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From The Atlantic:

Stephen Colbert’s Writing Staff: 17 Men, 2 Women
And all 19 of the Late Show’s writers are white. So.

MEGAN GARBER 2:38 PM ET

Well, this is sad. Splitsider reports that Stephen Colbert’s new show—the one that premiered delightfully earlier this week, the one that seems to be trying to bring a new kind of intellectualism to late-night network comedy—has a writing staff that includes 17 men. And only two women.

And: All 19 of those writers are white. …

A writing staff is, in many ways, the soul of a show. The 19 people Colbert selected for The Late Show will decide much about how his influential platform will do its influencing. And Colbert himself, furthermore, is someone who—based on interviews he’s given as himself rather than the characters he has played on The Colbert Report and, now, The Late Show—seems to think deeply about the structures and systems that make the world what it is. He seems to understand, in a way many comedians don’t, that even the most innocuous kinds of “entertainment” play a role in defining culture.

You’d think Colbert would know better than most of his peers that “diversity” is not just some aspirational tautology, but the best proxy we have for ensuring that cultural products that aspire to some kind of mass-ness represent, as best they can, the actual mass.

But at least we have The Atlantic, Salon, TNR, and Slate to represent those masses who are Humorless-Americans and Petty Grievance-Americans.

That diversity is—even when it’s kept behind the scenes, even when it’s rumply and sarcastic and sleep-deprived—a signal of the value his show places on differing opinions, and differing experiences, and differing modes of understanding and processing and representing the world.

But if he’s made the decision, at the outset, to have such a wildly skewed ratio of men to women, and of white writers to writers of color—then nuance has already been pre-empted. The benefit of the doubt has already been taken.

Colbert has been asked before about the lack of diversity on his writing staff. His responses tend to involve making a joke of the question itself. When asked about his staff’s makeup during this year’s Television Critics Association convention, Splitsider notes, Colbert responded, “Lot of Leos. A couple Tauruses. But we make it work. Obviously those people shouldn’t be left alone.” During his acceptance speech when The Colbert Report won an Emmy last year, Colbert noted, “Our writers won last week for Writing a Variety Series! I’m so proud of those guys and one woman! And I’m sorry for that, for some reason.”

For some reason. If it’s 2015, and you’re not sure why you should be sorry about something like that, then—I hate to say it, but—you actually have a lot to be sorry for.

The Funny White Guy menace continues …

Colbert’s first book, back in 2009, I Am America (And So Can You!) was the initial time I got the impression that a professional comedy writer was riffing off my stuff. Not stealing my jokes: the punchlines were better than my punchlines, but a lot of the topics seemed highly familiar. I finally got to an entire page devoted to the otherwise less than red-hot topic of cousin marriage and realized one of Colbert’s staffers must be a reader of mine.

Colbert’s second book, America Again: Re-becoming the Greatness We Never Weren’t, is quite funny as well, but I didn’t see much evidence for any of my influence on it; so I presume my reader that had been on Colbert’s staff wasn’t involved with writing the second book. (In other words, I’m not just imagining things.)

 
• Tags: Diversity, Funny 
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  1. anon • Disclaimer says:

    After catching Colbert’s show last night, I can confidently say his writers aren’t particularly funny either, unless you find “Trump hair joke #768” hilarious.

    If you haven’t caught his new show yet, the premise is fairly simple: Take his old show, expand it to an hour, and replace Colbert’s previous caricature with the real (and much less interesting) Colbert.

    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
  2. Making fun of things and ignoring it is the right way to handle things like this. The bosses only care about ad boycotts and those only happen if you do or say something really heinous.

  3. if you can’t mock the following you be bad comedian:

    “Barack Obama ‏@BarackObama 10h10 hours ago

    “The events of September 11, 2001, left a permanent mark on the spirit of every American.” —President Obama ”

    or a partisan hack

  4. It’s not going to be “White men can’t write”
    It going to to be
    ” white men aren’t allowed to write”

  5. …ensuring that cultural products that aspire to some kind of mass-ness represent, as best they can, the actual mass.

    In other words, he should aim to be a masshole.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Reg Cæsar

    Nobody's going to get that outside of the Northeast.

  6. The writer is an example of the awful new web journalism style that has almost completely taken over, even at once-serious publications like the Atlantic. Snark is assumed and inherent in every sentence, as is an annoying “conversational” style. “So. Well, this is sad.”

    But at least we have The Atlantic, Salon, TNR, and Slate to represent those masses who are Humorless-Americans and Petty Grievance-Americans.

    Hacks who think racism is why they can’t get a break on TV no longer have any grounds to complain with the Internet now letting anyone release their work to the masses.

    As it turns out, what the public was really demanding, but the lame-stream media not providing, was funny commentary about video games and Justin Bieber.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Lot


    Hacks who think racism is why they can’t get a break on TV no longer have any grounds to complain with the Internet now letting anyone release their work to the masses.
     
    A lot of these kinds of articles seem to be written by Jewish writers like Ms. Gerber, who would not have cause to blame discrimination, since Jewish writers tend to be overrepresented in Hollywood writing.

    Replies: @Robert Abrahamsen

  7. Black people don’t even watch Stephen Colbert. They are too busy watching The Real Housewives Of Atlanta and Empire. So who gives a damn that his writing staff is as White as the cast of Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory.

    Stephen Colbert’s brand of comedy is too White bread corny for Black folks anyways.

    • Replies: @Beach
    @Jefferson


    Black people don’t even watch Stephen Colbert. They are too busy watching The Real Housewives Of Atlanta and Empire.
     
    Speaking of Empire and writers...

    http://news.moviefone.com/2015/06/12/empire-creator-black-people-hate-white-people-writing-for-them/

    Lee Daniels, the creator of Empire, thinks white people writing for a black audience is offensive. If Colbert expressed a similar sentiment about black writers for his show, how many seconds would pass before he was escorted off the premises? His feet wouldn't touch the ground.

    Replies: @tbraton

  8. Discriminating in favor of funny people is humorist (a subset of ableism), and humorism isn’t funny!

  9. In 1996, there was a short-lived series on Fox called “The Show.” The premise was that there’s a black sitcom, “The Wilson Lee Show,” that stars black comedian Lee and is written by black writers with names like Big Chewy, Chocolate Walt, and Bo. Lee brings in a white writer, Tom Delaney, to head the team and the attempts at humor stem from his many culture clashes with the black writers. As the Fox promotional campaign puts it, “The hippest comedian in America just hired the whitest writer in Hollywood.”

    When Delaney tells his wife about his new job, she worries: “You’re the guy on ‘Def Jam’ who they pull out of the audience to make fun of, the corny white guy in the white shirt.” At the office, Delaney is called “punk” and “Pillsbury Doughboy,” and one of the black writers challenges him to defend such all-white sitcoms as NBC’s “Friends.”

    In contrast to “The Wilson Lee Show,” though, “The Show” was written entirely by white writers. Not a “Big Chewy” in the bunch.

    Where are all the Big Chewys? Colbert needs them!

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Harry Baldwin

    Aaron Sorkin's Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip took the opposite tack. A black comic actor (D.L. Hughley) complains about the lack of black writers on the show, so he takes the head writer (Matthew Perry) to some comedy club where they hire a dorky black standup as a writer.

    Studio 60 was like an unfunny version of 30 Rock. Entertaining, though, in Sorkin's earnest sort of way. And, to his credit, he had an evangelical character (I don't know how big they are in sketch comedy IRL).

  10. “Well, this is sad.”

    Only to anti-white racists.

  11. That diversity is … a signal of the value his show places on … differing modes of understanding and processing and representing the world.

    This is an encouraging article. The author grasps that “diverse” people are inherently different and presents that knowledge as self-evident.

    It’s not too far a conceptual leap to perceive that certain groups (judging by their behavior) rely on incompatible “modes of understanding and processing and representing [?] the world”.

    A black comedy writer and a white one will, all other things being equal, still interpret the world differently. The central nervous system would have to play a part in that.

    Doesn’t Jared Taylor say the same thing?

    • Agree: Travis
  12. iSteveFan says:

    And: All 19 of those writers are white. …

    Can’t they break that down further?

    That diversity is—even when it’s kept behind the scenes, even when it’s rumply and sarcastic and sleep-deprived—a signal of the value his show places on differing opinions, and differing experiences, and differing modes of understanding and processing and representing the world.

    If only diversity meant just differing opinions. In fact diversity seems to mean uniformity when it comes to opinions.

    They lump whites into one giant category, but whites are the essence of diversity of opinion. In fact the reason we even have competitive elections is because whites don’t bloc-vote.

    As for experiences, whites are all over the place. We have rural whites, urban SWPLs and suburban types. We’ve got whites who come from every economic and social strata. We have whites who are atheists, agnostics, too many types of Christian denominations to count and Jews for starters. If that is not the essence of diversity, then the internet meme that diversity mean less white and less male must be true.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @iSteveFan

    Diversity means people who do not look like me, but share my biases, and especially my prejudices.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @Dirk Dagger
    @iSteveFan

    Current Late Show "Co-Head Writer" Jay Katsir was interviewed in Haaretz a few years back. Sheds some light on his background.

    An insider's look at the Colbert Report - Week's End http://www.haaretz.com/weekend/week-s-end/1.407089

    , @Desiderius
    @iSteveFan


    As for experiences, whites are all over the place. We have rural whites, urban SWPLs and suburban types. We’ve got whites who come from every economic and social strata. We have whites who are atheists, agnostics, too many types of Christian denominations to count and Jews for starters.
     
    We might.

    I doubt Colbert's staff does.

    Replies: @Dirk Dagger

  13. Discriminating in favor of funny people is humorist (a subset of ableism), and humorism isn’t funny!

    Are you saying being a humorist isn’t humorous?

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    @Lot

    As with WWT pronoun rules, it can get a little confusing. But progress is hard.

    Under the old definition of "humorism"--the science of the humors--that writer might be described as "yellow" (what we still sometimes call "choleric"); per Wikipedia: "ambitious, leader-like, restless, easily angered".

  14. That writer seems to be yet another naive person wishing that there was no such thing as a BUSINESS MODEL.

    Could she convince advertisers and others with real money to invest to chase after her notions of social justice, and still turn a profit?

    Has she ever thought about, let alone met, a payroll?

    A journalism professor back in the Dark Ages told me that his students were required to take classes in the areas they wanted to cover. Write about business, then understand it. Write about sports, etc.

  15. Pat Casey says:

    I’m very surprised at how bad Colbert’s new show is. I don’t know what the fuck Garber is talking about when she says its trying to bring intellectualism to late night. Quite the opposite. Colbert’s been acting really stupid. For one bit he couldn’t stop eating oreos till he just poured them on his face. Retarded.

    But then he got really sincere and poignant with Joe Biden. Which was worth watching in my opinion. In fact after that, I think there’s going to be too many loud voices telling him to run for him to not. He is a very, very genuine man. Hard not to more than like him. And his gaffes and tall tales rather speak to that too. In other words, he’s very, very Irish, and prone to blarney. America would be so unspeakably awful without us.

    But when are one these click-bait bozos going to man up and do an expose on Steve? That would be really interesting and luminous clickbait. The piece by Yglesias that’s currently on the front page quoted Richard Spencer, and it was a great quote. But Steve is actually influential, and that would make a great lead. Which gives me an idea….

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    @Pat Casey

    They don't mention Sailer because they don't want to reveal they read him and they don't want to steer anyone toward such an effective critic of their schtick. Guys like Richard Spencer are still impolitic enough for them to think they're "exposing" something when they quote him I suppose. But note the SPLC's recent attack on Henry Harpending--everything they quote is convincing argument to anyone not so far beyond reason as to have rendered themselves moronic. They really should be more careful.
    They're wise to leave Sailer mostly alone and unquoted. I came across something in an interesting old book "Ancient Pagan and Christian Symbolism" (Thomas Inman, 1876) that I thought relevant to our times and its relegation of interesting dissent to the shadows of obscurity: "The dislike of inquiry ever attends to those who profess a religion which is believed or known to be weak." He was referring to Moses in Deuteronomy decreeing the Jews should not inquire too much into the practices of other religions--for fear they might find similarities to their own religion. Rule one of SJW tyranny should be: "do not humanize our enemies".

    I came to like Biden on 9/11 when, as the vice president cowered in his underground lair and Bush only appeared for a few minutes to deliver some shell-shocked, insufficient remarks, Biden was telling an interviewer first thing we need to do is "get these bastards." I didn't see a single other pol express honest outrage.

    Replies: @Pat Casey

    , @timothy
    @Pat Casey


    I don’t know what the fuck Garber is talking about when she says its trying to bring intellectualism to late night.
     
    For "intellectualism" read "partisan snark." That's a pretty revealing choice of words, actually. As Douthat complained, the Stewart / Oliver / Colbert SMACKDOWN clips are the Millennial equivalent of the old TNR's back-of-the-book section. Back in the day, when you got tired of reading about the latest political horserace or policy snafu, you'd turn to the back pages where a bunch of historians and philosophers and novelists would remind you that today's fashions aren't permanent truths. Now, the diversions on, say, Vox are either contentless or they're snarky stuff that insists bien-pensisme is the truth of the ages.

    I was also surprised by how bad the first two episodes were. Jeb Bush didn't help.

    Yglesias used to link to Steve all the time. Writing for Vox appears to have killed off his subtly sardonic style, for some reason.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    , @e
    @Pat Casey

    Biden's "blarney" is often pure compulsive lying. I mean clinical compulsive lying.

    Replies: @Pat Casey

    , @Perplexed
    @Pat Casey

    I don't find Biden likable. Aside from his putting his hands on women and girls without their consent, when his wife caused the car accident that killed her and their daughter, he blamed the unfortunate truck driver of the other vehicle, suggesting he had drunk his lunch.

    The dead son, Beau, locked up Larry Sinclair for publicizing his coke-fueled sexual encounter with Obama; I suspect this is how Biden got to be VP. The other son just washed out of some military commission a month in for flunking a drug test.

    Replies: @Pat Casey, @Mr. Anon, @Bill Jones, @Harry Baldwin

    , @Bugg
    @Pat Casey

    Had occasion to seen Steven Colbert interview Steven King last night. I've enjoyed King's work, though his books are better when say, Stanley Kubrick or someone else adopts them into a movie or TV drama than when he does it himself. After a few opening pleasantries, the conversation turned into a whiny bitchfest about the awfulness and evil of Donald Trump. Trump may or not be perfect or wonderful, but as he said in the first debate, until he made immigration an issue the MSM and the D C establishment was perfectly happy with the status never discussing it. And really Trump is nowhere near the embarrassment that those in power in Washington in both parties are. Trump has taken of because since 1/20/1989 our government has been run for the establishment rather than it's citizens. Colbert will never go after Obama like that.

    Jimmy Fallon, by contrast, had Trump on and had some fun with him. And the audience loved it. If Fallon and Colbert were stocks, nobody would buy Colbert.

    Replies: @Pat Casey

    , @Pericles
    @Pat Casey

    "America would be so unspeakably awful without us."

    Every ethnic group could have said this. And probably has.

  16. @Lot

    Discriminating in favor of funny people is humorist (a subset of ableism), and humorism isn’t funny!
     
    Are you saying being a humorist isn't humorous?

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

    As with WWT pronoun rules, it can get a little confusing. But progress is hard.

    Under the old definition of “humorism”–the science of the humors–that writer might be described as “yellow” (what we still sometimes call “choleric”); per Wikipedia: “ambitious, leader-like, restless, easily angered”.

  17. @iSteveFan

    And: All 19 of those writers are white. …
     
    Can't they break that down further?

    That diversity is—even when it’s kept behind the scenes, even when it’s rumply and sarcastic and sleep-deprived—a signal of the value his show places on differing opinions, and differing experiences, and differing modes of understanding and processing and representing the world.
     
    If only diversity meant just differing opinions. In fact diversity seems to mean uniformity when it comes to opinions.

    They lump whites into one giant category, but whites are the essence of diversity of opinion. In fact the reason we even have competitive elections is because whites don't bloc-vote.

    As for experiences, whites are all over the place. We have rural whites, urban SWPLs and suburban types. We've got whites who come from every economic and social strata. We have whites who are atheists, agnostics, too many types of Christian denominations to count and Jews for starters. If that is not the essence of diversity, then the internet meme that diversity mean less white and less male must be true.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Dirk Dagger, @Desiderius

    Diversity means people who do not look like me, but share my biases, and especially my prejudices.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Right. My local county board is all liberals, but it has diversity. There is a gay liberal, a Hispanic liberal, a woman who may be gay liberal, and a coupla white guy liberals. They would like to have a Black liberal, but all the blacks live in PG County.

  18. Don’t forget the funny white women! As far as I can tell from a brief examination of their twitter feeds, they are interchangeable white female New Yorkers in their thirties, who despair of getting married and make sturdy femme aging jokes. I’m pretty sure I’ve seen their personas about 1,000 times in dozens of clever sitcoms.

    In Steven’s defense, the Colbert Report was excruciating to watch for the first month. It eventually achieved greatness. So, we’ll see.

  19. Colbert like the other guy whom he replaced operated on a very simple assumption: rules for thee and not for me.

    IOW typical liberal hypocrite at work.

    Oh yeah neither was funny. Liebowitz was at best tiresome with a comedy routine straight out of high school, even with a team of 20 gag writers. Really mugging for the camera like some 5 year old. Too bad he never heard of George Carlin, Jonathan Winters or Victor Buono.

    And Colbert has that creepy, desperate little guy thing going on who tries to be funny but can’t.

  20. anon • Disclaimer says:

    I don’t have cable so I’m not really very familiar with Colbert. But one thing I have always noticed is that IMO he really is not a pleasant guy to look at. I’d say even Jay Leno, when he was at Colbert’s age, was probably more pleasant to look at. So the dude better be pretty darn funny, which as far as I have seen may not be the case.

    • Replies: @Glossy
    @anon

    I don’t have cable so I’m not really very familiar with Colbert. But one thing I have always noticed is that IMO he really is not a pleasant guy to look at.

    Colbert looks OK (not an endorsement of his politics), but I've thought the exact thing you typed above about John Oliver. He's difficult to look at. It's stupid to put people like that on TV.

  21. Hilarious that twenty writers (Colbert + 19) can’t make the show funny. Maybe if he hires ten more.

    PS Colbert is even less Southern than Bernanke! Anyone hailing from the American South who presents themselves as full Yankee is definitely mentally disturbed.

    • Replies: @EriK
    @Anonymous

    Colbert presents himself as a full Yankee? He overdid it, I was fooled into thinking he was Canadian.

  22. Reality has a well-known racist and sexist bias.

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    @Glaivester

    Got something against reality? That's realism, Mister, and I won't tolerate it!

  23. Look at these two humorists making fun of each other: http://goo.gl/WuQ16h

    Question: were the writers white too, or did it write itself?

  24. This is pretty funny by the way.

    If the writers and the Colbert Report are winning Emmys, then they clearly are doing something right and certainly are appealing to Mass-ness.

    It will be interesting how Trevor Noah and Larry Wilmore compare to Stewart and Colbert. So far Wilmore has been forgettable. Forgettable in a year where Black issues and Black protest was driving the national conversation.

    I wish Trevor Noah well, but I wonder if his comedy will translate to American audiences.

  25. The Trump Surge continues:

    Latest Iowa poll:

    Trump: 27 percent
    Carson: 21 percent
    Cruz: 9 percent
    Bush: 6 percent
    Carly Fiorina/John Kasich/Marco Rubio: 5 percent
    Mike Huckabee/Rand Paul: 4 percent
    Walker: 3 percent

    Walker was in first place in Iowa in July, is now in 10th place.

    Latest big-media national poll, Trump is at 32%:

    http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2015/images/09/10/rel9a.-.gop.2016.pdf

    Going to page 10 of the results, Trump is the first or second choice of 50% of GOP voters, and is leading as both the most popular first choice and most popular second choice. This disposes of the anti-Trump line that once other candidates start dropping out their supporters will shift to the anti-Trump dwarfs.

  26. @Pat Casey
    I'm very surprised at how bad Colbert's new show is. I don't know what the fuck Garber is talking about when she says its trying to bring intellectualism to late night. Quite the opposite. Colbert's been acting really stupid. For one bit he couldn't stop eating oreos till he just poured them on his face. Retarded.

    But then he got really sincere and poignant with Joe Biden. Which was worth watching in my opinion. In fact after that, I think there's going to be too many loud voices telling him to run for him to not. He is a very, very genuine man. Hard not to more than like him. And his gaffes and tall tales rather speak to that too. In other words, he's very, very Irish, and prone to blarney. America would be so unspeakably awful without us.

    But when are one these click-bait bozos going to man up and do an expose on Steve? That would be really interesting and luminous clickbait. The piece by Yglesias that's currently on the front page quoted Richard Spencer, and it was a great quote. But Steve is actually influential, and that would make a great lead. Which gives me an idea....

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @timothy, @e, @Perplexed, @Bugg, @Pericles

    They don’t mention Sailer because they don’t want to reveal they read him and they don’t want to steer anyone toward such an effective critic of their schtick. Guys like Richard Spencer are still impolitic enough for them to think they’re “exposing” something when they quote him I suppose. But note the SPLC’s recent attack on Henry Harpending–everything they quote is convincing argument to anyone not so far beyond reason as to have rendered themselves moronic. They really should be more careful.
    They’re wise to leave Sailer mostly alone and unquoted. I came across something in an interesting old book “Ancient Pagan and Christian Symbolism” (Thomas Inman, 1876) that I thought relevant to our times and its relegation of interesting dissent to the shadows of obscurity: “The dislike of inquiry ever attends to those who profess a religion which is believed or known to be weak.” He was referring to Moses in Deuteronomy decreeing the Jews should not inquire too much into the practices of other religions–for fear they might find similarities to their own religion. Rule one of SJW tyranny should be: “do not humanize our enemies”.

    I came to like Biden on 9/11 when, as the vice president cowered in his underground lair and Bush only appeared for a few minutes to deliver some shell-shocked, insufficient remarks, Biden was telling an interviewer first thing we need to do is “get these bastards.” I didn’t see a single other pol express honest outrage.

    • Replies: @Pat Casey
    @Dennis Dale

    Yeah. I recently said Steve being alienated is a law of nature obtaining, because you don't engage the Alpha if you can't win. He's too totally transparently sane. Not to gush, but this guy really does strike me as the most normal high-IQ man in America. Whittaker Chambers' best essay was titled The Sanity of St. Benedict; someone will have to pen The Sanity of Steve Sailer one of these days. And he's changed my opinion of sarcasm from universally cheap to potentially deadly. (I guess that's because sarcasm is, when you think about it, extremely rare in writing relative to how much its spoken, and spoken sarcasm always does seem cheap.) They can't win.

    I've never heard of Thomas Inman and that's a great quote. The context reminds me of Hegel's position that the Jews are inoculated against the Greek tragic sense, because their fate is entirely the necessity of servitude to a tyrannical God, or "alien being" in Hegel's term. Hence it is essential to sustaining the Jewish faith that their misfortunes be exaggerated in retrospect, as opposed to Oedipus, who keeps the faith of freedom until he must admit defeat, making him a true hero when he does, rather than a slave. If I was a Jealous God, I wouldn't want my slaves to inquire either, to know that I was really an artist, not the devil.

  27. @Pat Casey
    I'm very surprised at how bad Colbert's new show is. I don't know what the fuck Garber is talking about when she says its trying to bring intellectualism to late night. Quite the opposite. Colbert's been acting really stupid. For one bit he couldn't stop eating oreos till he just poured them on his face. Retarded.

    But then he got really sincere and poignant with Joe Biden. Which was worth watching in my opinion. In fact after that, I think there's going to be too many loud voices telling him to run for him to not. He is a very, very genuine man. Hard not to more than like him. And his gaffes and tall tales rather speak to that too. In other words, he's very, very Irish, and prone to blarney. America would be so unspeakably awful without us.

    But when are one these click-bait bozos going to man up and do an expose on Steve? That would be really interesting and luminous clickbait. The piece by Yglesias that's currently on the front page quoted Richard Spencer, and it was a great quote. But Steve is actually influential, and that would make a great lead. Which gives me an idea....

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @timothy, @e, @Perplexed, @Bugg, @Pericles

    I don’t know what the fuck Garber is talking about when she says its trying to bring intellectualism to late night.

    For “intellectualism” read “partisan snark.” That’s a pretty revealing choice of words, actually. As Douthat complained, the Stewart / Oliver / Colbert SMACKDOWN clips are the Millennial equivalent of the old TNR’s back-of-the-book section. Back in the day, when you got tired of reading about the latest political horserace or policy snafu, you’d turn to the back pages where a bunch of historians and philosophers and novelists would remind you that today’s fashions aren’t permanent truths. Now, the diversions on, say, Vox are either contentless or they’re snarky stuff that insists bien-pensisme is the truth of the ages.

    I was also surprised by how bad the first two episodes were. Jeb Bush didn’t help.

    Yglesias used to link to Steve all the time. Writing for Vox appears to have killed off his subtly sardonic style, for some reason.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @timothy

    "I was also surprised by how bad the first two episodes were. Jeb Bush didn’t help."

    Jeb Bush felt uncomfortable on Stephen Colbert because he was culturally out of his element. Jeb Bush would feel a lot more culturally comfortable going on Sabado Gigante With Don Francisco.

  28. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot
    The writer is an example of the awful new web journalism style that has almost completely taken over, even at once-serious publications like the Atlantic. Snark is assumed and inherent in every sentence, as is an annoying "conversational" style. "So. Well, this is sad."

    But at least we have The Atlantic, Salon, TNR, and Slate to represent those masses who are Humorless-Americans and Petty Grievance-Americans.
     
    Hacks who think racism is why they can't get a break on TV no longer have any grounds to complain with the Internet now letting anyone release their work to the masses.

    As it turns out, what the public was really demanding, but the lame-stream media not providing, was funny commentary about video games and Justin Bieber.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Hacks who think racism is why they can’t get a break on TV no longer have any grounds to complain with the Internet now letting anyone release their work to the masses.

    A lot of these kinds of articles seem to be written by Jewish writers like Ms. Gerber, who would not have cause to blame discrimination, since Jewish writers tend to be overrepresented in Hollywood writing.

    • Replies: @Robert Abrahamsen
    @Anonymous

    What percentage of Colbert's 19 white writers are Jewish? If even one of them is, then Jews are over represented relative to their percentage of the U.S. population on his writing staff. I'd bet dollars against dimes that more than one of them is Jewish, however. It wouldn't surprise me if half of them are.

    Why doesn't this question ever seem to interest the Defenders of Diversity? I believe I know why.

  29. Currently the least Black/Whitest shows on television are

    1) Bates Motel

    2) Scream

    3) Silicon Valley

    4) Better Call Saul, unless Gustavo Fring eventually shows up

    5) Fargo

    6) The Big Bang Theory

    7) Shark Tank

    Those shows are all racist microaggressions for their lack of Sub Saharan diversity.

  30. Speaking of Diversity, this trailer for ABC’s Quantico will fulfill virtually any SJW Bingo Card.

    This really has to be seen to be believed.

    • Replies: @Cryptogenic
    @Clifford Brown

    I'm guessing this abortion will be praised for "taking risks" and "facing issues."

    Like, of course the Muslim woman did it! But wait ... she didn't? My God. It's time to examine myself and enter the conversation.

    Hey, did you see that brown girl slut shame that white dude? Smell the justice, backwards viewers. This is the really real world as it really appears in reality. Time to get real.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Clifford Brown

    I saw an even briefer ad on TV, and even from that it was obvious this is some kind of SJW wet-dream, and naked propaganda (and ridiculously stupid propaganda at that). I can only assume its target audience is white women. Is this the way women think the world works? They had one of every creed, orientation, and color. And the protagonist is a strong slutty women, who is proud of her sluttishness. And of course they have some straight white men, because that's what their target demographic wants, though they take pains to make them ashamed of wanting what they want. I didn't see a transsexual - they're probably saving it for the second season.

    Also, it's remarkable how authoritarian liberals have become. Consider how the FBI has come to be portrayed in movies and TV over the last 25 years. They are invariably portrayed as efficient, competent, and always on the side of the angels, rather than as what they really are - clueless, obtuse, time-serving civil-servants. The last vaguely negative portrayal I can remember of the FBI was in th movie "Die Hard", where the agents were portrayed as callous, reckless and none-to-bright cowboys. The way Hollywood portrays the FBI today is merely an updated version of positive spin they lavished on them in the 50s and 60s. One wonders how much the FBI spends on collaboration with the entertainment business. J. Edgar Hoover would be proud.

    , @Anonymous
    @Clifford Brown

    The obviously steep production costs and (as you note) high fakeness quotient might not have prevented the network from picking it up but won't save them from mid-season cancellation. What is the public appetite saturation level for FBI shows and D.C. government soap operas w/ thinly disguised Hillary characters?

    , @silviosilver
    @Clifford Brown

    Thanks for that clip. I'm definitely going to watch that show, just to see whether it'll actually be as awful as the preview promises. Until such time as mainstream society can concede baseline racial and sexual realities, the "necessary lies" it tells itself to perpetuate its mythology will grow ever more incredulous.

  31. OT.

    Sadiq Khan: this Muslim leftwinger can become London’s next mayor
    … 11 September 2015 …
    Sadiq Khan … Labour’s candidate to succeed Boris Johnson as London mayor

  32. @Glaivester
    Reality has a well-known racist and sexist bias.

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

    Got something against reality? That’s realism, Mister, and I won’t tolerate it!

  33. Petty Grievance-Americans

    Oh, I thought you said “Percy Gryce-Americans.” For a minute there, I was onboard with the other side.

  34. Steve Sailer should go on podcast shows to get his name out there in the media. Go on Ben Shapiro or Laura Ingraham or Anthony Cumia or Adam Carolla or Larry Elder. Steve is way too low key. Maybe that’s the German introvert trait in him.

    • Replies: @Rifleman
    @Jefferson


    Steve is way too low key. Maybe that’s the German introvert trait in him.
     
    Low key? Steve makes Jeb Bush look like a coked up Robin Williams or Bobcat Goldthwait by comparison.

    Look at Steve's photos. He looks half dead.

    Steve's a literary guy. Other people need to take the texts and deliver them.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    @Jefferson


    What I think when you tell me about your podcast pic.twitter.com/ffqtd8YHZm— Andy Swan (@AndySwan) September 12, 2015
     
    , @BurplesonAFB
    @Jefferson

    I'm sure Gavin McInnes would love to have Steve on. He mentions him sometimes so he'd probably be nice although he does like to give his guests a ribbing.

    He had Jared Taylor on a few weeks ago.

    Unfortunately it's a subscribers only show, but the clips usually end up on youtube eventually

    Replies: @Jefferson

  35. Comedy is one of the true meritocracies. No matter how much institutional inertia you have behind you, you won’t last if you aren’t funny.

  36. @timothy
    @Pat Casey


    I don’t know what the fuck Garber is talking about when she says its trying to bring intellectualism to late night.
     
    For "intellectualism" read "partisan snark." That's a pretty revealing choice of words, actually. As Douthat complained, the Stewart / Oliver / Colbert SMACKDOWN clips are the Millennial equivalent of the old TNR's back-of-the-book section. Back in the day, when you got tired of reading about the latest political horserace or policy snafu, you'd turn to the back pages where a bunch of historians and philosophers and novelists would remind you that today's fashions aren't permanent truths. Now, the diversions on, say, Vox are either contentless or they're snarky stuff that insists bien-pensisme is the truth of the ages.

    I was also surprised by how bad the first two episodes were. Jeb Bush didn't help.

    Yglesias used to link to Steve all the time. Writing for Vox appears to have killed off his subtly sardonic style, for some reason.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “I was also surprised by how bad the first two episodes were. Jeb Bush didn’t help.”

    Jeb Bush felt uncomfortable on Stephen Colbert because he was culturally out of his element. Jeb Bush would feel a lot more culturally comfortable going on Sabado Gigante With Don Francisco.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  37. @Jefferson
    Black people don't even watch Stephen Colbert. They are too busy watching The Real Housewives Of Atlanta and Empire. So who gives a damn that his writing staff is as White as the cast of Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory.

    Stephen Colbert's brand of comedy is too White bread corny for Black folks anyways.

    Replies: @Beach

    Black people don’t even watch Stephen Colbert. They are too busy watching The Real Housewives Of Atlanta and Empire.

    Speaking of Empire and writers…

    http://news.moviefone.com/2015/06/12/empire-creator-black-people-hate-white-people-writing-for-them/

    Lee Daniels, the creator of Empire, thinks white people writing for a black audience is offensive. If Colbert expressed a similar sentiment about black writers for his show, how many seconds would pass before he was escorted off the premises? His feet wouldn’t touch the ground.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Beach

    "Lee Daniels, the creator of Empire, thinks white people writing for a black audience is offensive. If Colbert expressed a similar sentiment about black writers for his show, how many seconds would pass before he was escorted off the premises? His feet wouldn’t touch the ground."

    Back in the early 90's, a white writer named Richard Price came out with a very good, critically acclaimed novel, "Clockers," which portrayed young, black inner city drug dealers. It was a terrific novel. When they set out to make a movie of the book, they got the same white writer, Price, to write the screen play (he was later to write several of the episodes of that excellent HBO series "The Wire"), and they lined up Martin Scorsese to direct the film and Robert DeNiro to play the lead role. Then, as I recall, Spike Lee started "mau mauing the flack catcher" and engaged in a public relations battle challenging the right of a white director (even the far superior Martin Scorsese) to direct a movie that portrayed black inner city life. So Scorsese bowed out, as did DeNiro, and the producers hired Spike Lee to direct the screen play written by a white screen writer based on the same white writer's first-rate novel. Spike Lee turned out a movie that was not nearly as good as the novel and probably not as good as the movie Scorsese would have made. (I hedge the previous comment because Scorsese's work seems to fall short of his very high standards when he deals with social milieus that are other than Italian. I am thinking specifically of "Gangs of New York" dealing with Civil War era Irish in NYC, but then I thought he did an excellent job on "The Departed" based loosely on Boston Irish Whitey Bulger.) I guess nobody ever thought to ask Spike Lee why, if no white director could accurately portray black inner-city life, a white writer was able to do such a good job in the novel, which formed the basis of the movie.

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @Mr. Anon

  38. I just finished listening to tonight’s edition of Radio Derb whose segment on the faux-Chinese poetaster had me laughing so hard I nearly wet myself: http://www.vdare.com/radios/radio-derb-narrative-collapse-overtakes-the-refugee-crisis-nonwhite-privilege-anthologized-etc

    Seriously, do these people – all the finger-waggers like Megan Garber and Ta-Nehisi Coates-of-Constantly-Up-In-Arms and all the other Social Justice Whiners and Junior Gestapo Auxiliary Thought Police – ever actually hear themselves talk?

    These monotonously preachy schmucks are so in love with the sounds of their own dogma-doo that they can’t hear (or see) what wet blankets, what utter killjoys they come across as. They sound exactly like Tower Hamlets’ Sharia Patrol Moslems, exactly like old Joe Göbbels haranguing the captive audience at the Sportpalast about “decadent” art, exactly like Red Guards drumming Mao’s Little Red Book into the skulls of reeducation camp prisoners, exactly like the prescriptive dullards depicted in this fashion show:

    Lord, what a bunch of tight-asses, what a bunch of stiffs.

  39. Stephen Colbert is so boring. Key and Peele is much funnier, but then they are allowed to recurring gay jokes that would bring spitstorms if done by whites, and they can do things like make fun of blacks who leave the labels on their baseball caps.

    Dueling baseball caps:

    • Replies: @WowJustWow
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    A lot of their sketches absolutely couldn't be done with the races reversed either. Here's one about killing white people for not being racist enough, and, in the final twist, killing them for being too racist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWO1pkHgrBM

    It's interesting because they have a very cerebral, very white sense of humor. Often there's no source of humor besides flattering their ethnomasochistic target demographic by flaunting racial double standards.

    Relatedly, tonight there was a sort of telethon raising money for schools that was broadcast simultaneously on all the major networks. There were a few jokes that really subverted the whole spirit of the event made by Colbert (about plagiarizing Wikipedia for essays) and K&P (teacher's strike), and maybe a couple others. That is, unless the idea was to make you feel like you were back in junior high, sitting through an interminable assembly designed to demotivate you with speakers trying too hard to sound cool just so the school can meet its quota for motivational events for the year.

  40. OT: Some Ellen Pao news…
    Ellen Pao won’t appeal verdict in Silicon Valley discrimination trial

    San Francisco-based Pao said she was now advising some start-up entrepreneurs, making early-stage investments and spending more time with her family.

  41. This story is tailor made for SJW outrage on Twitter.

    We just need to prime it with something along the lines of

    “Stephen Colbert has 19 writers, and 19 of them are white. In 2015. #colbracist”

  42. @anon
    I don't have cable so I'm not really very familiar with Colbert. But one thing I have always noticed is that IMO he really is not a pleasant guy to look at. I'd say even Jay Leno, when he was at Colbert's age, was probably more pleasant to look at. So the dude better be pretty darn funny, which as far as I have seen may not be the case.

    Replies: @Glossy

    I don’t have cable so I’m not really very familiar with Colbert. But one thing I have always noticed is that IMO he really is not a pleasant guy to look at.

    Colbert looks OK (not an endorsement of his politics), but I’ve thought the exact thing you typed above about John Oliver. He’s difficult to look at. It’s stupid to put people like that on TV.

  43. Stephen Colbert’s Writing Staff: 17 Men, 2 Women
    And all 19 of the Late Show’s writers are white. So.

    What’s the Jew percentage Megan?

    Also what’s the Democrat vs Republican breakdown?

    Long wait for the Atlantic response to that.

  44. @Jefferson
    Steve Sailer should go on podcast shows to get his name out there in the media. Go on Ben Shapiro or Laura Ingraham or Anthony Cumia or Adam Carolla or Larry Elder. Steve is way too low key. Maybe that's the German introvert trait in him.

    Replies: @Rifleman, @Dave Pinsen, @BurplesonAFB

    Steve is way too low key. Maybe that’s the German introvert trait in him.

    Low key? Steve makes Jeb Bush look like a coked up Robin Williams or Bobcat Goldthwait by comparison.

    Look at Steve’s photos. He looks half dead.

    Steve’s a literary guy. Other people need to take the texts and deliver them.

  45. Colbert’s interview with Vice President Biden about the death of Biden’s son was especially moving. Colbert’s greatest strength is his capacity for empathy. He is a man of Faith who has an incredible reservoir of compassion.

    Irish American Catholics are pretty good at pathos. Colbert is one of the few celebrities, along with Martin Sheen, a fellow Catholic, that is allowed to openly express their Christian Faith without much blowback in popular culture. I think the mutual Catholic Faith between Biden and Colbert greatly enhanced the interview.

    It’s hard not to admire Biden’s declarations that one should “Never Complain” or that “No One Owes You Anything.” These both sound like expressions from a foreign, more ancient, noble culture at this point. The whole Ethos of the Left in this country is to always complain and demand that you are entitled to certain things. It was refreshing and frankly shocking to hear Biden express virtues of a different America. Perhaps, there is hope in this.

    Interesting that Biden is America’s first Catholic Vice President. There has only been one. When it comes to Late Night, there is now a definite Catholic bent. Colbert, Fallon and Conan O’Brien are Irish American Catholics. Jimmy Kimmel is an Italian American Catholic. The former CBS host, Craig Ferguson, my personal favorite Late Night host, while a Scottish born Presbyterian, he was certainly a Celt with some interesting tattoos.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Clifford Brown

    "Interesting that Biden is America’s first Catholic Vice President. There has only been one. When it comes to Late Night, there is now a definite Catholic bent. Colbert, Fallon and Conan O’Brien are Irish American Catholics. Jimmy Kimmel is an Italian American Catholic. The former CBS host, Craig Ferguson, my personal favorite Late Night host, while a Scottish born Presbyterian, he was certainly a Celt with some interesting tattoos."

    On The Fox News Channel Catholics also outnumber WASPS, especially among the male personalities on that network. The majority of the males on that network are either Irish or Italian with Jews coming in 3rd place. Which is not surprising because The FNC headquarters is in New York City.

    Replies: @SFG

    , @Hibernian
    @Clifford Brown

    Sheen in "The Departed" was Captain Queenan, who, according to the Mark Wahlberg character, was being surveilled by Internal Affairs because they were "tryin' ta find out about th' good Catholic life." Queenan/Sheen never got a retirement party because he was thrown off a rooftop at the age of about 60.

  46. Question of such moral importance that only an evil person would not ask it: What race are the writing staffs of network television shows?

    Question of such complete irrelevance that only an evil person would ask it: What ethnicity are the writing staffs of network television shows?

  47. Pat Casey says:
    @Dennis Dale
    @Pat Casey

    They don't mention Sailer because they don't want to reveal they read him and they don't want to steer anyone toward such an effective critic of their schtick. Guys like Richard Spencer are still impolitic enough for them to think they're "exposing" something when they quote him I suppose. But note the SPLC's recent attack on Henry Harpending--everything they quote is convincing argument to anyone not so far beyond reason as to have rendered themselves moronic. They really should be more careful.
    They're wise to leave Sailer mostly alone and unquoted. I came across something in an interesting old book "Ancient Pagan and Christian Symbolism" (Thomas Inman, 1876) that I thought relevant to our times and its relegation of interesting dissent to the shadows of obscurity: "The dislike of inquiry ever attends to those who profess a religion which is believed or known to be weak." He was referring to Moses in Deuteronomy decreeing the Jews should not inquire too much into the practices of other religions--for fear they might find similarities to their own religion. Rule one of SJW tyranny should be: "do not humanize our enemies".

    I came to like Biden on 9/11 when, as the vice president cowered in his underground lair and Bush only appeared for a few minutes to deliver some shell-shocked, insufficient remarks, Biden was telling an interviewer first thing we need to do is "get these bastards." I didn't see a single other pol express honest outrage.

    Replies: @Pat Casey

    Yeah. I recently said Steve being alienated is a law of nature obtaining, because you don’t engage the Alpha if you can’t win. He’s too totally transparently sane. Not to gush, but this guy really does strike me as the most normal high-IQ man in America. Whittaker Chambers’ best essay was titled The Sanity of St. Benedict; someone will have to pen The Sanity of Steve Sailer one of these days. And he’s changed my opinion of sarcasm from universally cheap to potentially deadly. (I guess that’s because sarcasm is, when you think about it, extremely rare in writing relative to how much its spoken, and spoken sarcasm always does seem cheap.) They can’t win.

    I’ve never heard of Thomas Inman and that’s a great quote. The context reminds me of Hegel’s position that the Jews are inoculated against the Greek tragic sense, because their fate is entirely the necessity of servitude to a tyrannical God, or “alien being” in Hegel’s term. Hence it is essential to sustaining the Jewish faith that their misfortunes be exaggerated in retrospect, as opposed to Oedipus, who keeps the faith of freedom until he must admit defeat, making him a true hero when he does, rather than a slave. If I was a Jealous God, I wouldn’t want my slaves to inquire either, to know that I was really an artist, not the devil.

  48. @Pat Casey
    I'm very surprised at how bad Colbert's new show is. I don't know what the fuck Garber is talking about when she says its trying to bring intellectualism to late night. Quite the opposite. Colbert's been acting really stupid. For one bit he couldn't stop eating oreos till he just poured them on his face. Retarded.

    But then he got really sincere and poignant with Joe Biden. Which was worth watching in my opinion. In fact after that, I think there's going to be too many loud voices telling him to run for him to not. He is a very, very genuine man. Hard not to more than like him. And his gaffes and tall tales rather speak to that too. In other words, he's very, very Irish, and prone to blarney. America would be so unspeakably awful without us.

    But when are one these click-bait bozos going to man up and do an expose on Steve? That would be really interesting and luminous clickbait. The piece by Yglesias that's currently on the front page quoted Richard Spencer, and it was a great quote. But Steve is actually influential, and that would make a great lead. Which gives me an idea....

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @timothy, @e, @Perplexed, @Bugg, @Pericles

    Biden’s “blarney” is often pure compulsive lying. I mean clinical compulsive lying.

    • Replies: @Pat Casey
    @e

    Like I said, blarney. Otherwise known as Irish Facts (see Hugh Kenner's The Impertinence of Being Definitive).

  49. Maybe somebody has mentioned this, but the last episode of Silicon Valley has a long-scene on the less than red-hot topic of how to blackmail someone without being convicted of blackmail, a familiar isteve topic.

  50. @Harry Baldwin
    In 1996, there was a short-lived series on Fox called "The Show." The premise was that there's a black sitcom, "The Wilson Lee Show," that stars black comedian Lee and is written by black writers with names like Big Chewy, Chocolate Walt, and Bo. Lee brings in a white writer, Tom Delaney, to head the team and the attempts at humor stem from his many culture clashes with the black writers. As the Fox promotional campaign puts it, "The hippest comedian in America just hired the whitest writer in Hollywood."

    When Delaney tells his wife about his new job, she worries: "You're the guy on 'Def Jam' who they pull out of the audience to make fun of, the corny white guy in the white shirt." At the office, Delaney is called "punk" and "Pillsbury Doughboy," and one of the black writers challenges him to defend such all-white sitcoms as NBC's "Friends."

    In contrast to "The Wilson Lee Show," though, "The Show" was written entirely by white writers. Not a "Big Chewy" in the bunch.

    Where are all the Big Chewys? Colbert needs them!

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Aaron Sorkin’s Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip took the opposite tack. A black comic actor (D.L. Hughley) complains about the lack of black writers on the show, so he takes the head writer (Matthew Perry) to some comedy club where they hire a dorky black standup as a writer.

    Studio 60 was like an unfunny version of 30 Rock. Entertaining, though, in Sorkin’s earnest sort of way. And, to his credit, he had an evangelical character (I don’t know how big they are in sketch comedy IRL).

  51. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Stephen Colbert is so boring. Key and Peele is much funnier, but then they are allowed to recurring gay jokes that would bring spitstorms if done by whites, and they can do things like make fun of blacks who leave the labels on their baseball caps.

    Dueling baseball caps:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5ZM0-f5_CU

    Replies: @WowJustWow

    A lot of their sketches absolutely couldn’t be done with the races reversed either. Here’s one about killing white people for not being racist enough, and, in the final twist, killing them for being too racist:

    It’s interesting because they have a very cerebral, very white sense of humor. Often there’s no source of humor besides flattering their ethnomasochistic target demographic by flaunting racial double standards.

    Relatedly, tonight there was a sort of telethon raising money for schools that was broadcast simultaneously on all the major networks. There were a few jokes that really subverted the whole spirit of the event made by Colbert (about plagiarizing Wikipedia for essays) and K&P (teacher’s strike), and maybe a couple others. That is, unless the idea was to make you feel like you were back in junior high, sitting through an interminable assembly designed to demotivate you with speakers trying too hard to sound cool just so the school can meet its quota for motivational events for the year.

  52. @e
    @Pat Casey

    Biden's "blarney" is often pure compulsive lying. I mean clinical compulsive lying.

    Replies: @Pat Casey

    Like I said, blarney. Otherwise known as Irish Facts (see Hugh Kenner’s The Impertinence of Being Definitive).

  53. They should all be put in prison!!!

    In future all comedy should be unfunny marxist proaganda from ethnics + feminists like Lenny Henry, Sue Perkins and Rhona Cameron. We could rename it The BBC.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    @Mr Curious

    Lenny Henry was hilarious in the '90s Britcom "Chef!" though m

  54. @Jefferson
    Steve Sailer should go on podcast shows to get his name out there in the media. Go on Ben Shapiro or Laura Ingraham or Anthony Cumia or Adam Carolla or Larry Elder. Steve is way too low key. Maybe that's the German introvert trait in him.

    Replies: @Rifleman, @Dave Pinsen, @BurplesonAFB

    What I think when you tell me about your podcast pic.twitter.com/ffqtd8YHZm— Andy Swan (@AndySwan) September 12, 2015

  55. @Clifford Brown
    Colbert's interview with Vice President Biden about the death of Biden's son was especially moving. Colbert's greatest strength is his capacity for empathy. He is a man of Faith who has an incredible reservoir of compassion.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opVaEC_WxWs

    Irish American Catholics are pretty good at pathos. Colbert is one of the few celebrities, along with Martin Sheen, a fellow Catholic, that is allowed to openly express their Christian Faith without much blowback in popular culture. I think the mutual Catholic Faith between Biden and Colbert greatly enhanced the interview.

    It's hard not to admire Biden's declarations that one should "Never Complain" or that "No One Owes You Anything." These both sound like expressions from a foreign, more ancient, noble culture at this point. The whole Ethos of the Left in this country is to always complain and demand that you are entitled to certain things. It was refreshing and frankly shocking to hear Biden express virtues of a different America. Perhaps, there is hope in this.

    Interesting that Biden is America's first Catholic Vice President. There has only been one. When it comes to Late Night, there is now a definite Catholic bent. Colbert, Fallon and Conan O'Brien are Irish American Catholics. Jimmy Kimmel is an Italian American Catholic. The former CBS host, Craig Ferguson, my personal favorite Late Night host, while a Scottish born Presbyterian, he was certainly a Celt with some interesting tattoos.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Hibernian

    “Interesting that Biden is America’s first Catholic Vice President. There has only been one. When it comes to Late Night, there is now a definite Catholic bent. Colbert, Fallon and Conan O’Brien are Irish American Catholics. Jimmy Kimmel is an Italian American Catholic. The former CBS host, Craig Ferguson, my personal favorite Late Night host, while a Scottish born Presbyterian, he was certainly a Celt with some interesting tattoos.”

    On The Fox News Channel Catholics also outnumber WASPS, especially among the male personalities on that network. The majority of the males on that network are either Irish or Italian with Jews coming in 3rd place. Which is not surprising because The FNC headquarters is in New York City.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Jefferson

    NR always had a heavy Catholic slant.

    Replies: @Hibernian

  56. @Pat Casey
    I'm very surprised at how bad Colbert's new show is. I don't know what the fuck Garber is talking about when she says its trying to bring intellectualism to late night. Quite the opposite. Colbert's been acting really stupid. For one bit he couldn't stop eating oreos till he just poured them on his face. Retarded.

    But then he got really sincere and poignant with Joe Biden. Which was worth watching in my opinion. In fact after that, I think there's going to be too many loud voices telling him to run for him to not. He is a very, very genuine man. Hard not to more than like him. And his gaffes and tall tales rather speak to that too. In other words, he's very, very Irish, and prone to blarney. America would be so unspeakably awful without us.

    But when are one these click-bait bozos going to man up and do an expose on Steve? That would be really interesting and luminous clickbait. The piece by Yglesias that's currently on the front page quoted Richard Spencer, and it was a great quote. But Steve is actually influential, and that would make a great lead. Which gives me an idea....

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @timothy, @e, @Perplexed, @Bugg, @Pericles

    I don’t find Biden likable. Aside from his putting his hands on women and girls without their consent, when his wife caused the car accident that killed her and their daughter, he blamed the unfortunate truck driver of the other vehicle, suggesting he had drunk his lunch.

    The dead son, Beau, locked up Larry Sinclair for publicizing his coke-fueled sexual encounter with Obama; I suspect this is how Biden got to be VP. The other son just washed out of some military commission a month in for flunking a drug test.

    • Replies: @Pat Casey
    @Perplexed

    Oh please. I see that Washington Examiner crap trash, "Biden's Women-Touching Habit." He appears to have the social graces of a patrician gentleman who doesn't treat women like men, doesn't have a pervert's guilty conscience, and maybe forgets such women who don't know those manners were once the norm, back when women were not taught to be paranoid, by reading headlines like "Biden's Women-Touching Habit."

    His wife and daughter died tragically, so he probably couldn't help resenting the guy, and twice implied the guy might have been drunk. He probably wanted to hate the guy so much he made himself believe he might have been drunk, and felt better when he got that off his chest. No one's perfect, but people can have more generous sympathies considering his situation.

    One time I kind of let this old rich gay guy at a bar in DC think I was out and about because he was fascinating to talk to, considering his background. He had made a fortune in real estate and then started going to Washington for funding for the museums in SC that he would be the director of. Anyways, he filled me in on how vast the old gay-boy network is, and he got carried away as we drank, and eventually said JFK was bisexual and would go at whichever way was in the elevator with him with reckless abandon. Now that's bullshit. The tendency of gay men is to say lots of other men are gay, and all the better to be gay JFK. Point being, I wouldn't be one iota surprised if Larry Sinclair is telling the truth, but I wouldn't be surprised if he's not, and from what I can see, he either was or wasn't killed in a car accident back in 2014, so its all around weird. Either way, I don't think he was speaking any truth to power that actually matters, and guys who think they're doing that and aren't are not people to be trusted anyways.

    Biden voted against the first Gulf War (tho not the second) and he candidly admits he was the cautious one about the Bin Laden raid, which was at least a very honest thing to do. I mean I think the entire American political system is such a corrupt maze of mirrors that the only thing you can trust is your instincts about these people's personal character. The moment in that Colbert interview when he goes, "and I lost it, and....and....you just can't do that," its not clear what he's saying you can't do, but the best interpretation is that he was saying, I can't get up there and give speeches about my son, because that cheapens his memory even if my intentions are pure. That's the only thing you can say if you're a decent person, and Biden was so choked up he couldn't even get it out.

    Every thought of listening to Hilary Clinton try to tell jokes for eight years makes a small part of me die.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Perplexed

    "I don’t find Biden likable."

    Same here. He's a corrupt jerk. One of his sons was a lobbyist for credit-card companies at the same time that Biden was in the Senate as a prominent member of the banking committee. Biden was instrumental in changing the bankruptcy laws in favor of credit-card lenders. Like most political families, they live not by the labor of their hands or minds, but by peddling influence and favors. They are grifters and parasites.

    And let us not forget that old Plagiarizin' Joe couldn't even be bothered to commission new speeches for himself when he was running for President. He, or one of his lackeys, cribbed a speech from the British labor leader Neil Kinnock. As Americans don't pay much attention to the UK, I guess they figured nobody would notice.

    Clown, stooge,.......many words spring to mind that describe Biden. "Likeable" is not one of them.

    , @Bill Jones
    @Perplexed

    Then there's the gig his other spawn got looting the gas revenues of the Ukraine.
    Biden's just one more piece of lying, thieving filth, or, in the vernacular, Irish.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Perplexed

    After Biden choked up on television the other night, the talking heads were going on about what a better candidate he would be than Hillary, how he seems real, someone people can connect to. Yes, Biden fakes sincerity much better than Hillary does. Biden is so good at faking sincerity he was even able to describe the details of Neil Kinnock's family history as sincerely as if it were his own. That's some good faking, and that's what we need in the Democrat candidate for president.

    BTW, I always felt that Bill Clinton is slightly overrated as a liar and Obama underrated. After all, Bill generally felt it necessary to insert lawyerly escape clauses, while Obama just tells baldfaced lies to your face with the confidence that he'll never pay a price.

    I think Nixon was greatly overrated as a liar. Sure, he said, "I am not a crook," but as Clinton would say, "That all depends on what your definition of a crook is."

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  57. We laugh at Colbert’s hypocrisy but really it’s quite evil. Colbert adamantly believes that some white guy in Saginaw should be denied a job with the Saginaw Fire Department in order to hire a far less qualified black candidate because we need to approach fire from every possible ethnoreligious angle because Duhversity – and who gives a shit if people die as a result? – but how dare you expect him to take a small hit to his 7-figure paycheck for the sake of his own political ideology? His political ideology is about oppressing others, not himself.

    To see the demographics of Colbert’s writing staff or Barack Obama’s campaign staff is to see how little these leftist a-holes are truly willing to sacrifice when it’s something important to them, no matter how trivial it seems by comparison. Colbert and Obama have no problem with hundreds and hundreds of more Americans being murdered as a result of BlackLivesMatter, and have no problem with putting the lives of tens of thousands of American soldiers at risk by installing more black generals in America’s military than all previous presidents combined, but how dare how expect Colbert to take a small hit to his paycheck or expect Obama to risk electoral defeat?

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Wilkey

    White "anti-racists" are quite similar to female students on campus who voice enthusiastic agreement with feminist talking points, but still daydream about meeting Mr Right and raising a family with him - to the supreme consternation of feminist true believers. White anti-racists love to spout all the leftie racial platitudes, but they continue to think white, act white and live white. It's only when "diversity" demands they - not other whites - make a real sacrifice in its name that they begin to think Hmmmmmmm.

  58. Colbert needs to do a Rachel Dolzeal (sp?) + Caitlyn Jenner to compensate for the lack of racial and gender diversity on his staff.

  59. @Anonymous
    Hilarious that twenty writers (Colbert + 19) can't make the show funny. Maybe if he hires ten more.

    PS Colbert is even less Southern than Bernanke! Anyone hailing from the American South who presents themselves as full Yankee is definitely mentally disturbed.

    Replies: @EriK

    Colbert presents himself as a full Yankee? He overdid it, I was fooled into thinking he was Canadian.

  60. @Clifford Brown
    Colbert's interview with Vice President Biden about the death of Biden's son was especially moving. Colbert's greatest strength is his capacity for empathy. He is a man of Faith who has an incredible reservoir of compassion.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opVaEC_WxWs

    Irish American Catholics are pretty good at pathos. Colbert is one of the few celebrities, along with Martin Sheen, a fellow Catholic, that is allowed to openly express their Christian Faith without much blowback in popular culture. I think the mutual Catholic Faith between Biden and Colbert greatly enhanced the interview.

    It's hard not to admire Biden's declarations that one should "Never Complain" or that "No One Owes You Anything." These both sound like expressions from a foreign, more ancient, noble culture at this point. The whole Ethos of the Left in this country is to always complain and demand that you are entitled to certain things. It was refreshing and frankly shocking to hear Biden express virtues of a different America. Perhaps, there is hope in this.

    Interesting that Biden is America's first Catholic Vice President. There has only been one. When it comes to Late Night, there is now a definite Catholic bent. Colbert, Fallon and Conan O'Brien are Irish American Catholics. Jimmy Kimmel is an Italian American Catholic. The former CBS host, Craig Ferguson, my personal favorite Late Night host, while a Scottish born Presbyterian, he was certainly a Celt with some interesting tattoos.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Hibernian

    Sheen in “The Departed” was Captain Queenan, who, according to the Mark Wahlberg character, was being surveilled by Internal Affairs because they were “tryin’ ta find out about th’ good Catholic life.” Queenan/Sheen never got a retirement party because he was thrown off a rooftop at the age of about 60.

  61. I hate Colbert’s act. Literally hate it. Same with Jon Stewart. I’m the easiest going guy in the world, but watching those clowns fills me with rage. All that mugging and preening. All the smug certainty and in-crowd audiences. All the stupid received opinions and deliberately tossed in minor curve balls: “Hey look! I just made fun of Hillary!” As if that makes them somehow the apogee of objectivity. Barf.

    But it’s brilliantly effective propaganda, perfectly attuned to the current era.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @peterike

    "I hate Colbert’s act. Literally hate it. Same with Jon Stewart."

    I agree completely. Well said.

  62. @Pat Casey
    I'm very surprised at how bad Colbert's new show is. I don't know what the fuck Garber is talking about when she says its trying to bring intellectualism to late night. Quite the opposite. Colbert's been acting really stupid. For one bit he couldn't stop eating oreos till he just poured them on his face. Retarded.

    But then he got really sincere and poignant with Joe Biden. Which was worth watching in my opinion. In fact after that, I think there's going to be too many loud voices telling him to run for him to not. He is a very, very genuine man. Hard not to more than like him. And his gaffes and tall tales rather speak to that too. In other words, he's very, very Irish, and prone to blarney. America would be so unspeakably awful without us.

    But when are one these click-bait bozos going to man up and do an expose on Steve? That would be really interesting and luminous clickbait. The piece by Yglesias that's currently on the front page quoted Richard Spencer, and it was a great quote. But Steve is actually influential, and that would make a great lead. Which gives me an idea....

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @timothy, @e, @Perplexed, @Bugg, @Pericles

    Had occasion to seen Steven Colbert interview Steven King last night. I’ve enjoyed King’s work, though his books are better when say, Stanley Kubrick or someone else adopts them into a movie or TV drama than when he does it himself. After a few opening pleasantries, the conversation turned into a whiny bitchfest about the awfulness and evil of Donald Trump. Trump may or not be perfect or wonderful, but as he said in the first debate, until he made immigration an issue the MSM and the D C establishment was perfectly happy with the status never discussing it. And really Trump is nowhere near the embarrassment that those in power in Washington in both parties are. Trump has taken of because since 1/20/1989 our government has been run for the establishment rather than it’s citizens. Colbert will never go after Obama like that.

    Jimmy Fallon, by contrast, had Trump on and had some fun with him. And the audience loved it. If Fallon and Colbert were stocks, nobody would buy Colbert.

    • Replies: @Pat Casey
    @Bugg

    For so long I didn't know Shawshank Redemption was a Steven King book. And I never read it. But I can't imagine King can write a better character than Morgan Freeman played. I most remember his On Writing, and I think its a great memoir, especially if you think of his instructions for writing as the compulsive supplements of a successful writer, rather than useful advice.

    Churchill had a trusted inner circle, who would pull him back down, when he would get very insane, being a manic depressive prone to florid excess, especially as prime minister, when he became a God of War. Trump is not Churchill, but I think we might find out he needs an inner circle, and I'm not sure he would have one.

    Replies: @Bugg

  63. Whites are the only race you can ever have “too many” people of (unless those whites are Jewish, in which case you have a choice of how to play it). That’s why some people say that “Diversity means hunting down the last white person.”

  64. @iSteveFan

    And: All 19 of those writers are white. …
     
    Can't they break that down further?

    That diversity is—even when it’s kept behind the scenes, even when it’s rumply and sarcastic and sleep-deprived—a signal of the value his show places on differing opinions, and differing experiences, and differing modes of understanding and processing and representing the world.
     
    If only diversity meant just differing opinions. In fact diversity seems to mean uniformity when it comes to opinions.

    They lump whites into one giant category, but whites are the essence of diversity of opinion. In fact the reason we even have competitive elections is because whites don't bloc-vote.

    As for experiences, whites are all over the place. We have rural whites, urban SWPLs and suburban types. We've got whites who come from every economic and social strata. We have whites who are atheists, agnostics, too many types of Christian denominations to count and Jews for starters. If that is not the essence of diversity, then the internet meme that diversity mean less white and less male must be true.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Dirk Dagger, @Desiderius

    Current Late Show “Co-Head Writer” Jay Katsir was interviewed in Haaretz a few years back. Sheds some light on his background.

    An insider’s look at the Colbert Report – Week’s End http://www.haaretz.com/weekend/week-s-end/1.407089

  65. Pat Casey says:
    @Perplexed
    @Pat Casey

    I don't find Biden likable. Aside from his putting his hands on women and girls without their consent, when his wife caused the car accident that killed her and their daughter, he blamed the unfortunate truck driver of the other vehicle, suggesting he had drunk his lunch.

    The dead son, Beau, locked up Larry Sinclair for publicizing his coke-fueled sexual encounter with Obama; I suspect this is how Biden got to be VP. The other son just washed out of some military commission a month in for flunking a drug test.

    Replies: @Pat Casey, @Mr. Anon, @Bill Jones, @Harry Baldwin

    Oh please. I see that Washington Examiner crap trash, “Biden’s Women-Touching Habit.” He appears to have the social graces of a patrician gentleman who doesn’t treat women like men, doesn’t have a pervert’s guilty conscience, and maybe forgets such women who don’t know those manners were once the norm, back when women were not taught to be paranoid, by reading headlines like “Biden’s Women-Touching Habit.”

    His wife and daughter died tragically, so he probably couldn’t help resenting the guy, and twice implied the guy might have been drunk. He probably wanted to hate the guy so much he made himself believe he might have been drunk, and felt better when he got that off his chest. No one’s perfect, but people can have more generous sympathies considering his situation.

    One time I kind of let this old rich gay guy at a bar in DC think I was out and about because he was fascinating to talk to, considering his background. He had made a fortune in real estate and then started going to Washington for funding for the museums in SC that he would be the director of. Anyways, he filled me in on how vast the old gay-boy network is, and he got carried away as we drank, and eventually said JFK was bisexual and would go at whichever way was in the elevator with him with reckless abandon. Now that’s bullshit. The tendency of gay men is to say lots of other men are gay, and all the better to be gay JFK. Point being, I wouldn’t be one iota surprised if Larry Sinclair is telling the truth, but I wouldn’t be surprised if he’s not, and from what I can see, he either was or wasn’t killed in a car accident back in 2014, so its all around weird. Either way, I don’t think he was speaking any truth to power that actually matters, and guys who think they’re doing that and aren’t are not people to be trusted anyways.

    Biden voted against the first Gulf War (tho not the second) and he candidly admits he was the cautious one about the Bin Laden raid, which was at least a very honest thing to do. I mean I think the entire American political system is such a corrupt maze of mirrors that the only thing you can trust is your instincts about these people’s personal character. The moment in that Colbert interview when he goes, “and I lost it, and….and….you just can’t do that,” its not clear what he’s saying you can’t do, but the best interpretation is that he was saying, I can’t get up there and give speeches about my son, because that cheapens his memory even if my intentions are pure. That’s the only thing you can say if you’re a decent person, and Biden was so choked up he couldn’t even get it out.

    Every thought of listening to Hilary Clinton try to tell jokes for eight years makes a small part of me die.

  66. @Wilkey
    We laugh at Colbert's hypocrisy but really it's quite evil. Colbert adamantly believes that some white guy in Saginaw should be denied a job with the Saginaw Fire Department in order to hire a far less qualified black candidate because we need to approach fire from every possible ethnoreligious angle because Duhversity - and who gives a shit if people die as a result? - but how dare you expect him to take a small hit to his 7-figure paycheck for the sake of his own political ideology? His political ideology is about oppressing others, not himself.

    To see the demographics of Colbert's writing staff or Barack Obama's campaign staff is to see how little these leftist a-holes are truly willing to sacrifice when it's something important to them, no matter how trivial it seems by comparison. Colbert and Obama have no problem with hundreds and hundreds of more Americans being murdered as a result of BlackLivesMatter, and have no problem with putting the lives of tens of thousands of American soldiers at risk by installing more black generals in America's military than all previous presidents combined, but how dare how expect Colbert to take a small hit to his paycheck or expect Obama to risk electoral defeat?

    Replies: @silviosilver

    White “anti-racists” are quite similar to female students on campus who voice enthusiastic agreement with feminist talking points, but still daydream about meeting Mr Right and raising a family with him – to the supreme consternation of feminist true believers. White anti-racists love to spout all the leftie racial platitudes, but they continue to think white, act white and live white. It’s only when “diversity” demands they – not other whites – make a real sacrifice in its name that they begin to think Hmmmmmmm.

  67. @iSteveFan

    And: All 19 of those writers are white. …
     
    Can't they break that down further?

    That diversity is—even when it’s kept behind the scenes, even when it’s rumply and sarcastic and sleep-deprived—a signal of the value his show places on differing opinions, and differing experiences, and differing modes of understanding and processing and representing the world.
     
    If only diversity meant just differing opinions. In fact diversity seems to mean uniformity when it comes to opinions.

    They lump whites into one giant category, but whites are the essence of diversity of opinion. In fact the reason we even have competitive elections is because whites don't bloc-vote.

    As for experiences, whites are all over the place. We have rural whites, urban SWPLs and suburban types. We've got whites who come from every economic and social strata. We have whites who are atheists, agnostics, too many types of Christian denominations to count and Jews for starters. If that is not the essence of diversity, then the internet meme that diversity mean less white and less male must be true.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Dirk Dagger, @Desiderius

    As for experiences, whites are all over the place. We have rural whites, urban SWPLs and suburban types. We’ve got whites who come from every economic and social strata. We have whites who are atheists, agnostics, too many types of Christian denominations to count and Jews for starters.

    We might.

    I doubt Colbert’s staff does.

    • Replies: @Dirk Dagger
    @Desiderius

    According to Split Sider here's Colbert’s full writing staff: Jay Katsir, Opus Moreschi, Michael Brumm, Nate Charny, Aaron Cohen, Cullen Crawford, Paul Dinello, Rob Dubbin, Eric Drysdale, Ariel Dumas, Glenn Eichler, Gabe Gronli, Barry Julien, Daniel Kibblesmith, Matt Lappin, Tom Purcell, Jen Spyra, and Brian Stack.

  68. Cryptogenic [AKA "Mr. Zeepie"] says:
    @Clifford Brown
    Speaking of Diversity, this trailer for ABC's Quantico will fulfill virtually any SJW Bingo Card.

    This really has to be seen to be believed.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRnFFinkCFA

    Replies: @Cryptogenic, @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous, @silviosilver

    I’m guessing this abortion will be praised for “taking risks” and “facing issues.”

    Like, of course the Muslim woman did it! But wait … she didn’t? My God. It’s time to examine myself and enter the conversation.

    Hey, did you see that brown girl slut shame that white dude? Smell the justice, backwards viewers. This is the really real world as it really appears in reality. Time to get real.

  69. “Splitsider reports that Stephen Colbert’s new show—the one that premiered delightfully earlier this week, the one that seems to be trying to bring a new kind of intellectualism to late-night network comedy.”

    The notion that a late-night talk-show could be construed, even vaguely, as “intellectual” is laughable. What do interviews of actors – and the only guests they ever have on such shows are actors – contribute to the life of the mind? All of those shows are nothing but platforms for the promotion of movies and TV shows. They are really just advertisements.

    Even the old Tonight Show with Johnny Carson aspired to something more middle-brow. Carson occasionally had authors on his show – people who actually wrote books – rather than merely actors and entertainment people.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Mr. Anon

    Nah, not just actors. They also book a lot of TV newsreaders and politicians now... Which I suppose are also types of acting

    , @James Kabala
    @Mr. Anon

    Actually, Colbert (and Stewart) did have authors on a lot on their old shows. Usually from the left, of course, but nonetheless authors of books. There even were websites devoted to them:

    http://www.dailyshowbooklist.com/

    http://www.dailyshowbooklist.com/browse-books-by-cover.html

    http://www.colbertreportbooklist.com/

    http://www.colbertreportbooklist.com/browse-books-by-cover.html

    (Often the books were pseudo-books written by - or at least credited to - actors or politicians, but if you browse through the list you will find that quite a few were real books.)

  70. @Jefferson
    Steve Sailer should go on podcast shows to get his name out there in the media. Go on Ben Shapiro or Laura Ingraham or Anthony Cumia or Adam Carolla or Larry Elder. Steve is way too low key. Maybe that's the German introvert trait in him.

    Replies: @Rifleman, @Dave Pinsen, @BurplesonAFB

    I’m sure Gavin McInnes would love to have Steve on. He mentions him sometimes so he’d probably be nice although he does like to give his guests a ribbing.

    He had Jared Taylor on a few weeks ago.

    Unfortunately it’s a subscribers only show, but the clips usually end up on youtube eventually

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @BurplesonAFB

    "I’m sure Gavin McInnes would love to have Steve on. He mentions him sometimes so he’d probably be nice although he does like to give his guests a ribbing.

    He had Jared Taylor on a few weeks ago.

    Unfortunately it’s a subscribers only show, but the clips usually end up on youtube eventually"

    I wonder who has a higher IQ, Jared Taylor or Steve Sailer? I bet they both have a higher IQ than Hussein Obama.

  71. @Perplexed
    @Pat Casey

    I don't find Biden likable. Aside from his putting his hands on women and girls without their consent, when his wife caused the car accident that killed her and their daughter, he blamed the unfortunate truck driver of the other vehicle, suggesting he had drunk his lunch.

    The dead son, Beau, locked up Larry Sinclair for publicizing his coke-fueled sexual encounter with Obama; I suspect this is how Biden got to be VP. The other son just washed out of some military commission a month in for flunking a drug test.

    Replies: @Pat Casey, @Mr. Anon, @Bill Jones, @Harry Baldwin

    “I don’t find Biden likable.”

    Same here. He’s a corrupt jerk. One of his sons was a lobbyist for credit-card companies at the same time that Biden was in the Senate as a prominent member of the banking committee. Biden was instrumental in changing the bankruptcy laws in favor of credit-card lenders. Like most political families, they live not by the labor of their hands or minds, but by peddling influence and favors. They are grifters and parasites.

    And let us not forget that old Plagiarizin’ Joe couldn’t even be bothered to commission new speeches for himself when he was running for President. He, or one of his lackeys, cribbed a speech from the British labor leader Neil Kinnock. As Americans don’t pay much attention to the UK, I guess they figured nobody would notice.

    Clown, stooge,…….many words spring to mind that describe Biden. “Likeable” is not one of them.

  72. @Clifford Brown
    Speaking of Diversity, this trailer for ABC's Quantico will fulfill virtually any SJW Bingo Card.

    This really has to be seen to be believed.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRnFFinkCFA

    Replies: @Cryptogenic, @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous, @silviosilver

    I saw an even briefer ad on TV, and even from that it was obvious this is some kind of SJW wet-dream, and naked propaganda (and ridiculously stupid propaganda at that). I can only assume its target audience is white women. Is this the way women think the world works? They had one of every creed, orientation, and color. And the protagonist is a strong slutty women, who is proud of her sluttishness. And of course they have some straight white men, because that’s what their target demographic wants, though they take pains to make them ashamed of wanting what they want. I didn’t see a transsexual – they’re probably saving it for the second season.

    Also, it’s remarkable how authoritarian liberals have become. Consider how the FBI has come to be portrayed in movies and TV over the last 25 years. They are invariably portrayed as efficient, competent, and always on the side of the angels, rather than as what they really are – clueless, obtuse, time-serving civil-servants. The last vaguely negative portrayal I can remember of the FBI was in th movie “Die Hard”, where the agents were portrayed as callous, reckless and none-to-bright cowboys. The way Hollywood portrays the FBI today is merely an updated version of positive spin they lavished on them in the 50s and 60s. One wonders how much the FBI spends on collaboration with the entertainment business. J. Edgar Hoover would be proud.

  73. @Anonymous
    @Lot


    Hacks who think racism is why they can’t get a break on TV no longer have any grounds to complain with the Internet now letting anyone release their work to the masses.
     
    A lot of these kinds of articles seem to be written by Jewish writers like Ms. Gerber, who would not have cause to blame discrimination, since Jewish writers tend to be overrepresented in Hollywood writing.

    Replies: @Robert Abrahamsen

    What percentage of Colbert’s 19 white writers are Jewish? If even one of them is, then Jews are over represented relative to their percentage of the U.S. population on his writing staff. I’d bet dollars against dimes that more than one of them is Jewish, however. It wouldn’t surprise me if half of them are.

    Why doesn’t this question ever seem to interest the Defenders of Diversity? I believe I know why.

  74. @peterike
    I hate Colbert's act. Literally hate it. Same with Jon Stewart. I'm the easiest going guy in the world, but watching those clowns fills me with rage. All that mugging and preening. All the smug certainty and in-crowd audiences. All the stupid received opinions and deliberately tossed in minor curve balls: "Hey look! I just made fun of Hillary!" As if that makes them somehow the apogee of objectivity. Barf.

    But it's brilliantly effective propaganda, perfectly attuned to the current era.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    “I hate Colbert’s act. Literally hate it. Same with Jon Stewart.”

    I agree completely. Well said.

  75. For some reason. If it’s 2015, and you’re not sure why you should be sorry about something like that, then—I hate to say it, but—you actually have a lot to be sorry for.

    I just had a vivid mental image of some still newsroom type place, lots of desks with computer monitors and keyboards on them. The room strangely quiet despite having 30-40 people seated at the desks. Exactly half the people are women (or appear to be) and half men (or appear to be). There are muted female voices but all rather shrill sounding. I can hear words like, “patriarchy” and “discrimination.” The men (or those who appear to be men), all of them white, are all completely silent and look as though they are desperately trying to disappear. Their shoulders are rounded and heads bowed. Suddenly, a chubby man with an enormous grin on his black face comes strutting into the room virtually shouting, “All right you hoes, which one a you cracka hoes been drinking my sodas from da refridgamater? Ima rape yo cracka ass when I catch you!” Immediately, all the women in the room beam with barely contained excitement while the men (or those who appear to be men) seem to busy themselves looking for a pencil eraser in the back of their bottom desk drawers.

    And that is our news media. Demoralized. Deracinated. Abused and dominated. Filled with racial self-hate. Waiting and hoping for their own demise.

  76. I’ve seen it before, the leader’s name is Megan. Of course! Why name your daughter Megan? Are ya stockin’ up for a bitch shortage?

  77. @Mr. Anon
    "Splitsider reports that Stephen Colbert’s new show—the one that premiered delightfully earlier this week, the one that seems to be trying to bring a new kind of intellectualism to late-night network comedy."

    The notion that a late-night talk-show could be construed, even vaguely, as "intellectual" is laughable. What do interviews of actors - and the only guests they ever have on such shows are actors - contribute to the life of the mind? All of those shows are nothing but platforms for the promotion of movies and TV shows. They are really just advertisements.

    Even the old Tonight Show with Johnny Carson aspired to something more middle-brow. Carson occasionally had authors on his show - people who actually wrote books - rather than merely actors and entertainment people.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @James Kabala

    Nah, not just actors. They also book a lot of TV newsreaders and politicians now… Which I suppose are also types of acting

  78. @Clifford Brown
    Speaking of Diversity, this trailer for ABC's Quantico will fulfill virtually any SJW Bingo Card.

    This really has to be seen to be believed.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRnFFinkCFA

    Replies: @Cryptogenic, @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous, @silviosilver

    The obviously steep production costs and (as you note) high fakeness quotient might not have prevented the network from picking it up but won’t save them from mid-season cancellation. What is the public appetite saturation level for FBI shows and D.C. government soap operas w/ thinly disguised Hillary characters?

  79. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @iSteveFan

    Diversity means people who do not look like me, but share my biases, and especially my prejudices.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Right. My local county board is all liberals, but it has diversity. There is a gay liberal, a Hispanic liberal, a woman who may be gay liberal, and a coupla white guy liberals. They would like to have a Black liberal, but all the blacks live in PG County.

  80. @Reg Cæsar

    …ensuring that cultural products that aspire to some kind of mass-ness represent, as best they can, the actual mass.
     
    In other words, he should aim to be a masshole.

    Replies: @SFG

    Nobody’s going to get that outside of the Northeast.

  81. @Beach
    @Jefferson


    Black people don’t even watch Stephen Colbert. They are too busy watching The Real Housewives Of Atlanta and Empire.
     
    Speaking of Empire and writers...

    http://news.moviefone.com/2015/06/12/empire-creator-black-people-hate-white-people-writing-for-them/

    Lee Daniels, the creator of Empire, thinks white people writing for a black audience is offensive. If Colbert expressed a similar sentiment about black writers for his show, how many seconds would pass before he was escorted off the premises? His feet wouldn't touch the ground.

    Replies: @tbraton

    “Lee Daniels, the creator of Empire, thinks white people writing for a black audience is offensive. If Colbert expressed a similar sentiment about black writers for his show, how many seconds would pass before he was escorted off the premises? His feet wouldn’t touch the ground.”

    Back in the early 90’s, a white writer named Richard Price came out with a very good, critically acclaimed novel, “Clockers,” which portrayed young, black inner city drug dealers. It was a terrific novel. When they set out to make a movie of the book, they got the same white writer, Price, to write the screen play (he was later to write several of the episodes of that excellent HBO series “The Wire”), and they lined up Martin Scorsese to direct the film and Robert DeNiro to play the lead role. Then, as I recall, Spike Lee started “mau mauing the flack catcher” and engaged in a public relations battle challenging the right of a white director (even the far superior Martin Scorsese) to direct a movie that portrayed black inner city life. So Scorsese bowed out, as did DeNiro, and the producers hired Spike Lee to direct the screen play written by a white screen writer based on the same white writer’s first-rate novel. Spike Lee turned out a movie that was not nearly as good as the novel and probably not as good as the movie Scorsese would have made. (I hedge the previous comment because Scorsese’s work seems to fall short of his very high standards when he deals with social milieus that are other than Italian. I am thinking specifically of “Gangs of New York” dealing with Civil War era Irish in NYC, but then I thought he did an excellent job on “The Departed” based loosely on Boston Irish Whitey Bulger.) I guess nobody ever thought to ask Spike Lee why, if no white director could accurately portray black inner-city life, a white writer was able to do such a good job in the novel, which formed the basis of the movie.

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    @tbraton

    One of the better Spike Lee films, but I think he caught hell for not making it the usual black/white morality play. It's ironic if he did get to wrestle it away from Scorsese; from lighting to writing, it owes a lot to the Scorsese style.

    Replies: @tbraton

    , @Mr. Anon
    @tbraton

    "I thought he did an excellent job on “The Departed” based loosely on Boston Irish Whitey Bulger.)"

    Actually, I believe that "The Departed" was based not-so-loosely on a Hong-Kong action movie, which might explain the rather ridiculous plot.

    Replies: @tbraton

  82. @Jefferson
    @Clifford Brown

    "Interesting that Biden is America’s first Catholic Vice President. There has only been one. When it comes to Late Night, there is now a definite Catholic bent. Colbert, Fallon and Conan O’Brien are Irish American Catholics. Jimmy Kimmel is an Italian American Catholic. The former CBS host, Craig Ferguson, my personal favorite Late Night host, while a Scottish born Presbyterian, he was certainly a Celt with some interesting tattoos."

    On The Fox News Channel Catholics also outnumber WASPS, especially among the male personalities on that network. The majority of the males on that network are either Irish or Italian with Jews coming in 3rd place. Which is not surprising because The FNC headquarters is in New York City.

    Replies: @SFG

    NR always had a heavy Catholic slant.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @SFG

    Bill Buckley was an Irish-German Catholic. Many contributors were Protestant or Jewish. Presently National Review Online is headed by the very Catholic Kathryn Jean Lopez.

  83. Pat Casey says:
    @Bugg
    @Pat Casey

    Had occasion to seen Steven Colbert interview Steven King last night. I've enjoyed King's work, though his books are better when say, Stanley Kubrick or someone else adopts them into a movie or TV drama than when he does it himself. After a few opening pleasantries, the conversation turned into a whiny bitchfest about the awfulness and evil of Donald Trump. Trump may or not be perfect or wonderful, but as he said in the first debate, until he made immigration an issue the MSM and the D C establishment was perfectly happy with the status never discussing it. And really Trump is nowhere near the embarrassment that those in power in Washington in both parties are. Trump has taken of because since 1/20/1989 our government has been run for the establishment rather than it's citizens. Colbert will never go after Obama like that.

    Jimmy Fallon, by contrast, had Trump on and had some fun with him. And the audience loved it. If Fallon and Colbert were stocks, nobody would buy Colbert.

    Replies: @Pat Casey

    For so long I didn’t know Shawshank Redemption was a Steven King book. And I never read it. But I can’t imagine King can write a better character than Morgan Freeman played. I most remember his On Writing, and I think its a great memoir, especially if you think of his instructions for writing as the compulsive supplements of a successful writer, rather than useful advice.

    Churchill had a trusted inner circle, who would pull him back down, when he would get very insane, being a manic depressive prone to florid excess, especially as prime minister, when he became a God of War. Trump is not Churchill, but I think we might find out he needs an inner circle, and I’m not sure he would have one.

    • Replies: @Bugg
    @Pat Casey

    2 very odd things.

    Red/Freeman is "Shawshank" was an Irish guy as King wrote him, as Freeman even says jokingly in the dialogue.

    And the Kubrick "Shining" is way better than King's own TV adaptation(which in fairness is good but nowhere near the movie) .In part because movies work at 2 hours, more than that is simply too long. King gets bogged down in his story which is why"The Stand", "The Shining" and Pennywise are TV miniseries long.And King hated what Kubrick and Nicholson did despite the fact it might be the best horror movie ever.

    King gets wedded to his own story, others get the Big Picture of his stories right.

  84. Salon headline I want to see: “That’s Not Funny: Is it okay to laugh at comedy written by non-diverse staffs?”

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    @Dennis Dale

    or maybe: "Laughing at jokes by white writers makes us complicit in our own oppression."

  85. Well, Bill Mahar, the other unfunny, way left comedian, gets diversity points for dating black women, maybe exclusively. No articles about his writing staff. Colbert should consider dating a woman of color or better yet, a trans-woman of color.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Buffalo Joe

    Perhaps he views the alternative of Jewish women as less desirable?

    Replies: @ben tillman

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Buffalo Joe


    Colbert should consider dating a woman of color or better yet, a trans-woman of color.
     
    Would Lindsay Graham with a cheap tan count? The Falsetto Palmettos.
    , @Mr. Anon
    @Buffalo Joe

    "Well, Bill Mahar, the other unfunny, way left comedian, gets diversity points for dating black women, maybe exclusively. No articles about his writing staff. Colbert should consider dating a woman of color or better yet, a trans-woman of color"

    And to complete the Maher parallel, slapping he/she/it around a little.

  86. @Mr Curious
    They should all be put in prison!!!

    In future all comedy should be unfunny marxist proaganda from ethnics + feminists like Lenny Henry, Sue Perkins and Rhona Cameron. We could rename it The BBC.

    Replies: @cthulhu

    Lenny Henry was hilarious in the ’90s Britcom “Chef!” though m

  87. @Dennis Dale
    Salon headline I want to see: "That's Not Funny: Is it okay to laugh at comedy written by non-diverse staffs?"

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

    or maybe: “Laughing at jokes by white writers makes us complicit in our own oppression.”

  88. @Desiderius
    @iSteveFan


    As for experiences, whites are all over the place. We have rural whites, urban SWPLs and suburban types. We’ve got whites who come from every economic and social strata. We have whites who are atheists, agnostics, too many types of Christian denominations to count and Jews for starters.
     
    We might.

    I doubt Colbert's staff does.

    Replies: @Dirk Dagger

    According to Split Sider here’s Colbert’s full writing staff: Jay Katsir, Opus Moreschi, Michael Brumm, Nate Charny, Aaron Cohen, Cullen Crawford, Paul Dinello, Rob Dubbin, Eric Drysdale, Ariel Dumas, Glenn Eichler, Gabe Gronli, Barry Julien, Daniel Kibblesmith, Matt Lappin, Tom Purcell, Jen Spyra, and Brian Stack.

  89. @Perplexed
    @Pat Casey

    I don't find Biden likable. Aside from his putting his hands on women and girls without their consent, when his wife caused the car accident that killed her and their daughter, he blamed the unfortunate truck driver of the other vehicle, suggesting he had drunk his lunch.

    The dead son, Beau, locked up Larry Sinclair for publicizing his coke-fueled sexual encounter with Obama; I suspect this is how Biden got to be VP. The other son just washed out of some military commission a month in for flunking a drug test.

    Replies: @Pat Casey, @Mr. Anon, @Bill Jones, @Harry Baldwin

    Then there’s the gig his other spawn got looting the gas revenues of the Ukraine.
    Biden’s just one more piece of lying, thieving filth, or, in the vernacular, Irish.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Bill Jones

    Them's fighting words.

  90. Every time I hear this “under-representation” complaint I can’t help thinking: isn’t it really that “women and minorities” (at least in these cases) are not contributing their fair share? In the case of Colbert, it’s even worse: he’s advocating on behalf of these people better than they can or will themselves. And isn’t it just that the white-cis-males are being extremely generous with their efforts and very polite in not mentioning (or even noticing)? Who’s shame is this? Time to flip this script.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Dennis Dale

    More accurate headline:

    "Women, Minorities Still Not Pulling Their Own Weight"

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  91. iirc, Colbert did a wonderful hit job on the corporate media whores at the white house/media fuck-fest a few years ago.

  92. @tbraton
    @Beach

    "Lee Daniels, the creator of Empire, thinks white people writing for a black audience is offensive. If Colbert expressed a similar sentiment about black writers for his show, how many seconds would pass before he was escorted off the premises? His feet wouldn’t touch the ground."

    Back in the early 90's, a white writer named Richard Price came out with a very good, critically acclaimed novel, "Clockers," which portrayed young, black inner city drug dealers. It was a terrific novel. When they set out to make a movie of the book, they got the same white writer, Price, to write the screen play (he was later to write several of the episodes of that excellent HBO series "The Wire"), and they lined up Martin Scorsese to direct the film and Robert DeNiro to play the lead role. Then, as I recall, Spike Lee started "mau mauing the flack catcher" and engaged in a public relations battle challenging the right of a white director (even the far superior Martin Scorsese) to direct a movie that portrayed black inner city life. So Scorsese bowed out, as did DeNiro, and the producers hired Spike Lee to direct the screen play written by a white screen writer based on the same white writer's first-rate novel. Spike Lee turned out a movie that was not nearly as good as the novel and probably not as good as the movie Scorsese would have made. (I hedge the previous comment because Scorsese's work seems to fall short of his very high standards when he deals with social milieus that are other than Italian. I am thinking specifically of "Gangs of New York" dealing with Civil War era Irish in NYC, but then I thought he did an excellent job on "The Departed" based loosely on Boston Irish Whitey Bulger.) I guess nobody ever thought to ask Spike Lee why, if no white director could accurately portray black inner-city life, a white writer was able to do such a good job in the novel, which formed the basis of the movie.

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @Mr. Anon

    One of the better Spike Lee films, but I think he caught hell for not making it the usual black/white morality play. It’s ironic if he did get to wrestle it away from Scorsese; from lighting to writing, it owes a lot to the Scorsese style.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Dennis Dale

    I read the book and was very impressed and looked forward to seeing the movie. I vaguely recall reading about the brouhaha Spike Lee was raising about a "white director" directing this movie when it should go to a black director, which struck me as completely preposterous in light of the fact that a white man had written the book. I also recalled that Spike Lee felt perfectly comfortable as a black director portraying Italian-American characters in "Do the Right Thing." I tried Googling and came up with nothing about the controversy, which I found somewhat surprising since the book came out in 1992 and the movie in 1995. Finally, I ran across a NY Times piece which mentioned Scorsese as the original director, a fact that had completely escaped my memory. I honestly can't recall much of the movie, but I distinctly remember being disappointed. It was similar to the feeling I had when I saw the movie version of Tom Wolfe's novel "Bonfire of the Vanities" a few years earlier. A missed opportunity to make a great movie of some great material. Even the director of BOTV, Brian DePalma, later admitted that he had "blown it." (Not to mention that Tom Hanks was completely miscast as the "master of the universe.") DePalma later did a very fine job on "The Untouchables," imho. Perhaps if I were to see "Clockers" today, I might form a different impression. Incidentally, the Times piece states that Lee completely changed the story from that told in the book, forcing Richard Price to completely rewrite the screenplay, changing the locale from its original northern New Jersey to Brooklyn and changing the book's balance of white cop and young black dope dealer to place more emphasis on the black side. Here's a link to the Times piece if you are interested. http://partners.nytimes.com/library/film/091095lee-clockers-essay.html

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dennis Dale

  93. @Buffalo Joe
    Well, Bill Mahar, the other unfunny, way left comedian, gets diversity points for dating black women, maybe exclusively. No articles about his writing staff. Colbert should consider dating a woman of color or better yet, a trans-woman of color.

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon

    Perhaps he views the alternative of Jewish women as less desirable?

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Bill Jones


    Perhaps he views the alternative of Jewish women as less desirable?
     
    There are plenty of hot Jewish women.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  94. @Perplexed
    @Pat Casey

    I don't find Biden likable. Aside from his putting his hands on women and girls without their consent, when his wife caused the car accident that killed her and their daughter, he blamed the unfortunate truck driver of the other vehicle, suggesting he had drunk his lunch.

    The dead son, Beau, locked up Larry Sinclair for publicizing his coke-fueled sexual encounter with Obama; I suspect this is how Biden got to be VP. The other son just washed out of some military commission a month in for flunking a drug test.

    Replies: @Pat Casey, @Mr. Anon, @Bill Jones, @Harry Baldwin

    After Biden choked up on television the other night, the talking heads were going on about what a better candidate he would be than Hillary, how he seems real, someone people can connect to. Yes, Biden fakes sincerity much better than Hillary does. Biden is so good at faking sincerity he was even able to describe the details of Neil Kinnock’s family history as sincerely as if it were his own. That’s some good faking, and that’s what we need in the Democrat candidate for president.

    BTW, I always felt that Bill Clinton is slightly overrated as a liar and Obama underrated. After all, Bill generally felt it necessary to insert lawyerly escape clauses, while Obama just tells baldfaced lies to your face with the confidence that he’ll never pay a price.

    I think Nixon was greatly overrated as a liar. Sure, he said, “I am not a crook,” but as Clinton would say, “That all depends on what your definition of a crook is.”

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    As George Burns said: "The key to show-business is sincerity. If you can fake that, you've got it made."

  95. @Dennis Dale
    Every time I hear this "under-representation" complaint I can't help thinking: isn't it really that "women and minorities" (at least in these cases) are not contributing their fair share? In the case of Colbert, it's even worse: he's advocating on behalf of these people better than they can or will themselves. And isn't it just that the white-cis-males are being extremely generous with their efforts and very polite in not mentioning (or even noticing)? Who's shame is this? Time to flip this script.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    More accurate headline:

    “Women, Minorities Still Not Pulling Their Own Weight”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer

    Women minorities have a lot of weight to pull. A trip to the local Aldi's will illustrate.

  96. @Steve Sailer
    @Dennis Dale

    More accurate headline:

    "Women, Minorities Still Not Pulling Their Own Weight"

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Women minorities have a lot of weight to pull. A trip to the local Aldi’s will illustrate.

  97. @SFG
    @Jefferson

    NR always had a heavy Catholic slant.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Bill Buckley was an Irish-German Catholic. Many contributors were Protestant or Jewish. Presently National Review Online is headed by the very Catholic Kathryn Jean Lopez.

  98. @Bill Jones
    @Perplexed

    Then there's the gig his other spawn got looting the gas revenues of the Ukraine.
    Biden's just one more piece of lying, thieving filth, or, in the vernacular, Irish.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Them’s fighting words.

  99. @Bill Jones
    @Buffalo Joe

    Perhaps he views the alternative of Jewish women as less desirable?

    Replies: @ben tillman

    Perhaps he views the alternative of Jewish women as less desirable?

    There are plenty of hot Jewish women.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @ben tillman

    Ben, some of the best I've ever had.

  100. @Pat Casey
    @Bugg

    For so long I didn't know Shawshank Redemption was a Steven King book. And I never read it. But I can't imagine King can write a better character than Morgan Freeman played. I most remember his On Writing, and I think its a great memoir, especially if you think of his instructions for writing as the compulsive supplements of a successful writer, rather than useful advice.

    Churchill had a trusted inner circle, who would pull him back down, when he would get very insane, being a manic depressive prone to florid excess, especially as prime minister, when he became a God of War. Trump is not Churchill, but I think we might find out he needs an inner circle, and I'm not sure he would have one.

    Replies: @Bugg

    2 very odd things.

    Red/Freeman is “Shawshank” was an Irish guy as King wrote him, as Freeman even says jokingly in the dialogue.

    And the Kubrick “Shining” is way better than King’s own TV adaptation(which in fairness is good but nowhere near the movie) .In part because movies work at 2 hours, more than that is simply too long. King gets bogged down in his story which is why”The Stand”, “The Shining” and Pennywise are TV miniseries long.And King hated what Kubrick and Nicholson did despite the fact it might be the best horror movie ever.

    King gets wedded to his own story, others get the Big Picture of his stories right.

  101. @BurplesonAFB
    @Jefferson

    I'm sure Gavin McInnes would love to have Steve on. He mentions him sometimes so he'd probably be nice although he does like to give his guests a ribbing.

    He had Jared Taylor on a few weeks ago.

    Unfortunately it's a subscribers only show, but the clips usually end up on youtube eventually

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “I’m sure Gavin McInnes would love to have Steve on. He mentions him sometimes so he’d probably be nice although he does like to give his guests a ribbing.

    He had Jared Taylor on a few weeks ago.

    Unfortunately it’s a subscribers only show, but the clips usually end up on youtube eventually”

    I wonder who has a higher IQ, Jared Taylor or Steve Sailer? I bet they both have a higher IQ than Hussein Obama.

  102. @Buffalo Joe
    Well, Bill Mahar, the other unfunny, way left comedian, gets diversity points for dating black women, maybe exclusively. No articles about his writing staff. Colbert should consider dating a woman of color or better yet, a trans-woman of color.

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon

    Colbert should consider dating a woman of color or better yet, a trans-woman of color.

    Would Lindsay Graham with a cheap tan count? The Falsetto Palmettos.

  103. @Pat Casey
    I'm very surprised at how bad Colbert's new show is. I don't know what the fuck Garber is talking about when she says its trying to bring intellectualism to late night. Quite the opposite. Colbert's been acting really stupid. For one bit he couldn't stop eating oreos till he just poured them on his face. Retarded.

    But then he got really sincere and poignant with Joe Biden. Which was worth watching in my opinion. In fact after that, I think there's going to be too many loud voices telling him to run for him to not. He is a very, very genuine man. Hard not to more than like him. And his gaffes and tall tales rather speak to that too. In other words, he's very, very Irish, and prone to blarney. America would be so unspeakably awful without us.

    But when are one these click-bait bozos going to man up and do an expose on Steve? That would be really interesting and luminous clickbait. The piece by Yglesias that's currently on the front page quoted Richard Spencer, and it was a great quote. But Steve is actually influential, and that would make a great lead. Which gives me an idea....

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @timothy, @e, @Perplexed, @Bugg, @Pericles

    “America would be so unspeakably awful without us.”

    Every ethnic group could have said this. And probably has.

  104. @Harry Baldwin
    @Perplexed

    After Biden choked up on television the other night, the talking heads were going on about what a better candidate he would be than Hillary, how he seems real, someone people can connect to. Yes, Biden fakes sincerity much better than Hillary does. Biden is so good at faking sincerity he was even able to describe the details of Neil Kinnock's family history as sincerely as if it were his own. That's some good faking, and that's what we need in the Democrat candidate for president.

    BTW, I always felt that Bill Clinton is slightly overrated as a liar and Obama underrated. After all, Bill generally felt it necessary to insert lawyerly escape clauses, while Obama just tells baldfaced lies to your face with the confidence that he'll never pay a price.

    I think Nixon was greatly overrated as a liar. Sure, he said, "I am not a crook," but as Clinton would say, "That all depends on what your definition of a crook is."

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    As George Burns said: “The key to show-business is sincerity. If you can fake that, you’ve got it made.”

  105. @Dennis Dale
    @tbraton

    One of the better Spike Lee films, but I think he caught hell for not making it the usual black/white morality play. It's ironic if he did get to wrestle it away from Scorsese; from lighting to writing, it owes a lot to the Scorsese style.

    Replies: @tbraton

    I read the book and was very impressed and looked forward to seeing the movie. I vaguely recall reading about the brouhaha Spike Lee was raising about a “white director” directing this movie when it should go to a black director, which struck me as completely preposterous in light of the fact that a white man had written the book. I also recalled that Spike Lee felt perfectly comfortable as a black director portraying Italian-American characters in “Do the Right Thing.” I tried Googling and came up with nothing about the controversy, which I found somewhat surprising since the book came out in 1992 and the movie in 1995. Finally, I ran across a NY Times piece which mentioned Scorsese as the original director, a fact that had completely escaped my memory. I honestly can’t recall much of the movie, but I distinctly remember being disappointed. It was similar to the feeling I had when I saw the movie version of Tom Wolfe’s novel “Bonfire of the Vanities” a few years earlier. A missed opportunity to make a great movie of some great material. Even the director of BOTV, Brian DePalma, later admitted that he had “blown it.” (Not to mention that Tom Hanks was completely miscast as the “master of the universe.”) DePalma later did a very fine job on “The Untouchables,” imho. Perhaps if I were to see “Clockers” today, I might form a different impression. Incidentally, the Times piece states that Lee completely changed the story from that told in the book, forcing Richard Price to completely rewrite the screenplay, changing the locale from its original northern New Jersey to Brooklyn and changing the book’s balance of white cop and young black dope dealer to place more emphasis on the black side. Here’s a link to the Times piece if you are interested. http://partners.nytimes.com/library/film/091095lee-clockers-essay.html

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @tbraton

    Also, Scorsese is a better director than Spike.

    "Clockers" is okay, but it is dragged down by a morose score by the guy who usually writes sad music for Spike Lee's films ever since he fired his musician dad for going back on heroin. (I suspect that's a key event in Spike's early promise fizzling.)

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @tbraton

    , @Dennis Dale
    @tbraton

    DePalma needs to steer clear of anything involving social commentary. The Untouchables was great because it's so stylized and makes no attempt to show a realistic human side but just lets rip a morality play about Cosner's unimpeachable family man do-gooder up against DeNiro's psychopathic Capone. Of course, he did have Cosner throw that guy off a building, so maybe I'm full of it.

  106. @tbraton
    @Beach

    "Lee Daniels, the creator of Empire, thinks white people writing for a black audience is offensive. If Colbert expressed a similar sentiment about black writers for his show, how many seconds would pass before he was escorted off the premises? His feet wouldn’t touch the ground."

    Back in the early 90's, a white writer named Richard Price came out with a very good, critically acclaimed novel, "Clockers," which portrayed young, black inner city drug dealers. It was a terrific novel. When they set out to make a movie of the book, they got the same white writer, Price, to write the screen play (he was later to write several of the episodes of that excellent HBO series "The Wire"), and they lined up Martin Scorsese to direct the film and Robert DeNiro to play the lead role. Then, as I recall, Spike Lee started "mau mauing the flack catcher" and engaged in a public relations battle challenging the right of a white director (even the far superior Martin Scorsese) to direct a movie that portrayed black inner city life. So Scorsese bowed out, as did DeNiro, and the producers hired Spike Lee to direct the screen play written by a white screen writer based on the same white writer's first-rate novel. Spike Lee turned out a movie that was not nearly as good as the novel and probably not as good as the movie Scorsese would have made. (I hedge the previous comment because Scorsese's work seems to fall short of his very high standards when he deals with social milieus that are other than Italian. I am thinking specifically of "Gangs of New York" dealing with Civil War era Irish in NYC, but then I thought he did an excellent job on "The Departed" based loosely on Boston Irish Whitey Bulger.) I guess nobody ever thought to ask Spike Lee why, if no white director could accurately portray black inner-city life, a white writer was able to do such a good job in the novel, which formed the basis of the movie.

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @Mr. Anon

    “I thought he did an excellent job on “The Departed” based loosely on Boston Irish Whitey Bulger.)”

    Actually, I believe that “The Departed” was based not-so-loosely on a Hong-Kong action movie, which might explain the rather ridiculous plot.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Mr. Anon

    You're right, and, for that reason, I refused to see the movie when it first came out, erroneously thinking it was just a blatant attempt to win an Oscar for Scorsese. But I caught it later on DVD and thought it was a very good movie with fine actors. The locale was changed to Boston, and the Jack Nicholson character was loosely based on Whitey Bulger. However, he got killed in the movie a few years before he was apprehended alive in California.

  107. @Buffalo Joe
    Well, Bill Mahar, the other unfunny, way left comedian, gets diversity points for dating black women, maybe exclusively. No articles about his writing staff. Colbert should consider dating a woman of color or better yet, a trans-woman of color.

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon

    “Well, Bill Mahar, the other unfunny, way left comedian, gets diversity points for dating black women, maybe exclusively. No articles about his writing staff. Colbert should consider dating a woman of color or better yet, a trans-woman of color”

    And to complete the Maher parallel, slapping he/she/it around a little.

  108. @Clifford Brown
    Speaking of Diversity, this trailer for ABC's Quantico will fulfill virtually any SJW Bingo Card.

    This really has to be seen to be believed.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRnFFinkCFA

    Replies: @Cryptogenic, @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous, @silviosilver

    Thanks for that clip. I’m definitely going to watch that show, just to see whether it’ll actually be as awful as the preview promises. Until such time as mainstream society can concede baseline racial and sexual realities, the “necessary lies” it tells itself to perpetuate its mythology will grow ever more incredulous.

  109. @ben tillman
    @Bill Jones


    Perhaps he views the alternative of Jewish women as less desirable?
     
    There are plenty of hot Jewish women.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Ben, some of the best I’ve ever had.

  110. @tbraton
    @Dennis Dale

    I read the book and was very impressed and looked forward to seeing the movie. I vaguely recall reading about the brouhaha Spike Lee was raising about a "white director" directing this movie when it should go to a black director, which struck me as completely preposterous in light of the fact that a white man had written the book. I also recalled that Spike Lee felt perfectly comfortable as a black director portraying Italian-American characters in "Do the Right Thing." I tried Googling and came up with nothing about the controversy, which I found somewhat surprising since the book came out in 1992 and the movie in 1995. Finally, I ran across a NY Times piece which mentioned Scorsese as the original director, a fact that had completely escaped my memory. I honestly can't recall much of the movie, but I distinctly remember being disappointed. It was similar to the feeling I had when I saw the movie version of Tom Wolfe's novel "Bonfire of the Vanities" a few years earlier. A missed opportunity to make a great movie of some great material. Even the director of BOTV, Brian DePalma, later admitted that he had "blown it." (Not to mention that Tom Hanks was completely miscast as the "master of the universe.") DePalma later did a very fine job on "The Untouchables," imho. Perhaps if I were to see "Clockers" today, I might form a different impression. Incidentally, the Times piece states that Lee completely changed the story from that told in the book, forcing Richard Price to completely rewrite the screenplay, changing the locale from its original northern New Jersey to Brooklyn and changing the book's balance of white cop and young black dope dealer to place more emphasis on the black side. Here's a link to the Times piece if you are interested. http://partners.nytimes.com/library/film/091095lee-clockers-essay.html

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dennis Dale

    Also, Scorsese is a better director than Spike.

    “Clockers” is okay, but it is dragged down by a morose score by the guy who usually writes sad music for Spike Lee’s films ever since he fired his musician dad for going back on heroin. (I suspect that’s a key event in Spike’s early promise fizzling.)

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    @Steve Sailer

    The film Spike caught hell for from other blacks I was thinking of isn't Clockers but the confused, meandering Son of Sam. They were mad it was set entirely in an Italian Brooklyn neighborhood and used rock music for the score. The movie was a dud but I think it's responsible for Baba O'Rily becoming a sort of unofficial theme song for NY.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @cthulhu

    , @tbraton
    @Steve Sailer

    "Also, Scorsese is a better director than Spike."

    We are in total agreement on that point. You must have missed what I said in the message which started this particular thread:

    "Then, as I recall, Spike Lee started “mau mauing the flack catcher” and engaged in a public relations battle challenging the right of a white director (even the far superior Martin Scorsese) to direct a movie that portrayed black inner city life."

    We are also in agreement about "Clockers." Actually, I saw Spike Lee's first movie, "She's Gotta Have It," when it opened in a theater owned by the Pedas brothers in Washington, D.C., and I thought it was pretty good for a first, very low budget movie. The Pedas brothers were the ones who "produced" (that is, financed its release after seeing the movie at one of the film festivals) the first Coen brothers movie, "Blood Simple," and I think some of their early movies, before deciding to exit the movie production business because they decided it was too risky, I believe. The Pedas brothers had come to Washington, D.C. in the mid 50's to attend GW Law School, bought an old, second run movie theater near George Washington U. and Washington Circle (after he was shot Reagan was taken to GW Hospital which is on Washington Circle) called the "Circle Theater" and started showing old movies in repertory. Admission when I started going there to catch up on many old classic movies in the late 60's was $1 or $2. Eventually, they would print up a schedule of all the movies that were going to be shown over the next year. They had a couple of old people serving as usher and concession server, who, I just found out, may have been the brothers' parents. It was a very funky place. Those were the days before Beta and VHS and Blockbuster. I think it was the latter which put an end to the business model of the Circle Theater. Using that one theater as a base they created a chain of theaters in the D.C. area called the Circle Theaters (as a result of the city plan drawn up by Pierre L'Enfant in the late 1790's, Washington has a lot of Circles, originally designed for the military to stop the marauding masses of outraged citizens but rarely if ever used for that purpose). They wound up selling the chain to a Canadian Garth Drabinsky (Cineplex Odeon) in the late 80's. In the meantime, they had made a fortune off their real estate investments. When they had their movie production company going, one of their employees was George Pelacanos, who eventually turned out a number of crime novels based on the Washington, D.C. area and, like Richard Price, wound up writing a number of episodes for "The Wire." For an account of the Pedas brothers' little adventure, see https://www.hellenext.org/2014/09/jim-and-ted-pedas-excellent-adventure/

  111. @Mr. Anon
    "Splitsider reports that Stephen Colbert’s new show—the one that premiered delightfully earlier this week, the one that seems to be trying to bring a new kind of intellectualism to late-night network comedy."

    The notion that a late-night talk-show could be construed, even vaguely, as "intellectual" is laughable. What do interviews of actors - and the only guests they ever have on such shows are actors - contribute to the life of the mind? All of those shows are nothing but platforms for the promotion of movies and TV shows. They are really just advertisements.

    Even the old Tonight Show with Johnny Carson aspired to something more middle-brow. Carson occasionally had authors on his show - people who actually wrote books - rather than merely actors and entertainment people.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @James Kabala

    Actually, Colbert (and Stewart) did have authors on a lot on their old shows. Usually from the left, of course, but nonetheless authors of books. There even were websites devoted to them:

    http://www.dailyshowbooklist.com/

    http://www.dailyshowbooklist.com/browse-books-by-cover.html

    http://www.colbertreportbooklist.com/

    http://www.colbertreportbooklist.com/browse-books-by-cover.html

    (Often the books were pseudo-books written by – or at least credited to – actors or politicians, but if you browse through the list you will find that quite a few were real books.)

  112. @Steve Sailer
    @tbraton

    Also, Scorsese is a better director than Spike.

    "Clockers" is okay, but it is dragged down by a morose score by the guy who usually writes sad music for Spike Lee's films ever since he fired his musician dad for going back on heroin. (I suspect that's a key event in Spike's early promise fizzling.)

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @tbraton

    The film Spike caught hell for from other blacks I was thinking of isn’t Clockers but the confused, meandering Son of Sam. They were mad it was set entirely in an Italian Brooklyn neighborhood and used rock music for the score. The movie was a dud but I think it’s responsible for Baba O’Rily becoming a sort of unofficial theme song for NY.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Dennis Dale

    "The film Spike caught hell for from other blacks I was thinking of isn’t Clockers but the confused, meandering Son of Sam. They were mad it was set entirely in an Italian Brooklyn neighborhood and used rock music for the score. The movie was a dud but I think it’s responsible for Baba O’Rily becoming a sort of unofficial theme song for NY."

    The time period of the film Summer Of Sam is 1977. Were Black critics of the film expecting Italians in 1977 to be listening to rap music? Not even most Black people in 1977 were listening to rap music, let alone Italians.

    It wasn't just rock music, the Summer Of Sam soundtrack scores also had disco music. Which is not surprising given the time period of the film.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwsjeeqOzaA

    , @cthulhu
    @Dennis Dale


    I think it’s responsible for Baba O’Rily becoming a sort of unofficial theme song for NY.
     
    I'm not sure about when that happened, but I recollect that the Who's performance at the post-9/11 "Concert for New York" was more-or-less universally recognized as the highlight of the night. Both"Baba O'Riley" and "Won't Get Fooled Again" got a huge response from the police and firefighters in attendance. Perhaps this had something to do with it too?

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

  113. @tbraton
    @Dennis Dale

    I read the book and was very impressed and looked forward to seeing the movie. I vaguely recall reading about the brouhaha Spike Lee was raising about a "white director" directing this movie when it should go to a black director, which struck me as completely preposterous in light of the fact that a white man had written the book. I also recalled that Spike Lee felt perfectly comfortable as a black director portraying Italian-American characters in "Do the Right Thing." I tried Googling and came up with nothing about the controversy, which I found somewhat surprising since the book came out in 1992 and the movie in 1995. Finally, I ran across a NY Times piece which mentioned Scorsese as the original director, a fact that had completely escaped my memory. I honestly can't recall much of the movie, but I distinctly remember being disappointed. It was similar to the feeling I had when I saw the movie version of Tom Wolfe's novel "Bonfire of the Vanities" a few years earlier. A missed opportunity to make a great movie of some great material. Even the director of BOTV, Brian DePalma, later admitted that he had "blown it." (Not to mention that Tom Hanks was completely miscast as the "master of the universe.") DePalma later did a very fine job on "The Untouchables," imho. Perhaps if I were to see "Clockers" today, I might form a different impression. Incidentally, the Times piece states that Lee completely changed the story from that told in the book, forcing Richard Price to completely rewrite the screenplay, changing the locale from its original northern New Jersey to Brooklyn and changing the book's balance of white cop and young black dope dealer to place more emphasis on the black side. Here's a link to the Times piece if you are interested. http://partners.nytimes.com/library/film/091095lee-clockers-essay.html

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dennis Dale

    DePalma needs to steer clear of anything involving social commentary. The Untouchables was great because it’s so stylized and makes no attempt to show a realistic human side but just lets rip a morality play about Cosner’s unimpeachable family man do-gooder up against DeNiro’s psychopathic Capone. Of course, he did have Cosner throw that guy off a building, so maybe I’m full of it.

  114. @Dennis Dale
    @Steve Sailer

    The film Spike caught hell for from other blacks I was thinking of isn't Clockers but the confused, meandering Son of Sam. They were mad it was set entirely in an Italian Brooklyn neighborhood and used rock music for the score. The movie was a dud but I think it's responsible for Baba O'Rily becoming a sort of unofficial theme song for NY.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @cthulhu

    “The film Spike caught hell for from other blacks I was thinking of isn’t Clockers but the confused, meandering Son of Sam. They were mad it was set entirely in an Italian Brooklyn neighborhood and used rock music for the score. The movie was a dud but I think it’s responsible for Baba O’Rily becoming a sort of unofficial theme song for NY.”

    The time period of the film Summer Of Sam is 1977. Were Black critics of the film expecting Italians in 1977 to be listening to rap music? Not even most Black people in 1977 were listening to rap music, let alone Italians.

    It wasn’t just rock music, the Summer Of Sam soundtrack scores also had disco music. Which is not surprising given the time period of the film.

  115. @Steve Sailer
    @tbraton

    Also, Scorsese is a better director than Spike.

    "Clockers" is okay, but it is dragged down by a morose score by the guy who usually writes sad music for Spike Lee's films ever since he fired his musician dad for going back on heroin. (I suspect that's a key event in Spike's early promise fizzling.)

    Replies: @Dennis Dale, @tbraton

    “Also, Scorsese is a better director than Spike.”

    We are in total agreement on that point. You must have missed what I said in the message which started this particular thread:

    “Then, as I recall, Spike Lee started “mau mauing the flack catcher” and engaged in a public relations battle challenging the right of a white director (even the far superior Martin Scorsese) to direct a movie that portrayed black inner city life.”

    We are also in agreement about “Clockers.” Actually, I saw Spike Lee’s first movie, “She’s Gotta Have It,” when it opened in a theater owned by the Pedas brothers in Washington, D.C., and I thought it was pretty good for a first, very low budget movie. The Pedas brothers were the ones who “produced” (that is, financed its release after seeing the movie at one of the film festivals) the first Coen brothers movie, “Blood Simple,” and I think some of their early movies, before deciding to exit the movie production business because they decided it was too risky, I believe. The Pedas brothers had come to Washington, D.C. in the mid 50’s to attend GW Law School, bought an old, second run movie theater near George Washington U. and Washington Circle (after he was shot Reagan was taken to GW Hospital which is on Washington Circle) called the “Circle Theater” and started showing old movies in repertory. Admission when I started going there to catch up on many old classic movies in the late 60’s was $1 or $2. Eventually, they would print up a schedule of all the movies that were going to be shown over the next year. They had a couple of old people serving as usher and concession server, who, I just found out, may have been the brothers’ parents. It was a very funky place. Those were the days before Beta and VHS and Blockbuster. I think it was the latter which put an end to the business model of the Circle Theater. Using that one theater as a base they created a chain of theaters in the D.C. area called the Circle Theaters (as a result of the city plan drawn up by Pierre L’Enfant in the late 1790’s, Washington has a lot of Circles, originally designed for the military to stop the marauding masses of outraged citizens but rarely if ever used for that purpose). They wound up selling the chain to a Canadian Garth Drabinsky (Cineplex Odeon) in the late 80’s. In the meantime, they had made a fortune off their real estate investments. When they had their movie production company going, one of their employees was George Pelacanos, who eventually turned out a number of crime novels based on the Washington, D.C. area and, like Richard Price, wound up writing a number of episodes for “The Wire.” For an account of the Pedas brothers’ little adventure, see https://www.hellenext.org/2014/09/jim-and-ted-pedas-excellent-adventure/

  116. @Mr. Anon
    @tbraton

    "I thought he did an excellent job on “The Departed” based loosely on Boston Irish Whitey Bulger.)"

    Actually, I believe that "The Departed" was based not-so-loosely on a Hong-Kong action movie, which might explain the rather ridiculous plot.

    Replies: @tbraton

    You’re right, and, for that reason, I refused to see the movie when it first came out, erroneously thinking it was just a blatant attempt to win an Oscar for Scorsese. But I caught it later on DVD and thought it was a very good movie with fine actors. The locale was changed to Boston, and the Jack Nicholson character was loosely based on Whitey Bulger. However, he got killed in the movie a few years before he was apprehended alive in California.

  117. @Dennis Dale
    @Steve Sailer

    The film Spike caught hell for from other blacks I was thinking of isn't Clockers but the confused, meandering Son of Sam. They were mad it was set entirely in an Italian Brooklyn neighborhood and used rock music for the score. The movie was a dud but I think it's responsible for Baba O'Rily becoming a sort of unofficial theme song for NY.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @cthulhu

    I think it’s responsible for Baba O’Rily becoming a sort of unofficial theme song for NY.

    I’m not sure about when that happened, but I recollect that the Who’s performance at the post-9/11 “Concert for New York” was more-or-less universally recognized as the highlight of the night. Both”Baba O’Riley” and “Won’t Get Fooled Again” got a huge response from the police and firefighters in attendance. Perhaps this had something to do with it too?

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    @cthulhu

    Yeah, this is just an assumption I'm making so I don't know. The film is from 1995 and the song was featured in the previews. When they picked it up after 9/11 I got the impression it was because the film had already put it out there.

  118. @cthulhu
    @Dennis Dale


    I think it’s responsible for Baba O’Rily becoming a sort of unofficial theme song for NY.
     
    I'm not sure about when that happened, but I recollect that the Who's performance at the post-9/11 "Concert for New York" was more-or-less universally recognized as the highlight of the night. Both"Baba O'Riley" and "Won't Get Fooled Again" got a huge response from the police and firefighters in attendance. Perhaps this had something to do with it too?

    Replies: @Dennis Dale

    Yeah, this is just an assumption I’m making so I don’t know. The film is from 1995 and the song was featured in the previews. When they picked it up after 9/11 I got the impression it was because the film had already put it out there.

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