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White House Denounces FBI for Doubting the Narrative
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From the front page of the New York Times:

White House Disagrees With F.B.I. Chief on Scrutiny as a Cause of Crime
By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT and MATT APUZZO OCT. 26, 2015

WASHINGTON — The White House said Monday that it did not agree with the assertion last week by the F.B.I. director, James B. Comey, that additional scrutiny of law enforcement in the past year may have made police officers less aggressive, leading to a rise in violent crime in some cities.

“The evidence we have seen so far doesn’t support the contention that law enforcement officials are shirking their responsibilities,” the White House press secretary, Josh Earnest, said in response to a question about Mr. Comey at his daily briefing. “In fact, you hear law enforcement leaders across the country indicating that that’s not what’s taking place,”

In a speech at the University of Chicago on Friday, the F.B.I. director said there might be many factors — like cheaper drugs and easier access to guns — that had spawned an increase in crime. But none of them were as convincing to him as the notion that officers were afraid to get out of their patrol cars and deal directly with people on the street because the officers were afraid their interactions would be caught on video.

Mr. Comey acknowledged there was no data to back it up, but he said law enforcement leaders and officers had told him it was affecting policing.

“I spoke to officers privately in one big city precinct who described being surrounded by young people with mobile phone cameras held high, taunting them the moment they get out of their cars,” Mr. Comey said. “They told me, ‘We feel like we’re under siege and we don’t feel much like getting out of our cars.’ ”

Many have called it “the Ferguson effect,” referring to the protests that erupted in the summer of 2014 after a white police officer fatally shot an unarmed black man in Ferguson, Mo. But this explanation for a crime increase has been criticized because it can be seen as suggesting that those who protest police tactics are in part to blame for violent crime. It can also be interpreted as an accusation that police officers are not doing their jobs while crime rises.

That’s what happened in the 1960s. Liberals like the Warren Court and the Lindsay Administration in NYC took control of the criminal justice Narrative, blacks acted out, and the police retreated to the donut shop.

Here’s a three word lesson that social theorists should keep in mind: Cops Like Donuts.

Mr. Comey’s remarks angered Justice Department and White House officials, because they saw them as undermining the administration’s criminal justice policies. Holding the police accountable for civil rights violations has been a top priority for the Obama administration in recent years, and several officials privately fumed at the suggestion that criticizing the police had led to violent crime.

In Mr. Comey’s speech, he also appeared out of step with the administration over whether the imprisonment of thousands of criminals in the 1980s and 1990s — when there were high rates of crime in many cities — could be called “mass incarceration.”

Mr. Comey said these prosecutions “didn’t happen ‘en masse.’ ”

“Each drug dealer, each mugger, each killer, and each felon with a gun had his own lawyer, his own case, his own time before judge and jury, his own sentencing, and, in many cases, an appeal or other post-sentencing review,” Mr. Comey said. “There were thousands and thousands of those individual cases, but to speak of ‘mass incarceration’ I believe is confusing, and it distorts an important reality.”

Many of the Obama administration’s criminal justice initiatives focus on undoing policies from the 1980s and 1990s that disproportionately affect minorities.

Meanwhile, also from the front page of the New York Times:

The authorities in South Carolina are investigating an encounter captured on two videos that went viral Monday afternoon that show a white school police officer in a Columbia classroom grabbing an African-American student by the neck, flipping her backward as she sat at her desk, then dragging and throwing her across the floor.

The videos, apparently shot by students in the classroom, were picked up by national news outlets and had ricocheted across social media platforms by Monday evening, sparking a new round of angry and anguished debate over how police officers treat African-Americans.

I’d add that in this chain of cause and effect, probably an earlier impetus is a development that very seldom makes the front page of the New York Times, but has been having a dark energy effect for the last half decade or so: the rise of World Star Hip Hop-style online videos of blacks behaving badly, usually camera-phoned by other blacks.

It’s a big country and there always something spectacularly screwed up going on. The rise of random video unfiltered by the Narrative has caused a chain reaction of attempts to re-impose Narrative on what you are seeing with your lying eyes.

 
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  1. World Star Hip Hop and sites like LiveLeak have destroyed the narrative.

    Some folks don’t realize that yet.

    Those sites get picked up by sites like the Daily Mail.

    It may get even more interesting with apps like periscope. Like twitter, but livefeed video.

    • Replies: @DCThrowback
    @wren

    No, these videos often lack context. The media and #BLM folks get to spread their lies before the truth gets it shoes on; only those "racists" who hate black people care to find out what the actual context was: that this particular teen was asked to leave the classroom 4x for being disruptive, wouldn't listen, was written up, and wouldn't move when asked several times by a uniformed officer (!) in her school.

    Replies: @nglaer

    , @Ed
    @wren

    Much is made of the ubiquity of videos in regards to police by the media. Rightfully so, it's clear videos have influenced behavior of cops and civilians.

    As you point out though sites like worldstar & liveleak have an impact as well. I'd argue even a greater impact. It fuels the silent majority that produces the likes of Trump & shocking election results.

    Replies: @NOTA

  2. We need an agency to control the internet

  3. OT, perhaps, but two NYT errors caught my eye:

    “But none of them were [should be “was”] as convincing to him as the notion that officers were afraid to get out of their patrol cars and deal directly with people on the street because the officers were afraid their interactions would be caught on video.

    Mr. Comey acknowledged there was [should be “were”] no data to back it up, but he said law enforcement leaders and officers had told him it was affecting policing.”

    And to what does (or do) the twice used “it” refer in the second of these awkward sentences?

    Even the veneer is rotting.

    If anyone cares to pass this along to the NYT, please do.

    • Replies: @Chris Adams
    @guest

    First example: "them" is the subject, correct? It's plural. So "were" would be correct.

    Second example: "data" is the subject. One collection of data. Singular. So the singular "was" is required.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @(((Owen)))

    , @Massimo Heitor
    @guest


    OT, perhaps, but two NYT errors caught my eye
     
    NYT's grammar is completely technically correct on the issues that you cite. At least it is correct in the traditional sense and not in the ebonics sense: "we/they were", "he/she/it was".
    , @gregor
    @guest

    "None of them were" is perfectly fine.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/help/faq/language/g11.html

  4. …several officials privately fumed at the suggestion that criticizing the police had led to violent crime.

    These people are really scum.

    With well-crafted talking points, Trump can score some solid points here as well.

    • Replies: @Penguinchip
    @eah

    Trump should regularly refer to Obama as "President Cop-killer" and to Holder as "Attorney General Cop-killer." He's shown so far that, unlike the Bush / Rove / Boehner idiot parade, he gets that real Americans don't give a shit how much something upsets the likes of the Washington Post and Rachel Maddow, and it would be energizingly insulting, divisive, and hateful to provide exactly what that little alinskyite prick Obama deserves. It would have the added merit of bring true, unlike anything Barry Hussein Cop-killer believes.

    Replies: @eah

  5. @guest
    OT, perhaps, but two NYT errors caught my eye:

    "But none of them were [should be "was"] as convincing to him as the notion that officers were afraid to get out of their patrol cars and deal directly with people on the street because the officers were afraid their interactions would be caught on video.

    Mr. Comey acknowledged there was [should be "were"] no data to back it up, but he said law enforcement leaders and officers had told him it was affecting policing."

    And to what does (or do) the twice used "it" refer in the second of these awkward sentences?

    Even the veneer is rotting.

    If anyone cares to pass this along to the NYT, please do.

    Replies: @Chris Adams, @Massimo Heitor, @gregor

    First example: “them” is the subject, correct? It’s plural. So “were” would be correct.

    Second example: “data” is the subject. One collection of data. Singular. So the singular “was” is required.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Chris Adams


    First example: “them” is the subject, correct? It’s plural. So “were” would be correct.

     

    Actually, 'none' is the subject; 'them' is the object of the preposition 'of'. So since 'none' is singular, 'was' is indeed correct.

    Second example: “data” is the subject. One collection of data. Singular. So the singular “was” is required.

     

    'Data' is the subject here, yes, but since no single collection of data is specified, 'data' on its own is plural. The singular is 'datum'. The plural 'were' is therefore correct. 'Data' is sometimes treated as singular in colloquial usage, as it is in this NYT article, but doing so is sloppy.

    The NYT should get things like this right.

    And I also agree with 'guest' that the 'it's with vague antecedents are obfuscating the question at hand.

    Replies: @guest, @John Derbyshire

    , @(((Owen)))
    @Chris Adams

    In the first example, 'none' is the subject. None is always plural because any number other than exactly one is plural including numbers like zero, negative infinity, 0.999, and 1.001. Therefore 'were' is correct.

    In the second example, 'data' is the subject. Unless 'data' is being used as the plural of 'datum,' it is singular. Almost all use of 'data' in English is singular describing a collection so 'was' is correct.

    There are writers ignorant of the process of linguistic borrowing and the differences between English and Latin with respect to collective nouns and those writers often insist wrongly on the use of 'data' as a plural. It gives them pleasure to pedantically overcorrect anyone who uses English as its own legitimate language instead of a mere embarrassing accidental outgrowth of Latin culture. These punks have been trying to control our culture since 1066.

    In Latin, the word for everybody is omnēs and it is inherently plural. The singular form is used as an adjective and rarely functions as a bare noun. Datum is a neuter perfect passive periphrastic participle meaning 'that which has been done' and functions as a singular and as plural 'data' with something vaguely like its English meaning. In English, 'everybody' is always singular but collective. 'Nobody' is always a singular collective even though the collection is a collection of zero. Similarly 'the people' is a singular collective. English likes collective singulars.

    Replies: @Jim

  6. Today in Sweden the jewish-owned, jewish-led Dagens Nyheter reports that according to Nato’s Stratcom in Riga, xenophobia and “hate of foreigners” is actively being fueled by “foreign powers.” The fellows of Stratcom in Riga have discovered a pattern in online “hate campaigns” where the infowarriors are said to exploit societies’ “instinctive fear of the foreign.” Mikael Tofvesson, a Swedish colleague to Stratcom’s boss Janis Sarts confirms the picture: “It is hard to point out specific nations, but there are actors communicating about this, that we can see. Xenophobia and that kind of fear can be raised and fueled by foreign powers. We see that tendency also, Tofvesson says.”

    It is hard to not “flip the script” and interpret the piece as follows: NATO is playing an active role in pushing for a multicultural Europe, while these efforts are actively being resisted by a certain eastern force. The second half of the article contains some details about ties between the Swedish Resistance Movement and the Russian Imperialist Movement (great name!). Daniel Poohl of the far-left organization Expo is interviewed. The members of Expo fancy themselves as being nazihunters. In practice they mostly work to track down, harass and dox Sweden Democrats, and anyone else daring to question the current “cultural” policies.

    http://www.dn.se/nyheter/sverige/nato-framlingshatet-kan-godas-av-frammande-makt/
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonnier_family

    • Replies: @cwhatfuture
    @Swenon

    Although the Bonnier family is of Jewish origin (a long time ago) they do not seem to be so Jewish now, as one of them, Åke Bonnier, is a bishop in the Diocese of Skara.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @swenon, @5371, @fnn, @AnonymousCoward

  7. Pat Casey says:

    Yep. One thing tho, and the NYT did have a big piece on this not long ago, apparently K2, the synthetic marijuana, has only latishly caught on in Harlem. I bought some of that stuff four years ago at a gas station in Front Royal, VA and it’s about twenty times as potent as weed and the high is more like riding a spaceship than zoning out in an aerie—it apparently makes blacks take sidewalk naps and whatever else.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Pat Casey

    Makes sense. In my limited experience, when white kids hit the K2 hard they generally end up burning down a curling club:

    http://www.nornow.org/2013/02/02/curling-club-arsonists-imprisoned-for-10-years/

    , @Kevin O'Keeffe
    @Pat Casey

    " I bought some of that stuff four years ago at a gas station in Front Royal, VA and it’s about twenty times as potent as weed and the high is more like riding a spaceship than zoning out in an aerie—it apparently makes blacks take sidewalk naps and whatever else."

    I flushed some of that crap down the toilet myself, after having tried it a few times. If anything, you understate the case; its more than simply twenty times more potent that marijuana. Its a difference of kind, not merely degree. I think it functions effectively as more of a PCP substitute, as opposed to a marijuana substitute, and I strongly advocate it be made illegal (as it has been in some states).

  8. @Chris Adams
    @guest

    First example: "them" is the subject, correct? It's plural. So "were" would be correct.

    Second example: "data" is the subject. One collection of data. Singular. So the singular "was" is required.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @(((Owen)))

    First example: “them” is the subject, correct? It’s plural. So “were” would be correct.

    Actually, ‘none’ is the subject; ‘them’ is the object of the preposition ‘of’. So since ‘none’ is singular, ‘was’ is indeed correct.

    Second example: “data” is the subject. One collection of data. Singular. So the singular “was” is required.

    ‘Data’ is the subject here, yes, but since no single collection of data is specified, ‘data’ on its own is plural. The singular is ‘datum’. The plural ‘were’ is therefore correct. ‘Data’ is sometimes treated as singular in colloquial usage, as it is in this NYT article, but doing so is sloppy.

    The NYT should get things like this right.

    And I also agree with ‘guest’ that the ‘it’s with vague antecedents are obfuscating the question at hand.

    • Replies: @guest
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Thank you.

    "Obfuscating the question at hand" might make a good NYT masthead.

    , @John Derbyshire
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    "Data" is an aggregative noun in English, like "rice" or "grass." Try:

    "The rice are cooked."

    "The grass need mowing."

    It's true that in Latin, data is the plural of datum, "that which is given." If it's the Latin word you're using, though, it should be in italics.

    The rule is: If you are using a foreign word with its foreign case, number, mood, person, tense, . . . then put it in italics and follow foreign rules of grammar (and orthography: Zeitgeist). If you want to Anglicize the word, drop the italics and all foreignness (zeitgeist).

    I don't think I've ever heard an English-speaking person unselfconsciously use the word "datum," and I worked in data processing for 30 years. For a particle of data the usual term was "data item."

    Replies: @GW, @The Last Real Calvinist, @(((Owen))), @Jean Cocteausten, @Harold, @ben tillman, @tbraton

  9. It’s impossible to police any society where there’s a large number of people willing to taunt and goad the police when they’re going about their business. This was OK before everybody had a camera. Back then, if people obstructed police for the sole purpose of provoking them, the officers could respond with force, and get the benefit of the doubt if their behaviour was called into question later. Nowadays payouts for perceived misconduct on the part of law enforcement officers only provide an incentive for people to push them over the edge.

    • Replies: @William BadWhite
    @Rob McX

    "It’s impossible to police any society where there’s a large number of people willing to taunt and goad the police when they’re going about their business. "

    Well said. I'd go further and add that any society that really needs a lot of law enforcement has already lost. I have never lived there but I can't imagine that the police in the more rural parts of Switzerland or Japan are terribly busy - because they are policing people that have societal norms roughly in line with the law. The law represents how they'd mostly choose to live anyway.

    The "law" theoretically represents a consensus of a society itself as to what behavior is acceptable and what is not. Further the law represents the bare minimum, not what is acceptable. How many of you go through your daily routines behaving just well enough to avoid getting arrested? You may stay out of prison, but you wouldn't have many friends.

    Thus if you have a large subset of society that not only can not/will not behave in a sociable manner, but also that can not/will not behave in a legal (the bare minimum) manner, then that segment of society is being governed by laws that are fundamentally not in line with their consensus as to what is acceptable behavior, which is really just their nature. This is one of the fatal flaws of multi-ethnic or more accurately multi-cultural societies: subgroups don't want to live by other subgroups' laws and norms.

    Using American blacks and American whites as examples: Blacks clearly don't want to or can't behave according to white norms, and they really resent being forced to do so (if their reactions to being policed are an indication). However whites absolutely do not want to and are not willing to live in a society governed by black norms (see: Flight, White). Nonetheless we are all forced to live together, because diversity blah blah and racism blah blah. Whites move away from blacks, blacks follow the whites, then complain, over and over. One group needs to be forced to bend to the other's norms. For now, its whites that get to do the bending and blacks that get bent.

    For me that's certainly better than the alternative. And it will remain this way as long as whites are able to continue to move away from blacks and re-establish their own mini civilizations.

  10. I am with the cops on this. but I also understand the reaction the blacks had when one of their own dies of injuries sustained during police custody. BUT rioting for days isn’t the way to go about it.

    they would have a hell of alot of more support from normal folks if they did peaceful protests, not taking the chance to burn and loot. I was with them till the riot, now I 100% squarely support the cops.

  11. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Chris Adams


    First example: “them” is the subject, correct? It’s plural. So “were” would be correct.

     

    Actually, 'none' is the subject; 'them' is the object of the preposition 'of'. So since 'none' is singular, 'was' is indeed correct.

    Second example: “data” is the subject. One collection of data. Singular. So the singular “was” is required.

     

    'Data' is the subject here, yes, but since no single collection of data is specified, 'data' on its own is plural. The singular is 'datum'. The plural 'were' is therefore correct. 'Data' is sometimes treated as singular in colloquial usage, as it is in this NYT article, but doing so is sloppy.

    The NYT should get things like this right.

    And I also agree with 'guest' that the 'it's with vague antecedents are obfuscating the question at hand.

    Replies: @guest, @John Derbyshire

    Thank you.

    “Obfuscating the question at hand” might make a good NYT masthead.

  12. Sailer says “Liberals like the Warren Court and the Lindsay Administration in NYC took control of the criminal justice Narrative, blacks acted out, and the police retreated to the donut shop.” You’ve got it backwards. My wife and I lived on the Lower East Side (144 Henry St.) in the sixties first under Mayor Wagner’s non-functional administration (no cops, I get stabbed in the daylight by 2 Puerto Rican teenager junkies) and then under Mayor Lindsay’s administration during which the police were re-activated, the cops back on the street even at night.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Anonymouse

    Anecdotes are not statistics. In the last fully year of the Wagner administration (1965) there were 634 murders in NYC. By the last year of Lindsay's there were 1,680.

    Replies: @Jim, @Anonymouse

  13. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Cameras are ubiquitous and are the new reality; there’s no going back to the past on this. The police don’t like being monitored yet they themselves like to monitor the public. It now may be working both ways. It’s doubtful that major crime such as homicide and armed robbery rates depend on whether or not the cops are hiding out since they never prevented them in the first place; they arrive after a homicide occurs to cordon off the body. It’s at the lower levels of misbehavior that police reluctance to act can make a difference. However, in the old days before the camera era a lot of police also let things slide because they were just lazy and were there to mainly collect a paycheck and whatever else they could pocket.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @anonymous


    Cameras are ubiquitous and are the new reality

     

    Forget all that U.S. military tactical gear and MRAPs hand-me-downs from the Iraq war. Police departments need some of that Russian military gear being used in Syria, specifically the Krasukha-4 electronic zapping system. Install that sucker on patrol car and SWAT vans and create an electronic blackout on non-police electronic devices on a call. Or you can target known cyber troublemakers on social media. Drive by with this system in an unmarked van. [Click, click, click...] "Yo my homies gonna get som pigs in a blanket..." *ZAP*!
    , @Mr. Blank
    @anonymous

    The ubiquity of cameras is working both ways, but unfortunately, as Steve pointed out, the press only covers it in one direction. Cameras have allowed a lot more exposure of police misbehavior, and that has gotten a lot of coverage in the "mainstream" press. But they've also led to a lot more exposure of black underclass misbehavior, and THIS stuff gets gets zero mainstream coverage but gets widely circulated among knuckleheaded ghetto blacks and samizdat-style among angry whites.

    This does not bode well for the future — I seem to recall that there was a similar dynamic in Yugoslavia before it collapsed, with the media conspiring to cover up crimes committed by politically-protected ethnic groups and the stories instead getting spread through the underground rumor mill. The authorities probably thought they were being "responsible" and protecting the public from information they "couldn't handle," but in the end the information got out anyway, and usually in a heavily distorted fashion that only served to fan the flames of ethnic strife.

    As Steve pointed out, the mainstream press hasn't yet caught on to this phenomenon, although it's already causing problems — apparently that kid who shot up the black church in South Carolina was partially motivated by videos he'd seen online of blacks behaving badly, though that detail got lost in all the hand-wringing over how the Confederate Flag made him do it. Eventually, some of these videos will get enough public attention that the New York Times will be forced to report on this phenomenon, and it will be interesting to see how they work to maintain the Narrative when it happens.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Steve Sailer

  14. @Swenon
    Today in Sweden the jewish-owned, jewish-led Dagens Nyheter reports that according to Nato's Stratcom in Riga, xenophobia and "hate of foreigners" is actively being fueled by "foreign powers." The fellows of Stratcom in Riga have discovered a pattern in online "hate campaigns" where the infowarriors are said to exploit societies' "instinctive fear of the foreign." Mikael Tofvesson, a Swedish colleague to Stratcom's boss Janis Sarts confirms the picture: "It is hard to point out specific nations, but there are actors communicating about this, that we can see. Xenophobia and that kind of fear can be raised and fueled by foreign powers. We see that tendency also, Tofvesson says."

    It is hard to not "flip the script" and interpret the piece as follows: NATO is playing an active role in pushing for a multicultural Europe, while these efforts are actively being resisted by a certain eastern force. The second half of the article contains some details about ties between the Swedish Resistance Movement and the Russian Imperialist Movement (great name!). Daniel Poohl of the far-left organization Expo is interviewed. The members of Expo fancy themselves as being nazihunters. In practice they mostly work to track down, harass and dox Sweden Democrats, and anyone else daring to question the current "cultural" policies.

    http://www.dn.se/nyheter/sverige/nato-framlingshatet-kan-godas-av-frammande-makt/
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonnier_family

    Replies: @cwhatfuture

    Although the Bonnier family is of Jewish origin (a long time ago) they do not seem to be so Jewish now, as one of them, Åke Bonnier, is a bishop in the Diocese of Skara.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @cwhatfuture

    "Although the Bonnier family is of Jewish origin (a long time ago) they do not seem to be so Jewish now, as one of them, Åke Bonnier, is a bishop in the Diocese of Skara."

    According to Wikipedia, Ake Bonnier's father was jewish. That isn't so far removed as you imply. In any event, surely you're not going to play the old "it's a religion" game, are you? Given that many Jews are athiests and yet strongly self-identify as jewish, it is clear that they deem jewishness to be primarily an ethnic affiliation, not a religion.

    Replies: @snorlax

    , @swenon
    @cwhatfuture

    @cwhatfuture The Bonnier family is still so jewish that one isn't supposed to joke about their jewishness. In 2010, a Swedish cartoonist whose material is published by Dagens Nyheter got in trouble for having in a strip - in obvious satire - referred to the "jews at Bonnier" as the causes of the cartoon character's failed love life. ("I am beginning to think that the jews at Bonnier are at fault for all girls falling in love with me being mean, because this increases my productivity and thus [Bonnier's] income."). The comic strip that made fun of conspiracy theorists and antisemities of the kind that are occasionally found among the commenters here was pulled because of "antisemitism." To be fair to the owners, nothing suggests that it was pressure from them that lead to the pull decision.

    The current editor-in-chief at Dagens Nyheter, Peter Wolodarski, has explicitly said that they are focusing on "agenda-setting journalism." I'll let the readers guess to the major themes of the "agenda" that he is speaking about. When the editor-in-chief says that they are going to push the Narrative, and then pushes that Narrative as it has never been pushed before in Swedish media, there is little room left for guesswork.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Wolodarski

    , @5371
    @cwhatfuture

    Bishop-in-Sweden is like rape-in-Sweden.

    , @fnn
    @cwhatfuture


    Although the Bonnier family is of Jewish origin (a long time ago) they do not seem to be so Jewish now, as one of them, Åke Bonnier, is a bishop in the Diocese of Skara.
     
    I think no one will be surprised that the Church of Sweden is a pseudo-Christian cultural marxist entity:
    http://gatesofvienna.net/2013/10/the-dhimmi-church-of-sweden/

    As reported here last weekend, a controversy has arisen in Sweden over the inability of candidates for the office archbishop in the Swedish Church to affirm that Jesus Christ presented a truer picture of God than Mohammed.
     
    http://www.amren.com/news/2015/10/worlds-first-lesbian-bishop-calls-for-church-to-remove-crosses-to-install-muslim-prayer-space/

    The Bishop of Stockholm has proposed a church in her diocese remove all signs of the cross and put down markings showing the direction to Mecca for the benefit of Muslim worshippers.

    Eva Brunne, who was made the world’s first openly lesbian bishop by the church of Sweden in 2009, and has a young son with her wife and fellow lesbian priest Gunilla Linden, made the suggestion to make those of other faiths more welcome.
     
    , @AnonymousCoward
    @cwhatfuture

    Grow up. Many of the most dildo-fied priests in Scandinavia are "converted" jews, who just happen to still go to their Jewish family gatherings. And then they go back to "their" church, and argue for mass immigration of muslims, gay marriage, etc.

    Who cares whether they themselves think that they've genuinely converted to Christianity or not? That's beside the point, they're still who they are, and they still hate Swedes for being latent nazis who must be blanda-upped.

  15. Let cops nothing and may the cities burn so that glib Libs won’t be able to put on homo parades anymore.

  16. If the cops don’t like the scrutiny, maybe they should quit breaking the law. If a government employee can be provoked by a citizen filming them or hurling abuse at them, then they need to find honest work and quit living off the sweat of the citizen’s brow. Calm, cool, and collected is what we need in government employees, not steroid addicted rage freaks.

    Cops vs blacks, may they both lose.

    • Agree: E. Rekshun
    • Replies: @bomag
    @Chris Mallory

    If a government employee can be provoked by a citizen filming them or hurling abuse at them...

    I don't think hurling abuse at police is a good long term strategy for an orderly society. A lot of informal cooperation goes into civilization, and if you have to start explaining this, the retreat has started.

  17. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The police should continue to stand down, withdraw, and / or respond as slowly as possible when called for help. They should do this until they get their communities to agree that they will not tolerate this kind of demonization of the police force. Until then, the whiney, complaining, high maintenance, premodanna citizenry should largely be left to fend for themselves. Let’s see how well that works out in areas where there are strict gun control laws.

  18. @Pat Casey
    Yep. One thing tho, and the NYT did have a big piece on this not long ago, apparently K2, the synthetic marijuana, has only latishly caught on in Harlem. I bought some of that stuff four years ago at a gas station in Front Royal, VA and it's about twenty times as potent as weed and the high is more like riding a spaceship than zoning out in an aerie---it apparently makes blacks take sidewalk naps and whatever else.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Makes sense. In my limited experience, when white kids hit the K2 hard they generally end up burning down a curling club:

    http://www.nornow.org/2013/02/02/curling-club-arsonists-imprisoned-for-10-years/

  19. Part of the problem is that there has been a culture of brutality and impunity among police for generations.

    The Megaphone’s incident du semaine right now is a prime example. While the “victim” is extremely difficult to sympathize with (how did she think disobeying her teacher and a cop’s lawful commands would end for her?), one need not give a hoot about her to think that the cop used way more force than was necessary. Then he arrested another girl in the class just for speaking up. He clearly should be charged with a felony and never allowed to work in law enforcement again.

    There is no easy solution. Ultimately the black community does not want to be policed. We do hear about blacks calling for the police to “do something” about crime, but then they circle the wagons around extremely unsympathetic characters like Mike Brown, Kajieme Powell, Trayvon Martin, etc. So obviously there will always be tension between blacks and cops.

    But we are long overdue to end police brutality and corruption. I don’t think the Obama regime is trying to achieve this in a productive way, but all Americans should be able to agree that cops should be held to a very high professional standard.

    I do think it’s going to get a lot worse before it gets better.

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    @AndrewR

    I saw the video clip of the girl being manhandled by the police officer in South Carolina. Flipping her over in her school desk was just absurd -- he was twice her size to begin with -- and it's surprising he didn't break her neck.

    Having said that, it's a local issue, let's not pretend otherwise. If some town, city, county, state, etc. wants to allow what amounts to corporal punishment, that's their business.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @NOTA

    , @bomag
    @AndrewR

    I do think it’s going to get a lot worse before it gets better

    Is there any arc in sight where things get better? With today's demographics and eugenics, we're sliding down to a rougher existence. I don't think that the Almighty is going to come down and restore things after letting the people suffer for awhile to show them the evil of their ways.

    Ultimately the black community does not want to be policed. We do hear about blacks calling for the police to “do something” about crime, but then they circle the wagons...

    Oh, they want to be policed all right; as long as the police arrest people bothering them, and enforce the various mechanisms of the welfare state.

    It is nothing new for groups to have contradictory aims: Many White people want unlimited immigration, but they move to and live in homogeneous communities.

    , @Massimo Heitor
    @AndrewR


    The police don’t like being monitored yet they themselves like to monitor the public.
     
    No one likes being video recorded at work, that's not just police. Teachers are uncomfortable with supervisors watching. When video cameras are installed in classrooms, many teachers will be more upset. Programmers don't like it when bosses watch their screens and record all their web traffic. Technology has made video cameras ubiquitous and everyone will need to adapt.
    , @Massimo Heitor
    @AndrewR


    Ultimately the black community does not want to be policed.

     

    I have personal relationships with many black Americans and this isn't true.

    Blacks definitely want police service. They call the police and make requests. I personally know many regular blacks whose views on say, the Michael Brown incident are largely in line with right-wing types. Even right wing types don't think Michael Brown necessarily deserved execution, but he bears most of the responsibility for his death.

    Many black Americans are sympathetic with the police and think the BLM type protests are ridiculous. They aren't threatened by BLM protests like this crowd, they don't go online and get angry about it, they are not going to stage counter protests. But the BLM types are a loud minority of blacks and to a lesser extent, whites. Remember, it was largely white people who elected Obama, despite his racist hostility towards whites.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @leper messiah, @Gandydancer

  20. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Chris Adams


    First example: “them” is the subject, correct? It’s plural. So “were” would be correct.

     

    Actually, 'none' is the subject; 'them' is the object of the preposition 'of'. So since 'none' is singular, 'was' is indeed correct.

    Second example: “data” is the subject. One collection of data. Singular. So the singular “was” is required.

     

    'Data' is the subject here, yes, but since no single collection of data is specified, 'data' on its own is plural. The singular is 'datum'. The plural 'were' is therefore correct. 'Data' is sometimes treated as singular in colloquial usage, as it is in this NYT article, but doing so is sloppy.

    The NYT should get things like this right.

    And I also agree with 'guest' that the 'it's with vague antecedents are obfuscating the question at hand.

    Replies: @guest, @John Derbyshire

    “Data” is an aggregative noun in English, like “rice” or “grass.” Try:

    “The rice are cooked.”

    “The grass need mowing.”

    It’s true that in Latin, data is the plural of datum, “that which is given.” If it’s the Latin word you’re using, though, it should be in italics.

    The rule is: If you are using a foreign word with its foreign case, number, mood, person, tense, . . . then put it in italics and follow foreign rules of grammar (and orthography: Zeitgeist). If you want to Anglicize the word, drop the italics and all foreignness (zeitgeist).

    I don’t think I’ve ever heard an English-speaking person unselfconsciously use the word “datum,” and I worked in data processing for 30 years. For a particle of data the usual term was “data item.”

    • Agree: SPMoore8, (((Owen)))
    • Replies: @GW
    @John Derbyshire

    It's similar to "media" as well. Someone needs to tell Ann Coulter that the correct usage would be "the media is" not "the media are."

    Replies: @Rob McX

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    @John Derbyshire


    “Data” is an aggregative noun in English, like “rice” or “grass.”
     
    Hmmm. 'Data' can be used in this sense, yes, but 'rice' and 'grass' both lack a singular form, i.e. one must say 'a grain of rice' and 'a blade of grass'.

    Isn't 'datum/data' therefore more like 'criterion/criteria', albeit coming from the Latin instead of the Greek?

    Anyway, it's not a big deal, especially in comparison to the NYT's many other, and more egregious, journalistic sins.
    , @(((Owen)))
    @John Derbyshire


    For a particle of data the usual term was “data item.”
     
    Do we really say that or is it a back-formation? I hear 'record' and 'row' (in a database) naturally but 'data item' sounds like what I would make up if I needed an ad hoc word for a particle of data.
    , @Jean Cocteausten
    @John Derbyshire

    "Datum" is commonly used in fields involving careful measurement, although not as the singular of data. It means the location from which a distance is reckoned. Its plural is, you guessed it, datums.

    , @Harold
    @John Derbyshire

    I agree that it is perfectly fine to use “data” as singular, but my impression from (certain subareas of) computer science is that using it as a plural is still common.

    Some ngrams out of curiosity:

    data is vs. data are

    data item vs. datum vs. item of data vs. piece of data vs. bit of data

    And pertaining to the earlier usage comments:

    none of them was vs. none of them were

    , @ben tillman
    @John Derbyshire


    It’s true that in Latin, data is the plural of datum, “that which is given.” If it’s the Latin word you’re using, though, it should be in italics.
     
    You're just begging the question. Educated people use "data" as a plural, and they are in fact using an English word when hey do so.

    And changing it to a singular is stupid and destructive of the language. We already have an aggregate noun that means what you want "data" to mean: information or, if you want a four-letter word, info.
    , @tbraton
    @John Derbyshire

    FWIW, here is what my volume of H.W. Fowler's "A Dictionary of Modern English Usage" (1959 ed.) says about "data":

    "data is plural only (The d. are, not is, insufficient./What are the d.?/We have no d.); the singular, comparatively rare, is datum; one of the data is commoner than a datum; but datum-line, line taken as a basis, is common. My Intellligence Department has furnished me with so much valuable data illustrates the mistake of taking the plural for a singular."

    It should be kept in mind that the same volume of Fowler has this to say about "gender":

    "gender, n., is a grammatical term only. To talk of persons or creatures of the masculine or feminine g., meaning of the male or female sex, is either a jocularity (permissible or not according to context) or a blunder."

    As can be seen, Fowler, if he were living today (he died in 1933, so he completely missed WWII), would not have a clue what is the proper grammar to apply to this age of mass migration of "Syrian refugees." So his usage tips are not nearly as helpful as they were nearly a hundred years ago.

    BTW here is what Fowler has to say about a dispute that arose in the dim and distant past of this past August (more than two months ago) re Warren G. Harding's death (Attention, rihanna.):

    "hang. Past and p.p. hanged of the capital punishment & in the imprecation; otherwise hung."

    So my 10th grade teacher taught me right after all. RIP, Miss Bryant.

  21. My New York county has the highest rate of heroin overdoses. Street heroin is now up to 55% pure. Both New York state & Federal drug felons are now getting early release from incarceration after their drug convictions . Those now being arrested in New York state for drug sales and possession are offered alternatives to jail no matter the number of past drug convictions. This is madness.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @jill

    "My New York county has the highest rate of heroin overdoses."

    I wonder, has there been any attempt to determine why Heroin is making such a big comeback now? I realize that there are demand-side drivers, such as the DEA's campaign against oxycontin. However, does anyone else think it might - just perhaps - have something to do with the fact that for the last decade and a half we have been militarily involved in a country that is reknowned for its poppy crop? Just what's coming back on those military transport planes anyway? Has any enterprising investigative journalist (assuming that investigative journalists even exist anymore) seen the movie "American Gangster" and wondered if something similiar might be going on today?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  22. @AndrewR
    Part of the problem is that there has been a culture of brutality and impunity among police for generations.

    The Megaphone's incident du semaine right now is a prime example. While the "victim" is extremely difficult to sympathize with (how did she think disobeying her teacher and a cop's lawful commands would end for her?), one need not give a hoot about her to think that the cop used way more force than was necessary. Then he arrested another girl in the class just for speaking up. He clearly should be charged with a felony and never allowed to work in law enforcement again.

    There is no easy solution. Ultimately the black community does not want to be policed. We do hear about blacks calling for the police to "do something" about crime, but then they circle the wagons around extremely unsympathetic characters like Mike Brown, Kajieme Powell, Trayvon Martin, etc. So obviously there will always be tension between blacks and cops.

    But we are long overdue to end police brutality and corruption. I don't think the Obama regime is trying to achieve this in a productive way, but all Americans should be able to agree that cops should be held to a very high professional standard.

    I do think it's going to get a lot worse before it gets better.

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @bomag, @Massimo Heitor, @Massimo Heitor

    I saw the video clip of the girl being manhandled by the police officer in South Carolina. Flipping her over in her school desk was just absurd — he was twice her size to begin with — and it’s surprising he didn’t break her neck.

    Having said that, it’s a local issue, let’s not pretend otherwise. If some town, city, county, state, etc. wants to allow what amounts to corporal punishment, that’s their business.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @SPMoore8

    I never said the federal government had any business meddling in this situation. But this was not an isolated incident. It's part of a broad national trend that must be dealt with collectively even if we leave a one-size-fits-all approach off the table.

    Replies: @IA

    , @NOTA
    @SPMoore8

    Not a national issue, just a guy who needs to be gotten off the police force and sent down the road.

  23. @wren
    World Star Hip Hop and sites like LiveLeak have destroyed the narrative.

    Some folks don't realize that yet.

    Those sites get picked up by sites like the Daily Mail.

    It may get even more interesting with apps like periscope. Like twitter, but livefeed video.

    Replies: @DCThrowback, @Ed

    No, these videos often lack context. The media and #BLM folks get to spread their lies before the truth gets it shoes on; only those “racists” who hate black people care to find out what the actual context was: that this particular teen was asked to leave the classroom 4x for being disruptive, wouldn’t listen, was written up, and wouldn’t move when asked several times by a uniformed officer (!) in her school.

    • Replies: @nglaer
    @DCThrowback

    I thought it was revealing that in the video, the black male teens who observed the cop and the girl were completely indifferent. They had probably seen her acting out for the past half hour and thought she might deserve something like what she was getting. If she was innocent, they would have been outraged.

  24. @SPMoore8
    @AndrewR

    I saw the video clip of the girl being manhandled by the police officer in South Carolina. Flipping her over in her school desk was just absurd -- he was twice her size to begin with -- and it's surprising he didn't break her neck.

    Having said that, it's a local issue, let's not pretend otherwise. If some town, city, county, state, etc. wants to allow what amounts to corporal punishment, that's their business.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @NOTA

    I never said the federal government had any business meddling in this situation. But this was not an isolated incident. It’s part of a broad national trend that must be dealt with collectively even if we leave a one-size-fits-all approach off the table.

    • Agree: SPMoore8
    • Replies: @IA
    @AndrewR


    It’s part of a broad national trend that must be dealt with collectively even if we leave a one-size-fits-all approach off the table.

     

    Speaking of broad national trends I go back far enough that the very idea of guards, let alone police, in a public school seems bizarre. You're living in an insane asylum and don't know it.

    Replies: @AndrewR

  25. @John Derbyshire
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    "Data" is an aggregative noun in English, like "rice" or "grass." Try:

    "The rice are cooked."

    "The grass need mowing."

    It's true that in Latin, data is the plural of datum, "that which is given." If it's the Latin word you're using, though, it should be in italics.

    The rule is: If you are using a foreign word with its foreign case, number, mood, person, tense, . . . then put it in italics and follow foreign rules of grammar (and orthography: Zeitgeist). If you want to Anglicize the word, drop the italics and all foreignness (zeitgeist).

    I don't think I've ever heard an English-speaking person unselfconsciously use the word "datum," and I worked in data processing for 30 years. For a particle of data the usual term was "data item."

    Replies: @GW, @The Last Real Calvinist, @(((Owen))), @Jean Cocteausten, @Harold, @ben tillman, @tbraton

    It’s similar to “media” as well. Someone needs to tell Ann Coulter that the correct usage would be “the media is” not “the media are.”

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @GW

    The French have gone further in mangling the original Latin - the media is les médias.

  26. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous
    Cameras are ubiquitous and are the new reality; there's no going back to the past on this. The police don't like being monitored yet they themselves like to monitor the public. It now may be working both ways. It's doubtful that major crime such as homicide and armed robbery rates depend on whether or not the cops are hiding out since they never prevented them in the first place; they arrive after a homicide occurs to cordon off the body. It's at the lower levels of misbehavior that police reluctance to act can make a difference. However, in the old days before the camera era a lot of police also let things slide because they were just lazy and were there to mainly collect a paycheck and whatever else they could pocket.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mr. Blank

    Cameras are ubiquitous and are the new reality

    Forget all that U.S. military tactical gear and MRAPs hand-me-downs from the Iraq war. Police departments need some of that Russian military gear being used in Syria, specifically the Krasukha-4 electronic zapping system. Install that sucker on patrol car and SWAT vans and create an electronic blackout on non-police electronic devices on a call. Or you can target known cyber troublemakers on social media. Drive by with this system in an unmarked van. [Click, click, click…] “Yo my homies gonna get som pigs in a blanket…” *ZAP*!

  27. @John Derbyshire
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    "Data" is an aggregative noun in English, like "rice" or "grass." Try:

    "The rice are cooked."

    "The grass need mowing."

    It's true that in Latin, data is the plural of datum, "that which is given." If it's the Latin word you're using, though, it should be in italics.

    The rule is: If you are using a foreign word with its foreign case, number, mood, person, tense, . . . then put it in italics and follow foreign rules of grammar (and orthography: Zeitgeist). If you want to Anglicize the word, drop the italics and all foreignness (zeitgeist).

    I don't think I've ever heard an English-speaking person unselfconsciously use the word "datum," and I worked in data processing for 30 years. For a particle of data the usual term was "data item."

    Replies: @GW, @The Last Real Calvinist, @(((Owen))), @Jean Cocteausten, @Harold, @ben tillman, @tbraton

    “Data” is an aggregative noun in English, like “rice” or “grass.”

    Hmmm. ‘Data’ can be used in this sense, yes, but ‘rice’ and ‘grass’ both lack a singular form, i.e. one must say ‘a grain of rice’ and ‘a blade of grass’.

    Isn’t ‘datum/data’ therefore more like ‘criterion/criteria’, albeit coming from the Latin instead of the Greek?

    Anyway, it’s not a big deal, especially in comparison to the NYT’s many other, and more egregious, journalistic sins.

  28. @GW
    @John Derbyshire

    It's similar to "media" as well. Someone needs to tell Ann Coulter that the correct usage would be "the media is" not "the media are."

    Replies: @Rob McX

    The French have gone further in mangling the original Latin – the media is les médias.

  29. @cwhatfuture
    @Swenon

    Although the Bonnier family is of Jewish origin (a long time ago) they do not seem to be so Jewish now, as one of them, Åke Bonnier, is a bishop in the Diocese of Skara.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @swenon, @5371, @fnn, @AnonymousCoward

    “Although the Bonnier family is of Jewish origin (a long time ago) they do not seem to be so Jewish now, as one of them, Åke Bonnier, is a bishop in the Diocese of Skara.”

    According to Wikipedia, Ake Bonnier’s father was jewish. That isn’t so far removed as you imply. In any event, surely you’re not going to play the old “it’s a religion” game, are you? Given that many Jews are athiests and yet strongly self-identify as jewish, it is clear that they deem jewishness to be primarily an ethnic affiliation, not a religion.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    @Mr. Anon

    I dunno, I read something on the internet by a Jewish guy, who said that at his synagogue (either Reform or one of the more touchy-feely Conservative ones) they frequently invite guests to address the congregation after the sermon. They've invited atheist Jews and ultra-orthodox Jews, Democrats, Republicans, Communists, Asians, blacks, Protestants, Catholics, Israelis, anti-Zionist Jews and even Palestinians to speak.

    But the one type of person who would never be welcome is a Jewish convert to Christianity. Not even one of those churches where they have the pride flag out front and people wear t-shirts to the service.* It's seen as worse than converting to Islam, even. They literally view such a person as a race traitor.

    If someone has the link feel free to post it.

    *It's borderline socially-acceptable to join one of those churches by reason of marriage, so long as they don't "really" convert and don't evangelize.

  30. @cwhatfuture
    @Swenon

    Although the Bonnier family is of Jewish origin (a long time ago) they do not seem to be so Jewish now, as one of them, Åke Bonnier, is a bishop in the Diocese of Skara.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @swenon, @5371, @fnn, @AnonymousCoward

    The Bonnier family is still so jewish that one isn’t supposed to joke about their jewishness. In 2010, a Swedish cartoonist whose material is published by Dagens Nyheter got in trouble for having in a strip – in obvious satire – referred to the “jews at Bonnier” as the causes of the cartoon character’s failed love life. (“I am beginning to think that the jews at Bonnier are at fault for all girls falling in love with me being mean, because this increases my productivity and thus [Bonnier’s] income.”). The comic strip that made fun of conspiracy theorists and antisemities of the kind that are occasionally found among the commenters here was pulled because of “antisemitism.” To be fair to the owners, nothing suggests that it was pressure from them that lead to the pull decision.

    The current editor-in-chief at Dagens Nyheter, Peter Wolodarski, has explicitly said that they are focusing on “agenda-setting journalism.” I’ll let the readers guess to the major themes of the “agenda” that he is speaking about. When the editor-in-chief says that they are going to push the Narrative, and then pushes that Narrative as it has never been pushed before in Swedish media, there is little room left for guesswork.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Wolodarski

  31. @cwhatfuture
    @Swenon

    Although the Bonnier family is of Jewish origin (a long time ago) they do not seem to be so Jewish now, as one of them, Åke Bonnier, is a bishop in the Diocese of Skara.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @swenon, @5371, @fnn, @AnonymousCoward

    Bishop-in-Sweden is like rape-in-Sweden.

  32. @jill
    My New York county has the highest rate of heroin overdoses. Street heroin is now up to 55% pure. Both New York state & Federal drug felons are now getting early release from incarceration after their drug convictions . Those now being arrested in New York state for drug sales and possession are offered alternatives to jail no matter the number of past drug convictions. This is madness.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    “My New York county has the highest rate of heroin overdoses.”

    I wonder, has there been any attempt to determine why Heroin is making such a big comeback now? I realize that there are demand-side drivers, such as the DEA’s campaign against oxycontin. However, does anyone else think it might – just perhaps – have something to do with the fact that for the last decade and a half we have been militarily involved in a country that is reknowned for its poppy crop? Just what’s coming back on those military transport planes anyway? Has any enterprising investigative journalist (assuming that investigative journalists even exist anymore) seen the movie “American Gangster” and wondered if something similiar might be going on today?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Mr. Anon

    As the father of a heroin addict I have suffered an education on this subject.

    The Afghani heroin goes to Europe and Russia. The heroin in the US comes from Mexico. Farmers in the Sierra Nevada mountains have switched from growing marijuana to growing poppies. Because such high-quality marijuana is now grown in the US, the Mexicans have largely lost their market share of that. They're smuggling heroin now to make up the difference.

    Big pharmaceutical had a major push years ago encouraging doctors to prescribe opiate painkillers, even for teenagers. These drugs were originally intended for terminal patients for whom addiction was not a concern. With the crackdown on the opiates now, addicts find it easier and cheaper to resort to heroin.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  33. @guest
    OT, perhaps, but two NYT errors caught my eye:

    "But none of them were [should be "was"] as convincing to him as the notion that officers were afraid to get out of their patrol cars and deal directly with people on the street because the officers were afraid their interactions would be caught on video.

    Mr. Comey acknowledged there was [should be "were"] no data to back it up, but he said law enforcement leaders and officers had told him it was affecting policing."

    And to what does (or do) the twice used "it" refer in the second of these awkward sentences?

    Even the veneer is rotting.

    If anyone cares to pass this along to the NYT, please do.

    Replies: @Chris Adams, @Massimo Heitor, @gregor

    OT, perhaps, but two NYT errors caught my eye

    NYT’s grammar is completely technically correct on the issues that you cite. At least it is correct in the traditional sense and not in the ebonics sense: “we/they were”, “he/she/it was”.

  34. @guest
    OT, perhaps, but two NYT errors caught my eye:

    "But none of them were [should be "was"] as convincing to him as the notion that officers were afraid to get out of their patrol cars and deal directly with people on the street because the officers were afraid their interactions would be caught on video.

    Mr. Comey acknowledged there was [should be "were"] no data to back it up, but he said law enforcement leaders and officers had told him it was affecting policing."

    And to what does (or do) the twice used "it" refer in the second of these awkward sentences?

    Even the veneer is rotting.

    If anyone cares to pass this along to the NYT, please do.

    Replies: @Chris Adams, @Massimo Heitor, @gregor

    “None of them were” is perfectly fine.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/help/faq/language/g11.html

  35. Mr. Comey said these prosecutions “didn’t happen ‘en masse.’ ”

    Jim…

    Yes, Barack?

    Jim, less Adlai Stevenson and more Al Sharpton, please.

  36. One thing that is clearly lacking are the proper rules and punishments for non-criminal offences. This teenager in the classroom who was collared and dragged out should never have been handled by a cop. The police can only enforce laws so by definition, every time they act it is a legal matter. If the schools had the ability to EXPEL the student then they could have just waited out the situation and washed their hands of the miscreant. Of course the police are protecting minorities also. If they did not monopolize the violence, a gang of white people would have shown up and done the same thing the cop did only with less sympathy and patience.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Prof. Woland

    Prof, thanks for visiting planet earth....I guess you missed the whole recent, administration backed, narrative that blacks are being suspended and expelled too often. Never mind the fact that a lot of in school misbehavior is criminal....as in assaults and battery, and the occasional sexual assault and oh, yeah, guns in school. And no, no gang of whites is going to handle in school discipline.

  37. Jack Hanson says:

    Here we see from some commenters the aspie/libertarian lawgic that all people can be reasoned with and anything else is “brutality”. Like Pvt. Hudson said, what do you want them to use? Harsh language?

    Also from the Dept. Of Unintended Consequences: A few months ago the Arizona Daily Star (communist rag) had a hand wringing editorial AGAINST police video cameras. They tried to frame it as a 4Amd civil rights issue but the underlying context was Blacks Behaving Badly absolutely obliterated the narrative when it’s not 7 seconds of edited footage.

    • Replies: @G Pinfold
    @Jack Hanson


    Here we see from some commenters the aspie/libertarian lawgic that all people can be reasoned with and anything else is “brutality”. Like Pvt. Hudson said, what do you want them to use? Harsh language?
     
    We need to deploy teams of perfectly trained, culturally compatible, citizen-restraint professionals with soma sprays of infinite bliss and silky nets to spin a web of peace around the angry one.

    Oh wait, the new methods are too costly and creepily sci-fi; and so we drift towards the other end of the sci-fi spectrum: Mad Max machete mayhem.
  38. @cwhatfuture
    @Swenon

    Although the Bonnier family is of Jewish origin (a long time ago) they do not seem to be so Jewish now, as one of them, Åke Bonnier, is a bishop in the Diocese of Skara.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @swenon, @5371, @fnn, @AnonymousCoward

    Although the Bonnier family is of Jewish origin (a long time ago) they do not seem to be so Jewish now, as one of them, Åke Bonnier, is a bishop in the Diocese of Skara.

    I think no one will be surprised that the Church of Sweden is a pseudo-Christian cultural marxist entity:
    http://gatesofvienna.net/2013/10/the-dhimmi-church-of-sweden/

    As reported here last weekend, a controversy has arisen in Sweden over the inability of candidates for the office archbishop in the Swedish Church to affirm that Jesus Christ presented a truer picture of God than Mohammed.

    http://www.amren.com/news/2015/10/worlds-first-lesbian-bishop-calls-for-church-to-remove-crosses-to-install-muslim-prayer-space/

    The Bishop of Stockholm has proposed a church in her diocese remove all signs of the cross and put down markings showing the direction to Mecca for the benefit of Muslim worshippers.

    Eva Brunne, who was made the world’s first openly lesbian bishop by the church of Sweden in 2009, and has a young son with her wife and fellow lesbian priest Gunilla Linden, made the suggestion to make those of other faiths more welcome.

  39. Ultimately the black community does not want to be policed. We do hear about blacks calling for the police to “do something” about crime, but then they circle the wagons around extremely unsympathetic characters like Mike Brown, Kajieme Powell, Trayvon Martin, etc.

    (You can add OJ Simpson to that list).

    Totally agree. Blacks want to opt out of what civilized societies require in terms of keeping the peace. The problem is that white guys (and now girls as well) want to be the hard ass savior/warrior. It is why whites join the armed forces in vast majorities despite the fact that the US government and the people really do not care how they are treated once their service is finished (ever been in a V.A.? talk about medieval….). The same with police. That white guy should have not gone near that girl with a 10 foot pole. But he just couldn’t help himself trying to be the keeper of all that is good. He is one dumb ass and now he is going to pay. Wouldn’t walking out and getting a doughnut have made more sense once he confronted the situation? Hell yes….

    • Replies: @Jim
    @leper messiah

    What would have happened to the officer if he had simply turned around and left the school after the student refused to comply with his commands?

    Replies: @leper messiah

  40. @cwhatfuture
    @Swenon

    Although the Bonnier family is of Jewish origin (a long time ago) they do not seem to be so Jewish now, as one of them, Åke Bonnier, is a bishop in the Diocese of Skara.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @swenon, @5371, @fnn, @AnonymousCoward

    Grow up. Many of the most dildo-fied priests in Scandinavia are “converted” jews, who just happen to still go to their Jewish family gatherings. And then they go back to “their” church, and argue for mass immigration of muslims, gay marriage, etc.

    Who cares whether they themselves think that they’ve genuinely converted to Christianity or not? That’s beside the point, they’re still who they are, and they still hate Swedes for being latent nazis who must be blanda-upped.

  41. @Chris Mallory
    If the cops don't like the scrutiny, maybe they should quit breaking the law. If a government employee can be provoked by a citizen filming them or hurling abuse at them, then they need to find honest work and quit living off the sweat of the citizen's brow. Calm, cool, and collected is what we need in government employees, not steroid addicted rage freaks.

    Cops vs blacks, may they both lose.

    Replies: @bomag

    If a government employee can be provoked by a citizen filming them or hurling abuse at them…

    I don’t think hurling abuse at police is a good long term strategy for an orderly society. A lot of informal cooperation goes into civilization, and if you have to start explaining this, the retreat has started.

  42. @Anonymouse
    Sailer says "Liberals like the Warren Court and the Lindsay Administration in NYC took control of the criminal justice Narrative, blacks acted out, and the police retreated to the donut shop." You've got it backwards. My wife and I lived on the Lower East Side (144 Henry St.) in the sixties first under Mayor Wagner's non-functional administration (no cops, I get stabbed in the daylight by 2 Puerto Rican teenager junkies) and then under Mayor Lindsay's administration during which the police were re-activated, the cops back on the street even at night.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Anecdotes are not statistics. In the last fully year of the Wagner administration (1965) there were 634 murders in NYC. By the last year of Lindsay’s there were 1,680.

    • Replies: @Jim
    @Jack D

    I had the misfortune to live in Manhattan in the aftermath of the Lindsay administration. He was the worst disaster to ever befall NYC.

    , @Anonymouse
    @Jack D

    Cite your source for these statistics. I suspect you made up those figures out of the whole cloth. NYC in Mayor Wagner's years was a hell-hole: burnt-out cars left on the streets for weeks, drug-fueled crime everywhere. If the figures you quote are correct (which I doubt), it may reflect the cops getting back to policing under Mayor Lindsey instead of looking the other way which was SOP under Tammany Hall mayors such as Wagner.

    Anonymoose Mike

    Replies: @Dirk Dagger

  43. @Pat Casey
    Yep. One thing tho, and the NYT did have a big piece on this not long ago, apparently K2, the synthetic marijuana, has only latishly caught on in Harlem. I bought some of that stuff four years ago at a gas station in Front Royal, VA and it's about twenty times as potent as weed and the high is more like riding a spaceship than zoning out in an aerie---it apparently makes blacks take sidewalk naps and whatever else.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    ” I bought some of that stuff four years ago at a gas station in Front Royal, VA and it’s about twenty times as potent as weed and the high is more like riding a spaceship than zoning out in an aerie—it apparently makes blacks take sidewalk naps and whatever else.”

    I flushed some of that crap down the toilet myself, after having tried it a few times. If anything, you understate the case; its more than simply twenty times more potent that marijuana. Its a difference of kind, not merely degree. I think it functions effectively as more of a PCP substitute, as opposed to a marijuana substitute, and I strongly advocate it be made illegal (as it has been in some states).

  44. @eah
    ...several officials privately fumed at the suggestion that criticizing the police had led to violent crime.

    These people are really scum.

    With well-crafted talking points, Trump can score some solid points here as well.

    Replies: @Penguinchip

    Trump should regularly refer to Obama as “President Cop-killer” and to Holder as “Attorney General Cop-killer.” He’s shown so far that, unlike the Bush / Rove / Boehner idiot parade, he gets that real Americans don’t give a shit how much something upsets the likes of the Washington Post and Rachel Maddow, and it would be energizingly insulting, divisive, and hateful to provide exactly what that little alinskyite prick Obama deserves. It would have the added merit of bring true, unlike anything Barry Hussein Cop-killer believes.

    • Replies: @eah
    @Penguinchip

    real Americans don’t give a shit how much something upsets the likes of the Washington Post and Rachel Maddow

    Absolutely correct.

    As a person, an intellectual, Trump is a bit too...coarse for my taste. But I love the way he tells The Establishment to kiss his ass. And I agree with the spirit of what he says, if not always his word choice and tone -- his poll numbers show I am not alone. The Establishment and establishment politicians need to be kicked to the curb -- and Trump is the guy to do it. As if what he said about Mexican immigrants wasn't good enough, I was really sold on him when he said he paid as little tax as possible.

  45. @AndrewR
    Part of the problem is that there has been a culture of brutality and impunity among police for generations.

    The Megaphone's incident du semaine right now is a prime example. While the "victim" is extremely difficult to sympathize with (how did she think disobeying her teacher and a cop's lawful commands would end for her?), one need not give a hoot about her to think that the cop used way more force than was necessary. Then he arrested another girl in the class just for speaking up. He clearly should be charged with a felony and never allowed to work in law enforcement again.

    There is no easy solution. Ultimately the black community does not want to be policed. We do hear about blacks calling for the police to "do something" about crime, but then they circle the wagons around extremely unsympathetic characters like Mike Brown, Kajieme Powell, Trayvon Martin, etc. So obviously there will always be tension between blacks and cops.

    But we are long overdue to end police brutality and corruption. I don't think the Obama regime is trying to achieve this in a productive way, but all Americans should be able to agree that cops should be held to a very high professional standard.

    I do think it's going to get a lot worse before it gets better.

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @bomag, @Massimo Heitor, @Massimo Heitor

    I do think it’s going to get a lot worse before it gets better

    Is there any arc in sight where things get better? With today’s demographics and eugenics, we’re sliding down to a rougher existence. I don’t think that the Almighty is going to come down and restore things after letting the people suffer for awhile to show them the evil of their ways.

    Ultimately the black community does not want to be policed. We do hear about blacks calling for the police to “do something” about crime, but then they circle the wagons…

    Oh, they want to be policed all right; as long as the police arrest people bothering them, and enforce the various mechanisms of the welfare state.

    It is nothing new for groups to have contradictory aims: Many White people want unlimited immigration, but they move to and live in homogeneous communities.

  46. @Rob McX
    It's impossible to police any society where there's a large number of people willing to taunt and goad the police when they're going about their business. This was OK before everybody had a camera. Back then, if people obstructed police for the sole purpose of provoking them, the officers could respond with force, and get the benefit of the doubt if their behaviour was called into question later. Nowadays payouts for perceived misconduct on the part of law enforcement officers only provide an incentive for people to push them over the edge.

    Replies: @William BadWhite

    “It’s impossible to police any society where there’s a large number of people willing to taunt and goad the police when they’re going about their business. ”

    Well said. I’d go further and add that any society that really needs a lot of law enforcement has already lost. I have never lived there but I can’t imagine that the police in the more rural parts of Switzerland or Japan are terribly busy – because they are policing people that have societal norms roughly in line with the law. The law represents how they’d mostly choose to live anyway.

    The “law” theoretically represents a consensus of a society itself as to what behavior is acceptable and what is not. Further the law represents the bare minimum, not what is acceptable. How many of you go through your daily routines behaving just well enough to avoid getting arrested? You may stay out of prison, but you wouldn’t have many friends.

    Thus if you have a large subset of society that not only can not/will not behave in a sociable manner, but also that can not/will not behave in a legal (the bare minimum) manner, then that segment of society is being governed by laws that are fundamentally not in line with their consensus as to what is acceptable behavior, which is really just their nature. This is one of the fatal flaws of multi-ethnic or more accurately multi-cultural societies: subgroups don’t want to live by other subgroups’ laws and norms.

    Using American blacks and American whites as examples: Blacks clearly don’t want to or can’t behave according to white norms, and they really resent being forced to do so (if their reactions to being policed are an indication). However whites absolutely do not want to and are not willing to live in a society governed by black norms (see: Flight, White). Nonetheless we are all forced to live together, because diversity blah blah and racism blah blah. Whites move away from blacks, blacks follow the whites, then complain, over and over. One group needs to be forced to bend to the other’s norms. For now, its whites that get to do the bending and blacks that get bent.

    For me that’s certainly better than the alternative. And it will remain this way as long as whites are able to continue to move away from blacks and re-establish their own mini civilizations.

  47. @Chris Adams
    @guest

    First example: "them" is the subject, correct? It's plural. So "were" would be correct.

    Second example: "data" is the subject. One collection of data. Singular. So the singular "was" is required.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @(((Owen)))

    In the first example, ‘none’ is the subject. None is always plural because any number other than exactly one is plural including numbers like zero, negative infinity, 0.999, and 1.001. Therefore ‘were’ is correct.

    In the second example, ‘data’ is the subject. Unless ‘data’ is being used as the plural of ‘datum,’ it is singular. Almost all use of ‘data’ in English is singular describing a collection so ‘was’ is correct.

    There are writers ignorant of the process of linguistic borrowing and the differences between English and Latin with respect to collective nouns and those writers often insist wrongly on the use of ‘data’ as a plural. It gives them pleasure to pedantically overcorrect anyone who uses English as its own legitimate language instead of a mere embarrassing accidental outgrowth of Latin culture. These punks have been trying to control our culture since 1066.

    In Latin, the word for everybody is omnēs and it is inherently plural. The singular form is used as an adjective and rarely functions as a bare noun. Datum is a neuter perfect passive periphrastic participle meaning ‘that which has been done’ and functions as a singular and as plural ‘data’ with something vaguely like its English meaning. In English, ‘everybody’ is always singular but collective. ‘Nobody’ is always a singular collective even though the collection is a collection of zero. Similarly ‘the people’ is a singular collective. English likes collective singulars.

    • Replies: @Jim
    @(((Owen)))

    I will try to remember that.

  48. @John Derbyshire
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    "Data" is an aggregative noun in English, like "rice" or "grass." Try:

    "The rice are cooked."

    "The grass need mowing."

    It's true that in Latin, data is the plural of datum, "that which is given." If it's the Latin word you're using, though, it should be in italics.

    The rule is: If you are using a foreign word with its foreign case, number, mood, person, tense, . . . then put it in italics and follow foreign rules of grammar (and orthography: Zeitgeist). If you want to Anglicize the word, drop the italics and all foreignness (zeitgeist).

    I don't think I've ever heard an English-speaking person unselfconsciously use the word "datum," and I worked in data processing for 30 years. For a particle of data the usual term was "data item."

    Replies: @GW, @The Last Real Calvinist, @(((Owen))), @Jean Cocteausten, @Harold, @ben tillman, @tbraton

    For a particle of data the usual term was “data item.”

    Do we really say that or is it a back-formation? I hear ‘record’ and ‘row’ (in a database) naturally but ‘data item’ sounds like what I would make up if I needed an ad hoc word for a particle of data.

  49. @DCThrowback
    @wren

    No, these videos often lack context. The media and #BLM folks get to spread their lies before the truth gets it shoes on; only those "racists" who hate black people care to find out what the actual context was: that this particular teen was asked to leave the classroom 4x for being disruptive, wouldn't listen, was written up, and wouldn't move when asked several times by a uniformed officer (!) in her school.

    Replies: @nglaer

    I thought it was revealing that in the video, the black male teens who observed the cop and the girl were completely indifferent. They had probably seen her acting out for the past half hour and thought she might deserve something like what she was getting. If she was innocent, they would have been outraged.

  50. But the entire white population of the South (and everywhere else for that matter) was responsible for Dylan Roof’s crime.

    On topic and just so she won’t be butchered in complete silence:

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/dallas-cops-arrest-alleged-killer-teen-driving-church-article-1.2410797

  51. The FBI is investigating the South Carolina negress flipping incident, which is something to celebrate because it must mean they’ve solved all the real crimes.

    • Replies: @Chris Mallory
    @C. Van Carter

    A government employee committing battery is a real crime.

    Replies: @Danindc, @eah, @The Anti-Gnostic

  52. When you really think about it, aren’t laws against murder clearly immoral (and potentially unconstitutional) due to their disparate impact on blacks in general and especially on young black men?

  53. @C. Van Carter
    The FBI is investigating the South Carolina negress flipping incident, which is something to celebrate because it must mean they've solved all the real crimes.

    Replies: @Chris Mallory

    A government employee committing battery is a real crime.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    @Chris Mallory

    Did the cop go overboard? Maybe. Was it the 20th time that week he had a black girl ignore a direct command? Definitely.

    Suspension for two weeks....paid.

    , @eah
    @Chris Mallory

    Yeah it is.

    The point is, the media is pretty selective in what "real crimes" it makes a big deal about, wouldn't you say?

    Here are some other "real crimes":

    Slain White Rock Lake runner remembered as kind, hardworking engineer

    White engineer killed by a black guy. When will the national media make a big deal of this "real crime"? Any ideas on that? Oh, and his disconsolate wife later killed herself.

    Here's another "real crime": Court documents: Zoe Hastings was stabbed, found dead outside of minivan -- 18 y/o white girl murdered by a 34 y/o black man. Same questions as above.

    I could go on, but you get the idea.

    Replies: @D. K.

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Chris Mallory

    Yeah, and only the EFF BEE EYE has the forensic resources to unravel this one.

  54. What are we coming to when cops justify refusing to do their jobs because they don’t like the legal climate? And then get sympathy for their abstention. If you don’t like the terms of work, quit the force!

    I can’t understand the love affair of some honest supporters of ordinary people with the cops. The cops have always been the main arm of big capital and the banks in defeating working people militantly challenging them.

    Now their malign influence has penetrated poor white communities, where folks are incited to be cop callers on their neighbors. Cops infiltrating their way into the communities to create a sick, dependent society.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Stephen R. Diamond

    If you don’t like the terms of work, quit the force!

    People need support and encouragement to overcome obstacles. Maybe we offer police and soldiers too much support, but let us not reduce the thing to where only the desperate and weird take the jobs.

    , @silviosilver
    @Stephen R. Diamond


    The cops have always been the main arm of big capital and the banks in defeating working people militantly challenging them.
     
    Choke on it, commie.

    Replies: @Stephen R. Diamond

  55. Jayhu Campbell was the star quarterback at Cass Tech HS in Detroit and a Michigan U. football commit. He didn’t like it when a DPS security guard asked/told him to remove his hood while in the school hallway. Hats, caps and hoods may not be worn while in the school building. Young Mr. Campbell picked up the guard gave him a 180 body slam to the hallway floor, knocking him unconscious. You all remember seeing that video, right? No? How about the girl in Buffalo who knocked out the diminutive teacher with a full punch to the face…saw that too, right? I am not going to watch this video, there are too many that go the other way with a hapless teacher, male or female, being slapped, kicked, punched and assaulted in various ways. Was the cop over the top? Probably, but he has also probably handled dozens of similar situations and you grow weary. I was so happy when my daughter, who works with troubled students, worked in Onslow County, NC. They had on premise police officers, rarely any problems, and no assaults that I heard of. The thing that puzzles me is that unionized teachers are about as liberal as you can get, but they seem to wear it as a badge of honor when one of their members gets assaulted, a great bargaining chip at contract time. Fast forward, Mr. Campbell served 60 days at a juvenile facility and did his community service, returned to Cass and assaulted his girlfriend in a school stairwell.

  56. @Jack D
    @Anonymouse

    Anecdotes are not statistics. In the last fully year of the Wagner administration (1965) there were 634 murders in NYC. By the last year of Lindsay's there were 1,680.

    Replies: @Jim, @Anonymouse

    I had the misfortune to live in Manhattan in the aftermath of the Lindsay administration. He was the worst disaster to ever befall NYC.

  57. @leper messiah
    Ultimately the black community does not want to be policed. We do hear about blacks calling for the police to “do something” about crime, but then they circle the wagons around extremely unsympathetic characters like Mike Brown, Kajieme Powell, Trayvon Martin, etc.

    (You can add OJ Simpson to that list).

    Totally agree. Blacks want to opt out of what civilized societies require in terms of keeping the peace. The problem is that white guys (and now girls as well) want to be the hard ass savior/warrior. It is why whites join the armed forces in vast majorities despite the fact that the US government and the people really do not care how they are treated once their service is finished (ever been in a V.A.? talk about medieval....). The same with police. That white guy should have not gone near that girl with a 10 foot pole. But he just couldn't help himself trying to be the keeper of all that is good. He is one dumb ass and now he is going to pay. Wouldn't walking out and getting a doughnut have made more sense once he confronted the situation? Hell yes....

    Replies: @Jim

    What would have happened to the officer if he had simply turned around and left the school after the student refused to comply with his commands?

    • Replies: @leper messiah
    @Jim

    At worst he would have been fired.

    But believe me...in this toxic cesspool that Obama, Holder, Lynch, BLM..etc..have created, he would be in a much better position going forward. Now...he is going to be fiercely demonized and fired anyway - oh - and by they way - his family will have to go into hiding. And up next...sued for civil rights violations. And have no doubt, this girl's family just rang the cash register on a multi-million dollar payday...thereby encouraging countless others to mimic this behavior to hit the jackpot.

    If you feel he did the manly, right God-Fearing thing, you are as deluded as the rest of white, Fox News America is.

  58. Surprised at the amount of anti-cop venom here. You people need to get out and spend some time in Baltimore where I work. They’re out there every day trying to keep a lid on a powder keg.

    • Replies: @leper messiah
    @Danindc

    Don't confuse anti-cop venom from a sincere, gut-wrenching response to seeing white cops demonized day-after-day-after-day. White cops need to take back the power. They can do it. Just get over the God-complex, USA #1, strict law and order freak show. Start slacking off and let the savages eat each other alive.

    Replies: @NOTA

  59. @Chris Mallory
    @C. Van Carter

    A government employee committing battery is a real crime.

    Replies: @Danindc, @eah, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Did the cop go overboard? Maybe. Was it the 20th time that week he had a black girl ignore a direct command? Definitely.

    Suspension for two weeks….paid.

  60. @(((Owen)))
    @Chris Adams

    In the first example, 'none' is the subject. None is always plural because any number other than exactly one is plural including numbers like zero, negative infinity, 0.999, and 1.001. Therefore 'were' is correct.

    In the second example, 'data' is the subject. Unless 'data' is being used as the plural of 'datum,' it is singular. Almost all use of 'data' in English is singular describing a collection so 'was' is correct.

    There are writers ignorant of the process of linguistic borrowing and the differences between English and Latin with respect to collective nouns and those writers often insist wrongly on the use of 'data' as a plural. It gives them pleasure to pedantically overcorrect anyone who uses English as its own legitimate language instead of a mere embarrassing accidental outgrowth of Latin culture. These punks have been trying to control our culture since 1066.

    In Latin, the word for everybody is omnēs and it is inherently plural. The singular form is used as an adjective and rarely functions as a bare noun. Datum is a neuter perfect passive periphrastic participle meaning 'that which has been done' and functions as a singular and as plural 'data' with something vaguely like its English meaning. In English, 'everybody' is always singular but collective. 'Nobody' is always a singular collective even though the collection is a collection of zero. Similarly 'the people' is a singular collective. English likes collective singulars.

    Replies: @Jim

    I will try to remember that.

  61. @Mr. Anon
    @jill

    "My New York county has the highest rate of heroin overdoses."

    I wonder, has there been any attempt to determine why Heroin is making such a big comeback now? I realize that there are demand-side drivers, such as the DEA's campaign against oxycontin. However, does anyone else think it might - just perhaps - have something to do with the fact that for the last decade and a half we have been militarily involved in a country that is reknowned for its poppy crop? Just what's coming back on those military transport planes anyway? Has any enterprising investigative journalist (assuming that investigative journalists even exist anymore) seen the movie "American Gangster" and wondered if something similiar might be going on today?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    As the father of a heroin addict I have suffered an education on this subject.

    The Afghani heroin goes to Europe and Russia. The heroin in the US comes from Mexico. Farmers in the Sierra Nevada mountains have switched from growing marijuana to growing poppies. Because such high-quality marijuana is now grown in the US, the Mexicans have largely lost their market share of that. They’re smuggling heroin now to make up the difference.

    Big pharmaceutical had a major push years ago encouraging doctors to prescribe opiate painkillers, even for teenagers. These drugs were originally intended for terminal patients for whom addiction was not a concern. With the crackdown on the opiates now, addicts find it easier and cheaper to resort to heroin.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    I am sorry to hear of you trouble. I hope that your son (or daughter as the case may be) is able to beat his addiction.

    I don't know when opiate pain-killers became popular for doctors to prescribe; it seemed to me to be in the early 2000's when that started, although I wasn't really paying attention. The first I really took note of it was when Rush Limbaugh was busted for having pills without a prescription. I remember thinking at the time that it seemed a strange thing, and probably a bad idea, to prescribe opiates for chronic pain.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @NOTA

  62. @Penguinchip
    @eah

    Trump should regularly refer to Obama as "President Cop-killer" and to Holder as "Attorney General Cop-killer." He's shown so far that, unlike the Bush / Rove / Boehner idiot parade, he gets that real Americans don't give a shit how much something upsets the likes of the Washington Post and Rachel Maddow, and it would be energizingly insulting, divisive, and hateful to provide exactly what that little alinskyite prick Obama deserves. It would have the added merit of bring true, unlike anything Barry Hussein Cop-killer believes.

    Replies: @eah

    real Americans don’t give a shit how much something upsets the likes of the Washington Post and Rachel Maddow

    Absolutely correct.

    As a person, an intellectual, Trump is a bit too…coarse for my taste. But I love the way he tells The Establishment to kiss his ass. And I agree with the spirit of what he says, if not always his word choice and tone — his poll numbers show I am not alone. The Establishment and establishment politicians need to be kicked to the curb — and Trump is the guy to do it. As if what he said about Mexican immigrants wasn’t good enough, I was really sold on him when he said he paid as little tax as possible.

  63. @Jack D
    @Anonymouse

    Anecdotes are not statistics. In the last fully year of the Wagner administration (1965) there were 634 murders in NYC. By the last year of Lindsay's there were 1,680.

    Replies: @Jim, @Anonymouse

    Cite your source for these statistics. I suspect you made up those figures out of the whole cloth. NYC in Mayor Wagner’s years was a hell-hole: burnt-out cars left on the streets for weeks, drug-fueled crime everywhere. If the figures you quote are correct (which I doubt), it may reflect the cops getting back to policing under Mayor Lindsey instead of looking the other way which was SOP under Tammany Hall mayors such as Wagner.

    Anonymoose Mike

    • Replies: @Dirk Dagger
    @Anonymouse


    Cite your source for these statistics.
     
    You called him a liar. You first!
  64. OT, perhaps, but two NYT errors caught my eye:

    “But none of them were [should be “was”] as convincing to him as the notion that officers were afraid to get out of their patrol cars and deal directly with people on the street because the officers were afraid their interactions would be caught on video.

    Mr. Comey acknowledged there was [should be “were”] no data to back it up, but he said law enforcement leaders and officers had told him it was affecting policing.”

    And to what does (or do) the twice used “it” refer in the second of these awkward sentences?

    Even the veneer is rotting.

    If anyone cares to pass this along to the NYT, please do.

    AFAIK “none” works either way, and you’re wrong about data (the new data as plural is a neologism of ‘spergs; you don’t say “rice” were (thanks again ‘Derb!)).

  65. @Prof. Woland
    One thing that is clearly lacking are the proper rules and punishments for non-criminal offences. This teenager in the classroom who was collared and dragged out should never have been handled by a cop. The police can only enforce laws so by definition, every time they act it is a legal matter. If the schools had the ability to EXPEL the student then they could have just waited out the situation and washed their hands of the miscreant. Of course the police are protecting minorities also. If they did not monopolize the violence, a gang of white people would have shown up and done the same thing the cop did only with less sympathy and patience.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Prof, thanks for visiting planet earth….I guess you missed the whole recent, administration backed, narrative that blacks are being suspended and expelled too often. Never mind the fact that a lot of in school misbehavior is criminal….as in assaults and battery, and the occasional sexual assault and oh, yeah, guns in school. And no, no gang of whites is going to handle in school discipline.

  66. I’ve taken a pro-cop turn over the years. But I have no sympathy for their worries over being filmed. They should be proactive, get out ahead of the issue, and all start wearing always-on body cameras on the job. Then they’ll be far less vulnerable to hostile edits.

    Law and order types are fond of asking “if you’re not doing anything wrong, what are you worried about?” A very appropriate question to ask the cops in this case.

    If being recorded doing real police work really does expose cops to prosecution or the like, then maybe it’s time to either change how police work is done, or change how the legal system responds to it.

    If the upshot is that cops will spend a lot more time in the donut shop until the legal system finds a new equilibrium, I’m fine with that.

  67. In the first example, ‘none’ is the subject. None is always plural because any number other than exactly one is plural including numbers like zero, negative infinity, 0.999, and 1.001. Therefore ‘were’ is correct.

    “None” is a contraction of “no one,” so if anything it’s more correct to use the singular: “no one of these things is correct.”

  68. The black girl in the video missed out on the chance of a lifetime…..she wasn’t playing with her cell phone…..she “invented” the cell phone………hello White House invitation secretary.

  69. @Chris Mallory
    @C. Van Carter

    A government employee committing battery is a real crime.

    Replies: @Danindc, @eah, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Yeah it is.

    The point is, the media is pretty selective in what “real crimes” it makes a big deal about, wouldn’t you say?

    Here are some other “real crimes”:

    Slain White Rock Lake runner remembered as kind, hardworking engineer

    White engineer killed by a black guy. When will the national media make a big deal of this “real crime”? Any ideas on that? Oh, and his disconsolate wife later killed herself.

    Here’s another “real crime”: Court documents: Zoe Hastings was stabbed, found dead outside of minivan — 18 y/o white girl murdered by a 34 y/o black man. Same questions as above.

    I could go on, but you get the idea.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @eah

    I had not heard about the wife's committing suicide. How ghastly....

  70. @AndrewR
    Part of the problem is that there has been a culture of brutality and impunity among police for generations.

    The Megaphone's incident du semaine right now is a prime example. While the "victim" is extremely difficult to sympathize with (how did she think disobeying her teacher and a cop's lawful commands would end for her?), one need not give a hoot about her to think that the cop used way more force than was necessary. Then he arrested another girl in the class just for speaking up. He clearly should be charged with a felony and never allowed to work in law enforcement again.

    There is no easy solution. Ultimately the black community does not want to be policed. We do hear about blacks calling for the police to "do something" about crime, but then they circle the wagons around extremely unsympathetic characters like Mike Brown, Kajieme Powell, Trayvon Martin, etc. So obviously there will always be tension between blacks and cops.

    But we are long overdue to end police brutality and corruption. I don't think the Obama regime is trying to achieve this in a productive way, but all Americans should be able to agree that cops should be held to a very high professional standard.

    I do think it's going to get a lot worse before it gets better.

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @bomag, @Massimo Heitor, @Massimo Heitor

    The police don’t like being monitored yet they themselves like to monitor the public.

    No one likes being video recorded at work, that’s not just police. Teachers are uncomfortable with supervisors watching. When video cameras are installed in classrooms, many teachers will be more upset. Programmers don’t like it when bosses watch their screens and record all their web traffic. Technology has made video cameras ubiquitous and everyone will need to adapt.

  71. @AndrewR
    Part of the problem is that there has been a culture of brutality and impunity among police for generations.

    The Megaphone's incident du semaine right now is a prime example. While the "victim" is extremely difficult to sympathize with (how did she think disobeying her teacher and a cop's lawful commands would end for her?), one need not give a hoot about her to think that the cop used way more force than was necessary. Then he arrested another girl in the class just for speaking up. He clearly should be charged with a felony and never allowed to work in law enforcement again.

    There is no easy solution. Ultimately the black community does not want to be policed. We do hear about blacks calling for the police to "do something" about crime, but then they circle the wagons around extremely unsympathetic characters like Mike Brown, Kajieme Powell, Trayvon Martin, etc. So obviously there will always be tension between blacks and cops.

    But we are long overdue to end police brutality and corruption. I don't think the Obama regime is trying to achieve this in a productive way, but all Americans should be able to agree that cops should be held to a very high professional standard.

    I do think it's going to get a lot worse before it gets better.

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @bomag, @Massimo Heitor, @Massimo Heitor

    Ultimately the black community does not want to be policed.

    I have personal relationships with many black Americans and this isn’t true.

    Blacks definitely want police service. They call the police and make requests. I personally know many regular blacks whose views on say, the Michael Brown incident are largely in line with right-wing types. Even right wing types don’t think Michael Brown necessarily deserved execution, but he bears most of the responsibility for his death.

    Many black Americans are sympathetic with the police and think the BLM type protests are ridiculous. They aren’t threatened by BLM protests like this crowd, they don’t go online and get angry about it, they are not going to stage counter protests. But the BLM types are a loud minority of blacks and to a lesser extent, whites. Remember, it was largely white people who elected Obama, despite his racist hostility towards whites.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Massimo Heitor

    I guess I don't know many of these types of black people.

    Replies: @Massimo Heitor

    , @leper messiah
    @Massimo Heitor

    Total B.S.

    Of course there are blacks who are law abiding and respectful of societal norms Unfortunately, those proclivities are vastly overwhelmed by "snitches get stitches", "Uncle Tom", "acting white"...and on and on and on with dysfunctional culture.

    Now add up Obama/Holder/Lynch/Sharpton/Jackson/Farrakhan..etc. adding heft, weight, and power behind these ideas...and you have a race with a small percentage of very good people overwhelmed by a vast, criminal, undertow.

    Replies: @Massimo Heitor

    , @Gandydancer
    @Massimo Heitor


    Even right wing types don’t think Michael Brown necessarily deserved execution, but he bears most of the responsibility for his death.
     
    "Execution"? He was shot because he was running at the cop, who had a gun and didn't care to have it taken from him. Are you in doubt about this?

    Apropos a different subject on this thread, I believe video turned up of Darren Wilson demanding someone stop video recording him...

    And, apropos nothing Massimo said, I think fired School Resource Officer Ben Fields has as much a chance to collect as the girl who resisted arrest. The Chief who fired him complains about the "disturbing the school" charge she was arrested on, and doesn't think the police should be involved in such situations, but once she refused orders to leave, by teacher and vice principal, she was criminally trespassing and it was very much a cop's job to arrest her, it seems to me. And for that she had to be removed from the chair. I guess he could have dumped her out rather than try to pull her out and then toss her when she hit him, but it's a slender reed on which to fire him unless they have some very particular protocols he violated.
  72. @AndrewR
    @SPMoore8

    I never said the federal government had any business meddling in this situation. But this was not an isolated incident. It's part of a broad national trend that must be dealt with collectively even if we leave a one-size-fits-all approach off the table.

    Replies: @IA

    It’s part of a broad national trend that must be dealt with collectively even if we leave a one-size-fits-all approach off the table.

    Speaking of broad national trends I go back far enough that the very idea of guards, let alone police, in a public school seems bizarre. You’re living in an insane asylum and don’t know it.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @IA

    I have no doubt that the probability of having a cop in a school is in direct proportion to the number of ethnic minorities in that school.

    Replies: @IA

  73. @anonymous
    Cameras are ubiquitous and are the new reality; there's no going back to the past on this. The police don't like being monitored yet they themselves like to monitor the public. It now may be working both ways. It's doubtful that major crime such as homicide and armed robbery rates depend on whether or not the cops are hiding out since they never prevented them in the first place; they arrive after a homicide occurs to cordon off the body. It's at the lower levels of misbehavior that police reluctance to act can make a difference. However, in the old days before the camera era a lot of police also let things slide because they were just lazy and were there to mainly collect a paycheck and whatever else they could pocket.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mr. Blank

    The ubiquity of cameras is working both ways, but unfortunately, as Steve pointed out, the press only covers it in one direction. Cameras have allowed a lot more exposure of police misbehavior, and that has gotten a lot of coverage in the “mainstream” press. But they’ve also led to a lot more exposure of black underclass misbehavior, and THIS stuff gets gets zero mainstream coverage but gets widely circulated among knuckleheaded ghetto blacks and samizdat-style among angry whites.

    This does not bode well for the future — I seem to recall that there was a similar dynamic in Yugoslavia before it collapsed, with the media conspiring to cover up crimes committed by politically-protected ethnic groups and the stories instead getting spread through the underground rumor mill. The authorities probably thought they were being “responsible” and protecting the public from information they “couldn’t handle,” but in the end the information got out anyway, and usually in a heavily distorted fashion that only served to fan the flames of ethnic strife.

    As Steve pointed out, the mainstream press hasn’t yet caught on to this phenomenon, although it’s already causing problems — apparently that kid who shot up the black church in South Carolina was partially motivated by videos he’d seen online of blacks behaving badly, though that detail got lost in all the hand-wringing over how the Confederate Flag made him do it. Eventually, some of these videos will get enough public attention that the New York Times will be forced to report on this phenomenon, and it will be interesting to see how they work to maintain the Narrative when it happens.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Mr. Blank


    Eventually, some of these videos will get enough public attention that the New York Times will be forced to report on this phenomenon
     
    I'm not at all convinced of this...
    , @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Blank

    " seem to recall that there was a similar dynamic in Yugoslavia before it collapsed, with the media conspiring to cover up crimes committed by politically-protected ethnic groups and the stories instead getting spread through the underground rumor mill. "

    That's a plot device in Houellebecq's "Submission:" in 2022, there are AK47 battles among masked men in the fashionable parts of Paris, but they don't get covered on evening news or even on YouTube, just on RuTube.

  74. the F.B.I. director said there might be many factors — like cheaper drugs and easier access to guns — that had spawned an increase in crime.

    Since when is there “easier access to guns” than there used to be?

  75. @Massimo Heitor
    @AndrewR


    Ultimately the black community does not want to be policed.

     

    I have personal relationships with many black Americans and this isn't true.

    Blacks definitely want police service. They call the police and make requests. I personally know many regular blacks whose views on say, the Michael Brown incident are largely in line with right-wing types. Even right wing types don't think Michael Brown necessarily deserved execution, but he bears most of the responsibility for his death.

    Many black Americans are sympathetic with the police and think the BLM type protests are ridiculous. They aren't threatened by BLM protests like this crowd, they don't go online and get angry about it, they are not going to stage counter protests. But the BLM types are a loud minority of blacks and to a lesser extent, whites. Remember, it was largely white people who elected Obama, despite his racist hostility towards whites.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @leper messiah, @Gandydancer

    I guess I don’t know many of these types of black people.

    • Replies: @Massimo Heitor
    @AndrewR


    I guess I don’t know many of these types of black people.
     
    Honestly, how many black people do you know?

    Replies: @AndrewR

  76. @IA
    @AndrewR


    It’s part of a broad national trend that must be dealt with collectively even if we leave a one-size-fits-all approach off the table.

     

    Speaking of broad national trends I go back far enough that the very idea of guards, let alone police, in a public school seems bizarre. You're living in an insane asylum and don't know it.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    I have no doubt that the probability of having a cop in a school is in direct proportion to the number of ethnic minorities in that school.

    • Replies: @IA
    @AndrewR

    Then let them live in their own world.

  77. @Mr. Blank
    @anonymous

    The ubiquity of cameras is working both ways, but unfortunately, as Steve pointed out, the press only covers it in one direction. Cameras have allowed a lot more exposure of police misbehavior, and that has gotten a lot of coverage in the "mainstream" press. But they've also led to a lot more exposure of black underclass misbehavior, and THIS stuff gets gets zero mainstream coverage but gets widely circulated among knuckleheaded ghetto blacks and samizdat-style among angry whites.

    This does not bode well for the future — I seem to recall that there was a similar dynamic in Yugoslavia before it collapsed, with the media conspiring to cover up crimes committed by politically-protected ethnic groups and the stories instead getting spread through the underground rumor mill. The authorities probably thought they were being "responsible" and protecting the public from information they "couldn't handle," but in the end the information got out anyway, and usually in a heavily distorted fashion that only served to fan the flames of ethnic strife.

    As Steve pointed out, the mainstream press hasn't yet caught on to this phenomenon, although it's already causing problems — apparently that kid who shot up the black church in South Carolina was partially motivated by videos he'd seen online of blacks behaving badly, though that detail got lost in all the hand-wringing over how the Confederate Flag made him do it. Eventually, some of these videos will get enough public attention that the New York Times will be forced to report on this phenomenon, and it will be interesting to see how they work to maintain the Narrative when it happens.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Steve Sailer

    Eventually, some of these videos will get enough public attention that the New York Times will be forced to report on this phenomenon

    I’m not at all convinced of this…

  78. @Mr. Blank
    @anonymous

    The ubiquity of cameras is working both ways, but unfortunately, as Steve pointed out, the press only covers it in one direction. Cameras have allowed a lot more exposure of police misbehavior, and that has gotten a lot of coverage in the "mainstream" press. But they've also led to a lot more exposure of black underclass misbehavior, and THIS stuff gets gets zero mainstream coverage but gets widely circulated among knuckleheaded ghetto blacks and samizdat-style among angry whites.

    This does not bode well for the future — I seem to recall that there was a similar dynamic in Yugoslavia before it collapsed, with the media conspiring to cover up crimes committed by politically-protected ethnic groups and the stories instead getting spread through the underground rumor mill. The authorities probably thought they were being "responsible" and protecting the public from information they "couldn't handle," but in the end the information got out anyway, and usually in a heavily distorted fashion that only served to fan the flames of ethnic strife.

    As Steve pointed out, the mainstream press hasn't yet caught on to this phenomenon, although it's already causing problems — apparently that kid who shot up the black church in South Carolina was partially motivated by videos he'd seen online of blacks behaving badly, though that detail got lost in all the hand-wringing over how the Confederate Flag made him do it. Eventually, some of these videos will get enough public attention that the New York Times will be forced to report on this phenomenon, and it will be interesting to see how they work to maintain the Narrative when it happens.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Steve Sailer

    ” seem to recall that there was a similar dynamic in Yugoslavia before it collapsed, with the media conspiring to cover up crimes committed by politically-protected ethnic groups and the stories instead getting spread through the underground rumor mill. ”

    That’s a plot device in Houellebecq’s “Submission:” in 2022, there are AK47 battles among masked men in the fashionable parts of Paris, but they don’t get covered on evening news or even on YouTube, just on RuTube.

  79. @eah
    @Chris Mallory

    Yeah it is.

    The point is, the media is pretty selective in what "real crimes" it makes a big deal about, wouldn't you say?

    Here are some other "real crimes":

    Slain White Rock Lake runner remembered as kind, hardworking engineer

    White engineer killed by a black guy. When will the national media make a big deal of this "real crime"? Any ideas on that? Oh, and his disconsolate wife later killed herself.

    Here's another "real crime": Court documents: Zoe Hastings was stabbed, found dead outside of minivan -- 18 y/o white girl murdered by a 34 y/o black man. Same questions as above.

    I could go on, but you get the idea.

    Replies: @D. K.

    I had not heard about the wife’s committing suicide. How ghastly….

  80. @Jack Hanson
    Here we see from some commenters the aspie/libertarian lawgic that all people can be reasoned with and anything else is "brutality". Like Pvt. Hudson said, what do you want them to use? Harsh language?

    Also from the Dept. Of Unintended Consequences: A few months ago the Arizona Daily Star (communist rag) had a hand wringing editorial AGAINST police video cameras. They tried to frame it as a 4Amd civil rights issue but the underlying context was Blacks Behaving Badly absolutely obliterated the narrative when it's not 7 seconds of edited footage.

    Replies: @G Pinfold

    Here we see from some commenters the aspie/libertarian lawgic that all people can be reasoned with and anything else is “brutality”. Like Pvt. Hudson said, what do you want them to use? Harsh language?

    We need to deploy teams of perfectly trained, culturally compatible, citizen-restraint professionals with soma sprays of infinite bliss and silky nets to spin a web of peace around the angry one.

    Oh wait, the new methods are too costly and creepily sci-fi; and so we drift towards the other end of the sci-fi spectrum: Mad Max machete mayhem.

  81. @Jim
    @leper messiah

    What would have happened to the officer if he had simply turned around and left the school after the student refused to comply with his commands?

    Replies: @leper messiah

    At worst he would have been fired.

    But believe me…in this toxic cesspool that Obama, Holder, Lynch, BLM..etc..have created, he would be in a much better position going forward. Now…he is going to be fiercely demonized and fired anyway – oh – and by they way – his family will have to go into hiding. And up next…sued for civil rights violations. And have no doubt, this girl’s family just rang the cash register on a multi-million dollar payday…thereby encouraging countless others to mimic this behavior to hit the jackpot.

    If you feel he did the manly, right God-Fearing thing, you are as deluded as the rest of white, Fox News America is.

  82. @Anonymouse
    @Jack D

    Cite your source for these statistics. I suspect you made up those figures out of the whole cloth. NYC in Mayor Wagner's years was a hell-hole: burnt-out cars left on the streets for weeks, drug-fueled crime everywhere. If the figures you quote are correct (which I doubt), it may reflect the cops getting back to policing under Mayor Lindsey instead of looking the other way which was SOP under Tammany Hall mayors such as Wagner.

    Anonymoose Mike

    Replies: @Dirk Dagger

    Cite your source for these statistics.

    You called him a liar. You first!

  83. @Danindc
    Surprised at the amount of anti-cop venom here. You people need to get out and spend some time in Baltimore where I work. They're out there every day trying to keep a lid on a powder keg.

    Replies: @leper messiah

    Don’t confuse anti-cop venom from a sincere, gut-wrenching response to seeing white cops demonized day-after-day-after-day. White cops need to take back the power. They can do it. Just get over the God-complex, USA #1, strict law and order freak show. Start slacking off and let the savages eat each other alive.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @leper messiah

    Or, cops could enforce and follow the laws without smacking people around for contempt of cop, breaking their bones with rough rides, or shooting them in the back. The fact is, nobody, including the police, is good at policing their own behavior. Police in some places have well-deserved reputations for brutality and corruption, and that needs to change.

  84. @John Derbyshire
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    "Data" is an aggregative noun in English, like "rice" or "grass." Try:

    "The rice are cooked."

    "The grass need mowing."

    It's true that in Latin, data is the plural of datum, "that which is given." If it's the Latin word you're using, though, it should be in italics.

    The rule is: If you are using a foreign word with its foreign case, number, mood, person, tense, . . . then put it in italics and follow foreign rules of grammar (and orthography: Zeitgeist). If you want to Anglicize the word, drop the italics and all foreignness (zeitgeist).

    I don't think I've ever heard an English-speaking person unselfconsciously use the word "datum," and I worked in data processing for 30 years. For a particle of data the usual term was "data item."

    Replies: @GW, @The Last Real Calvinist, @(((Owen))), @Jean Cocteausten, @Harold, @ben tillman, @tbraton

    “Datum” is commonly used in fields involving careful measurement, although not as the singular of data. It means the location from which a distance is reckoned. Its plural is, you guessed it, datums.

  85. @Massimo Heitor
    @AndrewR


    Ultimately the black community does not want to be policed.

     

    I have personal relationships with many black Americans and this isn't true.

    Blacks definitely want police service. They call the police and make requests. I personally know many regular blacks whose views on say, the Michael Brown incident are largely in line with right-wing types. Even right wing types don't think Michael Brown necessarily deserved execution, but he bears most of the responsibility for his death.

    Many black Americans are sympathetic with the police and think the BLM type protests are ridiculous. They aren't threatened by BLM protests like this crowd, they don't go online and get angry about it, they are not going to stage counter protests. But the BLM types are a loud minority of blacks and to a lesser extent, whites. Remember, it was largely white people who elected Obama, despite his racist hostility towards whites.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @leper messiah, @Gandydancer

    Total B.S.

    Of course there are blacks who are law abiding and respectful of societal norms Unfortunately, those proclivities are vastly overwhelmed by “snitches get stitches”, “Uncle Tom”, “acting white”…and on and on and on with dysfunctional culture.

    Now add up Obama/Holder/Lynch/Sharpton/Jackson/Farrakhan..etc. adding heft, weight, and power behind these ideas…and you have a race with a small percentage of very good people overwhelmed by a vast, criminal, undertow.

    • Replies: @Massimo Heitor
    @leper messiah


    Total B.S.

    Of course there are blacks who are law abiding and respectful of societal norms Unfortunately, those proclivities are vastly overwhelmed by “snitches get stitches”, “Uncle Tom”, “acting white”…and on and on and on with dysfunctional culture.

    Now add up Obama/Holder/Lynch/Sharpton/Jackson/Farrakhan..etc. adding heft, weight, and power behind these ideas…and you have a race with a small percentage of very good people overwhelmed by a vast, criminal, undertow.
     
    Couldn't I easily say the same thing about white people? There are a few good, law abiding white people but they are overwhelmed by Michael Moore far left documentary types and Bill DeBlasio cop hater types and obnoxious white trash like the mom on Honey Boo Boo and school shooter types? Add in Obama, Eric Holder, and Jeremiah Wright who are all at least half white and you have a vast criminal undertow?

    But even many underclass blacks who shoplift, live off of exploiting welfare, purposefully speak ebonics, self-segregate, have a basic race preference for other blacks over whites: they definitely aren't saints but even many of them think the BLM stuff is ridiculous. Sure, there are many blacks behaving badly and there are still many blacks at BLM type protests. Many white/asian university grad students and professors buy into the BLM logic and hard left racial viewpoint.
  86. @AndrewR
    @IA

    I have no doubt that the probability of having a cop in a school is in direct proportion to the number of ethnic minorities in that school.

    Replies: @IA

    Then let them live in their own world.

  87. People need to believe in something. With Gay Marriages in the Vatican a matter of when, not if, the only thing people in this country (oh heck, White People) believe in is … Black people. Specifically, Black Redemption of White original sin.

    Its a Volk Religion, and oddly enough from the elites not the underclass. Ben Carson is substantially in the lead for the nomination in not one but TWO national polls, and that’s no surprise because he’s the magical Negro Messiah, Republican Edition. He’s awful on immigration, filled with the thinly disguised “get Whitey” agenda that animates 99.9999999% of Obama’s actions.

    Obama would nuke Washington and himself if he were convinced it would wipe out Whitey once and for all.

    So Obama denouncing the FBI Director for what amounts to heresy in the Elites religion is no surprise. I wonder what his heresy trial will be like.

  88. @AndrewR
    @Massimo Heitor

    I guess I don't know many of these types of black people.

    Replies: @Massimo Heitor

    I guess I don’t know many of these types of black people.

    Honestly, how many black people do you know?

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Massimo Heitor

    I'm from Flint.

  89. It’s similar to “media” as well. Someone needs to tell Ann Coulter that the correct usage would be “the media is” not “the media are.”

    This seems to be a potato potAtoe thing, too. If memory serves, British English uses the latter form a lot (in general, like when referring to companies). CIA/Microsoft/etc are vs is.

  90. leper messiah, I don’t see the bad outweighing the good in the black population, but rather, the two are relatively balanced…and that’s not nearly good enough for advanced civilization.

    You need the good to heavily outweigh the bad, or you get nowhere.

  91. Many black Americans are sympathetic with the police and think the BLM type protests are ridiculous. They aren’t threatened by BLM protests like this crowd, they don’t go online and get angry about it, they are not going to stage counter protests. But the BLM types are a loud minority of blacks and to a lesser extent, whites. Remember, it was largely white people who elected Obama, despite his racist hostility towards whites.

    Why no counter protests from the HR manager bloc? Because activists and agitators are their geese and golden eggs like A-A are sweet.

    And doesn’t the all-Obama black vote slightly undermine your thesis? Black solidarity behind the Activist-in-Chief must have come as a shock.

    • Replies: @Massimo Heitor
    @G Pinfold


    And doesn’t the all-Obama black vote slightly undermine your thesis? Black solidarity behind the Activist-in-Chief must have come as a shock.
     
    Blacks generally have a race preference for other blacks. Basic race preference is more common than support for the BLM crowd. Also, many blacks just vote for more government services and I suspect would pick Bernie Sanders or Hillary Clinton over Ben Carson. They wouldn't be as passionate about a white Sanders/Clinton as they were over a black Obama.

    But even blacks who self segregate, prefer blacks to whites in general, intentionally speak ebonics, can watch the video of Michael Brown in the convenience store and think Brown was acting badly and was supposed to be arrested and bears responsibility in his own death. Not all blacks, many blacks will join the BLM protests, be outraged at "All Lives Matter", as will many white liberals.
  92. @John Derbyshire
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    "Data" is an aggregative noun in English, like "rice" or "grass." Try:

    "The rice are cooked."

    "The grass need mowing."

    It's true that in Latin, data is the plural of datum, "that which is given." If it's the Latin word you're using, though, it should be in italics.

    The rule is: If you are using a foreign word with its foreign case, number, mood, person, tense, . . . then put it in italics and follow foreign rules of grammar (and orthography: Zeitgeist). If you want to Anglicize the word, drop the italics and all foreignness (zeitgeist).

    I don't think I've ever heard an English-speaking person unselfconsciously use the word "datum," and I worked in data processing for 30 years. For a particle of data the usual term was "data item."

    Replies: @GW, @The Last Real Calvinist, @(((Owen))), @Jean Cocteausten, @Harold, @ben tillman, @tbraton

    I agree that it is perfectly fine to use “data” as singular, but my impression from (certain subareas of) computer science is that using it as a plural is still common.

    Some ngrams out of curiosity:

    data is vs. data are

    data item vs. datum vs. item of data vs. piece of data vs. bit of data

    And pertaining to the earlier usage comments:

    none of them was vs. none of them were

  93. @Mr. Anon
    @cwhatfuture

    "Although the Bonnier family is of Jewish origin (a long time ago) they do not seem to be so Jewish now, as one of them, Åke Bonnier, is a bishop in the Diocese of Skara."

    According to Wikipedia, Ake Bonnier's father was jewish. That isn't so far removed as you imply. In any event, surely you're not going to play the old "it's a religion" game, are you? Given that many Jews are athiests and yet strongly self-identify as jewish, it is clear that they deem jewishness to be primarily an ethnic affiliation, not a religion.

    Replies: @snorlax

    I dunno, I read something on the internet by a Jewish guy, who said that at his synagogue (either Reform or one of the more touchy-feely Conservative ones) they frequently invite guests to address the congregation after the sermon. They’ve invited atheist Jews and ultra-orthodox Jews, Democrats, Republicans, Communists, Asians, blacks, Protestants, Catholics, Israelis, anti-Zionist Jews and even Palestinians to speak.

    But the one type of person who would never be welcome is a Jewish convert to Christianity. Not even one of those churches where they have the pride flag out front and people wear t-shirts to the service.* It’s seen as worse than converting to Islam, even. They literally view such a person as a race traitor.

    If someone has the link feel free to post it.

    *It’s borderline socially-acceptable to join one of those churches by reason of marriage, so long as they don’t “really” convert and don’t evangelize.

  94. The authorities in South Carolina are investigating an encounter captured on two videos that went viral Monday afternoon that show a white school police officer in a Columbia classroom grabbing an African-American student by the neck, flipping her backward as she sat at her desk….

    The Times is lying again. The video clearly shows that the desk was flipped sideways. Flipping the desk backwards would mean a significant chance of serious spinal injury; flipping it sideways means no chance of injury.

  95. @Harry Baldwin
    @Mr. Anon

    As the father of a heroin addict I have suffered an education on this subject.

    The Afghani heroin goes to Europe and Russia. The heroin in the US comes from Mexico. Farmers in the Sierra Nevada mountains have switched from growing marijuana to growing poppies. Because such high-quality marijuana is now grown in the US, the Mexicans have largely lost their market share of that. They're smuggling heroin now to make up the difference.

    Big pharmaceutical had a major push years ago encouraging doctors to prescribe opiate painkillers, even for teenagers. These drugs were originally intended for terminal patients for whom addiction was not a concern. With the crackdown on the opiates now, addicts find it easier and cheaper to resort to heroin.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I am sorry to hear of you trouble. I hope that your son (or daughter as the case may be) is able to beat his addiction.

    I don’t know when opiate pain-killers became popular for doctors to prescribe; it seemed to me to be in the early 2000’s when that started, although I wasn’t really paying attention. The first I really took note of it was when Rush Limbaugh was busted for having pills without a prescription. I remember thinking at the time that it seemed a strange thing, and probably a bad idea, to prescribe opiates for chronic pain.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Anon, Erie County in NY has had 173 heroin related overdose deaths, year to date according to the Buffalo News article on 10/27/15

    , @NOTA
    @Mr. Anon

    There is a nasty trade off going on there. A certain fraction of people are in constant, serious pain, and pretty much the only thing that helps them is opioid pain killers. These are also seriously addictive, and addicts will go to great lengths to get them.

    So we end up making a trade off: either we make them very hard to get, and leave some people in chronic unbearable pain, or we make them easy to get, and get more people hooked on them. Both sides of this trade off suck.

  96. @John Derbyshire
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    "Data" is an aggregative noun in English, like "rice" or "grass." Try:

    "The rice are cooked."

    "The grass need mowing."

    It's true that in Latin, data is the plural of datum, "that which is given." If it's the Latin word you're using, though, it should be in italics.

    The rule is: If you are using a foreign word with its foreign case, number, mood, person, tense, . . . then put it in italics and follow foreign rules of grammar (and orthography: Zeitgeist). If you want to Anglicize the word, drop the italics and all foreignness (zeitgeist).

    I don't think I've ever heard an English-speaking person unselfconsciously use the word "datum," and I worked in data processing for 30 years. For a particle of data the usual term was "data item."

    Replies: @GW, @The Last Real Calvinist, @(((Owen))), @Jean Cocteausten, @Harold, @ben tillman, @tbraton

    It’s true that in Latin, data is the plural of datum, “that which is given.” If it’s the Latin word you’re using, though, it should be in italics.

    You’re just begging the question. Educated people use “data” as a plural, and they are in fact using an English word when hey do so.

    And changing it to a singular is stupid and destructive of the language. We already have an aggregate noun that means what you want “data” to mean: information or, if you want a four-letter word, info.

  97. @leper messiah
    @Massimo Heitor

    Total B.S.

    Of course there are blacks who are law abiding and respectful of societal norms Unfortunately, those proclivities are vastly overwhelmed by "snitches get stitches", "Uncle Tom", "acting white"...and on and on and on with dysfunctional culture.

    Now add up Obama/Holder/Lynch/Sharpton/Jackson/Farrakhan..etc. adding heft, weight, and power behind these ideas...and you have a race with a small percentage of very good people overwhelmed by a vast, criminal, undertow.

    Replies: @Massimo Heitor

    Total B.S.

    Of course there are blacks who are law abiding and respectful of societal norms Unfortunately, those proclivities are vastly overwhelmed by “snitches get stitches”, “Uncle Tom”, “acting white”…and on and on and on with dysfunctional culture.

    Now add up Obama/Holder/Lynch/Sharpton/Jackson/Farrakhan..etc. adding heft, weight, and power behind these ideas…and you have a race with a small percentage of very good people overwhelmed by a vast, criminal, undertow.

    Couldn’t I easily say the same thing about white people? There are a few good, law abiding white people but they are overwhelmed by Michael Moore far left documentary types and Bill DeBlasio cop hater types and obnoxious white trash like the mom on Honey Boo Boo and school shooter types? Add in Obama, Eric Holder, and Jeremiah Wright who are all at least half white and you have a vast criminal undertow?

    But even many underclass blacks who shoplift, live off of exploiting welfare, purposefully speak ebonics, self-segregate, have a basic race preference for other blacks over whites: they definitely aren’t saints but even many of them think the BLM stuff is ridiculous. Sure, there are many blacks behaving badly and there are still many blacks at BLM type protests. Many white/asian university grad students and professors buy into the BLM logic and hard left racial viewpoint.

  98. @G Pinfold

    Many black Americans are sympathetic with the police and think the BLM type protests are ridiculous. They aren’t threatened by BLM protests like this crowd, they don’t go online and get angry about it, they are not going to stage counter protests. But the BLM types are a loud minority of blacks and to a lesser extent, whites. Remember, it was largely white people who elected Obama, despite his racist hostility towards whites.
     
    Why no counter protests from the HR manager bloc? Because activists and agitators are their geese and golden eggs like A-A are sweet.

    And doesn't the all-Obama black vote slightly undermine your thesis? Black solidarity behind the Activist-in-Chief must have come as a shock.

    Replies: @Massimo Heitor

    And doesn’t the all-Obama black vote slightly undermine your thesis? Black solidarity behind the Activist-in-Chief must have come as a shock.

    Blacks generally have a race preference for other blacks. Basic race preference is more common than support for the BLM crowd. Also, many blacks just vote for more government services and I suspect would pick Bernie Sanders or Hillary Clinton over Ben Carson. They wouldn’t be as passionate about a white Sanders/Clinton as they were over a black Obama.

    But even blacks who self segregate, prefer blacks to whites in general, intentionally speak ebonics, can watch the video of Michael Brown in the convenience store and think Brown was acting badly and was supposed to be arrested and bears responsibility in his own death. Not all blacks, many blacks will join the BLM protests, be outraged at “All Lives Matter”, as will many white liberals.

  99. @John Derbyshire
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    "Data" is an aggregative noun in English, like "rice" or "grass." Try:

    "The rice are cooked."

    "The grass need mowing."

    It's true that in Latin, data is the plural of datum, "that which is given." If it's the Latin word you're using, though, it should be in italics.

    The rule is: If you are using a foreign word with its foreign case, number, mood, person, tense, . . . then put it in italics and follow foreign rules of grammar (and orthography: Zeitgeist). If you want to Anglicize the word, drop the italics and all foreignness (zeitgeist).

    I don't think I've ever heard an English-speaking person unselfconsciously use the word "datum," and I worked in data processing for 30 years. For a particle of data the usual term was "data item."

    Replies: @GW, @The Last Real Calvinist, @(((Owen))), @Jean Cocteausten, @Harold, @ben tillman, @tbraton

    FWIW, here is what my volume of H.W. Fowler’s “A Dictionary of Modern English Usage” (1959 ed.) says about “data”:

    data is plural only (The d. are, not is, insufficient./What are the d.?/We have no d.); the singular, comparatively rare, is datum; one of the data is commoner than a datum; but datum-line, line taken as a basis, is common. My Intellligence Department has furnished me with so much valuable data illustrates the mistake of taking the plural for a singular.”

    It should be kept in mind that the same volume of Fowler has this to say about “gender”:

    gender, n., is a grammatical term only. To talk of persons or creatures of the masculine or feminine g., meaning of the male or female sex, is either a jocularity (permissible or not according to context) or a blunder.”

    As can be seen, Fowler, if he were living today (he died in 1933, so he completely missed WWII), would not have a clue what is the proper grammar to apply to this age of mass migration of “Syrian refugees.” So his usage tips are not nearly as helpful as they were nearly a hundred years ago.

    BTW here is what Fowler has to say about a dispute that arose in the dim and distant past of this past August (more than two months ago) re Warren G. Harding’s death (Attention, rihanna.):

    hang. Past and p.p. hanged of the capital punishment & in the imprecation; otherwise hung.”

    So my 10th grade teacher taught me right after all. RIP, Miss Bryant.

  100. @wren
    World Star Hip Hop and sites like LiveLeak have destroyed the narrative.

    Some folks don't realize that yet.

    Those sites get picked up by sites like the Daily Mail.

    It may get even more interesting with apps like periscope. Like twitter, but livefeed video.

    Replies: @DCThrowback, @Ed

    Much is made of the ubiquity of videos in regards to police by the media. Rightfully so, it’s clear videos have influenced behavior of cops and civilians.

    As you point out though sites like worldstar & liveleak have an impact as well. I’d argue even a greater impact. It fuels the silent majority that produces the likes of Trump & shocking election results.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @Ed

    Media are extremely bad at showing you a representative picture of what's going on in the world. That's why you'll see like a hundred times as much TV coverage of plane crashes as car crashes, even though you're much more likely to die in a car crash.

    Cellphone videos add another layer of biased sampling--you will never see a cellphone video of the 99+% of the time when a cop responds to a belligerent fool in a way that ends up with nobody getting tazed, maced, or beaten up. Who links to that on YouTube? But the rare case where the cop beats the fool senseless and arrests him for "resisting arrest" is interesting viewing, and may even make it onto the TV news. That leaves us with no way to know how common that sort of thing is. And the media aren't likely to help us find the answer.

    Does anyone know of good data on this stuff? Like a poll of lots of people asking if they've ever been subjected to police brutality?

    Body cameras might actually let us get real data on this.

  101. @SPMoore8
    @AndrewR

    I saw the video clip of the girl being manhandled by the police officer in South Carolina. Flipping her over in her school desk was just absurd -- he was twice her size to begin with -- and it's surprising he didn't break her neck.

    Having said that, it's a local issue, let's not pretend otherwise. If some town, city, county, state, etc. wants to allow what amounts to corporal punishment, that's their business.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @NOTA

    Not a national issue, just a guy who needs to be gotten off the police force and sent down the road.

  102. @Massimo Heitor
    @AndrewR


    I guess I don’t know many of these types of black people.
     
    Honestly, how many black people do you know?

    Replies: @AndrewR

    I’m from Flint.

  103. @Stephen R. Diamond
    What are we coming to when cops justify refusing to do their jobs because they don't like the legal climate? And then get sympathy for their abstention. If you don't like the terms of work, quit the force!

    I can't understand the love affair of some honest supporters of ordinary people with the cops. The cops have always been the main arm of big capital and the banks in defeating working people militantly challenging them.

    Now their malign influence has penetrated poor white communities, where folks are incited to be cop callers on their neighbors. Cops infiltrating their way into the communities to create a sick, dependent society.

    Replies: @bomag, @silviosilver

    If you don’t like the terms of work, quit the force!

    People need support and encouragement to overcome obstacles. Maybe we offer police and soldiers too much support, but let us not reduce the thing to where only the desperate and weird take the jobs.

  104. @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    I am sorry to hear of you trouble. I hope that your son (or daughter as the case may be) is able to beat his addiction.

    I don't know when opiate pain-killers became popular for doctors to prescribe; it seemed to me to be in the early 2000's when that started, although I wasn't really paying attention. The first I really took note of it was when Rush Limbaugh was busted for having pills without a prescription. I remember thinking at the time that it seemed a strange thing, and probably a bad idea, to prescribe opiates for chronic pain.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @NOTA

    Mr. Anon, Erie County in NY has had 173 heroin related overdose deaths, year to date according to the Buffalo News article on 10/27/15

  105. @leper messiah
    @Danindc

    Don't confuse anti-cop venom from a sincere, gut-wrenching response to seeing white cops demonized day-after-day-after-day. White cops need to take back the power. They can do it. Just get over the God-complex, USA #1, strict law and order freak show. Start slacking off and let the savages eat each other alive.

    Replies: @NOTA

    Or, cops could enforce and follow the laws without smacking people around for contempt of cop, breaking their bones with rough rides, or shooting them in the back. The fact is, nobody, including the police, is good at policing their own behavior. Police in some places have well-deserved reputations for brutality and corruption, and that needs to change.

  106. @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    I am sorry to hear of you trouble. I hope that your son (or daughter as the case may be) is able to beat his addiction.

    I don't know when opiate pain-killers became popular for doctors to prescribe; it seemed to me to be in the early 2000's when that started, although I wasn't really paying attention. The first I really took note of it was when Rush Limbaugh was busted for having pills without a prescription. I remember thinking at the time that it seemed a strange thing, and probably a bad idea, to prescribe opiates for chronic pain.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @NOTA

    There is a nasty trade off going on there. A certain fraction of people are in constant, serious pain, and pretty much the only thing that helps them is opioid pain killers. These are also seriously addictive, and addicts will go to great lengths to get them.

    So we end up making a trade off: either we make them very hard to get, and leave some people in chronic unbearable pain, or we make them easy to get, and get more people hooked on them. Both sides of this trade off suck.

  107. @Ed
    @wren

    Much is made of the ubiquity of videos in regards to police by the media. Rightfully so, it's clear videos have influenced behavior of cops and civilians.

    As you point out though sites like worldstar & liveleak have an impact as well. I'd argue even a greater impact. It fuels the silent majority that produces the likes of Trump & shocking election results.

    Replies: @NOTA

    Media are extremely bad at showing you a representative picture of what’s going on in the world. That’s why you’ll see like a hundred times as much TV coverage of plane crashes as car crashes, even though you’re much more likely to die in a car crash.

    Cellphone videos add another layer of biased sampling–you will never see a cellphone video of the 99+% of the time when a cop responds to a belligerent fool in a way that ends up with nobody getting tazed, maced, or beaten up. Who links to that on YouTube? But the rare case where the cop beats the fool senseless and arrests him for “resisting arrest” is interesting viewing, and may even make it onto the TV news. That leaves us with no way to know how common that sort of thing is. And the media aren’t likely to help us find the answer.

    Does anyone know of good data on this stuff? Like a poll of lots of people asking if they’ve ever been subjected to police brutality?

    Body cameras might actually let us get real data on this.

  108. @Chris Mallory
    @C. Van Carter

    A government employee committing battery is a real crime.

    Replies: @Danindc, @eah, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Yeah, and only the EFF BEE EYE has the forensic resources to unravel this one.

  109. @Massimo Heitor
    @AndrewR


    Ultimately the black community does not want to be policed.

     

    I have personal relationships with many black Americans and this isn't true.

    Blacks definitely want police service. They call the police and make requests. I personally know many regular blacks whose views on say, the Michael Brown incident are largely in line with right-wing types. Even right wing types don't think Michael Brown necessarily deserved execution, but he bears most of the responsibility for his death.

    Many black Americans are sympathetic with the police and think the BLM type protests are ridiculous. They aren't threatened by BLM protests like this crowd, they don't go online and get angry about it, they are not going to stage counter protests. But the BLM types are a loud minority of blacks and to a lesser extent, whites. Remember, it was largely white people who elected Obama, despite his racist hostility towards whites.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @leper messiah, @Gandydancer

    Even right wing types don’t think Michael Brown necessarily deserved execution, but he bears most of the responsibility for his death.

    “Execution”? He was shot because he was running at the cop, who had a gun and didn’t care to have it taken from him. Are you in doubt about this?

    Apropos a different subject on this thread, I believe video turned up of Darren Wilson demanding someone stop video recording him…

    And, apropos nothing Massimo said, I think fired School Resource Officer Ben Fields has as much a chance to collect as the girl who resisted arrest. The Chief who fired him complains about the “disturbing the school” charge she was arrested on, and doesn’t think the police should be involved in such situations, but once she refused orders to leave, by teacher and vice principal, she was criminally trespassing and it was very much a cop’s job to arrest her, it seems to me. And for that she had to be removed from the chair. I guess he could have dumped her out rather than try to pull her out and then toss her when she hit him, but it’s a slender reed on which to fire him unless they have some very particular protocols he violated.

  110. @Stephen R. Diamond
    What are we coming to when cops justify refusing to do their jobs because they don't like the legal climate? And then get sympathy for their abstention. If you don't like the terms of work, quit the force!

    I can't understand the love affair of some honest supporters of ordinary people with the cops. The cops have always been the main arm of big capital and the banks in defeating working people militantly challenging them.

    Now their malign influence has penetrated poor white communities, where folks are incited to be cop callers on their neighbors. Cops infiltrating their way into the communities to create a sick, dependent society.

    Replies: @bomag, @silviosilver

    The cops have always been the main arm of big capital and the banks in defeating working people militantly challenging them.

    Choke on it, commie.

    • Replies: @Stephen R. Diamond
    @silviosilver

    Well, you got the last word correct. Maybe you're smarter than the average reactionary numbskull. (With y'all's sub-90 average IQ.)

  111. @silviosilver
    @Stephen R. Diamond


    The cops have always been the main arm of big capital and the banks in defeating working people militantly challenging them.
     
    Choke on it, commie.

    Replies: @Stephen R. Diamond

    Well, you got the last word correct. Maybe you’re smarter than the average reactionary numbskull. (With y’all’s sub-90 average IQ.)

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