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Who Will be Disappointed if the Pandemic Is History by Mid-2021?
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From the New York Times science news section:

Immunity to the Coronavirus May Last Years, New Data Hint

Blood samples from recovered patients suggest a powerful, long-lasting immune response, researchers reported.

By Apoorva Mandavilli
Nov. 17, 2020

How long might immunity to the coronavirus last? Years, maybe even decades, according to a new study — the most hopeful answer yet to a question that has shadowed plans for widespread vaccination.

Eight months after infection, most people who have recovered still have enough immune cells to fend off the virus and prevent illness, the new data show. A slow rate of decline in the short term suggests, happily, that these cells may persist in the body for a very, very long time to come.

The research, published online, has not been peer-reviewed nor published in a scientific journal. But it is the most comprehensive and long-ranging study of immune memory to the coronavirus to date.

“That amount of memory would likely prevent the vast majority of people from getting hospitalized disease, severe disease, for many years,” said Shane Crotty, a virologist at the La Jolla Institute of Immunology who co-led the new study.

The findings are likely to come as a relief to experts worried that immunity to the virus might be short-lived, and that vaccines might have to be administered repeatedly to keep the pandemic under control.

And the research squares with another recent finding: that survivors of SARS, caused by another coronavirus, still carry certain important immune cells 17 years after recovering.

The findings are consistent with encouraging evidence emerging from other labs.

My upcoming Taki’s Magazine column is on the Not So Great Reset.

 
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  1. Rob McX says:

    All part of the great deTrumpening of America. If he’d been re-elected, who knows how long immunity would last.

  2. That’s a good question, Steve.

    Based on my experience in Hong Kong, there will be more disappointment than many people in more hard-hit countries may be expecting.

    A bit of background on COVID here: in short, Hong Kong has escaped largely unscathed so far. There have been about 5000 ‘cases’, of which some very substantial proportion has been classified as ‘asymptomatic’. Just over 100 people have died. We have never had a full-on, hard-core lockdown, but we’ve been under constant restrictions of varying degrees of intensity since late January.

    At the moment, new cases here run about 5-10 a day. The great majority are travellers entering HK who test positive at the airport on arrival. There are occasional ‘local’ cases, but often it’s one a day, or none at all.

    In spite of the very low risk of COVID spreading here, we are compelled by law to wear masks more or less everywhere public, including outdoors, even when hiking. The only exemptions are when engaging in ‘strenuous exercise’. It is essentially impossible to find anyone flouting this requirement other than a few old people who take off their masks out in the parks when doing their morning exercises. All travellers entering HK from anywhere other than mainland China must do two weeks of quarantine in a hotel room — no exceptions.

    You would think there would be a groundswell of support for relaxing the restrictions here. That is not the case. Last week there were a couple of days in which the numbers of new cases made it into double figures, and just like that the HK government announced a crackdown. Restaurants had been able to seat six at a table; now it’s down to four. Bars can now only seat tables of two.

    Many people here applaud this ‘caution’ and ‘prudence’. We have a set of ‘experts’ who dominate the media with constant — and I mean almost daily — pronouncements of extreme gloom and danger. Cases up from three yesterday to six today? It’s the next wave! (I believe we’re up to at least our ‘fourth wave’ here, although it would be perfectly plausible to suggest we’ve never really had our first one).

    There are also many people here who have become rigid, even obsessive, in their devotion to risk avoidance. They take the government pronouncements as gospel. They are adamant that even one case of COVID is intolerable; nothing short of complete ‘purity’ can ever be the goal. They seem uninterested in returning to normality; perhaps ‘fighting COVID’ has given their lives a focus and organizing principle they may have lacked BC (i.e. Before COVID). I’m running into people like this at work, at church, among friends — and it’s not always the people I would have expected.

    This of course evokes the oft-cited phenomenon of a certain subset of soldiers not knowing what to do with themselves when the war’s over. I’d never really seen that before, but I think I’m starting to see it now.

    So the obvious answer to your query is that certain government officials who are using COVID to amass and hold power are going to be most sorry when it’s all over, but they’re not going to be alone.

  3. The COVID-19 Epidemic was largely over by May of this year. The nature of the epidemic is consistent with other flu outbreaks. The PCR testing regimen is highly inaccurate. If you change the cycling protocols, the tests will deliver the desired results.

    Do you really think the virus just “disappeared” in China? In a way it did, just as all flus eventually “disappear” after they have run their initial course through a population.

    The shirtless soccer fans in this Chinese stadium are likely carrying the same corona viral loads (COVID-19 or the other corona viruses) as their American or European counterparts.

    What about shitty raves? Yep, on going in China for some mysterious reason.

    Remember, China is the enemy of the West because China is not “free.” Christmas will be celebrated more openly in China this year than in the United States or Italy. Think about that for a second.

    The Pandemic may end in 2021, but the Pandemic Response will likely escalate. Economic prosperity, uncensored discussion of public issues and freedom of movement may never return.

  4. Gordo says:

    Who Will be Disappointed if the Pandemic Is History by Mid-2021?

    The Amazon guy?

  5. You think this and a coming wave of successive public health scares that are facilitating the destruction of the merchant classes, the enrichment of the oligarchs, the expansion of public officials’ powers, and the fragmentation of social bonds that might allow the citizenry to take back control of their lives and our civil society are going to subside? Adorable.

  6. @Clifford Brown

    shitty raves

    It looks like an ok rave to me, although it would probably me more fun if it were in a field or a wood or an abandoned warehouse

  7. Everyone who gets paid to push the suicide-inducing lockdowns we’ve suffered under?

    I’m afraid we won’t ever return to normal. Too many people got too drunk on power.

    And there’s an army of Karens who love enforcing these rule. That is, when they aren’t demeaning children in school with “white privilege” exercises.

    • Agree: Charon
  8. @Rob McX

    We do know. Because the immunity was said by “experts” to last only weeks, not to mention all the mutating variants out there. Everything’s changed now. Just in time, right? Whew. Close one.

    • Agree: res, Chrisnonymous
  9. Coag says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    In spite of the very low risk of COVID spreading here, we are compelled by law to wear masks more or less everywhere public, including outdoors, even when hiking.

    Is there a relationship between the low risk of Covid spreading, and the wearing of masks?

  10. Or if you want to be conspiratorial, “wait a minute, this is a disease that kills our most expensive, least productive citizens? Whose bright idea was it to find a way to prevent it?”

    • Replies: @Jack D
  11. @Coag

    Is there a relationship between the low risk of Covid spreading, and the wearing of masks?

    As much as some readers of this blog will hate to hear me say it, I think there is. HK people nearly all masked up, immediately, in January, and haven’t stopped since. And given that HK is so crowded that nearly all other forms of ‘social distancing’ (e.g. maintaining six feet of space around you) are impossible when on the subway or in shopping malls, it’s hard to find other explanations.

    Well, having said that, here are a couple of other things HK has done.

    First, everybody who lands in HK has to be tested for COVID, and immediately gets hospitalized if they test positive, even if they have no symptoms. And everybody who arrives and tests negative still has to quarantine for two weeks. In effect, it’s an almost-closed border policy that is very harsh, but it’s hard to argue it hasn’t worked.

    Second, although the HK government has only just launched a ‘track and trace’ app, it has tried very hard to track all contacts of COVID cases. Again, it hasn’t been perfect, but I suspect it has helped.

    The problem is the long-term mindset here. Some people are getting too enthusiastic and prideful about HK’s ‘victory’ over COVID. Case in point: it was announced last week all HK kindergartens (which correspond to US preschools, i.e. for kids 3-5) would be closed, summarily, for two weeks because of an outbreak amongst the children of — I’m not making this up — the common cold. When you start closing schools because a three-year-old’s nose is running, you’re getting too convinced you can control nature in a fallen world.

  12. @The Last Real Calvinist

    When you start closing schools because a three-year-old’s nose is running, you’re getting too convinced you can control nature in a fallen world.

    It’s said that it is good for a healthy immune system of kids to – work in fighting off diseases. So they might well hurt those kids in the long run if they somehow eradicate the common cold?

  13. Bill P says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Good rundowns on HK. I suspect it’s different on the mainland.

    The problem is the long-term mindset here. Some people are getting too enthusiastic and prideful about HK’s ‘victory’ over COVID. Case in point: it was announced last week all HK kindergartens (which correspond to US preschools, i.e. for kids 3-5) would be closed, summarily, for two weeks because of an outbreak amongst the children of — I’m not making this up — the common cold. When you start closing schools because a three-year-old’s nose is running, you’re getting too convinced you can control nature in a fallen world.

    As a parent with kids in school, this is what worries me most. Are they going to shut down schools every flu season now?

    BTW, I think there’s probably a lot of pre-existing immunity in China and its satellites. It seems that the closer you get to China the fewer fatalities this virus causes. Even seems to be the case here on the West Coast, where we haven’t been hit as hard as places back east.

  14. @The Last Real Calvinist

    As much as some readers of this blog will hate to hear me say it, I think there is.

    I hate you.

  15. @Bill P

    Do you have kids in elementary school Bill? For those who don’t, I’ll tell you what goes on in this “home of the free” place we live in. It may not be Hong Kong or the Orwellian UK completely yet, but it’s pretty sick.

    The kids can’t even play tag because they must stay 6 ft away from each other WHILE wearing masks, outside during recess. You would think that one or the other would suffice, right? My kid wanted to play some chess with another kid, but the new It’s nice dangerous to share! policy says they can’t both touch the same thing during school. They can’t catch or throw the ball during gym – feet only*. They cannot share pencils or pencil sharpeners.

    On the playground equipment, they must not play together (such as in swinging that rotating deally that makes me sick to my stomach in 30 seconds) on the same equipment, except for swings. However, they can still touch the metal right after other kids have done so. If you’re gonna really go for this hysteria, how about at least be consistently hysterical?!

    The kids have to stand outside in the cold on purple circles on a 2-D grid of 6 ft. spacing in the morning, until they can be marched in with proper Covid Clearance.

    I’m really getting pissed and depressed, both, seeing this. I will have to just get my wife to go, because I’m about to get in trouble. No, I will not wear a face diaper period, and I seem to be the only one.

    .

    * My new conspiracy theory is that this whole PanicFest is being implemented to force more Americans to play Communist Kickball, aka, soccer. (Hey, listen, it can’t be any dumber than Ron Unz’s theory.)

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Troll: AndrewR
    • Replies: @ganderson
    , @Bill P
    , @BenKenobi
  16. AndrewR says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    The sympathy I felt for HK last year during the protests is gone after reading your comments. They absolutely deserve to be controlled by the CCP

  17. Hibernian says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Expected in a totalitarian society, which we ourselves are becoming.

  18. ganderson says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I do think this is all pretty much made up- not the virus, but the scandemic reaction to it. What amazes me, as Achmed has pointed out, is the inconsistency- THIS will spread the Corona Chan, but THAT will not.

    Charlie Baker’s getting ready to lock down the commonwealth again- my guess schools statewide will shortly be forced to go remote, winter sports cancelled (Union College, which is a perennial DI hockey power- winning a championship over my beloved Gophers in 2014, just announced NO winter sports this year, leaving only 5 ECAC Hockey teams still playing. As to whom they are going to play… I’m also predicting Hockey East will cancel their season before Christmas. No NCAA championship for the second year in a row)

    And, folks get ready for another round of goalpost moving- around here, (Massachusetts) they’re saying that “yeah, we will have a vaccine, but that doesn’t mean that we have to stop doing all the social distancing, mask wearing, restaurant restricting, sportsball eliminating, etc., stuff we’ve been doing.

    And who ever up the thread said that there will be more Christmas celebrating in China than in the Pseudo-Christian west… that’s something to make me more angry/depressed. My son lives in China- maybe we should visit him for the holidays.

    I wish Steve would do more golf posts- way less depressing than the real news.

    BTW- I know Union College is in New York State…

  19. The pandemic has recealed that white people (especially conservatives) have a higher time preference than Negroids, contrary to what HBD theorists had speculated.

    Seriously guys, mark my words, the pandemic is going to last well in to the 2040s. Show discipline (nigga).

  20. Travis says:

    half the nation will be disappointed when the pandemic officially ends. Many want to extend mask wearing and social distancing even after the vulnerable are vaccinated.

    Millions of people prefer to work at home and are grateful that others cannot enjoy going to concerts, plays, sporting events, restaurants, church, school. Part if it is due to envy of those who had a rich social life. Also many people do these things without really enjoying them. Many people prefer wearing masks and avoiding talking to people. They will be sad when masks are no longer promoted. Others love living in fear, hiding in their homes.

    back in April people were concerned about the fatality rate and now that we know it is well below 1% the concern has vanished. Most people realize the risks are closer to a bad flu, so the narrative shifted over the summer to defeat Trump and keep the population scared and the economy weak. But so many Americans enjoy this new way of living and do not want to go back to normal.

    most of my friends and co-workers prefer working from home, they do not want to start commuting again. Most of the teachers prefer to stay at home and teach remotely. my wife teaches high school in New Jersey. her school did not open until November 6. Yesterday they closed the school again. No real reason was given. So my wife is back home teaching from our bedroom. She loves it. No need to commute, no need to take attendance, no accountability.

    • Agree: Sam Malone
  21. Voltarde says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Ang Lee’s next hit movie:

    Coughing Toddler, Hidden Dragon.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  22. Bert says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    The link below gives its own link to a Danish study on the effectiveness of surgical masks. The result of no effectiveness cannot be automatically extrapolated to N95 masks because infectious dose is likely important, at least in regard to severity of an infection.

    As expected, the establishment medical/public health gatekeepers arranged for the study to be rejected by the three most prominent medical journals, ignoring the idea that negative results in this case could be used to motivate wearing of more effective masks and the practice of more consistent social distancing, i.e., even if publication could work to make their own position stronger through further research and public cajoling, their instinct was to censor.

    • Thanks: Gabe Ruth
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
  23. @Clifford Brown

    The PCR testing regimen is highly inaccurate.

    http://philosophers-stone.info/2020/11/18/portuguese-court-rules-pcr-tests-as-unreliable-unlawful-to-quarantine-people/

    “if someone is tested by PCR as positive when a threshold of 35 cycles or higher is used (as is the rule in most laboratories in Europe and the US), the probability that said person is infected is less than 3%, and the probability that said result is a false positive is 97%.”

  24. Jack D says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    They are adamant that even one case of COVID is intolerable; nothing short of complete ‘purity’ can ever be the goal.

    The vaccine will change everything, but for now their attitude actually makes sense (although I know that many here will not agree). Covid is a highly contagious disease – either it is contained completely or it is not contained at all. There is no way to have “a little” Covid circulating in your community any more than you can have “a little” fire in California forests during fire season. Either you have no fire at all or your “little” fire will soon become a raging forest fire. All the places that have said that they are going to tolerate “a little” Covid in the interests of commerce now have “a lot” of Covid instead. If you are going to tolerate “a little” you might as well not bother and just open it all up because you are going to end up in the same place anyway.

    • Replies: @res
    , @MBlanc46
  25. Jack D says:
    @Redneck farmer

    Except in our society we always find a way to turn these things upside down. Executing criminals used to be a cheap solution for getting rid of the worst people but we now have a structure where every capital offender gets 20 years worth of taxpayer paid appeals so it’s cheaper just to keep them in prison for the rest of their life. Some of the obese diabetic Medicaid recipients who survive Covid are now getting million $ double lung transplants and we will get to pay for their maintenance drugs and future health care for as long as their new lungs last. Etc. No need to worry, just run the money printing press some more.

  26. @The Last Real Calvinist

    A fair amount of new research (which Steve has highlighted) is showing that the current fixation on people’s feelings of being hurt or persecuted being treated as the absolute Truth functions as an anti-CBT, worsening mental illness across the board. This is particularly true of anxiety and/or depression disorders. I think it’s dovetailing with the covid situation as you point out. If you feel anxious about covid it must be very important and serious. That the powers that be are helping make you feel anxious based on their coverage of it usually goes unmentioned, but this is obviously a self serving cycle for them.

  27. res says:
    @Jack D

    The vaccine will change everything, but for now their attitude actually makes sense (although I know that many here will not agree). Covid is a highly contagious disease – either it is contained completely or it is not contained at all. There is no way to have “a little” Covid circulating in your community any more than you can have “a little” fire in California forests during fire season.

    I disagree. Even eight months into this nonsense we don’t have a handle on how much transmission happens from asymptomatic people. I think just being rigorous about symptomatic people self quarantining would go a long way to slowing the transmission (what is important is getting R0 as much below 1 as possible to let the spread stop).

    • Replies: @Jack D
  28. HA says:
    @Coag

    “Is there a relationship between the low risk of Covid spreading, and the wearing of masks?”

    Yes. “Variolation” so far seems to work well for Covid, which means that mask wearing and social distancing not only reduce the number of infections, they make it more likely that the infections come from smaller whiffs of the virus as opposed to a big dump of viral load and therefore are more likely to remain asymptomatic or producing little in the way of distress.

    It’s not settled science — the primary evidence thus far, apart from the better performance of societies that mask up (which is actually pretty clear at this point all on its own) — is a single Syrian hamster study and the observation that death rates increase along with the viral load of the exposure, and variolation doesn’t work well at all for many other contagious diseases. But of course, to the naysayers, no evidence will be sufficient.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
  29. Bill P says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    My youngest is in elementary school. When I first heard he would be forced to wear a mask it gave me a feeling of visceral anger. There’s something about treating a healthy little kid that way that is very offensive to me as a father.

    However, the prolonged school closure eventually broke me. Now I go through the motions and do my best to make his life as normal as possible.

    This year has been truly awful. I remember at the very beginning of the lockdown I looked at the empty businesses and streets and told an immigrant coworker that “this is not the America I know.” I think that’s the day our republic finally died.

  30. BenKenobi says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    No, I will not wear a face diaper period, and I seem to be the only one.

    Same here.

    Interesting point: here in Vancouver mask-wearing on public transit is now mandatory. However, you can get an exemption card simply for the asking. I’ve got mine! Shows you how important the mask is.

    *Bane voice* “No one cared who I was until I refused to put on the mask.”

  31. Jack D says:
    @res

    This study:

    https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe2009758

    indicates that people who are presymptomatic or asymptomatic may be shedding high rates of Covid virus from their noses and mouths. If this is true then quarantining the symptomatic alone is not sufficient. This is consistent with “superspreader” events where even though none of the attendees are symptomatic, nevertheless many people contract the disease.

    If you want to know what works, you have to look at places where they have actually quelled the disease. None of those place relied solely on quarantining the sick.

    • Replies: @res
  32. res says:
    @Jack D

    To repeat.

    we don’t have a handle on how much transmission happens from asymptomatic people.

    Not how much virus shedding happens at maximum in asymptomatic people. How much (what proportion) of transmission actually happens from asymptomatic people. This involves factors such as the overall profile of infectiveness in asymptomatic people along with the length of time in that state (compared with both of those for symptomatic people).

    There is also the question of what qualifies as symptomatic. IMHO the sensitivity to that should be cranked up now. If you have an atypical scratchy throat or low fever stay home–ideally for at least a few days after you feel better as well.

    If this is true then quarantining the symptomatic alone is not sufficient.

    I never said it was. What so many fail to understand is that getting the effective R under 1 involves multiple factors. I think the trend towards fever checks makes clear people aren’t doing a good enough job of policing themselves.

    Lockdowns reduce R. Masks reduce R. Washing hands etc. reduces R. Self quarantining when symptomatic reduces R. Vitamin D reduces R. Being less handsy with other people reduces R. Optimal absolute humidity reduces R. Herd immunity (both partial and over the threshold) reduces R.

    Admittedly, not all of these are rigorously proved with known effect sizes, but I think it is hard to argue against any of those at worst doing no harm for transmission.

    The preoccupation with a silver bullet complete solution (a vaccine!) and claiming partial measures are worthless is infuriating.

    This is consistent with “superspreader” events where even though none of the attendees are symptomatic, nevertheless many people contract the disease.

    I love the “is consistent with” being presented as definitive proof approach. Seen very frequently in The Current Year.

    I don’t doubt there have been superspreader events caused by asymptomatic people. The question is: what proportion of them are?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  33. MB says: • Website

    Dunno.
    It certainly wasn’t the second coming of the Black Plague.
    And if it really was a pandemic, people would have been dropping like flies with the Spanish Flu.

    So lemme see.

    The last big panic pandemic we had wuz the Salem Witch trials which was back in Ye Olden Times, so yup.
    We should be good for a couple hunnerd more years of immunity impunity.

    [Joe Biden is cool with this unpaid for non political addendum]

  34. @Bill P

    Yes, that’s an interesting point. New Italian research jas detected the virus in blood samples taken in September 2019, so the history of the pandemic has yet to be understood.

    • Replies: @Bill P
  35. @Bert

    The research on masks is quite large and contradictory, and high-quality studies are difficult to produce. This is an important paper, but not the end of the story.

  36. @HA

    The evidence from masking countries is interesting but not entirely compelling. We don’t know the factors at play, and there are no controls. A Czech Republic that did not stop wearing masks for a while does not exist, for example, to tell us if their rise in cases would have happened anyway. Furthermore, there are these little contrary pieces of evidence, like the fact that masking in Wuhan, which was widespread it appeared to me, did not create an outcome like other Asian countries, and non-masking in Sweden was not a disaster.

    The hamster study is problematic because it was conducted by a scientist whose express purpose for the study was to prove that masks work and provide evidence to use against mask doubters. Questions of fraud aside, this is not a good way to approach research and raises the possibility of mistakes due to bias. I am waiting for replications of the study. They should be easy to produce, hamsters being cheap and accessible.

    • Replies: @HA
  37. @Voltarde

    Maybe that should have been a [Thanks} rather than an [Agree], Voltarde. “Thanks”, as in, thanks for letting me steal that one!

  38. Who Will be Disappointed…

    Those with the lawn signs for “Giant Meteor” nearly got their wish this year:

    Asteroid Gives Earth Record Close Shave on Friday the 13th

  39. Bill P says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    Antibody tests suggest it’s highly likely the virus was circulating in western Washington state by December at latest.

    However, I think related viruses have been circulating in China for decades. People who had SARS I are evidently immune to this current version, which is similar but more contagious. I had a SARS-like infection in China in the late 90s that hospitalized quite a few people in the laowai (foreigner) community. Fortunately, I was still very young and recovered quickly, but to say it caused “shortness of breath” would be an understatement. It was more like “bloody sputum, sensation of high-velocity sandblaster in throat when coughing and panic-inducing difficulty breathing.”

    China’s septic agricultural practices are a global menace.

  40. Who Will be Disappointed if the Pandemic Is History by Mid-2021?

    This guy:

  41. @Bill P

    However, I think related viruses have been circulating in China for decades.

    I sometimes get this feeling they’re circulating all over the place all of the time. The idea that there is a ‘set’ of diseases to which we human beings are susceptible at any given time is not very plausible.

    It’s possible that COVID-19 has been out there for years, and, as you suggest, the difference in 2019-2020 was simply a mutation that made it just a bit more contagious.

    • Replies: @Bill P
  42. Bill P says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I’ll take it one step further and claim that viruses are actually a form of asexual genetic communication. You know, we are actually born with viruses encoded in our DNA, and we shed them not because we caught them but because they are in our germline.

    Our understanding of viruses is still very elementary, and this most recent form of SARS proves it. Anthony Fauci might as well be a witch doctor for all he knows.

    • LOL: Gabe Ruth
  43. Reqwy says:
    @Bill P

    Considering that most US schools are closed because of coronavirus right now, even though less than 100 US children under 18 have died of coronavirus this year (as compared to about 150-200 US children under 18 who die from the flu in a typical year), school boards really should close schools for every flu season from now on. At least if school boards are going to be consistent.

  44. MBlanc46 says:
    @Jack D

    And since it’s impossible to totally shut up shop, the rational approach would have been to protect the particularly vulnerable populations to a reasonable extent, then let the virus run its course.

  45. @res

    What do you think of doing a human challenge trial in a reality TV format where a bunch of attractive young people are locked up in a house or on a cruise ship in front of TV cameras tracking their every move and we see how they spread or don’t spread the disease.

    • Replies: @res
  46. MEH 0910 says:

    Razib Khan:

  47. res says:
    @Steve Sailer

    It’s an interesting idea, but I’m not sure it’s workable. How do you seed the disease? Without everyone involved knowing the source? What about liability?

    I still like my idea of having COVID camps for kids during the summer.

  48. hhsiii says:

    Hey, I had antibodies back in May. Maybe I don’t need the vaccine. You guys first.

  49. HA says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    “The evidence from masking countries is interesting but not entirely compelling.”

    Exactly what part of “to the naysayers, no evidence will be sufficient” was too difficult to understand? Or were you just chiming in to make my point?

    Again, as noted previously, the “we’re too cool to wear masks” health experts of Holland have long since admitted the error of their ways. That speaks far more loudly than your supercilious link-free dismissal. “Not entirely compelling”, you say? See the previous paragraph.

    The Black Knight routine was funny once. But when it gets turned into a COVID policy, it’s far less amusing especially this far into the death toll. (The same could be said of the “Bring out yer dead” skit.)

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