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From the New York Times opinion page:

Why Are So Many More Men Dying from Coronavirus?

The disproportionate toll this virus is taking on males isn’t an anomaly. When it comes to survival, men are the weaker sex.

By Sharon Moalem

Dr. Moalem is a scientist, physician, and the author of the forthcoming “The Better Half: On the Genetic Superiority of Women.”

April 2, 2020

 
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  1. I was going to write “we die younger because of your constant nagging” but I looked him up.

    He’s got a M.D. in Simping. (Probably due to having a women’s first name.)

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Kronos

    His parents tried to give him some of that female superiority by naming him Sharon.

    Replies: @for-the-record

    , @Autochthon
    @Kronos

    Oh, it's not the feminine aspect of its (((first name))) that got it where it is....

  2. Gender is socially constructed. Men are the same as women. These statistics are sexist because they don’t differentiate Covid deaths for all 50 Facebook genders.

    But men being victimized more is ok and of no concern. They are not a historically disadvantaged class.

    • Replies: @Responds on to Morons
    @TruthRevolution.net

    Gender,

    Is XX or XY. Hilarious how people are brained washed. Science is fact. And no amount of propaganda can change it. No matter how many people say it over and over and over. It is simple Biology. Now I know the school systems are failing.

  3. Does this essay’s status as a NYT op-ed mean that it’s now okay to discuss any of these stats with the women you know?

    Didn’t think so.

  4. @Kronos
    I was going to write “we die younger because of your constant nagging” but I looked him up.

    https://diversityuk.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/The-Better-Half-by-Sharon-Moalem.jpg

    He’s got a M.D. in Simping. (Probably due to having a women’s first name.)

    https://stopsimpingnow.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/anti-simp-logo-picsay.jpg

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Autochthon

    His parents tried to give him some of that female superiority by naming him Sharon.

    • Replies: @for-the-record
    @Rob McX

    His parents tried to give him some of that female superiority by naming him Sharon.

    Sharon (Hebrew: שָׁרוֹן‎ Šārôn "plain") is a given name as well as an Israeli surname.

    In English-speaking areas, Sharon is now predominantly a feminine given name. However, historically it was also used as a masculine given name. In Israel, it is used both as a masculine and a feminine given name.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Cloudbuster, @prosa123

  5. @Rob McX
    @Kronos

    His parents tried to give him some of that female superiority by naming him Sharon.

    Replies: @for-the-record

    His parents tried to give him some of that female superiority by naming him Sharon.

    Sharon (Hebrew: שָׁרוֹן‎ Šārôn “plain”) is a given name as well as an Israeli surname.

    In English-speaking areas, Sharon is now predominantly a feminine given name. However, historically it was also used as a masculine given name. In Israel, it is used both as a masculine and a feminine given name.

    • Thanks: Rob McX, Kronos
    • Replies: @International Jew
    @for-the-record

    That's correct. His last name, Moalem, is Arabic but not uncommon among Jewish families from North Africa, Iraq, etc. Now all you conspiracy theorists really have something to talk about! (You're welcome, Steve.)

    Replies: @Clyde, @Curle

    , @Cloudbuster
    @for-the-record

    Nothing ruins a good joke like "Akshully..."

    , @prosa123
    @for-the-record

    Ariel Sharon had girl names for both his first and last names, but he was about as masculine as you could get!

    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Reg Cæsar, @HFR

  6. We need John Norman.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Whiskey

    I feel like I have to drop a link to 'Houseplants of Gor':

    http://www.rdrop.com/~wyvern/data/houseplants.html

    The whole thing was kind of amusing--the guy wrote it as a joke and then found it was actually doing really well. It became the basis of a whole BDSM subculture.

    DAW killed it in the late eighties after Donald Wollheim's feminist daughter took over. I remember someone trying to bring it back under the Masquerade Press line as erotic fiction sometime in the nineties (I saw it in Barnes and Noble), but I'm guessing feminists squelched that too. Looks like they managed to bring it back as an e-book sometime in the 2000s, and the last one is dated 2019, but the dude's 89 years old, so who knows who's actually writing them now.

    The secret popularity among female fans shows you that Roissy was right and the SJWs are dead wrong.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Bill Jones

    , @Herp McDerp
    @Whiskey

    I used to have a little ritual, back in the day: Whenever I was in a bookstore with friends and a new Gor book had come out, I would pick it up, theatrically open it to a random spot, and start reading aloud. Invariably somewhere on the two facing pages there would be a passage like:

    "Whip me again, Master!" she begged. "I long for the kiss of the lash upon my naked back!"

    "Silence, slave! I'll whip you when I damned well feel like it, and not a moment before!"

  7. Anonymous[383] • Disclaimer says:

    Possibly next week:

    Why Are So Many More Minorities Dying from Coronavirus?

    The disproportionate toll this virus is taking on minorities isn’t an anomaly. When it comes to survival, minorities are the weaker races.

    By Duke Bicklebaum

    Dr. Bicklebaum is a scientist, physician, and the author of the forthcoming “The Better Race: On the Genetic Superiority of Whites.”

    Just wait and see. Any day now in the NYT.

    • Agree: Clyde
  8. Look for my new book “On The Genetic Superiority of White Men” at your local Barnes & Noble. My agent tells me it’s gonna get the book-equivalent of hate-clicks and we’re going straight to the top of the NYT best seller list.

    I also did a very contentious interview with some homo from the New Yorker. With any luck his life was ruined forever.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @BenKenobi


    I also did a very contentious interview with some homo from the New Yorker. With any luck his life was ruined forever.
     
    Next time keep your fly zipped, hoss.
    , @Bill Jones
    @BenKenobi

    It's been done in a few sentences



    "Western man towers over the rest of the world in ways so large as to be almost inexpressible. It's Western exploration, science, and conquest that have revealed the world to itself.
    Other races feel like subjects of Western power long after colonialism, imperialism, and slavery have disappeared.
    The charge of racism puzzles whites who feel not hostility, but only baffled good will, because they don't grasp what it really means: humiliation.
    The white man presents an image of superiority even when he isn't conscious of it.
    And, superiority excites envy.
    Destroying white civilization is the inmost desire of the league of designated victims we call minorities."
    Joseph Sobran, April 1997
     
    Everything every white kid should be taught before their first race propaganda class.

    If you ever interview anybody for a job you should make them read it aloud.
    You'll know whether to hire them.
  9. This guy must OCD over his Wikipedia page because it calls him a polymath, presents him as an all purpose genius. But has nothing on his early years and his family.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Clyde

    In some cases you don't need to check the Wiki early years segment, the parentheses just slap you.

  10. Yes, the Y chromosome gives males a weaker immune system.

    (Interestingly, Amish males have a slightly unusual Y chromosome and thus a stronger immune system.)

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    @White Guy In Japan


    Interestingly, Amish males have a slightly unusual Y chromosome and thus a stronger immune system
     
    Amish would have a better immune system because they don’t hide in sterile containers all the time. They’re fully exposed to nature and get much more exercise.

    How do we know that their Y chromosome is responsible and not their environment/lifestyle?

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @White Guy In Japan

  11. I liked how he almost writes trannies aren’t women. “Genetic females” will probably get him cancelled.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    @Redneck farmer

    How about 'uterine females'?

  12. The reader comment with the second highest number of “recommends” is the pithiest:

    I get it. When a difference between men and women favors women the difference is acknowledged, but when the difference appears to favor men the difference is attacked as a social construct and denied.

    The most recommended comment appears to have a typo (unless the guy really did mean “XX genetic male.”)

    As an XX genetic male, I’m really ok with the insight that my gender gives me an on-average weaker immune system (although remember there are 23 chromosome pairs, not just the sex-based ones) and average shorter life expectancy. But I think the nomenclature of ‘superiority’ reduces a very complex issue with still-emerging proclivities (as a result of ongoing research) to an overly simple binomial superior/inferior ordering. I’m sure this has a certain value in attracting attention and controversy, and some resonance because of the historically patriarchal character of our society. But it creates the pernicious precedent towards rating people’s genetic profiles on other criteria in the same way, some as being superior and others as inferior. That sounds disturbingly like the Eugenics movement of the last century and Huxley’s “Brave New World”. I suggest we not go that direction. It’s entirely appropriate to explore and understand the complex characteristics of our chromosomes, and how that affects our health – the sex pair and all the others. It is useful to know how broad population groups’ genetic characteristics are related to those. While I’m sure the writer’s research is useful and timely, let’s leave it at that, and leave the ‘superior’ ‘inferior’ language behind.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @PiltdownMan

    Ironically he's actually right in this case--men are better at some stuff, and women at other stuff. Your grandparents knew this. Your parents knew this and pretended not to. Your kids don't.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Known Fact, @PIltdownMan

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @PiltdownMan


    I get it. When a difference between men and women favors women the difference is acknowledged, but when the difference appears to favor men the difference is attacked as a social construct and denied.
     
    This first commenter basically described all of "Feminism" in a nutshell. It's just an endless toggling between the two positions (women are different and superior/women are the same and equal), depending on which benefits women in a particular context.

    While I’m sure the writer’s research is useful and timely, let’s leave it at that, and leave the ‘superior’ ‘inferior’ language behind.
     
    This second commenter maybe has a point about how to diplomatically discuss differences. But it's hard to argue that surviving a disease is not "superior" to the alternative.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Jack D
    @PiltdownMan

    #3 recommended comment:

    Carolynn
    Atlanta
    April 2, 2020
    Times Pick
    This was a terrific read. I didn't know the details of chromosomes and you explained it well. Love that we have a real life global example that could possibly increase awareness and funding for women's health and research.


    Carolynn draws the right conclusions - men are dying at a higher rate than women - this means that we must increase awareness and funding for women's health. If men are dying at a lower rate than women - this also means that we must increase awareness and funding for women's health. Do you see how this works?

    Women BTW already account for something like 120% of male medical spending because their lady parts require a lot of medical intervention and because they like to go to the doctor more than men. But a long time ago RBG got the courts to rule that it would be discrimination for insurance companies to charge women higher premiums. Of course insurance companies don't bear that cost - they just charge everyone 10% more so that the men subsidize the women.

    Replies: @res

    , @Curle
    @PiltdownMan

    He starts summarizing an unremarkable finding “I’m really ok with the insight that my gender gives me an on-average weaker immune system.” But then drives the bus over to opportunistic complexity: “But I think the nomenclature of ‘superiority’ reduces a very complex issue with still-emerging proclivities (as a result of ongoing research) to an overly simple binomial superior/inferior ordering.” Because God forbid something in nature ever result in simple binomial ordering? Simple being inherently undesirable as outside the sphere of political meddling.

  13. @for-the-record
    @Rob McX

    His parents tried to give him some of that female superiority by naming him Sharon.

    Sharon (Hebrew: שָׁרוֹן‎ Šārôn "plain") is a given name as well as an Israeli surname.

    In English-speaking areas, Sharon is now predominantly a feminine given name. However, historically it was also used as a masculine given name. In Israel, it is used both as a masculine and a feminine given name.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Cloudbuster, @prosa123

    That’s correct. His last name, Moalem, is Arabic but not uncommon among Jewish families from North Africa, Iraq, etc. Now all you conspiracy theorists really have something to talk about! (You’re welcome, Steve.)

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @International Jew


    That’s correct. His last name, Moalem, is Arabic but not uncommon among Jewish families from North Africa, Iraq, etc.
     
    I knew someone with that last name but slightly diff spelling. He told me the Moalem name is Iraqi Jewish. Not many know that in 1947 Iraq had 300,000 or more Jews, one of the world's largest concentrations.

    Real "Arab" Jews are darker (skin) (swarthy) so this Sharon Moalem must only be part Iraqi Jew.

    Replies: @International Jew

    , @Curle
    @International Jew

    “Now all you conspiracy theorists really have something to talk about!”

    Wanna lend a hand getting us started?

  14. @International Jew
    @for-the-record

    That's correct. His last name, Moalem, is Arabic but not uncommon among Jewish families from North Africa, Iraq, etc. Now all you conspiracy theorists really have something to talk about! (You're welcome, Steve.)

    Replies: @Clyde, @Curle

    That’s correct. His last name, Moalem, is Arabic but not uncommon among Jewish families from North Africa, Iraq, etc.

    I knew someone with that last name but slightly diff spelling. He told me the Moalem name is Iraqi Jewish. Not many know that in 1947 Iraq had 300,000 or more Jews, one of the world’s largest concentrations.

    Real “Arab” Jews are darker (skin) (swarthy) so this Sharon Moalem must only be part Iraqi Jew.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Clyde

    Moalem means "teacher" in Arabic, so there you go.

    If I had to guess, this guy is the product of an Iraqi Jewish father who travelled to the University of Minnesota to get his PhD, and the hot Norwegian blonde he met there.

  15. A bit off topic and/or a question that has perhaps been answered elsewhere. Why are so many of the high Covid death rate countries small ? Andorra, San Marino and Liechtenstein are all in the top 20 for death rates per million.

    https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/#countries

    • Replies: @Mario Partisan
    @AKAHorace

    Keep in mind that covid deaths are a function of covid cases and covid cases are a function of covid tests.

    The small countries you mention rank high on deaths per million, but when you divide deaths by cases, you find that they are well within the range of the larger countries around them, with the exception of Andorra. Its deaths to cases ratio is only about 1% compared to the ~ 2.5% for countries like France, Germany and UK.

    Replies: @AKAHorace

  16. Dr. Moalem is a scientist, physician, and the author of the forthcoming “The Better Half: On the Genetic Superiority of Women.”

    I suppose that Scientist-Physician-Author is also an expert on asexual reproduction?

    But it’s a good game. He’s probably getting laid tremendously.

    I hope untreatable gonnorhea drills him a good one.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @El Dato

    Agree but not just untreatable gonnorhea but genital warts and mushrooms as well. He looks more the type to get AIDS. Lavender shirt with a gray suit is very nice. But a violet purple jacket just screams gay or child molester or some nasty Jewish perversion.

  17. @Clyde
    This guy must OCD over his Wikipedia page because it calls him a polymath, presents him as an all purpose genius. But has nothing on his early years and his family.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    In some cases you don’t need to check the Wiki early years segment, the parentheses just slap you.

  18. I will just leave this here:

    The 90s were good.

    Instead of irate Karens we get irate Laqueesha.

    And the bad guys with agency are all white in that comic.

  19. @Whiskey
    We need John Norman.

    Replies: @SFG, @Herp McDerp

    I feel like I have to drop a link to ‘Houseplants of Gor’:

    http://www.rdrop.com/~wyvern/data/houseplants.html

    The whole thing was kind of amusing–the guy wrote it as a joke and then found it was actually doing really well. It became the basis of a whole BDSM subculture.

    DAW killed it in the late eighties after Donald Wollheim’s feminist daughter took over. I remember someone trying to bring it back under the Masquerade Press line as erotic fiction sometime in the nineties (I saw it in Barnes and Noble), but I’m guessing feminists squelched that too. Looks like they managed to bring it back as an e-book sometime in the 2000s, and the last one is dated 2019, but the dude’s 89 years old, so who knows who’s actually writing them now.

    The secret popularity among female fans shows you that Roissy was right and the SJWs are dead wrong.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @SFG

    Judging by what you can find on Amazon, that's weak sauce to the callused women of today.

    Replies: @Stan d Mute

    , @Bill Jones
    @SFG

    You have provided a small insight into a sub-world that I knew nothing of.
    Enough is too much.
    Don't do it again.

  20. @PiltdownMan
    The reader comment with the second highest number of "recommends" is the pithiest:

    I get it. When a difference between men and women favors women the difference is acknowledged, but when the difference appears to favor men the difference is attacked as a social construct and denied.

     

    The most recommended comment appears to have a typo (unless the guy really did mean "XX genetic male.")

    As an XX genetic male, I'm really ok with the insight that my gender gives me an on-average weaker immune system (although remember there are 23 chromosome pairs, not just the sex-based ones) and average shorter life expectancy. But I think the nomenclature of 'superiority' reduces a very complex issue with still-emerging proclivities (as a result of ongoing research) to an overly simple binomial superior/inferior ordering. I'm sure this has a certain value in attracting attention and controversy, and some resonance because of the historically patriarchal character of our society. But it creates the pernicious precedent towards rating people's genetic profiles on other criteria in the same way, some as being superior and others as inferior. That sounds disturbingly like the Eugenics movement of the last century and Huxley's "Brave New World". I suggest we not go that direction. It's entirely appropriate to explore and understand the complex characteristics of our chromosomes, and how that affects our health - the sex pair and all the others. It is useful to know how broad population groups' genetic characteristics are related to those. While I'm sure the writer's research is useful and timely, let's leave it at that, and leave the 'superior' 'inferior' language behind.
     

    Replies: @SFG, @Hypnotoad666, @Jack D, @Curle

    Ironically he’s actually right in this case–men are better at some stuff, and women at other stuff. Your grandparents knew this. Your parents knew this and pretended not to. Your kids don’t.

    • Agree: Macumazahn
    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @SFG


    Your grandparents knew this. Your parents knew this and pretended not to. Your kids don’t.
     
    Your grandparents knew this. Your parents knew this and pretended not to. Your kids don’t. There won't be any grandchildren.

    There. FIFY
    , @Known Fact
    @SFG

    Camille Paglia also points out that men can't do all that stuff they're better at when a bunch of women are hanging around yammering and issuing HR memos

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    , @PIltdownMan
    @SFG


    Your parents knew this and pretended not to.
     
    Not mine. PiltdownPa was born when Woodrow Wilson was President. PiltdownMa in Coolidge's first year as President.
  21. Contaminating their precious bodily fluids etc etc
    _
    40% of Los Angeles Fire Department (LAFD) firefighters have failed to turn up for voluntary vaccination against the coronavirus, following a pattern of reluctance seen among many front-line health care workers and first responders.
    The Los Angeles Times reported Saturday
    https://www.breitbart.com/health/2021/01/16/40-of-l-a-firefighters-decline-to-show-for-coronavirus-vaccine/
    __
    General Jack D. Ripper : He said war was too important to be left to the generals. When he said that, 50 years ago, he might have been right. But today, war is too important to be left to politicians. They have neither the time, the training, nor the inclination for strategic thought. I can no longer sit back and allow Communist infiltration, Communist indoctrination, Communist subversion and the international Communist conspiracy to sap and impurify all of our precious bodily fluids.

  22. @SFG
    @PiltdownMan

    Ironically he's actually right in this case--men are better at some stuff, and women at other stuff. Your grandparents knew this. Your parents knew this and pretended not to. Your kids don't.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Known Fact, @PIltdownMan

    Your grandparents knew this. Your parents knew this and pretended not to. Your kids don’t.

    Your grandparents knew this. Your parents knew this and pretended not to. Your kids don’t. There won’t be any grandchildren.

    There. FIFY

  23. @SFG
    @Whiskey

    I feel like I have to drop a link to 'Houseplants of Gor':

    http://www.rdrop.com/~wyvern/data/houseplants.html

    The whole thing was kind of amusing--the guy wrote it as a joke and then found it was actually doing really well. It became the basis of a whole BDSM subculture.

    DAW killed it in the late eighties after Donald Wollheim's feminist daughter took over. I remember someone trying to bring it back under the Masquerade Press line as erotic fiction sometime in the nineties (I saw it in Barnes and Noble), but I'm guessing feminists squelched that too. Looks like they managed to bring it back as an e-book sometime in the 2000s, and the last one is dated 2019, but the dude's 89 years old, so who knows who's actually writing them now.

    The secret popularity among female fans shows you that Roissy was right and the SJWs are dead wrong.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Bill Jones

    Judging by what you can find on Amazon, that’s weak sauce to the callused women of today.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    @Pericles


    the callused women of today.
     
    I think you spelled corpulent wrongly.

    Replies: @SFG

  24. @BenKenobi
    Look for my new book “On The Genetic Superiority of White Men” at your local Barnes & Noble. My agent tells me it’s gonna get the book-equivalent of hate-clicks and we’re going straight to the top of the NYT best seller list.

    I also did a very contentious interview with some homo from the New Yorker. With any luck his life was ruined forever.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @Bill Jones

    I also did a very contentious interview with some homo from the New Yorker. With any luck his life was ruined forever.

    Next time keep your fly zipped, hoss.

  25. @for-the-record
    @Rob McX

    His parents tried to give him some of that female superiority by naming him Sharon.

    Sharon (Hebrew: שָׁרוֹן‎ Šārôn "plain") is a given name as well as an Israeli surname.

    In English-speaking areas, Sharon is now predominantly a feminine given name. However, historically it was also used as a masculine given name. In Israel, it is used both as a masculine and a feminine given name.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Cloudbuster, @prosa123

    Nothing ruins a good joke like “Akshully…”

  26. @PiltdownMan
    The reader comment with the second highest number of "recommends" is the pithiest:

    I get it. When a difference between men and women favors women the difference is acknowledged, but when the difference appears to favor men the difference is attacked as a social construct and denied.

     

    The most recommended comment appears to have a typo (unless the guy really did mean "XX genetic male.")

    As an XX genetic male, I'm really ok with the insight that my gender gives me an on-average weaker immune system (although remember there are 23 chromosome pairs, not just the sex-based ones) and average shorter life expectancy. But I think the nomenclature of 'superiority' reduces a very complex issue with still-emerging proclivities (as a result of ongoing research) to an overly simple binomial superior/inferior ordering. I'm sure this has a certain value in attracting attention and controversy, and some resonance because of the historically patriarchal character of our society. But it creates the pernicious precedent towards rating people's genetic profiles on other criteria in the same way, some as being superior and others as inferior. That sounds disturbingly like the Eugenics movement of the last century and Huxley's "Brave New World". I suggest we not go that direction. It's entirely appropriate to explore and understand the complex characteristics of our chromosomes, and how that affects our health - the sex pair and all the others. It is useful to know how broad population groups' genetic characteristics are related to those. While I'm sure the writer's research is useful and timely, let's leave it at that, and leave the 'superior' 'inferior' language behind.
     

    Replies: @SFG, @Hypnotoad666, @Jack D, @Curle

    I get it. When a difference between men and women favors women the difference is acknowledged, but when the difference appears to favor men the difference is attacked as a social construct and denied.

    This first commenter basically described all of “Feminism” in a nutshell. It’s just an endless toggling between the two positions (women are different and superior/women are the same and equal), depending on which benefits women in a particular context.

    While I’m sure the writer’s research is useful and timely, let’s leave it at that, and leave the ‘superior’ ‘inferior’ language behind.

    This second commenter maybe has a point about how to diplomatically discuss differences. But it’s hard to argue that surviving a disease is not “superior” to the alternative.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Hypnotoad666



    I get it. When a difference between men and women favors women the difference is acknowledged, but when the difference appears to favor men the difference is attacked as a social construct and denied.
     
    This first commenter basically described all of “Feminism” in a nutshell. It’s just an endless toggling between the two positions (women are different and superior/women are the same and equal), depending on which benefits women in a particular context.
     
    Jennifer Roback Morse's pithy encapsulation of feminism is, "Men and women are exactly alike, but women are better."

    Wisdom on using girly names from the birthday boy:

    [PDF] Benjamin Franklin's Female and Male Pseudonyms: Sex, Gender, Culture, and Name Suppression from Boston to Philadelphia and Beyond, 1722-1747


    Steve, this is the best day of the year for a post (or re-post) on Affordable Family Formation!

    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-6-hbe-isNYk/XQA5Nvv1oDI/AAAAAAAADUg/GpEZ_8yvvmE8DFs8kYGm8srFV0tqSa86wCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_20190612_044552.JPG

  27. “The Endurance” book about Shackleton’s ill-fated yet non-fatal Antarctic expedition gives a feel for how overwhelming masculine exploration was and had to be. Tender friendships formed between the men but one imagines a whiff of homosexuality would have destroyed everyone in that environment.

    Even just One woman would have led to terrible jealousy and fights and interrupted the professional friendships. Space exploration will be handicapped due to this.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    @Thea

    There won’t be any real space exploration. Not by the US, anyway.

  28. @SFG
    @PiltdownMan

    Ironically he's actually right in this case--men are better at some stuff, and women at other stuff. Your grandparents knew this. Your parents knew this and pretended not to. Your kids don't.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Known Fact, @PIltdownMan

    Camille Paglia also points out that men can’t do all that stuff they’re better at when a bunch of women are hanging around yammering and issuing HR memos

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Known Fact

    It's interesting to see today's Paglia compared to the 80's? "Sexual Personae" person.

    An open longing for more traditional times.

    Replies: @SFG

  29. @for-the-record
    @Rob McX

    His parents tried to give him some of that female superiority by naming him Sharon.

    Sharon (Hebrew: שָׁרוֹן‎ Šārôn "plain") is a given name as well as an Israeli surname.

    In English-speaking areas, Sharon is now predominantly a feminine given name. However, historically it was also used as a masculine given name. In Israel, it is used both as a masculine and a feminine given name.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Cloudbuster, @prosa123

    Ariel Sharon had girl names for both his first and last names, but he was about as masculine as you could get!

    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @prosa123


    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.
     
    Was Shirley ever unisex? I can recall only one man with that name, the late Washington Post sportswriter Shirley Povich (father of Maury).


    https://www.qbbooks.com/pictures/medium/53642.jpg

     

    What about Evelyn? Is it unisex if pronounced differently for male vs. female (e.g., EEV-e-lyn Waugh)?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @prosa123, @Ragno, @Expletive Deleted

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @prosa123


    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.
     
    Douglas was a girl's name in Scotland centuries ago. It disappeared for some time, and its history was likely forgotten by the time the MacArthurs had theirs in 1880.

    Feminizing boys names, e.g., Patrick/Patricia, James (Jacob)/Jacqueline, Francis/Frances, George/Georgia, Eric/Erica, seems to have been exclusively a Roman thing, which spread throughout the Empire. Greeks, Hebrews, Japanese, and other peoples had separate stocks of names for each sex.

    When names are more literal, as in Chinese or with American Indians, the sex divide might be less clear.

    Replies: @Curle, @Expletive Deleted

    , @HFR
    @prosa123

    WWII General Claire Chennault had what would be considered a girl's name. And to really mess with us, one of his sons by his first wife was named Claire, as was a daughter by his second wife.

    Consider also the actor Leslie Howard (who played Ashley Wilkes in "Gone With the Wind") and the director Sir Carol Reed.

    When my sister lived in Italy for a number of years, her name Andrea caused no end of confusion, since there it means Andrew.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  30. @Redneck farmer
    I liked how he almost writes trannies aren't women. "Genetic females" will probably get him cancelled.

    Replies: @dearieme

    How about ‘uterine females’?

  31. Anonymous[806] • Disclaimer says:
    @prosa123
    @for-the-record

    Ariel Sharon had girl names for both his first and last names, but he was about as masculine as you could get!

    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Reg Cæsar, @HFR

    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.

    Was Shirley ever unisex? I can recall only one man with that name, the late Washington Post sportswriter Shirley Povich (father of Maury).

    What about Evelyn? Is it unisex if pronounced differently for male vs. female (e.g., EEV-e-lyn Waugh)?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    Was Shirley ever unisex? I can recall only one man with that name, the late Washington Post sportswriter Shirley Povich (father of Maury).
     
    Spitballer Burleigh Grimes had a brother named Shirleigh.

    Someone at NR, Nordlinger I think, once mentioned knowing an older male Shirley who told him the name was never a problem until that damned Shirley Temple came along. That had to be Povich he was referring to-- both were in DC.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    , @prosa123
    @Anonymous

    According to Babynamewizard, Shirley was a popular girl name in the 1930's, ranking #11 at its peak with over 7,000 occurrences for every million births. Its popularity then plunged into the 1960's and it has barely registered since. Of all the well-known women named Shirley the youngest is Shirley Manson, b. 1966.

    As a boy name it was very uncommon until the 1950's when it almost entirely vanished. Interestingly, the site says that Shirley was usually a boy name until the publication of the Charlotte Bronte novel of the same name in 1849 made it associated with girls.

    Apropos of nothing, I live not too far away from one of the only US communities named Shirley. Unfortunately, it's mostly a dump.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    , @Ragno
    @Anonymous


    Was Shirley ever unisex? I can recall only one man with that name, the late Washington Post sportswriter Shirley Povich (father of Maury).

    What about Evelyn?
     
    Talk about toggling. Male Evelyns bite their pillows but love their country; male Shirleys will hump anything in skirts but (quietly yet firmly) despise their country. Well...one of their countries.
    , @Expletive Deleted
    @Anonymous

    Shirley "Big Daddy" Crabtree, TV wrestling star of long ago.
    Saturday afternoons in front of the B&W telly when visiting chainsmoking great-grandma, her going berserk for him or even fatter "Giant Haystacks" (got up to 699lbs!) behind us in her chair. 'Nother port'n'lemon then, grandma?

    Six foot six and three-seventy-five in his pomp. Born 1930, son of (occasional) pro wrestler, rugby player and collier Shirley Crabtree Sr., born 1906.
    https://www.wrestlingheritage.co.uk/shirley-crabtree

  32. @White Guy In Japan
    Yes, the Y chromosome gives males a weaker immune system.

    (Interestingly, Amish males have a slightly unusual Y chromosome and thus a stronger immune system.)

    Replies: @Stan d Mute

    Interestingly, Amish males have a slightly unusual Y chromosome and thus a stronger immune system

    Amish would have a better immune system because they don’t hide in sterile containers all the time. They’re fully exposed to nature and get much more exercise.

    How do we know that their Y chromosome is responsible and not their environment/lifestyle?

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @Stan d Mute

    Lamarck had a point.

    , @White Guy In Japan
    @Stan d Mute

    Maybe both genetics and environment are factors.

  33. @Pericles
    @SFG

    Judging by what you can find on Amazon, that's weak sauce to the callused women of today.

    Replies: @Stan d Mute

    the callused women of today.

    I think you spelled corpulent wrongly.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Stan d Mute

    They're both true, and there's probably a connection.

  34. @Whiskey
    We need John Norman.

    Replies: @SFG, @Herp McDerp

    I used to have a little ritual, back in the day: Whenever I was in a bookstore with friends and a new Gor book had come out, I would pick it up, theatrically open it to a random spot, and start reading aloud. Invariably somewhere on the two facing pages there would be a passage like:

    “Whip me again, Master!” she begged. “I long for the kiss of the lash upon my naked back!”

    “Silence, slave! I’ll whip you when I damned well feel like it, and not a moment before!”

  35. Ashley Montague used to say this way back, would appear on Johnny Carson and talk about it. He said women were stronger in every way but muscularly. He became more dubious as the years went by, and was defending the fake Blackfoot Indian Jamake Highwater. Probably senile by then. I just saw that the book The Natural Superior of Women goes back to 1952, and was used by the 2nd Wave Feminists. I hadn’t heard anybody say anything like that since he appeared on TV a few times. Never read that or anything else he wrote.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Ashley Montague Israel Ehrenberg used to say this way back, would appear on Johnny Carson and talk about it.

    Fixed it for you.

    Another amazing coincidence, isn't it?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashley_Montagu

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

  36. More interesting is why more Democrats are dying than Republicans, despite progressive mask fetishism.

  37. @PiltdownMan
    The reader comment with the second highest number of "recommends" is the pithiest:

    I get it. When a difference between men and women favors women the difference is acknowledged, but when the difference appears to favor men the difference is attacked as a social construct and denied.

     

    The most recommended comment appears to have a typo (unless the guy really did mean "XX genetic male.")

    As an XX genetic male, I'm really ok with the insight that my gender gives me an on-average weaker immune system (although remember there are 23 chromosome pairs, not just the sex-based ones) and average shorter life expectancy. But I think the nomenclature of 'superiority' reduces a very complex issue with still-emerging proclivities (as a result of ongoing research) to an overly simple binomial superior/inferior ordering. I'm sure this has a certain value in attracting attention and controversy, and some resonance because of the historically patriarchal character of our society. But it creates the pernicious precedent towards rating people's genetic profiles on other criteria in the same way, some as being superior and others as inferior. That sounds disturbingly like the Eugenics movement of the last century and Huxley's "Brave New World". I suggest we not go that direction. It's entirely appropriate to explore and understand the complex characteristics of our chromosomes, and how that affects our health - the sex pair and all the others. It is useful to know how broad population groups' genetic characteristics are related to those. While I'm sure the writer's research is useful and timely, let's leave it at that, and leave the 'superior' 'inferior' language behind.
     

    Replies: @SFG, @Hypnotoad666, @Jack D, @Curle

    #3 recommended comment:

    Carolynn
    Atlanta
    April 2, 2020
    Times Pick
    This was a terrific read. I didn’t know the details of chromosomes and you explained it well. Love that we have a real life global example that could possibly increase awareness and funding for women’s health and research.

    Carolynn draws the right conclusions – men are dying at a higher rate than women – this means that we must increase awareness and funding for women’s health. If men are dying at a lower rate than women – this also means that we must increase awareness and funding for women’s health. Do you see how this works?

    Women BTW already account for something like 120% of male medical spending because their lady parts require a lot of medical intervention and because they like to go to the doctor more than men. But a long time ago RBG got the courts to rule that it would be discrimination for insurance companies to charge women higher premiums. Of course insurance companies don’t bear that cost – they just charge everyone 10% more so that the men subsidize the women.

    • Replies: @res
    @Jack D


    But a long time ago RBG got the courts to rule that it would be discrimination for insurance companies to charge women higher premiums.
     
    But it is not discrimination to charge young men higher premiums for car insurance. We live in fascinating times. I wonder how that great legal mind of hers dealt with that inconsistency?

    The interesting part about this is that the balance changes with age and apparently older women actually pay higher auto premiums than comparable men.

    https://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2019/02/12/517466.htm

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

  38. @Jack D
    @PiltdownMan

    #3 recommended comment:

    Carolynn
    Atlanta
    April 2, 2020
    Times Pick
    This was a terrific read. I didn't know the details of chromosomes and you explained it well. Love that we have a real life global example that could possibly increase awareness and funding for women's health and research.


    Carolynn draws the right conclusions - men are dying at a higher rate than women - this means that we must increase awareness and funding for women's health. If men are dying at a lower rate than women - this also means that we must increase awareness and funding for women's health. Do you see how this works?

    Women BTW already account for something like 120% of male medical spending because their lady parts require a lot of medical intervention and because they like to go to the doctor more than men. But a long time ago RBG got the courts to rule that it would be discrimination for insurance companies to charge women higher premiums. Of course insurance companies don't bear that cost - they just charge everyone 10% more so that the men subsidize the women.

    Replies: @res

    But a long time ago RBG got the courts to rule that it would be discrimination for insurance companies to charge women higher premiums.

    But it is not discrimination to charge young men higher premiums for car insurance. We live in fascinating times. I wonder how that great legal mind of hers dealt with that inconsistency?

    The interesting part about this is that the balance changes with age and apparently older women actually pay higher auto premiums than comparable men.

    https://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2019/02/12/517466.htm

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @res

    Insurance premiums are based on empirical data plus cold actuarial calculations, so all the various regulations that prohibit considering various factors are literally "laws against noticing."

    OTOH, Discrimination based on sex probably tends to even out though, as most insurance is probably purchased to cover entire families with both male and female members.

  39. When it comes to survival, men are the weaker sex.

    Shouldn’t we immediately begin replacing all the front line combat troops with Women or Womyn or whatever? It should reduce our casualty rates while simultaneously increasing the casualty rates on the other side.

    That or the author is completely Pussy-whipped.
    (I spelled Pussy with a capital “P” because it is important.)

  40. So do we get affirmative action now?

  41. So the fair sex is better at surviving Covid because of their genetics. But this is illogical the authorities tell us so: sex is just how you feel. There has to be a study of transgender women (i.e. men) and the lethality of Covid in that group has to be the same as nontransgender women; because science. I mean they tell us transgender women must have menstual products and hence they must menstruate and they can give birth.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Malcolm Y

    If, and only if, M-F transgenders buy menstrual products what do they do with them? If they live with women and girls, someone in the house can use them. But if the M-F lives alone or with other men, what do they do with them?

    If, if any M-F really do buy them.

  42. @prosa123
    @for-the-record

    Ariel Sharon had girl names for both his first and last names, but he was about as masculine as you could get!

    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Reg Cæsar, @HFR

    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.

    Douglas was a girl’s name in Scotland centuries ago. It disappeared for some time, and its history was likely forgotten by the time the MacArthurs had theirs in 1880.

    Feminizing boys names, e.g., Patrick/Patricia, James (Jacob)/Jacqueline, Francis/Frances, George/Georgia, Eric/Erica, seems to have been exclusively a Roman thing, which spread throughout the Empire. Greeks, Hebrews, Japanese, and other peoples had separate stocks of names for each sex.

    When names are more literal, as in Chinese or with American Indians, the sex divide might be less clear.

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Reg Cæsar

    Seems pretty clear to me. Cherokee girl names:

    Adsila: Blossom
    Ama: Water
    Amadahy: Forest water
    Awinita: Fawn
    Gola: Winter
    Kamama: Butterfly
    Noya: Sand
    Salalai: Squirrel
    Selu: Corn
    Tayanita: Young beaver
    Tsula: Fox
    Walela: Hummingbird
    Woya: Dove

    Boy names:

    Ahuli — ah-HOO-lee — “drum”
    Atohi — ah-TOH-hee — “woods”
    Diwali — dee-WAH-lee — “bowls”
    Onacona — OH-nah-COH-nah — “white owl”
    Sequoyah — say-KWOH-yah — “sparrow”
    Tsiyi — JEE-yee — “canoe”
    Waya — WAH-yah — “Wolf”
    Wohali — woh-HAH-lee — “eagle”

    Sparrow for a boy seems the outlier. Bowls seems a lame name.

    , @Expletive Deleted
    @Reg Cæsar

    Then there's the inimitable Marion Robert Morrison, himself of ultimately Scottish ancestry.
    Grandson of Marion Mitchell Morrison.

    I shared a flat with a guy whose post-WW2 Polish refugee parents had somehow not figured out that naming their son "Marian" was not conducive to his health or happiness in 1950s/60s English schools.

    Known to all, except officialdom, only by the first syllable of his otherwise unpronounceable, un-spell-able surname (which to be fair to them, he said, the teachers did make some considerable proto-multikulti efforts to master).

  43. @Anonymous
    @prosa123


    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.
     
    Was Shirley ever unisex? I can recall only one man with that name, the late Washington Post sportswriter Shirley Povich (father of Maury).


    https://www.qbbooks.com/pictures/medium/53642.jpg

     

    What about Evelyn? Is it unisex if pronounced differently for male vs. female (e.g., EEV-e-lyn Waugh)?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @prosa123, @Ragno, @Expletive Deleted

    Was Shirley ever unisex? I can recall only one man with that name, the late Washington Post sportswriter Shirley Povich (father of Maury).

    Spitballer Burleigh Grimes had a brother named Shirleigh.

    Someone at NR, Nordlinger I think, once mentioned knowing an older male Shirley who told him the name was never a problem until that damned Shirley Temple came along. That had to be Povich he was referring to– both were in DC.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @Reg Cæsar

    Shirleigh "Don't Call Me Shirley" Grimes

  44. @AKAHorace
    A bit off topic and/or a question that has perhaps been answered elsewhere. Why are so many of the high Covid death rate countries small ? Andorra, San Marino and Liechtenstein are all in the top 20 for death rates per million.

    https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/#countries

    Replies: @Mario Partisan

    Keep in mind that covid deaths are a function of covid cases and covid cases are a function of covid tests.

    The small countries you mention rank high on deaths per million, but when you divide deaths by cases, you find that they are well within the range of the larger countries around them, with the exception of Andorra. Its deaths to cases ratio is only about 1% compared to the ~ 2.5% for countries like France, Germany and UK.

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    @Mario Partisan


    The small countries you mention rank high on deaths per million, but when you divide deaths by cases, you find that they are well within the range of the larger countries around them, with the exception of Andorra. Its deaths to cases ratio is only about 1% compared to the ~ 2.5% for countries like France, Germany and UK.
     
    So why do they have more cases ? Better reporting because it is easier to pick up in a small country ?

    Replies: @Mario Partisan

  45. So despite months of propaganda about “blacks and people of color” suffering more, the facts indicate that being male is a factor in getting COVID.

    I have also read that having Neanderthal DNA increases ones chances of infection and seriousness.

    Only genetic black Africans lack some Neanderthal DNA. Northern Europeans have the most.

    Yet according to the stats (if they aren’t being gamed) blacks have a higher mortality rate in the US.

    Don’t know if it is black males only or all blacks.

    Despite having reported genetic advantages for survival they fare less favorably. So what factors does this leave?

    Answer: behavioral. Such as physical co-morbidity like obesity, diabetes, heart disease, asthma, alcoholism and drug use, etc. Also cultural, such as lack of social distancing due to communal congregating in clubs, bars, street corners, “house parties,” street parties, riots and looting mayhem (okay, the latter not really statically significant but…)

    But aside from Sleepy Joe and his Progressive mafia buddies, white males will still be at the bottom of the distribution queue. Blacks and others are Protected Species. White males are the opposite.

  46. @Hypnotoad666
    @PiltdownMan


    I get it. When a difference between men and women favors women the difference is acknowledged, but when the difference appears to favor men the difference is attacked as a social construct and denied.
     
    This first commenter basically described all of "Feminism" in a nutshell. It's just an endless toggling between the two positions (women are different and superior/women are the same and equal), depending on which benefits women in a particular context.

    While I’m sure the writer’s research is useful and timely, let’s leave it at that, and leave the ‘superior’ ‘inferior’ language behind.
     
    This second commenter maybe has a point about how to diplomatically discuss differences. But it's hard to argue that surviving a disease is not "superior" to the alternative.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I get it. When a difference between men and women favors women the difference is acknowledged, but when the difference appears to favor men the difference is attacked as a social construct and denied.

    This first commenter basically described all of “Feminism” in a nutshell. It’s just an endless toggling between the two positions (women are different and superior/women are the same and equal), depending on which benefits women in a particular context.

    Jennifer Roback Morse’s pithy encapsulation of feminism is, “Men and women are exactly alike, but women are better.”

    Wisdom on using girly names from the birthday boy:

    [PDF] Benjamin Franklin’s Female and Male Pseudonyms: Sex, Gender, Culture, and Name Suppression from Boston to Philadelphia and Beyond, 1722-1747

    Steve, this is the best day of the year for a post (or re-post) on Affordable Family Formation!

  47. @Anonymous
    @prosa123


    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.
     
    Was Shirley ever unisex? I can recall only one man with that name, the late Washington Post sportswriter Shirley Povich (father of Maury).


    https://www.qbbooks.com/pictures/medium/53642.jpg

     

    What about Evelyn? Is it unisex if pronounced differently for male vs. female (e.g., EEV-e-lyn Waugh)?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @prosa123, @Ragno, @Expletive Deleted

    According to Babynamewizard, Shirley was a popular girl name in the 1930’s, ranking #11 at its peak with over 7,000 occurrences for every million births. Its popularity then plunged into the 1960’s and it has barely registered since. Of all the well-known women named Shirley the youngest is Shirley Manson, b. 1966.

    As a boy name it was very uncommon until the 1950’s when it almost entirely vanished. Interestingly, the site says that Shirley was usually a boy name until the publication of the Charlotte Bronte novel of the same name in 1849 made it associated with girls.

    Apropos of nothing, I live not too far away from one of the only US communities named Shirley. Unfortunately, it’s mostly a dump.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @prosa123

    Shirley Temple.

  48. @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    Was Shirley ever unisex? I can recall only one man with that name, the late Washington Post sportswriter Shirley Povich (father of Maury).
     
    Spitballer Burleigh Grimes had a brother named Shirleigh.

    Someone at NR, Nordlinger I think, once mentioned knowing an older male Shirley who told him the name was never a problem until that damned Shirley Temple came along. That had to be Povich he was referring to-- both were in DC.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    Shirleigh “Don’t Call Me Shirley” Grimes

  49. OT: There’s a couple of those LED billboards here in small town flyover country. I drove by both of them on the way to and from the bar and they both asked anyone who had tips about the “attack” on Mecca the Capitol to call some 800 number.

    A harbinger of things to come, I am sure.

  50. @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    Ashley Montague used to say this way back, would appear on Johnny Carson and talk about it. He said women were stronger in every way but muscularly. He became more dubious as the years went by, and was defending the fake Blackfoot Indian Jamake Highwater. Probably senile by then. I just saw that the book The Natural Superior of Women goes back to 1952, and was used by the 2nd Wave Feminists. I hadn't heard anybody say anything like that since he appeared on TV a few times. Never read that or anything else he wrote.

    Replies: @anon

    Ashley Montague Israel Ehrenberg used to say this way back, would appear on Johnny Carson and talk about it.

    Fixed it for you.

    Another amazing coincidence, isn’t it?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashley_Montagu

    • Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race
    @anon

    Thank you, yes, I realized later I ought to have included that. I was amused he chose such a stylish English name to replace the Yiddische.

  51. @PiltdownMan
    The reader comment with the second highest number of "recommends" is the pithiest:

    I get it. When a difference between men and women favors women the difference is acknowledged, but when the difference appears to favor men the difference is attacked as a social construct and denied.

     

    The most recommended comment appears to have a typo (unless the guy really did mean "XX genetic male.")

    As an XX genetic male, I'm really ok with the insight that my gender gives me an on-average weaker immune system (although remember there are 23 chromosome pairs, not just the sex-based ones) and average shorter life expectancy. But I think the nomenclature of 'superiority' reduces a very complex issue with still-emerging proclivities (as a result of ongoing research) to an overly simple binomial superior/inferior ordering. I'm sure this has a certain value in attracting attention and controversy, and some resonance because of the historically patriarchal character of our society. But it creates the pernicious precedent towards rating people's genetic profiles on other criteria in the same way, some as being superior and others as inferior. That sounds disturbingly like the Eugenics movement of the last century and Huxley's "Brave New World". I suggest we not go that direction. It's entirely appropriate to explore and understand the complex characteristics of our chromosomes, and how that affects our health - the sex pair and all the others. It is useful to know how broad population groups' genetic characteristics are related to those. While I'm sure the writer's research is useful and timely, let's leave it at that, and leave the 'superior' 'inferior' language behind.
     

    Replies: @SFG, @Hypnotoad666, @Jack D, @Curle

    He starts summarizing an unremarkable finding “I’m really ok with the insight that my gender gives me an on-average weaker immune system.” But then drives the bus over to opportunistic complexity: “But I think the nomenclature of ‘superiority’ reduces a very complex issue with still-emerging proclivities (as a result of ongoing research) to an overly simple binomial superior/inferior ordering.” Because God forbid something in nature ever result in simple binomial ordering? Simple being inherently undesirable as outside the sphere of political meddling.

  52. @International Jew
    @for-the-record

    That's correct. His last name, Moalem, is Arabic but not uncommon among Jewish families from North Africa, Iraq, etc. Now all you conspiracy theorists really have something to talk about! (You're welcome, Steve.)

    Replies: @Clyde, @Curle

    “Now all you conspiracy theorists really have something to talk about!”

    Wanna lend a hand getting us started?

  53. @Reg Cæsar
    @prosa123


    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.
     
    Douglas was a girl's name in Scotland centuries ago. It disappeared for some time, and its history was likely forgotten by the time the MacArthurs had theirs in 1880.

    Feminizing boys names, e.g., Patrick/Patricia, James (Jacob)/Jacqueline, Francis/Frances, George/Georgia, Eric/Erica, seems to have been exclusively a Roman thing, which spread throughout the Empire. Greeks, Hebrews, Japanese, and other peoples had separate stocks of names for each sex.

    When names are more literal, as in Chinese or with American Indians, the sex divide might be less clear.

    Replies: @Curle, @Expletive Deleted

    Seems pretty clear to me. Cherokee girl names:

    Adsila: Blossom
    Ama: Water
    Amadahy: Forest water
    Awinita: Fawn
    Gola: Winter
    Kamama: Butterfly
    Noya: Sand
    Salalai: Squirrel
    Selu: Corn
    Tayanita: Young beaver
    Tsula: Fox
    Walela: Hummingbird
    Woya: Dove

    Boy names:

    Ahuli — ah-HOO-lee — “drum”
    Atohi — ah-TOH-hee — “woods”
    Diwali — dee-WAH-lee — “bowls”
    Onacona — OH-nah-COH-nah — “white owl”
    Sequoyah — say-KWOH-yah — “sparrow”
    Tsiyi — JEE-yee — “canoe”
    Waya — WAH-yah — “Wolf”
    Wohali — woh-HAH-lee — “eagle”

    Sparrow for a boy seems the outlier. Bowls seems a lame name.

  54. I’ve heard the theory that we’re chromosomally challenged (less DNA). It’s probably more related to being larger and more combative.

  55. @Stan d Mute
    @White Guy In Japan


    Interestingly, Amish males have a slightly unusual Y chromosome and thus a stronger immune system
     
    Amish would have a better immune system because they don’t hide in sterile containers all the time. They’re fully exposed to nature and get much more exercise.

    How do we know that their Y chromosome is responsible and not their environment/lifestyle?

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @White Guy In Japan

    Lamarck had a point.

  56. @Thea
    “The Endurance” book about Shackleton’s ill-fated yet non-fatal Antarctic expedition gives a feel for how overwhelming masculine exploration was and had to be. Tender friendships formed between the men but one imagines a whiff of homosexuality would have destroyed everyone in that environment.


    Even just One woman would have led to terrible jealousy and fights and interrupted the professional friendships. Space exploration will be handicapped due to this.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    There won’t be any real space exploration. Not by the US, anyway.

  57. @anon
    @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Ashley Montague Israel Ehrenberg used to say this way back, would appear on Johnny Carson and talk about it.

    Fixed it for you.

    Another amazing coincidence, isn't it?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashley_Montagu

    Replies: @Lace the Artist Formerly Known as Race

    Thank you, yes, I realized later I ought to have included that. I was amused he chose such a stylish English name to replace the Yiddische.

  58. @Stan d Mute
    @White Guy In Japan


    Interestingly, Amish males have a slightly unusual Y chromosome and thus a stronger immune system
     
    Amish would have a better immune system because they don’t hide in sterile containers all the time. They’re fully exposed to nature and get much more exercise.

    How do we know that their Y chromosome is responsible and not their environment/lifestyle?

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @White Guy In Japan

    Maybe both genetics and environment are factors.

  59. @prosa123
    @Anonymous

    According to Babynamewizard, Shirley was a popular girl name in the 1930's, ranking #11 at its peak with over 7,000 occurrences for every million births. Its popularity then plunged into the 1960's and it has barely registered since. Of all the well-known women named Shirley the youngest is Shirley Manson, b. 1966.

    As a boy name it was very uncommon until the 1950's when it almost entirely vanished. Interestingly, the site says that Shirley was usually a boy name until the publication of the Charlotte Bronte novel of the same name in 1849 made it associated with girls.

    Apropos of nothing, I live not too far away from one of the only US communities named Shirley. Unfortunately, it's mostly a dump.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    Shirley Temple.

  60. @Mario Partisan
    @AKAHorace

    Keep in mind that covid deaths are a function of covid cases and covid cases are a function of covid tests.

    The small countries you mention rank high on deaths per million, but when you divide deaths by cases, you find that they are well within the range of the larger countries around them, with the exception of Andorra. Its deaths to cases ratio is only about 1% compared to the ~ 2.5% for countries like France, Germany and UK.

    Replies: @AKAHorace

    The small countries you mention rank high on deaths per million, but when you divide deaths by cases, you find that they are well within the range of the larger countries around them, with the exception of Andorra. Its deaths to cases ratio is only about 1% compared to the ~ 2.5% for countries like France, Germany and UK.

    So why do they have more cases ? Better reporting because it is easier to pick up in a small country ?

    • Replies: @Mario Partisan
    @AKAHorace

    I would imagine that the tiny size of these countries would make the logistics of testing a large percentage of the population much easier. And that certainly seems to be the case for Andorra, which has a very high tests per million ratio, although a relatively low ratio of cases to tests. So I would say that the low case mortality rate for Andorra is being driven by the large number of tests.

    San Marino also has a high tests to pop ratio relative to major Western European countries, but substantially below Andorra’s. Lichtenstein’s testing ratio is, however, slightly below average for the Euro countries.

    So, given the high deaths to population ratio, what is driving the moderate deaths to cases ratio for San Marino and Lichtenstein? Compared to their larger neighbors, the two countries have high cases to tests ratios. Where the UK and Germany have about 5.5% of tests coming back positive, San Marino is about 9.2% and Lichtenstein is at 10.6%.

    So Andorra looks bad on overall deaths, but they are doing extreme testing, but with a low positive rate per test. Lichtenstein, is middling on testing, but more tests come back positive, so the case mortality rate is line with the other nations.

    Replies: @Alden, @AKAHorace

  61. @res
    @Jack D


    But a long time ago RBG got the courts to rule that it would be discrimination for insurance companies to charge women higher premiums.
     
    But it is not discrimination to charge young men higher premiums for car insurance. We live in fascinating times. I wonder how that great legal mind of hers dealt with that inconsistency?

    The interesting part about this is that the balance changes with age and apparently older women actually pay higher auto premiums than comparable men.

    https://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2019/02/12/517466.htm

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    Insurance premiums are based on empirical data plus cold actuarial calculations, so all the various regulations that prohibit considering various factors are literally “laws against noticing.”

    OTOH, Discrimination based on sex probably tends to even out though, as most insurance is probably purchased to cover entire families with both male and female members.

  62. @prosa123
    @for-the-record

    Ariel Sharon had girl names for both his first and last names, but he was about as masculine as you could get!

    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Reg Cæsar, @HFR

    WWII General Claire Chennault had what would be considered a girl’s name. And to really mess with us, one of his sons by his first wife was named Claire, as was a daughter by his second wife.

    Consider also the actor Leslie Howard (who played Ashley Wilkes in “Gone With the Wind”) and the director Sir Carol Reed.

    When my sister lived in Italy for a number of years, her name Andrea caused no end of confusion, since there it means Andrew.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @HFR

    My vague impression is that American military heroes tend to have weird first names.

  63. @HFR
    @prosa123

    WWII General Claire Chennault had what would be considered a girl's name. And to really mess with us, one of his sons by his first wife was named Claire, as was a daughter by his second wife.

    Consider also the actor Leslie Howard (who played Ashley Wilkes in "Gone With the Wind") and the director Sir Carol Reed.

    When my sister lived in Italy for a number of years, her name Andrea caused no end of confusion, since there it means Andrew.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    My vague impression is that American military heroes tend to have weird first names.

  64. @AKAHorace
    @Mario Partisan


    The small countries you mention rank high on deaths per million, but when you divide deaths by cases, you find that they are well within the range of the larger countries around them, with the exception of Andorra. Its deaths to cases ratio is only about 1% compared to the ~ 2.5% for countries like France, Germany and UK.
     
    So why do they have more cases ? Better reporting because it is easier to pick up in a small country ?

    Replies: @Mario Partisan

    I would imagine that the tiny size of these countries would make the logistics of testing a large percentage of the population much easier. And that certainly seems to be the case for Andorra, which has a very high tests per million ratio, although a relatively low ratio of cases to tests. So I would say that the low case mortality rate for Andorra is being driven by the large number of tests.

    San Marino also has a high tests to pop ratio relative to major Western European countries, but substantially below Andorra’s. Lichtenstein’s testing ratio is, however, slightly below average for the Euro countries.

    So, given the high deaths to population ratio, what is driving the moderate deaths to cases ratio for San Marino and Lichtenstein? Compared to their larger neighbors, the two countries have high cases to tests ratios. Where the UK and Germany have about 5.5% of tests coming back positive, San Marino is about 9.2% and Lichtenstein is at 10.6%.

    So Andorra looks bad on overall deaths, but they are doing extreme testing, but with a low positive rate per test. Lichtenstein, is middling on testing, but more tests come back positive, so the case mortality rate is line with the other nations.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Mario Partisan

    Despite covid hoax killing billions, Sweden Germany Austria and Italy in 2020 had the lowest death rate in the last 10 years.

    Replies: @Mario Partisan, @AKAHorace

    , @AKAHorace
    @Mario Partisan

    Mario Partisan ,

    Look what happened to Deaths/million in Gibralter today. It is now high on the list. Perhaps there is a tendency for covid deaths tend to be "lumpy" you are likely to get a clusters in the 10s-40s or so. If one one these clusters occur in a small population it gives a high deaths/population figure.

  65. There is nothing about this that is vaguely appropriate… There is an asymmetry in all sorts of places.

  66. @Malcolm Y
    So the fair sex is better at surviving Covid because of their genetics. But this is illogical the authorities tell us so: sex is just how you feel. There has to be a study of transgender women (i.e. men) and the lethality of Covid in that group has to be the same as nontransgender women; because science. I mean they tell us transgender women must have menstual products and hence they must menstruate and they can give birth.

    Replies: @Alden

    If, and only if, M-F transgenders buy menstrual products what do they do with them? If they live with women and girls, someone in the house can use them. But if the M-F lives alone or with other men, what do they do with them?

    If, if any M-F really do buy them.

  67. @SFG
    @PiltdownMan

    Ironically he's actually right in this case--men are better at some stuff, and women at other stuff. Your grandparents knew this. Your parents knew this and pretended not to. Your kids don't.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Known Fact, @PIltdownMan

    Your parents knew this and pretended not to.

    Not mine. PiltdownPa was born when Woodrow Wilson was President. PiltdownMa in Coolidge’s first year as President.

  68. The top comment at Amazon is long but worthwhile, from a women who says she got a PhD in biomedical science. Book: “The Better Half: On the Genetic Superiority of Women”

    This is an excerpt of the comment:

    Brianna S
    3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting science, unnecessarily invidious presentation
    Reviewed in the United States on April 22, 2020

    Do we claim the overall “genetic superiority” of men because they are faster, stronger, have higher lung capacity, more red blood cells, greater psychomotor capacity, greater spatial abilities, etc? Or how about the “genetic superiority” of whites over blacks because they live longer and are less likely to get diabetes, obesity, and high blood pressure? It should be immediately clear to any reasonable person why this invidious language is problematic. It was probably done to incite controversy and thus boost sales no doubt.

    And if you think a book with the opposite title would not generate enormous outrage, I have a bridge to sell you.

  69. @Clyde
    @International Jew


    That’s correct. His last name, Moalem, is Arabic but not uncommon among Jewish families from North Africa, Iraq, etc.
     
    I knew someone with that last name but slightly diff spelling. He told me the Moalem name is Iraqi Jewish. Not many know that in 1947 Iraq had 300,000 or more Jews, one of the world's largest concentrations.

    Real "Arab" Jews are darker (skin) (swarthy) so this Sharon Moalem must only be part Iraqi Jew.

    Replies: @International Jew

    Moalem means “teacher” in Arabic, so there you go.

    If I had to guess, this guy is the product of an Iraqi Jewish father who travelled to the University of Minnesota to get his PhD, and the hot Norwegian blonde he met there.

  70. @TruthRevolution.net
    Gender is socially constructed. Men are the same as women. These statistics are sexist because they don't differentiate Covid deaths for all 50 Facebook genders.

    But men being victimized more is ok and of no concern. They are not a historically disadvantaged class.

    Replies: @Responds on to Morons

    Gender,

    Is XX or XY. Hilarious how people are brained washed. Science is fact. And no amount of propaganda can change it. No matter how many people say it over and over and over. It is simple Biology. Now I know the school systems are failing.

  71. @El Dato

    Dr. Moalem is a scientist, physician, and the author of the forthcoming “The Better Half: On the Genetic Superiority of Women.”
     
    I suppose that Scientist-Physician-Author is also an expert on asexual reproduction?

    But it's a good game. He's probably getting laid tremendously.

    I hope untreatable gonnorhea drills him a good one.

    Replies: @Alden

    Agree but not just untreatable gonnorhea but genital warts and mushrooms as well. He looks more the type to get AIDS. Lavender shirt with a gray suit is very nice. But a violet purple jacket just screams gay or child molester or some nasty Jewish perversion.

  72. @Mario Partisan
    @AKAHorace

    I would imagine that the tiny size of these countries would make the logistics of testing a large percentage of the population much easier. And that certainly seems to be the case for Andorra, which has a very high tests per million ratio, although a relatively low ratio of cases to tests. So I would say that the low case mortality rate for Andorra is being driven by the large number of tests.

    San Marino also has a high tests to pop ratio relative to major Western European countries, but substantially below Andorra’s. Lichtenstein’s testing ratio is, however, slightly below average for the Euro countries.

    So, given the high deaths to population ratio, what is driving the moderate deaths to cases ratio for San Marino and Lichtenstein? Compared to their larger neighbors, the two countries have high cases to tests ratios. Where the UK and Germany have about 5.5% of tests coming back positive, San Marino is about 9.2% and Lichtenstein is at 10.6%.

    So Andorra looks bad on overall deaths, but they are doing extreme testing, but with a low positive rate per test. Lichtenstein, is middling on testing, but more tests come back positive, so the case mortality rate is line with the other nations.

    Replies: @Alden, @AKAHorace

    Despite covid hoax killing billions, Sweden Germany Austria and Italy in 2020 had the lowest death rate in the last 10 years.

    • Replies: @Mario Partisan
    @Alden

    Hi there. I would like your source on that. FYI, I am a heretic in the Church of the Branch Covidians.

    , @AKAHorace
    @Alden


    Despite covid hoax killing billions, Sweden Germany Austria and Italy in 2020 had the lowest death rate in the last 10 years.
     
    Alden, this is fascinating. Can you send a link to where you got this information ?
  73. @Anonymous
    @prosa123


    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.
     
    Was Shirley ever unisex? I can recall only one man with that name, the late Washington Post sportswriter Shirley Povich (father of Maury).


    https://www.qbbooks.com/pictures/medium/53642.jpg

     

    What about Evelyn? Is it unisex if pronounced differently for male vs. female (e.g., EEV-e-lyn Waugh)?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @prosa123, @Ragno, @Expletive Deleted

    Was Shirley ever unisex? I can recall only one man with that name, the late Washington Post sportswriter Shirley Povich (father of Maury).

    What about Evelyn?

    Talk about toggling. Male Evelyns bite their pillows but love their country; male Shirleys will hump anything in skirts but (quietly yet firmly) despise their country. Well…one of their countries.

  74. @BenKenobi
    Look for my new book “On The Genetic Superiority of White Men” at your local Barnes & Noble. My agent tells me it’s gonna get the book-equivalent of hate-clicks and we’re going straight to the top of the NYT best seller list.

    I also did a very contentious interview with some homo from the New Yorker. With any luck his life was ruined forever.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @Bill Jones

    It’s been done in a few sentences

    “Western man towers over the rest of the world in ways so large as to be almost inexpressible. It’s Western exploration, science, and conquest that have revealed the world to itself.
    Other races feel like subjects of Western power long after colonialism, imperialism, and slavery have disappeared.
    The charge of racism puzzles whites who feel not hostility, but only baffled good will, because they don’t grasp what it really means: humiliation.
    The white man presents an image of superiority even when he isn’t conscious of it.
    And, superiority excites envy.
    Destroying white civilization is the inmost desire of the league of designated victims we call minorities.”
    Joseph Sobran, April 1997

    Everything every white kid should be taught before their first race propaganda class.

    If you ever interview anybody for a job you should make them read it aloud.
    You’ll know whether to hire them.

  75. @SFG
    @Whiskey

    I feel like I have to drop a link to 'Houseplants of Gor':

    http://www.rdrop.com/~wyvern/data/houseplants.html

    The whole thing was kind of amusing--the guy wrote it as a joke and then found it was actually doing really well. It became the basis of a whole BDSM subculture.

    DAW killed it in the late eighties after Donald Wollheim's feminist daughter took over. I remember someone trying to bring it back under the Masquerade Press line as erotic fiction sometime in the nineties (I saw it in Barnes and Noble), but I'm guessing feminists squelched that too. Looks like they managed to bring it back as an e-book sometime in the 2000s, and the last one is dated 2019, but the dude's 89 years old, so who knows who's actually writing them now.

    The secret popularity among female fans shows you that Roissy was right and the SJWs are dead wrong.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Bill Jones

    You have provided a small insight into a sub-world that I knew nothing of.
    Enough is too much.
    Don’t do it again.

  76. @Known Fact
    @SFG

    Camille Paglia also points out that men can't do all that stuff they're better at when a bunch of women are hanging around yammering and issuing HR memos

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    It’s interesting to see today’s Paglia compared to the 80’s? “Sexual Personae” person.

    An open longing for more traditional times.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Bill Jones

    She probably realized what she was doing and decided she was wrong.

    That and on the freedom-vs-security tradeoff, Paglia comes down squarely on the side of freedom, unlike the modern feminized left.

    It kind of makes sense she decided she was transgendered--she was just one of these rare women with a masculine brain. She's actually argued for trying to avoid surgery and hormones, though--better to just live life as a weirdo rather than cut parts of your body off and take drugs with side effects.

    If I had to rerun the past 50 years I'd probably try to find some more humane solution to cases like that--kind of a 'you're weird but we'll leave you alone' rather than tossing people in jail for being gay which led to the reactions against that, which led to the current situation where trying to follow the gender roles that were common for the last 2000 years is some kind of oppression. A few grumpy women who didn't like family life were fine, but now they convinced all the normal women they have to pretend it's a bad idea.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  77. @Mario Partisan
    @AKAHorace

    I would imagine that the tiny size of these countries would make the logistics of testing a large percentage of the population much easier. And that certainly seems to be the case for Andorra, which has a very high tests per million ratio, although a relatively low ratio of cases to tests. So I would say that the low case mortality rate for Andorra is being driven by the large number of tests.

    San Marino also has a high tests to pop ratio relative to major Western European countries, but substantially below Andorra’s. Lichtenstein’s testing ratio is, however, slightly below average for the Euro countries.

    So, given the high deaths to population ratio, what is driving the moderate deaths to cases ratio for San Marino and Lichtenstein? Compared to their larger neighbors, the two countries have high cases to tests ratios. Where the UK and Germany have about 5.5% of tests coming back positive, San Marino is about 9.2% and Lichtenstein is at 10.6%.

    So Andorra looks bad on overall deaths, but they are doing extreme testing, but with a low positive rate per test. Lichtenstein, is middling on testing, but more tests come back positive, so the case mortality rate is line with the other nations.

    Replies: @Alden, @AKAHorace

    Mario Partisan ,

    Look what happened to Deaths/million in Gibralter today. It is now high on the list. Perhaps there is a tendency for covid deaths tend to be “lumpy” you are likely to get a clusters in the 10s-40s or so. If one one these clusters occur in a small population it gives a high deaths/population figure.

  78. @Anonymous
    @prosa123


    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.
     
    Was Shirley ever unisex? I can recall only one man with that name, the late Washington Post sportswriter Shirley Povich (father of Maury).


    https://www.qbbooks.com/pictures/medium/53642.jpg

     

    What about Evelyn? Is it unisex if pronounced differently for male vs. female (e.g., EEV-e-lyn Waugh)?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @prosa123, @Ragno, @Expletive Deleted

    Shirley “Big Daddy” Crabtree, TV wrestling star of long ago.
    Saturday afternoons in front of the B&W telly when visiting chainsmoking great-grandma, her going berserk for him or even fatter “Giant Haystacks” (got up to 699lbs!) behind us in her chair. ‘Nother port’n’lemon then, grandma?

    Six foot six and three-seventy-five in his pomp. Born 1930, son of (occasional) pro wrestler, rugby player and collier Shirley Crabtree Sr., born 1906.
    https://www.wrestlingheritage.co.uk/shirley-crabtree

  79. @Alden
    @Mario Partisan

    Despite covid hoax killing billions, Sweden Germany Austria and Italy in 2020 had the lowest death rate in the last 10 years.

    Replies: @Mario Partisan, @AKAHorace

    Hi there. I would like your source on that. FYI, I am a heretic in the Church of the Branch Covidians.

  80. @Alden
    @Mario Partisan

    Despite covid hoax killing billions, Sweden Germany Austria and Italy in 2020 had the lowest death rate in the last 10 years.

    Replies: @Mario Partisan, @AKAHorace

    Despite covid hoax killing billions, Sweden Germany Austria and Italy in 2020 had the lowest death rate in the last 10 years.

    Alden, this is fascinating. Can you send a link to where you got this information ?

  81. @Bill Jones
    @Known Fact

    It's interesting to see today's Paglia compared to the 80's? "Sexual Personae" person.

    An open longing for more traditional times.

    Replies: @SFG

    She probably realized what she was doing and decided she was wrong.

    That and on the freedom-vs-security tradeoff, Paglia comes down squarely on the side of freedom, unlike the modern feminized left.

    It kind of makes sense she decided she was transgendered–she was just one of these rare women with a masculine brain. She’s actually argued for trying to avoid surgery and hormones, though–better to just live life as a weirdo rather than cut parts of your body off and take drugs with side effects.

    If I had to rerun the past 50 years I’d probably try to find some more humane solution to cases like that–kind of a ‘you’re weird but we’ll leave you alone’ rather than tossing people in jail for being gay which led to the reactions against that, which led to the current situation where trying to follow the gender roles that were common for the last 2000 years is some kind of oppression. A few grumpy women who didn’t like family life were fine, but now they convinced all the normal women they have to pretend it’s a bad idea.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @SFG

    I'd leave the loonies alone too.
    One caveat: It has to be reciprocal-
    Try to fuck with me and mine and into the Loony-Bin toute suite.

    Paglia's got a hell of a brain- works at 100 MPH. To listen to her on the topic of Derrida and the other deconstructivist grifters is a real joy.

  82. @Stan d Mute
    @Pericles


    the callused women of today.
     
    I think you spelled corpulent wrongly.

    Replies: @SFG

    They’re both true, and there’s probably a connection.

  83. @Kronos
    I was going to write “we die younger because of your constant nagging” but I looked him up.

    https://diversityuk.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/The-Better-Half-by-Sharon-Moalem.jpg

    He’s got a M.D. in Simping. (Probably due to having a women’s first name.)

    https://stopsimpingnow.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/anti-simp-logo-picsay.jpg

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Autochthon

    Oh, it’s not the feminine aspect of its (((first name))) that got it where it is….

  84. @Reg Cæsar
    @prosa123


    One naming peculiarity is that what were once boy names or at least unisex sometimes become almost exclusively girl names (Ashley, Blair, Lynn, Madison, Reese, Taylor, many others), but the reverse never happens.
     
    Douglas was a girl's name in Scotland centuries ago. It disappeared for some time, and its history was likely forgotten by the time the MacArthurs had theirs in 1880.

    Feminizing boys names, e.g., Patrick/Patricia, James (Jacob)/Jacqueline, Francis/Frances, George/Georgia, Eric/Erica, seems to have been exclusively a Roman thing, which spread throughout the Empire. Greeks, Hebrews, Japanese, and other peoples had separate stocks of names for each sex.

    When names are more literal, as in Chinese or with American Indians, the sex divide might be less clear.

    Replies: @Curle, @Expletive Deleted

    Then there’s the inimitable Marion Robert Morrison, himself of ultimately Scottish ancestry.
    Grandson of Marion Mitchell Morrison.

    I shared a flat with a guy whose post-WW2 Polish refugee parents had somehow not figured out that naming their son “Marian” was not conducive to his health or happiness in 1950s/60s English schools.

    Known to all, except officialdom, only by the first syllable of his otherwise unpronounceable, un-spell-able surname (which to be fair to them, he said, the teachers did make some considerable proto-multikulti efforts to master).

  85. @SFG
    @Bill Jones

    She probably realized what she was doing and decided she was wrong.

    That and on the freedom-vs-security tradeoff, Paglia comes down squarely on the side of freedom, unlike the modern feminized left.

    It kind of makes sense she decided she was transgendered--she was just one of these rare women with a masculine brain. She's actually argued for trying to avoid surgery and hormones, though--better to just live life as a weirdo rather than cut parts of your body off and take drugs with side effects.

    If I had to rerun the past 50 years I'd probably try to find some more humane solution to cases like that--kind of a 'you're weird but we'll leave you alone' rather than tossing people in jail for being gay which led to the reactions against that, which led to the current situation where trying to follow the gender roles that were common for the last 2000 years is some kind of oppression. A few grumpy women who didn't like family life were fine, but now they convinced all the normal women they have to pretend it's a bad idea.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    I’d leave the loonies alone too.
    One caveat: It has to be reciprocal-
    Try to fuck with me and mine and into the Loony-Bin toute suite.

    Paglia’s got a hell of a brain- works at 100 MPH. To listen to her on the topic of Derrida and the other deconstructivist grifters is a real joy.

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