The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Where Did All the Chicanos Go?
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Something Here
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Google has finally updated its Ngram system for tracking the uses of words in books. It now offers usage data up into 2019.

Above are the rate of usage of five demographic terms in English language books (with 3-years smoothing).

Whatever happened to all the “Chicanos?”

For a brief period in the late 1960s/early 1970s, the word “Chicano” appeared in English-language books more often the “Hispanic” or “Latino” combined. “Chicano” was used more than “Latino” well into the 1980s. But the word has been in steady decline in this century. The only thing saving “Chicano” from being surpassed by the comical “Latinx” by 2019 was the 3-year smoothing.

“Chicano” means a person of Mexican ancestry who was born in the US. It emphasized distinctness from Mexicans in Mexico, who were looked down upon by their American-born cousins as backwards and submissive. “Chicano” emphasized that American-born Mexicans were masculine, modern, and, perhaps most of all, car-owning. Just as in romance languages, terms emphasizing horse-owning, such as “chevalier” in French, also meant an elevated social class, Chicano culture emphasized cars.

So, what happened to “Chicano?”

The Wikipedia article offers a long, tendentious explanation for the decline from a Chicano-Chicana Studies perspective.

But a simpler explanation is: immigration. “Chicano” emerged during a low-immigration era, and especially among third generation Mexican-Americans who saw themselves as quite different culturally from Mexican-born Mexicans.

“Chicano” became popular in the low-immigration 1960s, but then as immigration from Mexico soared again, Democratic-affiliated mouthpieces stopped using it in favor of broader terms that blurred inconvenient questions like birth and citizenship.

 
Hide 83 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. OT: first it was Britney; then it was Miley; now it’s Billie’s turn to go from chaste teen queen to sex icon.

    Goodbye baggy clothing, hello femme fatale/hooker get-up:

    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/AsOc4YDu9yhm5K6phhHVBlG0-MU86DAeSZwzlNnrHp-Tv7Em0hqDTu9_3zGqjR1umYtm8Ixu_AhxsaZZPKkodXHgAJ4waGKrPw96B0yjASpzs0s435FQ3_LUvRKRGDnVavIPcUZOUYz_mQ2sv-uomxyX4xyYEy9ueq7aMiYak_3O2ogHtnYKLX0

    • Replies: @Right_On
    , @Anon
  2. Daniel H says:

    I grew up in NYC. We had no Chicanos in NYC. In fact, through the 60’s-70’s we had few to no Mexicans in NYC.

    I always thought that Chicano was a pretty cool appellation. As you say, it conferred a sense of macho, California urban cool.

    BTW, do Chicanos wear Chinos anymore?

  3. syonredux says:

    What about Xicanx ? It’s got a lot going for it:

    Xicanx (CHEE-canx, SHE-canx[1] or Shi-kan-sh[2]) is a gender-neutral neologism and identity mostly used to refer to people of Mexican and Latin American descent in the United States. The ⟨-x⟩ suffix replaces the ⟨-o/-a⟩ ending of Chicano and Chicana that are typical of grammatical gender in Spanish. The term is commonly used to reference a connection to Indigeneity, decolonial consciousness, inclusion of genders outside the Western gender binary imposed through colonialism, and transnationality.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xicanx

  4. The simplest explanation is that Chico and the Man went off the air.

    A little bit of diversity in parts of Los Angeles and in Miami weren’t too bad. Nobody had to go there. Nobody, including the Chicanos, felt that American wouldn’t get by without 30,000,000 more.

  5. Trinity says:

    How about Racer X?

  6. Trinity says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    And Chico was half Puerto Rican and half “German” according to (((Wikipedia.)))

    Damn, and we all thought Puerto Ricans and Mexicans hated being lumped in the same group. haha.

    The Mexico vs. Puerto Rican boxing rivalry is right up there with Yankees vs. Red Sox, Dodgers vs. Giants, Steelers vs. Ravens, etc.

    You really going to have a Puerto Rican playing a Mexican dude? haha. Only in racist Hollywood where they think all “latinos” look alike.

  7. Rob McX says:
    @syonredux

    A careless reader would think it was Xanax.

  8. Muggles says:

    Maybe it’s now “Chicanx”

    Better check the ThoughtPolice website…

    (I’m thinking of using ‘Caucasiax” for my preferred identity. At least the AP will have to capitalize it.)

    • LOL: Cortes
    • Replies: @jon
    , @stillCARealist
  9. Cortes says:
    @syonredux

    “grammatical gender in Spanish” sounds kind of oppressive, imperialistic and overbearing.

    Castilian, perhaps.

    Maybe look at the “gallegos” like the Castros and the Yglesias?

    And the old “X in Meheeko” nonsense they get a pass on too.

    ¡Ay caramba!

  10. If we popularized “Chicanx” it might come back into fashion.

  11. I associate the word Chicano with the comedy CHICO AND THE MAN on NBC. After Freddie Prinze (Sr.) shot himself, the word went into decline (no cause and effect suggested).

    • Replies: @sayless
  12. No one seems to know for sure the origin of the word Chicano. It may just be a dialectical version of the word Mexicano with the first syllable dropped.

    It could be influenced by the word chico which means boy. Maybe chico(a) americano(a) = American boy (girl), denoting a young person of Mexican descent born in the USA and speaking fluent to English.

    • Replies: @Alden
  13. Anon[378] • Disclaimer says:

    PBS Frontline had a 1994 episode about Berkeley (CA) High School and its racial issues. The biggest brawl of the entire school year was Chicanos versus Latinos.

    https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/school-colors/

  14. Not Raul says:

    “Hispanic” seems to peak around the heyday of Ricky Martin, and the Macarena craze.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
  15. Alden says:

    What happened to the word Chicano.

    It’s actually a slur meaning cheater con man petty crook in the Mexican version of the Spanish language. Chicanery is the same word in Spanish and English; cheating. Chicano was mostly a word used by White idiot academics and stupid liberals to display how knowledgeable they were about the Spanish language and Mexican Americans and immigrants.

    When Spanish speakers pointed out that Chicano means cheater in Spanish they stopped using it.

    I remember a DIE trainer using Chicana and then so proudly telling us the a ending meant a woman Chicano. We continued sneering at him. A White man out of work because of affirmative action grant grifting in the anti White NGO gravy train.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    , @Cortes
  16. @Achmed E. Newman

    L0ved that show as a kid.
    That and Sanford And Son.

  17. I remember the movies with the Chicano gangbangers in them. Wool plaid shirts buttoned all the way up to the collar and a black knit ski cap pulled down to their eyebrows. Maybe they all sweated to death.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  18. Alden says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    It means cheater. Often used as a slur by Mexicans against other Mexicans. Gained respectability for a few years when idiot White intellectuals assumed it was something like buddy or paisano Means cheater.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anon
  19. Anonymous[242] • Disclaimer says:

    Just watched a episode of Columbo, season 3, Candidate for Crime (Nov. 1973), where the killer and CA Senatorial candidate Nelson Hayward refers to “Chicano” political support in his campaign.

  20. Right_On says:
    @DextersLabRat

    Taylor Swift also reinvented herself with the slut look.
    Preferred it when she was an Aryan-cum-Nazi meme.

  21. Anonymous[369] • Disclaimer says:

    “Chicano” emphasized that American-born Mexicans were masculine, modern, and, perhaps most of all, car-owning. Just as in romance languages, terms emphasizing horse-owning, such as “chevalier” in French, also meant an elevated social class, Chicano culture emphasized cars.

    Today’s Indy Car race in Texas was won by young Mexican driver Patricio O’Ward (despite the Irish surname apparently his family has been in Mexico for centuries).


    Gotta love the Texas Motor Speedway celebration using revolvers firing blanks

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @syonredux
  22. Swamp Fox says:

    As someone who is technically a “Chicano”
    (without the black hair and brown eyes) they all received free liberal arts degrees and disappeared into make work government jobs.

  23. Anonymous[141] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden

    Interesting if true. Especially because “chicanery” is already an English word.

  24. The goons chasing down and beating Trump supporters at the San Jose rally in 2016 were most certainly Chicanos.

  25. Once the great taxpayer giveaway, correction; Civil Rights Bonanza started in the 60s, other ethnic groups saw the writing on the wall. This is all documented nicely in the book “Making Hispanics” by G. Cristina Mora.

    By centralizing multiple South American groups under the umbrella of marginalized groups, those sweet federal tax dollars could start flowing into all of those successful economic\social\community programs we see working today. /ward

    It still amazes how erasing ones identity is considered progressive. A Cuba or Puerto Rican has as much commonality with a Brazilian as an Alaskan Eskimo and a Siberian.

  26. Polistra says:
    @syonredux

    The Western gender binary imposed through colonialism

    It’s true, you know! Before western colonization all nations of the world were gender fluid. STFU about cites. I don’t have to provide any cites. Cites are redolent of the white supremacist patriarchy.

  27. Polistra says:
    @Right_On

    Taylor Swift also reinvented herself with the slut look.

    Now, in the interest of symmetry, would it be possible to get Nicki Minaj, Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion to reinvent themselves as non-sluts? Too tall an order?

  28. Anon[169] • Disclaimer says:
    @DextersLabRat

    OT: first it was Britney; then it was Miley; now it’s Billie’s turn to go from chaste teen queen to sex icon.

    I think something different is going on with Billie Eilish. I think she’s an example of a young woman who had a hard time during puberty and has not come to terms with her femaleness and her body. This is exacerbated by all the attention she got by becoming a star without having had time to work out her issues in the anonymous, protective surrounding of family and friends, something hard to do even if you’re not famous in the social media age.

    I think she is possibly at risk of having some sort of transgender or gender identity crisis.

    In Japan we have a lot of these young women who are thrust into fame as singer/songwriters, and they usually start out awkward and minimally groomed and styled, but their “people” slowly bring them along, and they get more and more dolled up over time. The two Puffy girls are a good example (I think they must have paid to get their old photos and videos deep sixed, since the internet has forgotten this period), and Aimyon is a current example. (The idol-girl style singers are different, selected for looks and personality, not for musical talent.) In the absence of social media the water-flows-downhill direction is to become more feminine and girly over time as adoleslcent traumas fade. In the social media world this has been perverted, and the trend is to deny your femaleness and get your tits cut off.

    • Replies: @Thoughts
  29. Trinity says:

    I always thought a Chicano was a Mexican from Chicago.

  30. @Not Raul

    Macarena is purely Spanish, a variant woman’s name to Magdalena. The protagonist of the song is a flirtatious young lass who does not stay faithful to her boyfriend doing his mandatory military term in support of our NATO ally. Macarena-Magdalena, get it?

    The singing act is named Los del Rio, meaning “Those of the River” but more freely translated, “The River People.” You know, sort of like “The Village People.”

    Or if The Village People were two aging, washed-up lounge singers who dance like your two goofy uncles at a wedding party.

    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=youtube+los+del+rio+macarena&docid=608048819515633187&mid=80D8AF151CA3C8E2F31680D8AF151CA3C8E2F316&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

  31. jon says:
    @syonredux

    What about Xicanx ?

    Oh please let it catch on. I’ve been a huge proponent of Latinx (always pronounced so that it rhymes with minx), but I may switch loyalties.

  32. syonredux says:

    So, what happened to “Chicano?”

    My take is this: Lumpers are winning. For all their talk about about the unscientific nature of continental-scale races and the need for maximum diversity, the Woke have a fondness for huge and unwieldy aggregates (Latinx, MENA, East Asian, etc). It makes things simpler when it comes to divvying-up the take. Who wants to dole out goodies to hundreds of ethnicities and races when you can chop things down to a half dozen or so? The main thing is that all these groups are defined by not being White….Which means that the Woke have reduced human variation to a simple binary: White and non-White….

  33. Anon[280] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Yep.

    It would be fascinating to see the above graphs overlaid against the percentage of Mexicans who self-identify as White or are aspirational White. Suspect most Mexican immigrants are bifurcating into two groups: Idiocracy-style Cholos or Aspirational Whites.

    Honestly, I would gladly trade 2 million Spanish/Euromutt-descent Mexicans for 2 million of our N. European-descent morons in Minneapolis or Portland. Maybe even throw in our Jewish population to sweeten the trade.

    As the kids are saying, America First is inevitable. I would put my money on a conservative platform that eventually runs on Conquistador Populism.

  34. Anon[169] • Disclaimer says:

    Chicano? Seriously, Steve, you need to keep up.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xicanx

    Xicanx
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Xicanx (CHEE-canx, SHE-canx or Shi-kan-sh) is a gender-neutral neologism and identity mostly used to refer to people of Mexican and Latin American descent in the United States. The -x suffix replaces the -o/-a ending of Chicano and Chicana that are typical of grammatical gender in Spanish. The term is commonly used to reference a connection to Indigeneity, decolonial consciousness, inclusion of genders outside the Western gender binary imposed through colonialism, and transnationality. In contrast, most Hispanics define themselves in nationalist terms, such as by a Latin American country of origin (i.e. “Mexican-American”).

    Xicanx started to emerge in the 2010s and media outlets started using the term in 2016. Its emergence has been described as reflecting a shift within the Chicano Movement. The term has been used by scholars to encompass all related identifiers of Latino/a, [email protected], Latinx, Chicano/a, [email protected], Latin American, or Hispanic. The term has also been used to replace what have been called colonizing and assimilationist terms, like Latino/a, Mexican American, Mestizo, and Hispanic. Some scholars argue that Xicanx is inclusive of colonized people outside of just Mexican descent, particularly from Central and South America.

    [MORE]

    The first X in Xicanx is believed to be rooted in usage of the x in México. Whereas older spellings of the country appeared as Méjico, the Mexican state symbolically reclaimed the X in MéXico and MeXica. However, scholars Jennie Luna and Gabriel S. Estrada describe that “this state reclamation of Indigenismo was a racialized logic that favored modern mestizo identity rather than supporting the living Nahua and Indigenous pueblos.” Luna and Estrada cite Indigenous peoples of Mexico who see the Mexican state as an agent of violence and destructive assimilationist practices in their communities. Recognizing this state violence, Luna and Estrada argue that it is important to deconstruct the notion that the X is only related to the Mexica people or “Aztec empire” (who the Mexican state has centered in its project of Indigenismo and who Chicano nationalists centered in the Chicano Movement), stating that “the Nahuatl language existed before the Mexica migrated south into what is now Mexico City.”

    Contemporary usage of the term Xicanx has been described as taking on new meanings. Luna and Estrada state that it has transformed to “reject Mexica-centrism, and instead can be viewed from a broader perspective, one that more widely embraces the Uto-Nahuatl, Mayan, and other Indigenous language families spoken throughout the Americas.” Maribel M. Acosta Matos states that some speakers have suggested pronouncing -x with its phonetic value in the Mayan language (/ʃ/ or ‘sh’), where Xicanx is then pronounced as Shi-kan-sh. The X may be perceived then as “symbolic return to Nahuatl and Maya usage and pronunciation and thus retains potential for Indigenous reclamation.” Luna and Estrada argue that Xicanas, Xicanos, and Xicanxs adopted the X “not only as a respelling, but also as a conscious resistance to further Hispanicization/colonization.”

    The rejection of coloniality in Xicanx extends to gender neutrality, which is represented in the second x in Xicanx. As noted by Acosta Matos, “the fact that Nahuatl and the Mayan languages do not have grammatical gender classes has also influenced the deployment of gender neutral forms” of terminology. As a result, Acosta Matos argues that “the use of -x reveals the intersection of race/ethnicity and (grammatical) gender politics: it ‘symbolizes’ efforts to decolonize language. Adopting and using gender neutral nouns and pronouns reclaims Mesoamerican activists’ Indigenous languages, as their linguistic systems do not conform with grammatical gender as codified in Spanish.” Luna and Estrada refer to the second x as an “Indigenized genderqueer” representation that interrupts “colonization and male/female hierarchies” while still acknowledging that it operates within a “partially European construction of language.” Scholars R. Tolteka Cuauhtin, Miguel Zavala, Christine Sleeter, and Wayne Au refer to Xicanx as a term that “moves closer to more Indigenous words, spellings, and identities.”

  35. Anon[123] • Disclaimer says:

    Chicano? Seriously, Steve, you need to keep up.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xicanx

    Xicanx
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Xicanx (CHEE-canx, SHE-canx or Shi-kan-sh) is a gender-neutral neologism and identity mostly used to refer to people of Mexican and Latin American descent in the United States. The -x suffix replaces the -o/-a ending of Chicano and Chicana that are typical of grammatical gender in Spanish. The term is commonly used to reference a connection to Indigeneity, decolonial consciousness, inclusion of genders outside the Western gender binary imposed through colonialism, and transnationality. In contrast, most Hispanics define themselves in nationalist terms, such as by a Latin American country of origin (i.e. “Mexican-American”).

    Xicanx started to emerge in the 2010s and media outlets started using the term in 2016. Its emergence has been described as reflecting a shift within the Chicano Movement. The term has been used by scholars to encompass all related identifiers of Latino/a, [email protected], Latinx, Chicano/a, [email protected], Latin American, or Hispanic. The term has also been used to replace what have been called colonizing and assimilationist terms, like Latino/a, Mexican American, Mestizo, and Hispanic. Some scholars argue that Xicanx is inclusive of colonized people outside of just Mexican descent, particularly from Central and South America.

    [MORE]

    The first X in Xicanx is believed to be rooted in usage of the x in México. Whereas older spellings of the country appeared as Méjico, the Mexican state symbolically reclaimed the X in MéXico and MeXica. However, scholars Jennie Luna and Gabriel S. Estrada describe that “this state reclamation of Indigenismo was a racialized logic that favored modern mestizo identity rather than supporting the living Nahua and Indigenous pueblos.” Luna and Estrada cite Indigenous peoples of Mexico who see the Mexican state as an agent of violence and destructive assimilationist practices in their communities. Recognizing this state violence, Luna and Estrada argue that it is important to deconstruct the notion that the X is only related to the Mexica people or “Aztec empire” (who the Mexican state has centered in its project of Indigenismo and who Chicano nationalists centered in the Chicano Movement), stating that “the Nahuatl language existed before the Mexica migrated south into what is now Mexico City.”

    Contemporary usage of the term Xicanx has been described as taking on new meanings. Luna and Estrada state that it has transformed to “reject Mexica-centrism, and instead can be viewed from a broader perspective, one that more widely embraces the Uto-Nahuatl, Mayan, and other Indigenous language families spoken throughout the Americas.” Maribel M. Acosta Matos states that some speakers have suggested pronouncing -x with its phonetic value in the Mayan language (/ʃ/ or ‘sh’), where Xicanx is then pronounced as Shi-kan-sh. The X may be perceived then as “symbolic return to Nahuatl and Maya usage and pronunciation and thus retains potential for Indigenous reclamation.” Luna and Estrada argue that Xicanas, Xicanos, and Xicanxs adopted the X “not only as a respelling, but also as a conscious resistance to further Hispanicization/colonization.”

    The rejection of coloniality in Xicanx extends to gender neutrality, which is represented in the second x in Xicanx. As noted by Acosta Matos, “the fact that Nahuatl and the Mayan languages do not have grammatical gender classes has also influenced the deployment of gender neutral forms” of terminology. As a result, Acosta Matos argues that “the use of -x reveals the intersection of race/ethnicity and (grammatical) gender politics: it ‘symbolizes’ efforts to decolonize language. Adopting and using gender neutral nouns and pronouns reclaims Mesoamerican activists’ Indigenous languages, as their linguistic systems do not conform with grammatical gender as codified in Spanish.” Luna and Estrada refer to the second x as an “Indigenized genderqueer” representation that interrupts “colonization and male/female hierarchies” while still acknowledging that it operates within a “partially European construction of language.” Scholars R. Tolteka Cuauhtin, Miguel Zavala, Christine Sleeter, and Wayne Au refer to Xicanx as a term that “moves closer to more Indigenous words, spellings, and identities.”

  36. jon says:
    @Muggles

    Maybe it’s now “Chicanx”

    How about Hispanx:

    • LOL: Trinity
  37. @Trinity

    Founder of Wikipedia Jimmy Wales is not Jewish and neither is co-founder Larry Sanger, Jew-obsessed one.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
  38. Thoughts says:
    @Anon

    Seriously?

    It’s just PR. Not some deep thinking thing.

    Not showing her body was PR. Showing her body is PR. Mental illness is PR. Sexual Abuse is PR.

    It’s All Fake

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @bomag
  39. syonredux says:
    @Anonymous

    Bernardo O’Higgins

    Bernardo O’Higgins Riquelme (Spanish pronunciation: [beɾˈnaɾðo oˈ(x)iɣins] (About this soundlisten); 1778–1842) was a Chilean independence leader who freed Chile from Spanish rule in the Chilean War of Independence. He was a wealthy landowner of Spanish and Irish ancestry.[1] Although he was the second Supreme Director of Chile (1817–1823), he is considered one of Chile’s founding fathers, as he was the first holder of this title to head a fully independent Chilean state.

    Bernardo O’Higgins, a member of the O’Higgins family, was born in the Chilean city of Chillán in 1778, the illegitimate son of Ambrosio O’Higgins, 1st Marquis of Osorno,[2] a Spanish officer born in County Sligo, Ireland, who became governor of Chile and later viceroy of Peru. His mother was Isabel Riquelme, a prominent local;[2] the daughter of Don Simón Riquelme y Goycolea, a member of the Chillán Cabildo, or town council.[3]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernardo_O%27Higgins

  40. @Alden

    What is your source of information about this?

    The word chicanery came into English from 16th century French, and does not seem to exist in standard Spanish.

    Of course Spanish and French have many similar words, but in most cases that is because they have inherited the same word root from Latin, which does not seem to be the case here.

    If you ask a dictionary to translate the English word chicanery into Spanish it does not come up with any similar word. Actually it comes up with a word similar to sophistry.

    So if it is in fact a well-known Mexican dialect word, it seems strange that so many Mexicans in the United States adopted the term to describe themselves, and that none of the various reference sources on the internet are aware of this.

  41. Anonymous[199] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Actually, after Mexico exports its underclass and criminal class it will be very nice. A major city like Monterrey has a much nicer and cleaner subway than any major U.S. city and even has a small orchestra playing Bach in the station.

    https://conarte.org.mx/2018/03/20/bach-regresara-al-metro-monterrey/

  42. In American English we sometimes called those who speak Romance languages Latins, particularly those from Latin America. However, calling them Latins was politically incorrect and also unhip because it ignored the gendered structure of Latin languages, so next we were required to use the term Latino, preferably with a definite Spanish accent. But Latino, it turns out, refers to the male gender, so to be correctly feminist we were required to say Latinos y Latinas. That was too cumbersome so then we had to do Latino/a. Latino/a, however, assumes that there are only two genders, and also no one knows how to pronounce it. Hence, in order to avoid losing your job and having your credit cards cancelled we are now required to say Latinx. But no one knows how to pronounce that.

    How about we go back to Latin?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  43. “Chicano” emphasized that American-born Mexicans were masculine, modern, and, perhaps most of all, car-owning. Just as in [R]omance languages, terms emphasizing horse-owning, such as “chevalier” in French, also meant an elevated social class, Chicano culture emphasized cars.

    Not just cars, man, lowriders!

    12 Of The Sickest Lowriders (And 13 That Don’t Make Any Sense)

    LOWRIDERS
    Cars with Identities

    “Lowrider” is the name used for cars transformed into cultural expressions and for the dedicated aficionados who make and drive them. Historically, lowriders were mostly Latino men from Texas, the Southwest, and southern California. Since the 1950s, car clubs and family members have converted older cars for cruising, shows, and competition at events, as they still do today.

    These would go well with your zoot suit:


  44. “Chicano” means a person of Mexican ancestry who was born in the US.

    The accepted term is Norteño.

  45. Cortes says:
    @Alden

    https://www.etymonline.com/word/chicane

    A more familiar word on the same lines is “scam” which (according to Daniel Cassidy in “The Secret Language of the Crossroads”) is from the Irish for “it’s a trick/it’s crooked”.

  46. Ngram updated! I finally got to test out an idea.

    Conventional wisdom is a pejorative phrase for orthodoxy, especially political orthodoxy. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conventional_wisdom I remember when the phrase was commonplace – smart people were sorely aware that current pieties have no necessary relation to the truth. In grim 2021, it’s current pieties or else! Conventional wisdom is sacred.

    Ngram shows that conventional wisdom took off in 1955, soared from the 60s through the 90s, peaked from 1999 to 2007 (Bush 2), and commenced to collapse in 2008 during the presidential campaign of Barack Obama. How about that?

    https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=conventional+wisdom&year_start=1940&year_end=2019&corpus=26&smoothing=3#

    2019 on the way down is at the same level of piety as 1983 on the way up. Presumably, 2021 matches the piety level of Ronald Reagan’s first year. Next up, Kamala Harris on the way down will match in piety Jimmy Carter on the way up.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  47. @New Dealer

    Goldberg the DA in “Bonfire of the Vanities” ruefully refers to his job being to luck up the “blacks and Latins.”

    I think “Latins” is mostly used in reference to baseball players. Here’s an NYT headline from 1983 and a press release from MLB in 2020 referred to “Latin ballplayers” too.

    CLEMENTE’S LEGACY FOR LATIN BALLPLAYERS

    By Robert Heuer
    Jan. 2, 1983

    Now that I think about it, using a term used for Roberto Clemente sounds pretty good. Indeed, how about we go back to Latin?

    • Replies: @New Dealer
  48. Thomm says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The simplest explanation is that Chico and the Man went off the air.

    No.

    It is because El Chicano, despite being a band of great promise that produced the lovely song below, never managed to be more than a two-hit-wonder band :

    There was in fact a music sub-genre known as ‘Chicano Soul’.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  49. @New Dealer

    My preference with Ngram is to set smoothing to zero, but I did use the default 3-year smoothing in my Chicano graph because there was a huge one year spike in the early 1990s in “Hispanic” for some reason, which made it harder to read the other lines.

    Also, be careful about the Case Insensitive radio button.

  50. @Thomm

    El Chicano’s first hit was a giant hit in Los Angeles in either 1970 or 1971.

    • Replies: @Thomm
  51. Thomm says:
    @Steve Sailer

    El Chicano’s first hit was a giant hit in Los Angeles in either 1970 or 1971.

    Yes, that was ‘Viva Tirado’.

    But only that and ‘Tell Her She’s Lovely’ ever made Top 40 in the US. No other single came close.

    Hence, they are a ‘two hit wonder’. Which is still a pretty good outcome relative to most bands.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  52. Yeah. Chicanos kind of got obliterated even worse than the rest of us.

    It was either get submerged in the great first-generation Hispanic tide or become kind of low-rent, dusky working-class whites. Not that I was in love with them, but they seem to be gone now.

  53. Anon[123] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thoughts

    It’s just PR. Not some deep thinking thing.

    Not showing her body was PR. Showing her body is PR. Mental illness is PR. Sexual Abuse is PR.

    It’s All Fake

    This approaches being a conspiracy theory.

    Celebrities are really isolated and lonely. Everyone has an agenda and is on the make. Everyone is a potential TMZ source. Friends and family think they are helping you by publicly defending you and revealing personal information in the process. You cannot go places. You’re stuck in your house, and there is at least one nutcase fan trying to break into your house at any given time. There is nobody you can trust, and you end up with a small group of toadies and yes-men in your life. You end up marrying other screwed-up celebrities or waiter/waitresses.

    The classic Gay Talese Esquire piece on Frank Sinatra is instructive: http://long.fm/ynpjOu

    Billie’s entire career has been in her teens, from 13 to her current age of 19, and she’s had to live that fraught period of her development in public. She has to write songs about experiences that she hasn’t had and will never be able to have.

    I repeat: She is going to eventually go tranny or gender atypical.

    • Agree: Not only wrathful
  54. @Right_On

    Peak Taylor Swift was 2014 when with complete innocence she did the video to ‘Wildest Dreams’, which was a post-imperial Orientalist fever dream based on her watching and liking ‘Out of Africa’.

    She really had no clue, which was her charm. Sadly somehow they got to her, and her brain is completely mangled now.

    Lana del Rey is more interesting as she seems to be undergoing the reverse process. She is noticing, and is savvy enough to stay within the bounds of the windows. But there are hints.

    • Replies: @black sea
  55. They became self-identified “white” Unz commenters.

    • Replies: @ADL Pyramid of Hate
  56. sayless says:
    @Tom Scarlett

    Did Freddie Prinze intend to kill himself? At the time the story was that he was fooling around on the set with a prop gun, loaded with a blank, and put it to his head and pulled the trigger. Not realizing that a blank could cause a fatal injury at that range.

    I hope he didn’t mean to.

  57. @Anon

    55% of Mexican-Americans self identified as white on the 2010 census while 33% list their race as “other” (Mexican or La Raza – the cosmic race), only 10% self-identify as mixed race.

    Will be interesting if this pattern holds in 2020. Not sure why the majority of Mexican-Americans self-identify as white when that majority are Mestizos (mixed race)

    • Replies: @CCG
  58. Travis says:

    Where have all the Whites gone ?

    The government counts births to White mothers as White Births. Yet not all of these births are white babies, since 10% of them have a non-white father.

  59. Neuday says:

    Chicanos were a product of a level of assimilation. As more Mexicans came North they simply created Mexico in the US. Now, even third generation US born they call themselves not Chicanos but Proud Mexicans.

  60. @Muggles

    I’m looking forward to voting for Ron DeSantix in 2024.

    My own personal name is Italian, which is Latinx. Can I put an X sound for its vowels?

  61. I recall Chicano briefly having some leftist revolutionary cachet in the 70s, like berets, bullet belts and Che posters. About the time Cesar Chavez was a hot name, although I guess he turned out to be a disappointment Venceramos-wise

  62. I thought you knew: Beaner Lives don’t Matter

  63. Dan Hayes says:
    @Right_On

    I’ve always wondered how many self-transformations, Taylor Swift still manages to present an asexual persona!

    • Agree: Right_On
  64. Anonymous[206] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thomm

    Aren’t you going to rant on about “white trashionalists”? Fag.

  65. @Ripple Earthdevil

    Trinity is aware, as you seem not to be, that the Israeli Govt. runs classes for people on editing Wikipedia. It is drenched with the bastards. Hence the brackets.

  66. @Right_On

    Lately, she seems to have gone the opposite way, donning cardigans and singing with Bon Iver.

  67. Shango says:
    @syonredux

    WTF!!! Did I just read?!

  68. @Trinity

    Chico was half Puerto Rican and half Hungarian. A Hungarican . Ate menado Goulash.

  69. I was just visiting my boomer norteño grandpa and he was reminiscing about the Chicano music scene of his youth. He had found a book extensively detailing it and part of the book mentioned the political grounding of “the Chicano movement” so I asked him if he had identified with said movement at the time; he essentially said he didn’t cause he had a job and was doing fine.

    I think this does provide some shading of what happened to “Chicano” in tandem with the immigration explanation. The political heavies of the pre-65er Chicano leftist radicals got comfortable and simultaneously realized they were better off at the head of a larger, more establishment-friendly group of Democrat Party auxiliaries comprised of all “Latinos” (including the new giant influx of post-65 immigrants) and supposedly representing their interests (which paid handsomely). Some La Raza talk has survived to the present amongst academics and the like, but in general it’s no threat to the neoliberal project (to the extent “the Chicano movement” ever really was).

  70. CCG says:
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Most Mexican mestizos are Spanish in the paternal line. Mexican society is patriarchal, the cultural practices of mestizos would be closer to Spaniards than to indigenous Mexicans.

  71. Anon[996] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden

    Nope. It’s an abbreviated version of “mexicano”. The “x” can easily be softened to “sh” (in front of a weak vowel) and then back to the harder “ch” (for ease of pronounciation at the beginning of a word). The dictionary of the Real Academia Española has the correct sense:
    https://dle.rae.es/chicano
    Amongst Mexicans, it is not necessarily pejorative, but rather often just a recognition of a different culture. For example, chicanos speak a very limited Spanish, with modified English words often standing in for the correct Spanish terms. So “truck” will become “troca” and “I parked the truck” will became “parquié la troca”. The correct form would be “camioneta” and “estacioné la camioneta”.

    Though “chicana” would be the femenine form of “Chicano”, it is not to be confused with the older, unrelated Spanish noun “chicana”, derived from the French, and which can mean both a joke or a fraud. It is not in current use, but certainly a part of literary spanish.
    https://dle.rae.es/chicana#8iKBF9V

    You will notice “shenanigan” has unknown etymology, the same two meanings, and the soft “sh” sound of the French “chicane”: https://www.wordnik.com/words/shenanigan

  72. anon[396] • Disclaimer says:

    “Chicano” was still popular in the 1970’s. Probably can still hear this song in some places. Or some version of it.

  73. as immigration from Mexico soared again, Democratic-affiliated mouthpieces stopped using it in favor of broader terms that blurred inconvenient questions like birth and citizenship.

    Immigration from Mexico may be part of the issue, but the bigger identity issue is that immigration from Central America soared, especially in the North East. That made it politically inconvenient for Democratic mouthpieces and social activists to talk about Chicanos since they wanted to lump Guatemalans, Salvadorans and Nicaraguans into the same basket.

  74. bomag says:
    @Thoughts

    They play the game pretty hard for something that is fake.

  75. MEH 0910 says:

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  76. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910

  77. Swamp Fox says:

    There was a class at my old high school called”Chicano Studies.”
    When I asked one of the Aztec students what they did in class, he stated that they sold weed to the freshmen and listened to Santana’s “Abraxas’ album

  78. black sea says:
    @Cowboy Shaw

    She really had no clue, which was her charm.

    My impression: Taylor Smith is quite talented, quite bright, and extremely ambitious. I suspect that she picked up on the nuances of the music business without confusion or effort, and made the jump from country singer to pop icon rather seamlessly. So, if she saw tramping it up as furthering her career, then she was probably pretty comfortable doing it. Whether she takes this sort of promotion seriously is another matter.

    Oh, I forgot one other thing. She is really, really good-looking.

  79. I don’t know where all the Chicanos went, but I do know they all went in the same car.

    • Replies: @Swamp Fox
Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments have been licensed to The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Commenting Disabled While in Translation Mode
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
Analyzing the History of a Controversial Movement
The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.