grow old, and rough and cause a fright. And Dolly and Reba have plastic surgeons who do excellent work. Wynonna Judd? Yikes.

    Naomi, not Wynonna.

  166. @Old Prude
    If I had it do all over again, I'd be Taylor Swift.

    If I had it do all over again, I’d be Taylor Swift.

    Dude, it’s the current year! Everyone gets a mulligan . Look at Caitlyn or Jennifer Pritzker. I say go for it.

    • LOL: Old Prude
  167. @Alden
    Exactly right. Anne Coulter’s pushing 60 and still has long hair. Also lives with a black man and approves of affirmative action.

    Anne Coulter’s pushing 60 and still has long hair. Also lives with a black man and approves of affirmative action.

    Coulter talks like a conservative and lives like a liberal.

    When it comes to hypocrisy conservatives leave liberals in the dust.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    They call her Dash 9. They don’t call her 844.

    Us foamers know why.

    The UP converted their remaining steam fleet to bunker oil. Has not burned coal for decades.

    Now they still need the fire department to water up at the fuel pad, but not a coal truck. They burn regular diesel now, Bunker C needing heated lines and not much cheaper.

    It’s a theory anyway.
  168. Little Richard Is still alive.

  169. I’m gonna put my money on Bob Dylan.

    Why? Well, being Jewish, you’ll have a four-way fight between hardcore counter-semites eager to gloat or claim they didn’t care, moderate counter-semites who feel bad because even if he was Jewish he was playing in the background when they got their first car or lost their virginity or something, the large Jewish minority who will point him out as an example of a guy who produced great American music and appreciated the ‘old, weird America’, and Christians who will argue he never really deconverted.

    Then there’s the whole fight over how his voice wasn’t really that good, or did he prove that it didn’t matter?

    Then the millennials chime in and say only old people care about this stuff.

    Isn’t the all-time record still the one where Steve suggested Otto Skorzeny was a Mossad agent?

    • Troll: HammerJack
    • Replies: @SFG
    HammerJack: I'm serious. The one with the most comments isn't the commentariat's favorite. It's the one that creates the most argument.
  170. @Known Fact
    "Arwa Mahdawi is a Palestinian/British writer and brand strategist based in New York. She writes about pop culture, marketing, race, technology, and women's issues." And Ivanka's hair.

    At least she's fairly attractive for an op-ed harpy. She has nice hair but apparently harbors some resentment based on other factors

    You know, this is a huge blindspot the older generation of right-wing guys has. They are way too susceptible to a pretty face. Remember Sarah Palin?

    There are quite a few feminists who are physically attractive, and they are no less hateful for it.

  171. How many people realize that Jerry Lee Lewis is still alive?

  172. @Anonymous
    Deb was bigger at Blondie’s peak and has had a longer career, Chrissie has been steadier in the public eye though. She’s a very much more confident stage performer but not as good looking. A fifty year vegetarian diet has made her age less well too, at least appearance wise. D looks pretty good for her age.

    We’ll know more in a few weeks when the Debbie Harry autobio hits the shelves. Chrissie put hers out a couple of years ago and it revealed a lot. Such as her being gangbanged by Hells Angels in their clubhouse. D also has a rape story, with the line “the stolen guitars hurt me more”. She doesn’t even play guitar.

    “Deb was bigger at Blondie’s peak and has had a longer career”

    She might have been ‘bigger’ at Blondie’s peak, but so what? If that’s the criterion I look forward to the Justin Bieber vs Michael Buble debates to come.

    Have Blondie had a longer career? They’ve split and reformed, whereas Big Miss Muffett just goes on and on. “I’ll Stand By You” is much better than “Maria”.

    Good looks aren’t everything, or Janis Joplin would be totally forgotten while Maria Muldaur, Carly Simon and Judy Tzuke were still played.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Both are great singers, though Chrissie is more stageworthy. Debbie has had her share of bad gigs, like the GD the Blondies are inconsistent from night to night and D does not work a tough room well. On a good night with a supportive crowd she is really, really good. In a half sold out Midwest shed they will suck, except Clem, who never fails to kick ass.

    I sort of know Deb and both factions of the band. Nigel bought me lunch once when I was in LA and broke. Chris is hard to talk to but a pretty amazing guitar player when he wants to be.

    I have never met Chrissie really, I’ve been within five feet of her twice but never talked to her, or she to me. I’ve talked to Martin Chambers and Robbie McIntosh, and corresponded a little with Natalie-I did not bring her mum up. I sort of suspect she reads this site occasionally. I suspect she is somewhat based but doesn’t need any more heat than she’s had and intends to keep low on it.

    Like her arch nemesis Uncle Ted, Chrissie demands a reaction from the crowd. If they disappoint her she will smack them. It’s not f*** me, it’s f*** you. She owns that stage. If you’re not there to put your cell phones away and have a good time you need to GTFO. Or she will. As a crowd in Dubai found out.
    , @Hhsiii
    No need to choose between the two. Both great in their way. But oh man, Debbie circa ‘78. 23 skidoo. And Parallel Lines was just about perfect. Pretty Baby and Picture This.

    There’s a clip of them doing A Girl Should Know Better at CBGBs in 1975 or so. The band all still sport long hair hippie look. Debbie is already new style.
  173. @R.G. Camara
    Elton played Rush Limbaugh's last wedding only a few years ago. Despite his degenerative sexual behavior and silly stage outfits, on the whole I think he's quite old fashioned on the rest. He's patriotic to the U.K. and his music can be enjoyed by straights without any hint of the gay. He strikes me as a Noel Coward kind of gay, just with a Liberace stage flair.

    Elton played Rush Limbaugh’s last wedding only a few years ago.

    Rush paid Elton a million dollars to sing at his wedding, and said he was a complete gentleman. Good for them both.

  174. @Steve Sailer
    OK, Townshend or Davies?

    Townsend will be a bigger media deal when he dies because everybody has heard of The Who, but Davies produced far more interesting and varied work than Townsend.

  175. @SFG
    I'm gonna put my money on Bob Dylan.


    Why? Well, being Jewish, you'll have a four-way fight between hardcore counter-semites eager to gloat or claim they didn't care, moderate counter-semites who feel bad because even if he was Jewish he was playing in the background when they got their first car or lost their virginity or something, the large Jewish minority who will point him out as an example of a guy who produced great American music and appreciated the 'old, weird America', and Christians who will argue he never really deconverted.

    Then there's the whole fight over how his voice wasn't really that good, or did he prove that it didn't matter?

    Then the millennials chime in and say only old people care about this stuff.

    Isn't the all-time record still the one where Steve suggested Otto Skorzeny was a Mossad agent?

    HammerJack: I’m serious. The one with the most comments isn’t the commentariat’s favorite. It’s the one that creates the most argument.

  176. Is it really a big deal if someone passes away naturally at a ripe old age? I don’t know that it is. We can all just acknowledge their contributions to the Luciferian project without oohing and ahhing over the inevitable.

  177. @Anonymous
    There was 'Paul is Dead' and 'Elvis is Alive'.

    Could the 60s thing happened if internet existed back then?

    Maybe everyone would have stayed home to watch it online than go to Woodstock.

    Biggest death news back then would have been Brian Jones, Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, and Jimi Hendrix.

    Best career move for rockers is to die at their peak or just before their artistic decline.

    If they die at the peak, people ponder what-might-have-been had they lived longer.
    If they die before the sure decline, people don't get tired of them.

    Stones would have done best to die in a plane crash after Exile on Main Street, maybe their peak. Or after Tattoo You, the last output when they still mattered as a force in music.



    https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/nik-cohn-i-was-right-the-stones-after-the-age-of-30-didn-t-create-anything-good-1.2505387

    As Steve has written many times, both in the arts and in science, after 32 years old your best creative and productive years are behind. Sadly, we were all born to die young.

  178. @Alfa158
    All the episodes spend about 1/3 of the content on the contributions of Black music to Country. There actually was a lot of cross-pollination, but curiously, or maybe not so curiously, there is no mention of the reciprocal being at least as true.
    It may be pretty subjective, but judge for yourself and listen to the musical structure and instruments developed by Europeans, and those developed by Africans, then compare them to the music of African-Americans. There would have been no Jazz or Blues as we know them without the European contribution. Good luck waiting for a documentary that will point that out.

    listen to the musical structure and instruments developed by Europeans,

    I find it interesting that the Asians, particularly the Chinese and Japanese, generally acknowledge that European music and it instruments are the apex of the music development, yet there is a European fascination with the “contributions” of Africans on European/American music.
    I recall being at a friend’s place, in the late 60s, watching a variety TV show when a Black Gospel Choir was singing and shaking. My friend’s father, who was born in England, said matter-of-factly, “There is something very primitive there.”
    Rock and Roll, no doubt, has been influenced by Blacks, and with it the notion that “Blacks have rythm”. However, a music teacher pointed out that it is not rythm, it is beat. A jig has rythm, as do waltzs, polkas, sea shanties, and all European music in general. Asian music has some rythm, but African and American Indian music is beat. Country music is not beat, it is rythm.

  179. @Old Prude
    When Merle Haggard died, surely Willie started looking over his shoulder for the grim reaper. Jones, Owens, Jennings, Twitty... No one gets out of here alive. Guy Clark's recent passing was a real shock for me. I just adored that man's song writing, which stayed strong even though the years took a toll on his voice.

    I find it interesting how some singer's voices stay sweet and clear, Dolly Parton comes to mind in particular, while others grow old, and rough and cause a fright. And Dolly and Reba have plastic surgeons who do excellent work. Wynonna Judd? Yikes.

    Dolly and Reba have plastic surgeons who do excellent work.

    Dolly says it costs a lot of money to look cheap.

  180. @Lagertha
    forget rock stars...Willie Nelson's death will be Theeeee sad day for many people, well, some of us. I adore him and will miss him once that day arrives.

    He does not want to move outta TX much, these days, which has, hahhahhahhaa, always been the case for the last few years.

    According to Don Nelson, the retired basketball coach, Willie is a regular (and something of a pigeon) in poker games at Don’s place in Maui.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    That is correct. He sticks to friends he adores. He is genuine....therefore, all the people he will spend time with are usually genuine, like Woody. I hope he has good health for another decade.
  181. @prosa123
    rich guys like him can play god about the natives in Africa while unrich white boys in Ireland get beaten up by stronger blacks. Bonehead has African kids at his feet while average Irish boy has the black fist in his face

    Blacks are not stronger than whites. And there aren't many blacks in Ireland.

    Check out Irish savant blog to learn about the black savages in Ireland. There aren’t that many blacks in America either, 12% but they commit most of the crime including many many assaults on Whites.

    As per usual, the blacks in Ireland roam in packs when hunting Whites. Hard for one to fight off five. Harder still for a 100 pd 12 year old to fight off 4 160 pd 16 year olds

  182. @Steve Sailer
    Sinatra had a teen girl audience in 1945: my late mother-in-law was a bobbysoxer who worshipped Frank when she was 15.

    Teen girls actually had good taste in guy performers with huge potential (Sinatra, Beatles, Stones) up until some point at which the music industry figured out how to reverse engineer boy bands.

    In fact, I think he was the first performer to have teenage girls screaming/crying/fainting at his concerts, which caused a lot of concerned commentary. Rightly, I guess. It’s weird, isn’t it?

  183. @Feryl
    85% of the time, gays have to reined in by straights. There are exceptions, however (Rob Halford of Judas Priest made the band's image tougher, while Micheal Stipe is probably gay but chose to be earnestly adult instead of childishly campy with his role in REM)

    Michael Stipe is probably gay but chose to be earnestly adult instead of childishly campy with his role in REM

  184. @obwandiyag
    Now I'm going to teach you poor pathetic ignoramuses.

    Hillbilly music sounds nothing like Scottish English and Irish folk music.

    Why?

    There is no other possible answer. The answer is blacks.

    The fact that blacks adopted all sorts of European styles songs and methods goes without saying.

    Chords are pure European. So are saxophones.

    But you fucking idiots always want to suppress the truth when country music isn't even a real term. It's a fake term made up by marketeers.

    Originally, before businessmen and marketing plans, black and white bands in roadhouses and on porches and at picnics and county fairs all over the US played exactly the same songs, the same style, and used the same methods.

    And they all called it "music." Period.

    Grow up and read a damn book.

    Instead of reading books, I listen. Mr Carter of whom you obviously never heard was born in the late 19th century and was interested in what was then called Old timey music, straight from 17th 18th century Scotland and Ireland.

    17th 18th 19th century old timey music had little black influence because the blacks lived with their wealthy and middle class owners far from the Whites who lived in the mountains forests and frontier far from the settled part of the country.

    You wrote about your ignorant opinions of late 20th 21th century country and country pop music. I write about 17th to late 19th century old timey American peasant and prole music collected by Mr Carter in his travels all over the parts of the south where few blacks lived.

    Listen to Irish music and Bluegrass. Same tunes and music. Listen even to country pop produced in 2019. If you’ve ever heard Irish and Scotch music it’s obvious it’s the same genre.

    The most obvious is a confederate song “ Rally to the Bonnie Blue Flag. “. That Royal Blue flag with a white star was the national flag of the Confederate States of America. That red one with the blue X was the battle flag, not the flag of the Confederate Nation. The battle flag by the way came straight from Scotland.

    Anyway, the music, the tune of Rally to the Bonnie Blue is identical to an old Irish tune. I forget the name of the Irish song but the music of both songs is identical.

    Start listening to Irish Scots and old timey country music. The similarities are obvious ignorant one.

    So many ignorant bigots on this site spouting their ignorance and bigotry. Ken Burns isn’t a historian, he’s just another anti White propagandist.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    That red one with the blue X was the battle flag, not the flag of the Confederate Nation. The battle flag by the way came straight from Scotland.
     
    That's the cross of St. Andrew, the patron saint of Scotland.

    He was also the patron of the old state of Burgundy which provided Spain with a royal family. That's how the same cross got onto Spanish military flags. (The Spanish air force still paints it on their aircraft.)
    , @Anonymous
    Bluegrass music per se is a genre invented by one man, Bill Monroe. It was most heavily influenced by Appalachian Celtic folk (in the true sense) music but there is an unmistakable “coon music” element there too. Hillbillies and prairiebillies of Monroe’s era were non-ideological. They would listen to talented black musicians without wanting to mix with them in church or in bed. A hillbilly man who took up with a black woman was effectively shunned. A white hillbilly girl that took up with a black didn’t show her face around her own kin, they tended to vanish.

    When Elvis covered “Blue Moon of Kentucky” he instinctively went for the negro element. The whole band was afraid Monroe would kick their asses when they were in Nashville. He was a large and powerful man and known as a good alley fighter.

    Monroe played up the elder statesman/ Pope of Bluegrass thing in his later years but I suspect there was an element of ambivalence in the role bluegrass music played. In itself it was not negrifying, besides whites only Japanese and some Jews were into it, but he wound up mostly categorized as “folk music” which really was the parlor music of Communists and anti-whites after WWII.
    , @Old Prude
    Somalia's flag is the Bonnie Blue Flag. WTF?!
    , @kaganovitch
    I forget the name of the Irish song but the music of both songs is identical.

    The Irish Jaunting Car
    , @obwandiyag
    Yeah! Guy who admits, actually admits to not reading books calls other people "ignorant." Fatuousness, thy name is Unz.

    You just don't know shit about shit you ignorant suburban boob.

  185. @obwandiyag
    No it isn't, you fool. You know nothing. What happened for a century was ignorant bohunks like you ignored and suppressed the simple and obvious fact that American music, so-called "country" music, is blackwhite.

    You have a really really fine filter if you think the world is full of people screaming "country is black." In fact, you have no filter. You are just an idiot.

    Okay folks, see what happens when anti White propagandists like Ken Burns put their propaganda on TV? Idiots believe his propaganda. Oooga booga has probably never heard a country song in his life but he saw Burns lying propaganda and is now an expert. Or maybe he just read the comment by someone who saw the Burns show

  186. @Anonymous
    Deb was bigger at Blondie’s peak and has had a longer career, Chrissie has been steadier in the public eye though. She’s a very much more confident stage performer but not as good looking. A fifty year vegetarian diet has made her age less well too, at least appearance wise. D looks pretty good for her age.

    We’ll know more in a few weeks when the Debbie Harry autobio hits the shelves. Chrissie put hers out a couple of years ago and it revealed a lot. Such as her being gangbanged by Hells Angels in their clubhouse. D also has a rape story, with the line “the stolen guitars hurt me more”. She doesn’t even play guitar.

    Meh I’ve noticed that just about every woman entertainment industry celebrity claims some kind of real rape or child molestation story.

    I doubt those stories.

    • Replies: @Feryl
    Well, "creative" people often take lots of risks.....so......Maybe these women hung out with the wrong kind of people and paid the price for it. And that's not even getting into the "casting couch" stuff.
  187. Anonymous[358] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden
    Instead of reading books, I listen. Mr Carter of whom you obviously never heard was born in the late 19th century and was interested in what was then called Old timey music, straight from 17th 18th century Scotland and Ireland.

    17th 18th 19th century old timey music had little black influence because the blacks lived with their wealthy and middle class owners far from the Whites who lived in the mountains forests and frontier far from the settled part of the country.

    You wrote about your ignorant opinions of late 20th 21th century country and country pop music. I write about 17th to late 19th century old timey American peasant and prole music collected by Mr Carter in his travels all over the parts of the south where few blacks lived.

    Listen to Irish music and Bluegrass. Same tunes and music. Listen even to country pop produced in 2019. If you’ve ever heard Irish and Scotch music it’s obvious it’s the same genre.

    The most obvious is a confederate song “ Rally to the Bonnie Blue Flag. “. That Royal Blue flag with a white star was the national flag of the Confederate States of America. That red one with the blue X was the battle flag, not the flag of the Confederate Nation. The battle flag by the way came straight from Scotland.

    Anyway, the music, the tune of Rally to the Bonnie Blue is identical to an old Irish tune. I forget the name of the Irish song but the music of both songs is identical.

    Start listening to Irish Scots and old timey country music. The similarities are obvious ignorant one.

    So many ignorant bigots on this site spouting their ignorance and bigotry. Ken Burns isn’t a historian, he’s just another anti White propagandist.

    That red one with the blue X was the battle flag, not the flag of the Confederate Nation. The battle flag by the way came straight from Scotland.

    That’s the cross of St. Andrew, the patron saint of Scotland.

    He was also the patron of the old state of Burgundy which provided Spain with a royal family. That’s how the same cross got onto Spanish military flags. (The Spanish air force still paints it on their aircraft.)

    • Replies: @BB753
    The Red Cross of Burgundy was actually the Spanish official flag until 1843.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_Spain


    This used to be the Spanish flag:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_of_Burgundy#/media/File%3ACross_of_Burgundy_(Template).svg
  188. Anonymous[160] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden
    Instead of reading books, I listen. Mr Carter of whom you obviously never heard was born in the late 19th century and was interested in what was then called Old timey music, straight from 17th 18th century Scotland and Ireland.

    17th 18th 19th century old timey music had little black influence because the blacks lived with their wealthy and middle class owners far from the Whites who lived in the mountains forests and frontier far from the settled part of the country.

    You wrote about your ignorant opinions of late 20th 21th century country and country pop music. I write about 17th to late 19th century old timey American peasant and prole music collected by Mr Carter in his travels all over the parts of the south where few blacks lived.

    Listen to Irish music and Bluegrass. Same tunes and music. Listen even to country pop produced in 2019. If you’ve ever heard Irish and Scotch music it’s obvious it’s the same genre.

    The most obvious is a confederate song “ Rally to the Bonnie Blue Flag. “. That Royal Blue flag with a white star was the national flag of the Confederate States of America. That red one with the blue X was the battle flag, not the flag of the Confederate Nation. The battle flag by the way came straight from Scotland.

    Anyway, the music, the tune of Rally to the Bonnie Blue is identical to an old Irish tune. I forget the name of the Irish song but the music of both songs is identical.

    Start listening to Irish Scots and old timey country music. The similarities are obvious ignorant one.

    So many ignorant bigots on this site spouting their ignorance and bigotry. Ken Burns isn’t a historian, he’s just another anti White propagandist.

    Bluegrass music per se is a genre invented by one man, Bill Monroe. It was most heavily influenced by Appalachian Celtic folk (in the true sense) music but there is an unmistakable “coon music” element there too. Hillbillies and prairiebillies of Monroe’s era were non-ideological. They would listen to talented black musicians without wanting to mix with them in church or in bed. A hillbilly man who took up with a black woman was effectively shunned. A white hillbilly girl that took up with a black didn’t show her face around her own kin, they tended to vanish.

    When Elvis covered “Blue Moon of Kentucky” he instinctively went for the negro element. The whole band was afraid Monroe would kick their asses when they were in Nashville. He was a large and powerful man and known as a good alley fighter.

    Monroe played up the elder statesman/ Pope of Bluegrass thing in his later years but I suspect there was an element of ambivalence in the role bluegrass music played. In itself it was not negrifying, besides whites only Japanese and some Jews were into it, but he wound up mostly categorized as “folk music” which really was the parlor music of Communists and anti-whites after WWII.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    Bluegrass. Now there will be an arguement: Play as fast as you can or wail and whine. A little goes a long way. Check out Bela Flecks "Big Foot" for what Bluegrass could be...
    , @JMcG
    There’s a big bluegrass revival going on in Ireland at the moment, at least that part of Ireland which isn’t Dublin. All of the small radio stations out in the countryside have bluegrass programming.
  189. Anonymous[160] • Disclaimer says:
    @YetAnotherAnon
    "Deb was bigger at Blondie’s peak and has had a longer career"

    She might have been 'bigger' at Blondie's peak, but so what? If that's the criterion I look forward to the Justin Bieber vs Michael Buble debates to come.

    Have Blondie had a longer career? They've split and reformed, whereas Big Miss Muffett just goes on and on. "I'll Stand By You" is much better than "Maria".

    Good looks aren't everything, or Janis Joplin would be totally forgotten while Maria Muldaur, Carly Simon and Judy Tzuke were still played.

    Both are great singers, though Chrissie is more stageworthy. Debbie has had her share of bad gigs, like the GD the Blondies are inconsistent from night to night and D does not work a tough room well. On a good night with a supportive crowd she is really, really good. In a half sold out Midwest shed they will suck, except Clem, who never fails to kick ass.

    I sort of know Deb and both factions of the band. Nigel bought me lunch once when I was in LA and broke. Chris is hard to talk to but a pretty amazing guitar player when he wants to be.

    I have never met Chrissie really, I’ve been within five feet of her twice but never talked to her, or she to me. I’ve talked to Martin Chambers and Robbie McIntosh, and corresponded a little with Natalie-I did not bring her mum up. I sort of suspect she reads this site occasionally. I suspect she is somewhat based but doesn’t need any more heat than she’s had and intends to keep low on it.

    Like her arch nemesis Uncle Ted, Chrissie demands a reaction from the crowd. If they disappoint her she will smack them. It’s not f*** me, it’s f*** you. She owns that stage. If you’re not there to put your cell phones away and have a good time you need to GTFO. Or she will. As a crowd in Dubai found out.

    • Replies: @Hhsiii
    There’s a YouTube clip of Blondie doing an early, punky version of Denis live on a Dutch tv show. Clem just goes wild.
  190. McCartney over Mick, and Lennon. I get the Stones are more rock, I love Beggars Banquet, Aftermath Exile on Main Street.

    And Lennon was less maudlin, usually. But McCartney is a much better musician, melody writer, singer than both of them, easily.

    The combo of early rock influences, Everly harmonies, Little Richard and Elvis vocalizations, Holly songwriting, with some English music hall. McCartney could rock out early. I’m Down, Saw Her Standing there, etc. And later stuff like Paperback Writer, You Never Give Me Your Money. Great bass playing.

    And Paul could play lead guitar damn well (the solo on Taxman, song written by George, was by Paul, a rags style homage to George that rocked). Drums on Ballad of John and Yoko. The John Cage style piano in Day in The Life in The woke up fell outta bed bit is Paul.

    Funny story, when Jagger opened a club in London in ‘68, Paul shows up. People are dancing to Street Fighting Man. Paul hands DJ new single Hey Jude backed by Revolution. The crowd goes nuts and they are played again and again all night.

    Now She prefer Street Fighting Man, and Revolution is John. But McCartney was just a hit machine. And by the end John couldn’t finish anything with McCartney prodding him.

    Ringing is also a very underrated drummer. Everything in service of the song. And very melodic. Listen to him in Rain and Paperback Writer.

    And Paul reinvented himself as arena rock star.Band in the Run over any post Beatles Lennon. And I think George did well with Wilbury’s.

    I used to believe yeah John was the serious one, and Paul fluff. But that’s mostly just rock critic shtick. Paul is just a better listen. Amazingly talented guy.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Hhsiii
    Sorry, needed an editor.

    John and Paul at their best together. My current fave Lennon song is I Don't Want to Spoil The Party.
  191. @Hhsiii
    McCartney over Mick, and Lennon. I get the Stones are more rock, I love Beggars Banquet, Aftermath Exile on Main Street.

    And Lennon was less maudlin, usually. But McCartney is a much better musician, melody writer, singer than both of them, easily.

    The combo of early rock influences, Everly harmonies, Little Richard and Elvis vocalizations, Holly songwriting, with some English music hall. McCartney could rock out early. I’m Down, Saw Her Standing there, etc. And later stuff like Paperback Writer, You Never Give Me Your Money. Great bass playing.

    And Paul could play lead guitar damn well (the solo on Taxman, song written by George, was by Paul, a rags style homage to George that rocked). Drums on Ballad of John and Yoko. The John Cage style piano in Day in The Life in The woke up fell outta bed bit is Paul.

    Funny story, when Jagger opened a club in London in ‘68, Paul shows up. People are dancing to Street Fighting Man. Paul hands DJ new single Hey Jude backed by Revolution. The crowd goes nuts and they are played again and again all night.

    Now She prefer Street Fighting Man, and Revolution is John. But McCartney was just a hit machine. And by the end John couldn’t finish anything with McCartney prodding him.

    Ringing is also a very underrated drummer. Everything in service of the song. And very melodic. Listen to him in Rain and Paperback Writer.

    And Paul reinvented himself as arena rock star.Band in the Run over any post Beatles Lennon. And I think George did well with Wilbury’s.

    I used to believe yeah John was the serious one, and Paul fluff. But that’s mostly just rock critic shtick. Paul is just a better listen. Amazingly talented guy.

    Sorry, needed an editor.

    John and Paul at their best together. My current fave Lennon song is I Don’t Want to Spoil The Party.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    My current fave Lennon song is I Don’t Want to Spoil The Party.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJFpUb7JGYo
  192. @YetAnotherAnon
    "Deb was bigger at Blondie’s peak and has had a longer career"

    She might have been 'bigger' at Blondie's peak, but so what? If that's the criterion I look forward to the Justin Bieber vs Michael Buble debates to come.

    Have Blondie had a longer career? They've split and reformed, whereas Big Miss Muffett just goes on and on. "I'll Stand By You" is much better than "Maria".

    Good looks aren't everything, or Janis Joplin would be totally forgotten while Maria Muldaur, Carly Simon and Judy Tzuke were still played.

    No need to choose between the two. Both great in their way. But oh man, Debbie circa ‘78. 23 skidoo. And Parallel Lines was just about perfect. Pretty Baby and Picture This.

    There’s a clip of them doing A Girl Should Know Better at CBGBs in 1975 or so. The band all still sport long hair hippie look. Debbie is already new style.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    "There’s a clip of them doing A Girl Should Know Better at CBGBs in 1975 or so. The band all still sport long hair hippie look. Debbie is already new style."

    Twas a sight to behold around 1975-6 to see long haired hippies changing in a few days into crop-haired punks, the flares becoming drainpipes and the velvet jackets becoming leather or PVC.

    Joe Strummer made that transformation earlier than most, but my favourite quick-change was the singer of The Ruts, who'd previously lived along with the guitarist in a Welsh hippy commune and played in a band called Aslan (after the CS Lewis figure), transforming into someone who looked like he'd forgotten to take his anti-psychotics. The guitarist kept his hair and a love of the flanger.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RoT-stXKpP8

  193. @Alden
    Instead of reading books, I listen. Mr Carter of whom you obviously never heard was born in the late 19th century and was interested in what was then called Old timey music, straight from 17th 18th century Scotland and Ireland.

    17th 18th 19th century old timey music had little black influence because the blacks lived with their wealthy and middle class owners far from the Whites who lived in the mountains forests and frontier far from the settled part of the country.

    You wrote about your ignorant opinions of late 20th 21th century country and country pop music. I write about 17th to late 19th century old timey American peasant and prole music collected by Mr Carter in his travels all over the parts of the south where few blacks lived.

    Listen to Irish music and Bluegrass. Same tunes and music. Listen even to country pop produced in 2019. If you’ve ever heard Irish and Scotch music it’s obvious it’s the same genre.

    The most obvious is a confederate song “ Rally to the Bonnie Blue Flag. “. That Royal Blue flag with a white star was the national flag of the Confederate States of America. That red one with the blue X was the battle flag, not the flag of the Confederate Nation. The battle flag by the way came straight from Scotland.

    Anyway, the music, the tune of Rally to the Bonnie Blue is identical to an old Irish tune. I forget the name of the Irish song but the music of both songs is identical.

    Start listening to Irish Scots and old timey country music. The similarities are obvious ignorant one.

    So many ignorant bigots on this site spouting their ignorance and bigotry. Ken Burns isn’t a historian, he’s just another anti White propagandist.

    Somalia’s flag is the Bonnie Blue Flag. WTF?!

  194. @Anonymous
    Bluegrass music per se is a genre invented by one man, Bill Monroe. It was most heavily influenced by Appalachian Celtic folk (in the true sense) music but there is an unmistakable “coon music” element there too. Hillbillies and prairiebillies of Monroe’s era were non-ideological. They would listen to talented black musicians without wanting to mix with them in church or in bed. A hillbilly man who took up with a black woman was effectively shunned. A white hillbilly girl that took up with a black didn’t show her face around her own kin, they tended to vanish.

    When Elvis covered “Blue Moon of Kentucky” he instinctively went for the negro element. The whole band was afraid Monroe would kick their asses when they were in Nashville. He was a large and powerful man and known as a good alley fighter.

    Monroe played up the elder statesman/ Pope of Bluegrass thing in his later years but I suspect there was an element of ambivalence in the role bluegrass music played. In itself it was not negrifying, besides whites only Japanese and some Jews were into it, but he wound up mostly categorized as “folk music” which really was the parlor music of Communists and anti-whites after WWII.

    Bluegrass. Now there will be an arguement: Play as fast as you can or wail and whine. A little goes a long way. Check out Bela Flecks “Big Foot” for what Bluegrass could be…

    • Replies: @Jefferson Temple
    Check out Dailey and Vincent for what Bluegrass is. Also AKUS before they went silent. There is a reason that Robert Plant called Alison Krauss's voice that of an angel. As with any genre there will be mediocrity but the stars still shine.
  195. @Intelligent Dasein

    One night Joel got so drunk he was just nonsensically shouting the names of Civil War battles while they were playing e.g.: “Antietam! Bull Run!”
     
    An astute critic would notice that this is simply the manner in which Billy Joel's corrupted Jewish mind works. The alcohol my have allowed his thoughts to flow freely without the hindrance of self-censorship, but it did not alter their fundamental nature. Think of the song "We Didn't Start the Fire". That's exactly what it is. It's just a concatenation of outbursts, a random litany of blurbs, namedropping, and headline items with nothing to connect them. I think the intended effect, as well as the spirit in which Billy Joel wrote the song, is supposed to be a smug sense of superiority as one surveys the fast-flowing collage, a sort of "Look at the crazy times we live in" humblebrag as one congratulates oneself on being above it all.

    Furthermore, think of how many Billy Joel songs feature some variant of the "You may be wrong/You may be right" motiff. It's a characteristically Jewish phrase, the sort of thing you could picture Tevye mumbling in Fiddler on the Roof. Billy Joel thinks that to naive goyish ears, this sounds like some sort of deep wisdom born of millennia of persecution. That's the ruse he's trying to pull, but the fact is that most white people simply ignore this line. It is nothing more to them than a generic verbal filler, and for all intents and purposes he might as well be singing "do wah diddy diddy dum diddy do." But in reality it is a peculiar Jewish obsession that Billy Joel cannot help kvetching about in his lyrics. The Jew wonders intently if the opinion of the man across from him is wrong or right, if this stranger (another Joelism!) just might be the prophet sent to him to pronounce victory or defeat, fortune or misery. Against this all important question, all the South Pacifics and Walter Winchells in the world are just so many "signs and wonders," i.e. mysterious alchemical configurations meant to redound to the benefit of the faithful while befuddling the unchosen. We Didn't Start the Fire is a veritable Talmud comprising both a vernacular and an esoteric interpretation. To the goyim it is "Wow, look at the headlines". To Billy Joel it is "All things work together for the good of those (like me) who are special".

    Once you see this you will not unsee it. Everywhere you look in Billy Joel you will find the litanies, the smugness, and the absolute insistence upon a special election. Billy Joe's superiority does not depend on any qualities he may or may not possess. He is chosen just because he is. It is the Jewish mind at work.

    One night Joel got so drunk he was just nonsensically shouting the names of Civil War battles while they were playing e.g.: “Antietam! Bull Run!”

    An astute critic would notice that this is simply the manner in which Billy Joel’s corrupted Jewish mind works.

    Obviously, nothing is more stereotypically Jewish than getting blind drunk and shouting the names of Civil War battlefields. Weren’t there a half-dozen Seinfeld and Curb Your Enthusiasm episodes about that?

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    It's in the commentary on the megillah of Esther: celebrate so hard that you cannot tell Mordecai apart from Haman, nor Antietam from Manassas. Actually, a lot of Civil War names either come from the Old Testament or sound like they do. But if it is Jewish perfidy to remember Civil war battles, should we forgive the sodomite, who just sits there and acts like he doesn't totally get what's going on, when he obviously should join in and shout along? Who is the real sinner here?
    -------
    Re Ramones being a hard sell, a while back NPR interviewed the music industry guy whose job it was back then to actually go around to local DJs and convince them to play the New Band of the Moment on their stations. He was unable to persuade anyone to do this for the Ramones -- in fact, he was unable to persuade anyone that the Ramones were not some kind of industry joke, like if Phil Spector sent you a single, with his logo, of the Bulgarian Women's Choir -- and he was fired.
  196. @Alden
    Meh I’ve noticed that just about every woman entertainment industry celebrity claims some kind of real rape or child molestation story.

    I doubt those stories.

    Well, “creative” people often take lots of risks…..so……Maybe these women hung out with the wrong kind of people and paid the price for it. And that’s not even getting into the “casting couch” stuff.

  197. @Anonymous

    That red one with the blue X was the battle flag, not the flag of the Confederate Nation. The battle flag by the way came straight from Scotland.
     
    That's the cross of St. Andrew, the patron saint of Scotland.

    He was also the patron of the old state of Burgundy which provided Spain with a royal family. That's how the same cross got onto Spanish military flags. (The Spanish air force still paints it on their aircraft.)

    The Red Cross of Burgundy was actually the Spanish official flag until 1843.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_Spain

    This used to be the Spanish flag:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_of_Burgundy#/media/File%3ACross_of_Burgundy_(Template).svg

  198. @Intelligent Dasein

    One night Joel got so drunk he was just nonsensically shouting the names of Civil War battles while they were playing e.g.: “Antietam! Bull Run!”
     
    An astute critic would notice that this is simply the manner in which Billy Joel's corrupted Jewish mind works. The alcohol my have allowed his thoughts to flow freely without the hindrance of self-censorship, but it did not alter their fundamental nature. Think of the song "We Didn't Start the Fire". That's exactly what it is. It's just a concatenation of outbursts, a random litany of blurbs, namedropping, and headline items with nothing to connect them. I think the intended effect, as well as the spirit in which Billy Joel wrote the song, is supposed to be a smug sense of superiority as one surveys the fast-flowing collage, a sort of "Look at the crazy times we live in" humblebrag as one congratulates oneself on being above it all.

    Furthermore, think of how many Billy Joel songs feature some variant of the "You may be wrong/You may be right" motiff. It's a characteristically Jewish phrase, the sort of thing you could picture Tevye mumbling in Fiddler on the Roof. Billy Joel thinks that to naive goyish ears, this sounds like some sort of deep wisdom born of millennia of persecution. That's the ruse he's trying to pull, but the fact is that most white people simply ignore this line. It is nothing more to them than a generic verbal filler, and for all intents and purposes he might as well be singing "do wah diddy diddy dum diddy do." But in reality it is a peculiar Jewish obsession that Billy Joel cannot help kvetching about in his lyrics. The Jew wonders intently if the opinion of the man across from him is wrong or right, if this stranger (another Joelism!) just might be the prophet sent to him to pronounce victory or defeat, fortune or misery. Against this all important question, all the South Pacifics and Walter Winchells in the world are just so many "signs and wonders," i.e. mysterious alchemical configurations meant to redound to the benefit of the faithful while befuddling the unchosen. We Didn't Start the Fire is a veritable Talmud comprising both a vernacular and an esoteric interpretation. To the goyim it is "Wow, look at the headlines". To Billy Joel it is "All things work together for the good of those (like me) who are special".

    Once you see this you will not unsee it. Everywhere you look in Billy Joel you will find the litanies, the smugness, and the absolute insistence upon a special election. Billy Joe's superiority does not depend on any qualities he may or may not possess. He is chosen just because he is. It is the Jewish mind at work.

    Joel in concert says he hates performing “..Fire”. In the album track he barely takes a breath, not fun to do in one take in front of 18,000 people, because sober or with a few pops you will screw it up unless you slow it down a bit. At the same time, well known he thinks Michael Stipe and REM ripped off that song with “It’s The End of The World As We Know It” and he should get a writing credit for it.

    At a loss what it has to do with booze or Judaism.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    I've always assumed that 'We Didn't Start the Fire' was Joel's attempt to write the definitive Baby Boomer generational anthem.
    , @Autochthon
    "It's the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)" was released in 1987. "We Didn't Start the Fire" was released in 1989.

    No word yet on when the guys of R.E.M. perfected the time machine they used to plaigerise Joel's work.

    (Peter Buck has acknowledged their song was in the tradition of "Subterranean Homesick Blues," but it's unknown whether Bob Dylan has a time machine, too.)
  199. Anonymous[160] • Disclaimer says:
    @dfordoom

    Anne Coulter’s pushing 60 and still has long hair. Also lives with a black man and approves of affirmative action.
     
    Coulter talks like a conservative and lives like a liberal.

    When it comes to hypocrisy conservatives leave liberals in the dust.

    They call her Dash 9. They don’t call her 844.

    Us foamers know why.

    The UP converted their remaining steam fleet to bunker oil. Has not burned coal for decades.

    Now they still need the fire department to water up at the fuel pad, but not a coal truck. They burn regular diesel now, Bunker C needing heated lines and not much cheaper.

    It’s a theory anyway.

  200. @Bugg
    Joel in concert says he hates performing "..Fire". In the album track he barely takes a breath, not fun to do in one take in front of 18,000 people, because sober or with a few pops you will screw it up unless you slow it down a bit. At the same time, well known he thinks Michael Stipe and REM ripped off that song with "It's The End of The World As We Know It" and he should get a writing credit for it.

    At a loss what it has to do with booze or Judaism.

    I’ve always assumed that ‘We Didn’t Start the Fire’ was Joel’s attempt to write the definitive Baby Boomer generational anthem.

  201. @Steve Sailer
    One night Joel got so drunk he was just nonsensically shouting the names of Civil War battles while they were playing e.g.: “Antietam! Bull Run!”

    An astute critic would notice that this is simply the manner in which Billy Joel’s corrupted Jewish mind works.

    Obviously, nothing is more stereotypically Jewish than getting blind drunk and shouting the names of Civil War battlefields. Weren't there a half-dozen Seinfeld and Curb Your Enthusiasm episodes about that?

    It’s in the commentary on the megillah of Esther: celebrate so hard that you cannot tell Mordecai apart from Haman, nor Antietam from Manassas. Actually, a lot of Civil War names either come from the Old Testament or sound like they do. But if it is Jewish perfidy to remember Civil war battles, should we forgive the sodomite, who just sits there and acts like he doesn’t totally get what’s going on, when he obviously should join in and shout along? Who is the real sinner here?
    ——-
    Re Ramones being a hard sell, a while back NPR interviewed the music industry guy whose job it was back then to actually go around to local DJs and convince them to play the New Band of the Moment on their stations. He was unable to persuade anyone to do this for the Ramones — in fact, he was unable to persuade anyone that the Ramones were not some kind of industry joke, like if Phil Spector sent you a single, with his logo, of the Bulgarian Women’s Choir — and he was fired.

    • Replies: @donvonburg
    One reason conventional Christians regard the Book of Mormon as obvious fabrication is that all the names are obviously intended to sound "biblical" as an English speaker raised on the KJV or the Geneva Bible would think as biblical. If the plates were authentic the names should be either utterly alien sounding or if translation was used, they would assign English names for the English version, Latin ones for Romance languages, et al. The BoM "translation" is not the work of a divine entity who natively thinks in any language but the nineteenth century's idea of sixteenth century English. It's KJV Onlyism to the sixth power.

    Besides which, it contains nearly no "objectionable" or prurient content where as the real Old Testament drips with sex in places. Onan indulging in onanism, explicit talk of women's menstrual status, and the all time scene of debauch:


    In the Hebrew Bible, Oholah (אהלה) and Oholibah (אהליבה) (or: Aholah and Aholibah) are pejorative personifications given by the prophet Ezekiel to the cities of Samaria in the Kingdom of Israel and Jerusalem in the kingdom of Judah, respectively. They appear in the Book of Ezekiel, chapter 23.

    There is a pun in these names in the Hebrew. Oholah means "her tent", and Oholibah means "my tent is in her".[1]

    The Hebrew prophets frequently compared the sin of idolatry to the sin of adultery, in a reappearing rhetorical figure.[2]:317 Ezekiel's rhetoric directed against these two allegorical figures depicts them as lusting after Egyptian men in explicitly sexual terms in Ezekiel 23:20–21:[3]:18

    There she lusted after her lovers, whose genitals were like those of donkeys and whose emission was like that of horses.
    So you longed for the lewdness of your youth, when in Egypt your bosom was caressed and your young breasts fondled.
     
    Sounds like a movie with Ron Jeremy, Marilyn Chambers and Sharon Mitchell, no?

    Ingersoll and other early atheists condemned the Bible as lewd for many passages, but the Book of Mormon is without any such. It's as if old Joe stayed away from controversy, whereas the true God had Ezekiel write as he was inspired to regardless of what troublemakers and scoffers might say.

    Real Scripture gets a little tedious to us moderns at times, but eloquently tells many stories with a unifying theme in ways scholars can endlessly plow (sometimes to the point of foolishness). The BoM contains a lot of sheer bafflegab, though:


    4 Now these are the names of the different pieces of their gold, and of their silver, according to their value. And the names are given by the Nephites, for they did not reckon after the amanner of the Jews who were at Jerusalem; neither did they measure after the manner of the Jews; but they altered their reckoning and their measure, according to the minds and the circumstances of the people, in every generation, until the reign of the judges, they having been bestablished by king Mosiah.

    5 Now the reckoning is thus—a senine of gold, a seon of gold, a shum of gold, and a limnah of gold.

    6 A senum of silver, an amnor of silver, an ezrom of silver, and an onti of silver.

    7 A senum of silver was equal to a senine of gold, and either for a measure of barley, and also for a measure of every kind of grain.

    8 Now the amount of a seon of gold was twice the value of a senine.

    9 And a shum of gold was twice the value of a seon.

    10 And a limnah of gold was the value of them all.

    11 And an amnor of silver was as great as two senums.

    12 And an ezrom of silver was as great as four senums.

    13 And an onti was as great as them all.

    14 Now this is the value of the lesser numbers of their reckoning—

    15 A shiblon is half of a senum; therefore, a shiblon for half a measure of barley.

    16 And a shiblum is a half of a shiblon.

    17 And a leah is the half of a shiblum.

    18 Now this is their number, according to their reckoning.

    19 Now an antion of gold is equal to three shiblons.
     
    Alma 11:4 et seq

    Got that? Me neither.
  202. @J.Ross
    It's in the commentary on the megillah of Esther: celebrate so hard that you cannot tell Mordecai apart from Haman, nor Antietam from Manassas. Actually, a lot of Civil War names either come from the Old Testament or sound like they do. But if it is Jewish perfidy to remember Civil war battles, should we forgive the sodomite, who just sits there and acts like he doesn't totally get what's going on, when he obviously should join in and shout along? Who is the real sinner here?
    -------
    Re Ramones being a hard sell, a while back NPR interviewed the music industry guy whose job it was back then to actually go around to local DJs and convince them to play the New Band of the Moment on their stations. He was unable to persuade anyone to do this for the Ramones -- in fact, he was unable to persuade anyone that the Ramones were not some kind of industry joke, like if Phil Spector sent you a single, with his logo, of the Bulgarian Women's Choir -- and he was fired.

    One reason conventional Christians regard the Book of Mormon as obvious fabrication is that all the names are obviously intended to sound “biblical” as an English speaker raised on the KJV or the Geneva Bible would think as biblical. If the plates were authentic the names should be either utterly alien sounding or if translation was used, they would assign English names for the English version, Latin ones for Romance languages, et al. The BoM “translation” is not the work of a divine entity who natively thinks in any language but the nineteenth century’s idea of sixteenth century English. It’s KJV Onlyism to the sixth power.

    Besides which, it contains nearly no “objectionable” or prurient content where as the real Old Testament drips with sex in places. Onan indulging in onanism, explicit talk of women’s menstrual status, and the all time scene of debauch:

    In the Hebrew Bible, Oholah (אהלה) and Oholibah (אהליבה) (or: Aholah and Aholibah) are pejorative personifications given by the prophet Ezekiel to the cities of Samaria in the Kingdom of Israel and Jerusalem in the kingdom of Judah, respectively. They appear in the Book of Ezekiel, chapter 23.

    There is a pun in these names in the Hebrew. Oholah means “her tent”, and Oholibah means “my tent is in her”.[1]

    The Hebrew prophets frequently compared the sin of idolatry to the sin of adultery, in a reappearing rhetorical figure.[2]:317 Ezekiel’s rhetoric directed against these two allegorical figures depicts them as lusting after Egyptian men in explicitly sexual terms in Ezekiel 23:20–21:[3]:18

    There she lusted after her lovers, whose genitals were like those of donkeys and whose emission was like that of horses.
    So you longed for the lewdness of your youth, when in Egypt your bosom was caressed and your young breasts fondled.

    Sounds like a movie with Ron Jeremy, Marilyn Chambers and Sharon Mitchell, no?

    Ingersoll and other early atheists condemned the Bible as lewd for many passages, but the Book of Mormon is without any such. It’s as if old Joe stayed away from controversy, whereas the true God had Ezekiel write as he was inspired to regardless of what troublemakers and scoffers might say.

    Real Scripture gets a little tedious to us moderns at times, but eloquently tells many stories with a unifying theme in ways scholars can endlessly plow (sometimes to the point of foolishness). The BoM contains a lot of sheer bafflegab, though:

    4 Now these are the names of the different pieces of their gold, and of their silver, according to their value. And the names are given by the Nephites, for they did not reckon after the amanner of the Jews who were at Jerusalem; neither did they measure after the manner of the Jews; but they altered their reckoning and their measure, according to the minds and the circumstances of the people, in every generation, until the reign of the judges, they having been bestablished by king Mosiah.

    5 Now the reckoning is thus—a senine of gold, a seon of gold, a shum of gold, and a limnah of gold.

    6 A senum of silver, an amnor of silver, an ezrom of silver, and an onti of silver.

    7 A senum of silver was equal to a senine of gold, and either for a measure of barley, and also for a measure of every kind of grain.

    8 Now the amount of a seon of gold was twice the value of a senine.

    9 And a shum of gold was twice the value of a seon.

    10 And a limnah of gold was the value of them all.

    11 And an amnor of silver was as great as two senums.

    12 And an ezrom of silver was as great as four senums.

    13 And an onti was as great as them all.

    14 Now this is the value of the lesser numbers of their reckoning—

    15 A shiblon is half of a senum; therefore, a shiblon for half a measure of barley.

    16 And a shiblum is a half of a shiblon.

    17 And a leah is the half of a shiblum.

    18 Now this is their number, according to their reckoning.

    19 Now an antion of gold is equal to three shiblons.

    Alma 11:4 et seq

    Got that? Me neither.

  203. @Anonymous
    Bluegrass music per se is a genre invented by one man, Bill Monroe. It was most heavily influenced by Appalachian Celtic folk (in the true sense) music but there is an unmistakable “coon music” element there too. Hillbillies and prairiebillies of Monroe’s era were non-ideological. They would listen to talented black musicians without wanting to mix with them in church or in bed. A hillbilly man who took up with a black woman was effectively shunned. A white hillbilly girl that took up with a black didn’t show her face around her own kin, they tended to vanish.

    When Elvis covered “Blue Moon of Kentucky” he instinctively went for the negro element. The whole band was afraid Monroe would kick their asses when they were in Nashville. He was a large and powerful man and known as a good alley fighter.

    Monroe played up the elder statesman/ Pope of Bluegrass thing in his later years but I suspect there was an element of ambivalence in the role bluegrass music played. In itself it was not negrifying, besides whites only Japanese and some Jews were into it, but he wound up mostly categorized as “folk music” which really was the parlor music of Communists and anti-whites after WWII.

    There’s a big bluegrass revival going on in Ireland at the moment, at least that part of Ireland which isn’t Dublin. All of the small radio stations out in the countryside have bluegrass programming.

  204. @Anonymous
    Both are great singers, though Chrissie is more stageworthy. Debbie has had her share of bad gigs, like the GD the Blondies are inconsistent from night to night and D does not work a tough room well. On a good night with a supportive crowd she is really, really good. In a half sold out Midwest shed they will suck, except Clem, who never fails to kick ass.

    I sort of know Deb and both factions of the band. Nigel bought me lunch once when I was in LA and broke. Chris is hard to talk to but a pretty amazing guitar player when he wants to be.

    I have never met Chrissie really, I’ve been within five feet of her twice but never talked to her, or she to me. I’ve talked to Martin Chambers and Robbie McIntosh, and corresponded a little with Natalie-I did not bring her mum up. I sort of suspect she reads this site occasionally. I suspect she is somewhat based but doesn’t need any more heat than she’s had and intends to keep low on it.

    Like her arch nemesis Uncle Ted, Chrissie demands a reaction from the crowd. If they disappoint her she will smack them. It’s not f*** me, it’s f*** you. She owns that stage. If you’re not there to put your cell phones away and have a good time you need to GTFO. Or she will. As a crowd in Dubai found out.

    There’s a YouTube clip of Blondie doing an early, punky version of Denis live on a Dutch tv show. Clem just goes wild.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Every Mark I/II Blondie album was a fresh new style, each had a distinctive cohesive style and ethos. They did six albums and the third, fourth and fifth were artistic and financial tours de force (only the band got screwed out of the money).

    The Mark I Pretenders only did two albums, but the first was one of the great debut albums of rock history and several songs on it have been hits for younger female artists. Then Pete and Jimmy died, Sir Ray got Chrissie pregnant, and all subsequent Pretenders albums and tour became “Chrissie and whatever hired guns would put up with her”. At that, she still wrote some great songs and put on some good concerts, she did have good taste in sidemen. But none had the promise Jimmy had as a guitarist. And since she was now an employer rather than a band member among equals the blokes were not capable of reining her in when needed, so along with some great music came self indulgent crap.

    Blondie broke up but Deb did solo albums, all with Chris and mostly with Clem, they were better than they were given credit for, but none as good as the first five Blondie albums. When they reformed they had Jimmy Destri, but he had severe drug problems and when he cleaned up he left the music business. The rest of the band had been disfellowshipped. Chris and Debbie made all artistic and business decisions, and Chris has the general business acumen of a ficus plant. The relationship of Chris and Debbie reminds me somewhat of Ayn Rand’s with Frank O’Connor, a man otherwise unknown to history. However, Chris did manage to marry and have a family with another, substantially younger and fairly high SMV woman. And, much like Lindsey Buckingham, he is a unique and often brilliant guitar contributor.
    , @Anonymous
    This is German:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtlnNaTBrUI


    There are half a dozen live versions on YT.
  205. @Prof. Woland
    I saw Deep Purple play recently. They weren't bad bu Ian Gillian's voice is kaput and Steve Morse is no Ritchie Blackmore. Like to Stones, their bass / drums is pretty solid and I think when a rock band dies, those are the last organs (no pun intended) to go.

    Like Sir Paul,Gillians voice is shot and Steve Morse is no Ritchie Blackmore…..he’s better…..pick up some Dixie Dregs and educate yourself my good man!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Steve Morse is a first rate technical guitarist, a nice guy, and a former airline pilot to boot. His music is a little more advanced than my tastes prefer but he is certainly a very remarkable guy.
  206. @Alden
    Instead of reading books, I listen. Mr Carter of whom you obviously never heard was born in the late 19th century and was interested in what was then called Old timey music, straight from 17th 18th century Scotland and Ireland.

    17th 18th 19th century old timey music had little black influence because the blacks lived with their wealthy and middle class owners far from the Whites who lived in the mountains forests and frontier far from the settled part of the country.

    You wrote about your ignorant opinions of late 20th 21th century country and country pop music. I write about 17th to late 19th century old timey American peasant and prole music collected by Mr Carter in his travels all over the parts of the south where few blacks lived.

    Listen to Irish music and Bluegrass. Same tunes and music. Listen even to country pop produced in 2019. If you’ve ever heard Irish and Scotch music it’s obvious it’s the same genre.

    The most obvious is a confederate song “ Rally to the Bonnie Blue Flag. “. That Royal Blue flag with a white star was the national flag of the Confederate States of America. That red one with the blue X was the battle flag, not the flag of the Confederate Nation. The battle flag by the way came straight from Scotland.

    Anyway, the music, the tune of Rally to the Bonnie Blue is identical to an old Irish tune. I forget the name of the Irish song but the music of both songs is identical.

    Start listening to Irish Scots and old timey country music. The similarities are obvious ignorant one.

    So many ignorant bigots on this site spouting their ignorance and bigotry. Ken Burns isn’t a historian, he’s just another anti White propagandist.

    I forget the name of the Irish song but the music of both songs is identical.

    The Irish Jaunting Car

  207. Anonymous[160] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hhsiii
    There’s a YouTube clip of Blondie doing an early, punky version of Denis live on a Dutch tv show. Clem just goes wild.

    Every Mark I/II Blondie album was a fresh new style, each had a distinctive cohesive style and ethos. They did six albums and the third, fourth and fifth were artistic and financial tours de force (only the band got screwed out of the money).

    The Mark I Pretenders only did two albums, but the first was one of the great debut albums of rock history and several songs on it have been hits for younger female artists. Then Pete and Jimmy died, Sir Ray got Chrissie pregnant, and all subsequent Pretenders albums and tour became “Chrissie and whatever hired guns would put up with her”. At that, she still wrote some great songs and put on some good concerts, she did have good taste in sidemen. But none had the promise Jimmy had as a guitarist. And since she was now an employer rather than a band member among equals the blokes were not capable of reining her in when needed, so along with some great music came self indulgent crap.

    Blondie broke up but Deb did solo albums, all with Chris and mostly with Clem, they were better than they were given credit for, but none as good as the first five Blondie albums. When they reformed they had Jimmy Destri, but he had severe drug problems and when he cleaned up he left the music business. The rest of the band had been disfellowshipped. Chris and Debbie made all artistic and business decisions, and Chris has the general business acumen of a ficus plant. The relationship of Chris and Debbie reminds me somewhat of Ayn Rand’s with Frank O’Connor, a man otherwise unknown to history. However, Chris did manage to marry and have a family with another, substantially younger and fairly high SMV woman. And, much like Lindsey Buckingham, he is a unique and often brilliant guitar contributor.

  208. @Darth Plastic
    Like Sir Paul,Gillians voice is shot and Steve Morse is no Ritchie Blackmore.....he's better.....pick up some Dixie Dregs and educate yourself my good man!

    Steve Morse is a first rate technical guitarist, a nice guy, and a former airline pilot to boot. His music is a little more advanced than my tastes prefer but he is certainly a very remarkable guy.

  209. Sir Mick or Sir Paul?

    Sir Paul, for the reason that young people (especially women) don’t really know who either of these people are…but they know they’re supposed to care about Sir Paul. And they will dutifully make the expected noises about how awesome The Beatles were. Although at the age of 49, I have never listened to an entire Beatles album, and I suspect much of the praise for Sir Paul will emanate from normies who couldn’t list four (4) Beatles songs if you put a pistol to their temple.

  210. @Hhsiii
    Sorry, needed an editor.

    John and Paul at their best together. My current fave Lennon song is I Don't Want to Spoil The Party.

    My current fave Lennon song is I Don’t Want to Spoil The Party.

  211. @Old Prude
    Bluegrass. Now there will be an arguement: Play as fast as you can or wail and whine. A little goes a long way. Check out Bela Flecks "Big Foot" for what Bluegrass could be...

    Check out Dailey and Vincent for what Bluegrass is. Also AKUS before they went silent. There is a reason that Robert Plant called Alison Krauss’s voice that of an angel. As with any genre there will be mediocrity but the stars still shine.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    There’s a video on YouTube of Allison Krauss singing The Wexford Carol accompanied by Yo Yo Ma on cello. Her voice really is astonishing.
  212. @Bugg
    Joel in concert says he hates performing "..Fire". In the album track he barely takes a breath, not fun to do in one take in front of 18,000 people, because sober or with a few pops you will screw it up unless you slow it down a bit. At the same time, well known he thinks Michael Stipe and REM ripped off that song with "It's The End of The World As We Know It" and he should get a writing credit for it.

    At a loss what it has to do with booze or Judaism.

    “It’s the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)” was released in 1987. “We Didn’t Start the Fire” was released in 1989.

    No word yet on when the guys of R.E.M. perfected the time machine they used to plaigerise Joel’s work.

    (Peter Buck has acknowledged their song was in the tradition of “Subterranean Homesick Blues,” but it’s unknown whether Bob Dylan has a time machine, too.)

  213. @Jefferson Temple
    Check out Dailey and Vincent for what Bluegrass is. Also AKUS before they went silent. There is a reason that Robert Plant called Alison Krauss's voice that of an angel. As with any genre there will be mediocrity but the stars still shine.

    There’s a video on YouTube of Allison Krauss singing The Wexford Carol accompanied by Yo Yo Ma on cello. Her voice really is astonishing.

  214. @Alden
    Instead of reading books, I listen. Mr Carter of whom you obviously never heard was born in the late 19th century and was interested in what was then called Old timey music, straight from 17th 18th century Scotland and Ireland.

    17th 18th 19th century old timey music had little black influence because the blacks lived with their wealthy and middle class owners far from the Whites who lived in the mountains forests and frontier far from the settled part of the country.

    You wrote about your ignorant opinions of late 20th 21th century country and country pop music. I write about 17th to late 19th century old timey American peasant and prole music collected by Mr Carter in his travels all over the parts of the south where few blacks lived.

    Listen to Irish music and Bluegrass. Same tunes and music. Listen even to country pop produced in 2019. If you’ve ever heard Irish and Scotch music it’s obvious it’s the same genre.

    The most obvious is a confederate song “ Rally to the Bonnie Blue Flag. “. That Royal Blue flag with a white star was the national flag of the Confederate States of America. That red one with the blue X was the battle flag, not the flag of the Confederate Nation. The battle flag by the way came straight from Scotland.

    Anyway, the music, the tune of Rally to the Bonnie Blue is identical to an old Irish tune. I forget the name of the Irish song but the music of both songs is identical.

    Start listening to Irish Scots and old timey country music. The similarities are obvious ignorant one.

    So many ignorant bigots on this site spouting their ignorance and bigotry. Ken Burns isn’t a historian, he’s just another anti White propagandist.

    Yeah! Guy who admits, actually admits to not reading books calls other people “ignorant.” Fatuousness, thy name is Unz.

    You just don’t know shit about shit you ignorant suburban boob.

  215. @Hhsiii
    There’s a YouTube clip of Blondie doing an early, punky version of Denis live on a Dutch tv show. Clem just goes wild.

    This is German:

    There are half a dozen live versions on YT.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EyWQ9oaaJxM


    That might be it.
    If not:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xlX1WNzaWI


    Notice Chris never plays the same guitar twice. He uses a natural-finished clear 70s Strat in one and one of those oddball bolt on neck Gibsons with the 3 single coils that were really one pickup functionally (Ronnie Wood had a dalliance with them too) in the other.

    At one time I owned one of Chris's old Burns guitars. Apparently he sold it while broke and I got it with docs from a New York store. I offered to sell it back to him for exactly what I paid and the offer was ignored: I wound up selling it to a guy that turned out to be a covert agent for Hard Rock. It was not a great guitar, needed substantial neck work that I wasn't interested in paying for.

    He seems to have a serious problem holding on to guitars.
    , @hhsiii
    Yeah, that's the one. German, not Dutch. My bad. Hootchie mama.

    I also like the old clips from Top of the Pops, Sunday Girl, etc.
  216. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    This is German:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtlnNaTBrUI


    There are half a dozen live versions on YT.

    That might be it.
    If not:

    Notice Chris never plays the same guitar twice. He uses a natural-finished clear 70s Strat in one and one of those oddball bolt on neck Gibsons with the 3 single coils that were really one pickup functionally (Ronnie Wood had a dalliance with them too) in the other.

    At one time I owned one of Chris’s old Burns guitars. Apparently he sold it while broke and I got it with docs from a New York store. I offered to sell it back to him for exactly what I paid and the offer was ignored: I wound up selling it to a guy that turned out to be a covert agent for Hard Rock. It was not a great guitar, needed substantial neck work that I wasn’t interested in paying for.

    He seems to have a serious problem holding on to guitars.

  217. @Marty
    According to Don Nelson, the retired basketball coach, Willie is a regular (and something of a pigeon) in poker games at Don’s place in Maui.

    That is correct. He sticks to friends he adores. He is genuine….therefore, all the people he will spend time with are usually genuine, like Woody. I hope he has good health for another decade.

  218. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lagertha
    forget rock stars...Willie Nelson's death will be Theeeee sad day for many people, well, some of us. I adore him and will miss him once that day arrives.

    He does not want to move outta TX much, these days, which has, hahhahhahhaa, always been the case for the last few years.

    Every time I see Willie with that piece of shit guitar he insists on playing I cringe. It sounds like crap.
    And his phrasing has declined radically from the halfway decent records he made when Chet Atkins at RCA kept him from thinking he could swing it like Sinatra. Sinatra could do it on a good night when he wasn’t loaded. Willie never could.

  219. @Anonymous
    This is German:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtlnNaTBrUI


    There are half a dozen live versions on YT.

    Yeah, that’s the one. German, not Dutch. My bad. Hootchie mama.

    I also like the old clips from Top of the Pops, Sunday Girl, etc.

  220. @Hhsiii
    No need to choose between the two. Both great in their way. But oh man, Debbie circa ‘78. 23 skidoo. And Parallel Lines was just about perfect. Pretty Baby and Picture This.

    There’s a clip of them doing A Girl Should Know Better at CBGBs in 1975 or so. The band all still sport long hair hippie look. Debbie is already new style.

    “There’s a clip of them doing A Girl Should Know Better at CBGBs in 1975 or so. The band all still sport long hair hippie look. Debbie is already new style.”

    Twas a sight to behold around 1975-6 to see long haired hippies changing in a few days into crop-haired punks, the flares becoming drainpipes and the velvet jackets becoming leather or PVC.

    Joe Strummer made that transformation earlier than most, but my favourite quick-change was the singer of The Ruts, who’d previously lived along with the guitarist in a Welsh hippy commune and played in a band called Aslan (after the CS Lewis figure), transforming into someone who looked like he’d forgotten to take his anti-psychotics. The guitarist kept his hair and a love of the flanger.

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