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As you may recall, the psychiatrist and blogger who uses the pseudonym “Scott Alexander” at his prodigious SlateStarCodex blog (prodigious both in verbose length but also in insight and thoughtfulness), was going to be doxxed by the New York Times, which is bad form in general and flagrantly wrong in the case of a psychiatrist dealing with genuinely crazy people. He protested loudly and the doxxing article has never appeared yet.

What now?

Back in September, Scott wrote:

At this point I think maintaining anonymity is a losing battle. So I am gradually reworking my life to be compatible with the sort of publicity that circumstances seem to be forcing on me. I had a talk with my employer and we came to a mutual agreement that I would gradually transition away from working there. At some point, I may start my own private practice, where I’m my own boss and where I can focus on medication management – and not the kinds of psychotherapy that I’m most worried are ethically incompatible with being a public figure.

As I pointed out back in 2015 in “Moneyball for Medicine, Anyone?“, Scott has the skill set to become the Bill James of psychiatric medicines. There is a lot of data available to be analyzed that could help psychiatrists guess faster which, say, anti-depression medicines are more likely to work for different individuals, but there’s no culture of studying these numbers the way America has a huge culture of high IQ guys studying baseball statistics.

I’m trying to do all of this maximally slowly and carefully and in a way that won’t cause undue burden to any of my patients, and it’s taking a long time to figure out.

I’m also talking to Substack about moving to their blogging platform. While part of me wants to jump right back into blogging here and pretend nothing ever happened, the Substack option has grown on me. I think I’d feel safer as part of a big group that specifically promises to defend their bloggers when needed. And also, I’d feel safer with a lot of diverse income streams, and Substack has made me an extremely generous offer. Many people gave me good advice about how I could monetize my blog without Substack – I took these suggestions very seriously, and without violating a confidentiality agreement all I can answer is that Substack’s offer was extremely generous.

 
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  1. Dude. What about this Substack. Why not?

    Caveat: I know nothing about it. But are you too ‘edgy’ to be hosted there?

    extremely generous

    Ya gotta admit, it has an appealing ring to it… 😉

    • Replies: @Polynikes
    @Mr McKenna

    I believe guys like Matt Taibi and Glen Greenwald have columns there. I follow them on Twitter, but they’re columns are subscription only.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  2. Thioridazine: 200 to 800 mg/day, divided into 2 to 4 doses

    This drug may cause drowsiness

  3. I really love Scott’s blogging. It is the best on the internet, but I do often wonder if his talent may be a bit wasted. His impact could be a lot bigger than just his writing.

  4. He posted a comment on the ssc subreddit I saw just a couple days ago. He really does not want to be sitting in a room with a patient and the patient saying something like “all your internet bully buddies have me suicidal.” Like he is seriously paranoid about maybe having to deal with that and it aggravates his own anxiety disorders.

    There are tens-thousands of people trying to improve chemical treatment of psychos and a Bill James would not make one teeny tiny itsy bitsy little small difference. Sculpting data sets which are more noise than signal is an enormous amount of work. Medication outcome and baseball performance are like apples and oranges. Or maybe apples and interstellar dust particles.

    This is vastly more dense than a bill james baseball abstract.

    • Thanks: Dieter Kief
    • Replies: @SFG
    @Morton's toes

    Eh, if I were a psychiatrist I'd feel bad if my postings were giving people mental health problems. He was actually in favor of trigger warnings, seeing a lot of the small part of the population who might actually benefit from them.

    TBH I think he could have been a major conservative or libertarian writer with the right background and mentors--Ed West cites him seven times in his new book--but--naah, he'll probably drift around after his career ends.

    He actually winds up being a sort of Jordan Peterson several clicks to the left, turning lefties into center-lefties and center-lefties into independents. If the alt-lite is the light version of the alt-right, and the intellectual dark web is the light version of the alt-lite, SSC was the light version of the intellectual dark web, for liberals who realized woke was BS but couldn't go much further.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    , @Moral Stone
    @Morton's toes

    It should also be noted that small armies of people go back and forth about drug value and pricing stuff. They mostly work for drug companies and payers (eg insurers, hospital systems, Medicare/cade). I suppose a neutral transparent entity looking at the data could be helpful, but the negotiations are opaque so it’s unclear what the impact would be. And even in situations where a well run study compares say two drugs, there are usually methodological considerations that make interpretation difficult.

    , @anonymous as usual
    @Morton's toes

    Thanks, I am glad you put this in perspective.

  5. My two favorite blogs are Steve Sailer and Slate Star Codex. They have a very different commenting policy though. Sailer seems to allow pretty much anyone to post (although perhaps he rejects death threats, I don’t see what does not get through). Scott is completely the opposite, and bans anyone who even approaches incivility. So once “Wild man Sailer” was banned from Slate Star Codex. Completely unfair given the stuff that he lets through here. I have to admit that I found it funny.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @AKAHorace

    Did he wind up banning Steve? I noted him on there quite a few times, kind of surprising given S.A.'s peer group.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @AKAHorace

    , @anonymous as usual
    @AKAHorace

    He never posted my comments after I explained to him why I believed that he is a mediocre thinker who does not understand his fellow humans.

    well good for him I would have banned me too ....
    that being said I was right and he was wrong.

    He is overweight and he could easily not be overweight, polyamorous when he could easily find a real girlfriend, speaks no language except English, which is sheer laziness on his part, and he has no idea about what the real moral issues of today are (trust me, he does not care about partial birth abortion), and he missed all my erudite references to the great writers who inspired Freud and Jung and Otto Rank.

    You know how you see a pile of newspapers and you never think wow I bet the people who wrote day in and day out for those newspapers were insightful geniuses? While each and every one of them is thinking how fucking brilliant they are, people paid 50 cents to buy a paper with their insights in it?

    think about it.

    Slate Star Codex, imho, was a crap website full of phony observations that pretended to be deep. (I know Steve Sailer disagrees with me on that, but I would not say it if I did not believe it).

    He should drop psychiatry and take up pharmacy or something where unrepentant Spergers like him can do less harm. If he can make a lot of bucks off blogging, good for him, but he is still a clueless unrepentant uneducated phony version of what people pretend he is.

    Replies: @SFG, @ScarletNumber, @pirelli

  6. …but there’s no culture of studying these numbers the way America has a huge culture of high IQ guys studying baseball statistics.

    What are all those Eutectics doing with their degrees?

  7. I remember reading his original blog entry about having read Trump’s book, and coming to the conclusion that a real estate developer’s job was to blatantly lie. My immediate thought was, speaking of professions which involve a lot of blatant lying, Scott Alexander is a psychiatrist, right?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Dmon


    My immediate thought was, speaking of professions which involve a lot of blatant lying, Scott Alexander is a psychiatrist, right?
     
    What do therapists lie about?

    Replies: @Dmon, @Hypnotoad666, @Harry Baldwin, @Kratoklastes, @Roger

    , @Mr McKenna
    @Dmon

    It's amusing how many people think that all the other pursuits and professions involve habitual liars, with the notable exception of their own. Somewhat less amusing, to me anyway, is the fact that I think the same way. Though in my own (unnamed) profession there are some miscreants of one kind or another, I know of no other which so consistently puts its clients' interests ahead of its own.

    And yet, and yet. There's that little voice which remains persistent.

    Replies: @Drew, @ScarletNumber

  8. … but there’s no culture of studying these numbers the way America has a huge culture of high IQ guys studying baseball statistics.

    We just had a culture of “high IQ” people, including those in HBD, tell us we needed a Covid lockdown, which cost over a trillion dollars and ruined millions of lives based on scant information. And based on some weird neuroticism.

    Intelligence is very important. But many “high IQ” people have the wisdom of a carrot.

    Use them for what they’re good for. Don’t let them be in control without a little oversight.

    • Agree: Polynikes
    • Replies: @Corn
    @RichardTaylor


    Intelligence is very important. But many “high IQ” people have the wisdom of a carrot.

    Use them for what they’re good for. Don’t let them be in control without a little oversight.
     
    I heard it once put like this: Do not be buffaloed by experts. They often possess more data than judgement.

    Wise words I thought.
  9. @AKAHorace
    My two favorite blogs are Steve Sailer and Slate Star Codex. They have a very different commenting policy though. Sailer seems to allow pretty much anyone to post (although perhaps he rejects death threats, I don't see what does not get through). Scott is completely the opposite, and bans anyone who even approaches incivility. So once "Wild man Sailer" was banned from Slate Star Codex. Completely unfair given the stuff that he lets through here. I have to admit that I found it funny.

    Replies: @SFG, @anonymous as usual

    Did he wind up banning Steve? I noted him on there quite a few times, kind of surprising given S.A.’s peer group.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @SFG

    He temporarily banned Steve due to too blatant self-promotion. But then, many regular commenters were given temp bans, it rarely led to any animosity and most were quickly back. The community has largely re-assembled at a new website:

    https://www.datasecretslox.com/

    , @AKAHorace
    @SFG


    Did he wind up banning Steve? I noted him on there quite a few times, kind of surprising given S.A.’s peer group.

     

    I think that Steve was eventually forgiven, but I still found it funny. Funny because it was totally unfair. S.A. peergroup were smart but tended to social justice so I can see why he would want to engage with them. One of the few places on the internet where people of completely different views could discuss with each other.
  10. @Dmon
    I remember reading his original blog entry about having read Trump's book, and coming to the conclusion that a real estate developer's job was to blatantly lie. My immediate thought was, speaking of professions which involve a lot of blatant lying, Scott Alexander is a psychiatrist, right?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mr McKenna

    My immediate thought was, speaking of professions which involve a lot of blatant lying, Scott Alexander is a psychiatrist, right?

    What do therapists lie about?

    • Replies: @Dmon
    @Anonymous

    Besides the fundamental premise of the whole discipline? Extending the Bill James analogy a little further, James takes a few pages of his book Popular Crime to discuss some of the more obvious areas where psychiatry has pulled up a little bit short of the finish line in the problem solving department. I believe the phrase he uses is "one of the great failures of the 20th century", or words to that effect.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Jim Don Bob

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Anonymous


    What do therapists lie about?
     
    It seems to me that people give credence to therapists because they are perceived as learned authority figures. For this reason, therapy must mostly be about figuring out which story makes the patient feel best.

    For example, some people want to be told they have agency to change and that makes them feel empowered. Others want to be told they have a condition that prevents them from changing so they can be off the hook for trying.

    It's not lying so much as selectively applying a placebo effect.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Anonymous

    One of the things I've heard therapists lie about is the prospective length of treatment. When my teenaged daughter wanted therapy for her personal problems, the therapist assured us it wasn't an open-ended treatment, that if she couldn't wrap it up in six months she'd sign off. This was to reassure us that the expense would not be too great. Once my daughter began attending weekly sessions, though, there was no end to it. What professionan who provides a service like that, with office rental to cover, doesn't like to have a fully booked calendar? I suppose a therapist who has more work than she can handle can afford to let some patients leave, but undoubtedly others can't.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Kratoklastes
    @Anonymous


    What do therapists lie about?
     
    Oh, little things - like the ability (or otherwise) of their nonsense to outperform placebo.

    Psych[pick an ending] has the same level of scientific merit as a women's magazine horoscope page, phrenology or homeopathy.

    Babbling away at some charlatan - or worse, taking the pills they prescribe - has as much chance of actually remedying mental/behavioural illness, as cancer patients have of being healed by intercessory prayer.

    Most of the poor bastards who patronise these grifting charlatans, get brow-beaten into believing that their results are unrepresentative.

    My blackest-hearted hatred is reserved for the political class, but the different branches of psych[pick an ending] come in a very close second.

    I despise the psychocharlatans more than I despise the leaders of organised religion - mostly because organised religion mo longer has any meaningful social power: no court would impose a church-ordered mandatory prayer session, but courts routinely listen to fucking nonsense from psych pill-peddlers.

    It will be another decade or so before sufficient reputational damage is done to the psychosophasters, to get to the point where courts (of whom I'm no friend) refuse to countenance forcing an offender to take mind-breaking chemical cocktails.

    Replies: @SFG

    , @Roger
    @Anonymous

    Just read Scott Alexander's blog, and you will find some amazing stories of problems in the psychiatric profession. And he is not even trying to make the profession look bad. Yes, it is an inherently dishonest profession.

  11. @Morton's toes
    He posted a comment on the ssc subreddit I saw just a couple days ago. He really does not want to be sitting in a room with a patient and the patient saying something like "all your internet bully buddies have me suicidal." Like he is seriously paranoid about maybe having to deal with that and it aggravates his own anxiety disorders.

    There are tens-thousands of people trying to improve chemical treatment of psychos and a Bill James would not make one teeny tiny itsy bitsy little small difference. Sculpting data sets which are more noise than signal is an enormous amount of work. Medication outcome and baseball performance are like apples and oranges. Or maybe apples and interstellar dust particles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Leonard-White/dp/0898626498/

    This is vastly more dense than a bill james baseball abstract.

    Replies: @SFG, @Moral Stone, @anonymous as usual

    Eh, if I were a psychiatrist I’d feel bad if my postings were giving people mental health problems. He was actually in favor of trigger warnings, seeing a lot of the small part of the population who might actually benefit from them.

    TBH I think he could have been a major conservative or libertarian writer with the right background and mentors–Ed West cites him seven times in his new book–but–naah, he’ll probably drift around after his career ends.

    He actually winds up being a sort of Jordan Peterson several clicks to the left, turning lefties into center-lefties and center-lefties into independents. If the alt-lite is the light version of the alt-right, and the intellectual dark web is the light version of the alt-lite, SSC was the light version of the intellectual dark web, for liberals who realized woke was BS but couldn’t go much further.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @SFG

    After being haunted for months after seeing an animal torture video posted on twitter I've come to be a strong advocate for trigger warnings, although admittedly it seems hard to understand how text can ve as triggering as video or audio

    Replies: @Old Prude

  12. @Dmon
    I remember reading his original blog entry about having read Trump's book, and coming to the conclusion that a real estate developer's job was to blatantly lie. My immediate thought was, speaking of professions which involve a lot of blatant lying, Scott Alexander is a psychiatrist, right?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Mr McKenna

    It’s amusing how many people think that all the other pursuits and professions involve habitual liars, with the notable exception of their own. Somewhat less amusing, to me anyway, is the fact that I think the same way. Though in my own (unnamed) profession there are some miscreants of one kind or another, I know of no other which so consistently puts its clients’ interests ahead of its own.

    And yet, and yet. There’s that little voice which remains persistent.

    • Replies: @Drew
    @Mr McKenna

    That's a bit extreme. Some professions have to be honest, like realtors. There a huge penalties for lying if you're a realtor, and opportunities to check on the veracity of your claims. Other professions, like trash collection, have no reason, or opportunity for dishonesty. In my experience, the most dishonest professions to be centered around home construction and repair, used cars (sales and repair), and high end electronics. A decent number of professions are more or less forced to be honest.

    Replies: @Zpaladin, @Mike1

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Mr McKenna

    As a teacher, I can tell you that I have to lie every day in order to keep my job. I teach in a STEM field so I don't have to lie about my material, but if I let my students and bosses know what I thought of them and their dopey ideas, my certificate would be revoked. Telling Phillip that his taking my class is a waste of my time and his and he would be better off dropping out of school might be truthful, but would be hazardous to my continued employment.

    Don't get me started on the secretaries and the janitors.

    I would imagine that the liberal arts teachers have it even tougher, as they have to lie about their actual material in order to make it politically palatable, in additi0n to the lying I mentioned above.

    Replies: @Marty

  13. @SFG
    @AKAHorace

    Did he wind up banning Steve? I noted him on there quite a few times, kind of surprising given S.A.'s peer group.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @AKAHorace

    He temporarily banned Steve due to too blatant self-promotion. But then, many regular commenters were given temp bans, it rarely led to any animosity and most were quickly back. The community has largely re-assembled at a new website:

    https://www.datasecretslox.com/

  14. @SFG
    @AKAHorace

    Did he wind up banning Steve? I noted him on there quite a few times, kind of surprising given S.A.'s peer group.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @AKAHorace

    Did he wind up banning Steve? I noted him on there quite a few times, kind of surprising given S.A.’s peer group.

    I think that Steve was eventually forgiven, but I still found it funny. Funny because it was totally unfair. S.A. peergroup were smart but tended to social justice so I can see why he would want to engage with them. One of the few places on the internet where people of completely different views could discuss with each other.

  15. @Anonymous
    @Dmon


    My immediate thought was, speaking of professions which involve a lot of blatant lying, Scott Alexander is a psychiatrist, right?
     
    What do therapists lie about?

    Replies: @Dmon, @Hypnotoad666, @Harry Baldwin, @Kratoklastes, @Roger

    Besides the fundamental premise of the whole discipline? Extending the Bill James analogy a little further, James takes a few pages of his book Popular Crime to discuss some of the more obvious areas where psychiatry has pulled up a little bit short of the finish line in the problem solving department. I believe the phrase he uses is “one of the great failures of the 20th century”, or words to that effect.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Dmon


    Besides the fundamental premise of the whole discipline?
     
    I don’t know what you mean by “fundamental premise of the discipline.” Educated people spend hundreds of dollars an hour for therapy. I’d say burden is on you to give a better explanation of your position.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @Dmon

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Dmon


    I believe the phrase he uses is “one of the great failures of the 20th century”, or words to that effect.
     
    Yeah, without drugs they'd have nothing to show for a hundred years of work.
  16. If you insist on attaching yourself to some shitlib midwit, why not Amber Frost or Anna Khachiyan? They occasionally say things far enough outside acceptability to deserve their being cancelled. Scott never does—but he is an autistic creep, so he gets bullied all the time. It’s not the same. He doesn’t earn it. It just happens.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Hemid

    SA is neither shitlib nor midwit, have you read him? And he gets bullied not because he is autistic but for the opposite reason--he is overempathetic and can't deal with anyone thinking him "a bad person", so he's an easy target. (Ok, I admit this is sort of a shitlib trait)

    Replies: @Anonymous

  17. Hopefully he’s plotting some naughty behavior at the NYT 😏

  18. @SFG
    @Morton's toes

    Eh, if I were a psychiatrist I'd feel bad if my postings were giving people mental health problems. He was actually in favor of trigger warnings, seeing a lot of the small part of the population who might actually benefit from them.

    TBH I think he could have been a major conservative or libertarian writer with the right background and mentors--Ed West cites him seven times in his new book--but--naah, he'll probably drift around after his career ends.

    He actually winds up being a sort of Jordan Peterson several clicks to the left, turning lefties into center-lefties and center-lefties into independents. If the alt-lite is the light version of the alt-right, and the intellectual dark web is the light version of the alt-lite, SSC was the light version of the intellectual dark web, for liberals who realized woke was BS but couldn't go much further.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    After being haunted for months after seeing an animal torture video posted on twitter I’ve come to be a strong advocate for trigger warnings, although admittedly it seems hard to understand how text can ve as triggering as video or audio

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @AndrewR

    I won't watch Tarantino movies or snuff videos or anything with gratuitous violence. Life is disturbing enough without inviting voyeuristic gore into one's mind.

    Schindlers List? Pass

    Saddam's execution? Pass

    No Country for Old Men? Pass

    Sniper kills? Pass.

    It is exceeding strange that society is so prudish about trifles like the N-word, and worked up about "bullying", yet revels in ungodly gore and violence in its popular fiction. It seems similar to the hyperventilating outrage over that Zumba instructor in Kennebunk Maine offering services to lonely men, yet approving acquiescence to the raunchy sex and pornography pervading television, the movies and the internet.

  19. Anonymous[215] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hemid
    If you insist on attaching yourself to some shitlib midwit, why not Amber Frost or Anna Khachiyan? They occasionally say things far enough outside acceptability to deserve their being cancelled. Scott never does—but he is an autistic creep, so he gets bullied all the time. It's not the same. He doesn't earn it. It just happens.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    SA is neither shitlib nor midwit, have you read him? And he gets bullied not because he is autistic but for the opposite reason–he is overempathetic and can’t deal with anyone thinking him “a bad person”, so he’s an easy target. (Ok, I admit this is sort of a shitlib trait)

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    From her comment history, Hemid looks to be a woman who's miffed that non-sexy men get to have opinions.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  20. @Mr McKenna
    Dude. What about this Substack. Why not?

    Caveat: I know nothing about it. But are you too 'edgy' to be hosted there?

    extremely generous
     
    Ya gotta admit, it has an appealing ring to it... ;)

    Replies: @Polynikes

    I believe guys like Matt Taibi and Glen Greenwald have columns there. I follow them on Twitter, but they’re columns are subscription only.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Polynikes

    Glen Greenwald is the only honest liberal left.

  21. @Anonymous
    @Dmon


    My immediate thought was, speaking of professions which involve a lot of blatant lying, Scott Alexander is a psychiatrist, right?
     
    What do therapists lie about?

    Replies: @Dmon, @Hypnotoad666, @Harry Baldwin, @Kratoklastes, @Roger

    What do therapists lie about?

    It seems to me that people give credence to therapists because they are perceived as learned authority figures. For this reason, therapy must mostly be about figuring out which story makes the patient feel best.

    For example, some people want to be told they have agency to change and that makes them feel empowered. Others want to be told they have a condition that prevents them from changing so they can be off the hook for trying.

    It’s not lying so much as selectively applying a placebo effect.

  22. @Anonymous
    @Dmon


    My immediate thought was, speaking of professions which involve a lot of blatant lying, Scott Alexander is a psychiatrist, right?
     
    What do therapists lie about?

    Replies: @Dmon, @Hypnotoad666, @Harry Baldwin, @Kratoklastes, @Roger

    One of the things I’ve heard therapists lie about is the prospective length of treatment. When my teenaged daughter wanted therapy for her personal problems, the therapist assured us it wasn’t an open-ended treatment, that if she couldn’t wrap it up in six months she’d sign off. This was to reassure us that the expense would not be too great. Once my daughter began attending weekly sessions, though, there was no end to it. What professionan who provides a service like that, with office rental to cover, doesn’t like to have a fully booked calendar? I suppose a therapist who has more work than she can handle can afford to let some patients leave, but undoubtedly others can’t.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Harry Baldwin


    What professionan who provides a service like that, with office rental to cover, doesn’t like to have a fully booked calendar? I suppose a therapist who has more work than she can handle can afford to let some patients leave, but undoubtedly others can’t.
     
    Would this reasoning apply to all health professionals?

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Roger

  23. @Anonymous
    @Dmon


    My immediate thought was, speaking of professions which involve a lot of blatant lying, Scott Alexander is a psychiatrist, right?
     
    What do therapists lie about?

    Replies: @Dmon, @Hypnotoad666, @Harry Baldwin, @Kratoklastes, @Roger

    What do therapists lie about?

    Oh, little things – like the ability (or otherwise) of their nonsense to outperform placebo.

    Psych[pick an ending] has the same level of scientific merit as a women’s magazine horoscope page, phrenology or homeopathy.

    Babbling away at some charlatan – or worse, taking the pills they prescribe – has as much chance of actually remedying mental/behavioural illness, as cancer patients have of being healed by intercessory prayer.

    Most of the poor bastards who patronise these grifting charlatans, get brow-beaten into believing that their results are unrepresentative.

    My blackest-hearted hatred is reserved for the political class, but the different branches of psych[pick an ending] come in a very close second.

    I despise the psychocharlatans more than I despise the leaders of organised religion – mostly because organised religion mo longer has any meaningful social power: no court would impose a church-ordered mandatory prayer session, but courts routinely listen to fucking nonsense from psych pill-peddlers.

    It will be another decade or so before sufficient reputational damage is done to the psychosophasters, to get to the point where courts (of whom I’m no friend) refuse to countenance forcing an offender to take mind-breaking chemical cocktails.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Kratoklastes

    Every society has its way of dealing with mental illness.

    There were some findings primitive tribes dealt better with schizophrenia, but from what I recall it seemed more like they didn't become outcast and stigmatized, so that was why. Also, apparently similar phenomena happen to normally functioning people sometimes (hearing voices etc), they just ignore them.

    Perhaps 1000 years ago you heard a voice saying someone was plotting against you, figured it was the Devil trying to tempt you into sin, said a rosary, and went on with your life.

    Or you couldn't ignore them and people thought you had been possessed by demons. I've always wondered how much of the Catholic Church's rules on demons were medieval psychiatry. Anyone here with actual knowledge of Catholicism care to comment?

  24. @AndrewR
    @SFG

    After being haunted for months after seeing an animal torture video posted on twitter I've come to be a strong advocate for trigger warnings, although admittedly it seems hard to understand how text can ve as triggering as video or audio

    Replies: @Old Prude

    I won’t watch Tarantino movies or snuff videos or anything with gratuitous violence. Life is disturbing enough without inviting voyeuristic gore into one’s mind.

    Schindlers List? Pass

    Saddam’s execution? Pass

    No Country for Old Men? Pass

    Sniper kills? Pass.

    It is exceeding strange that society is so prudish about trifles like the N-word, and worked up about “bullying”, yet revels in ungodly gore and violence in its popular fiction. It seems similar to the hyperventilating outrage over that Zumba instructor in Kennebunk Maine offering services to lonely men, yet approving acquiescence to the raunchy sex and pornography pervading television, the movies and the internet.

    • Agree: Dissident
  25. @Dmon
    @Anonymous

    Besides the fundamental premise of the whole discipline? Extending the Bill James analogy a little further, James takes a few pages of his book Popular Crime to discuss some of the more obvious areas where psychiatry has pulled up a little bit short of the finish line in the problem solving department. I believe the phrase he uses is "one of the great failures of the 20th century", or words to that effect.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Jim Don Bob

    Besides the fundamental premise of the whole discipline?

    I don’t know what you mean by “fundamental premise of the discipline.” Educated people spend hundreds of dollars an hour for therapy. I’d say burden is on you to give a better explanation of your position.

    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @Anonymous

    I'm far from an unstinting admirer of Ludwig Wittgenstein, but I think that this notorious passage from Philosophical Investigations:

    “The confusion and barrenness of psychology is not to be explained by calling it a “young science”; its state is not comparable with that of physics, for instance, in its beginnings... For in psychology there are experimental methods and conceptual confusion... The existence of the experimental method makes us think we have the means of solving the problems which trouble us; though problem and method pass one another by”

    ...is as true now as it was in 1951.

    , @Dmon
    @Anonymous

    https://www.apa.org/distil_identify_cookie.html?httpReferrer=%2Fadvocacy%2Fsubstance-use&distil_rA=2
    https://www.thetaskforce.org/american-psychiatric-association-officially-supports-equality-in-transgender-health/

    Official positions of the APA:
    Smoking nicotine : Mental illness
    Chopping your dick off : Normal and healthy

  26. Anonymous[414] • Disclaimer says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    @Anonymous

    One of the things I've heard therapists lie about is the prospective length of treatment. When my teenaged daughter wanted therapy for her personal problems, the therapist assured us it wasn't an open-ended treatment, that if she couldn't wrap it up in six months she'd sign off. This was to reassure us that the expense would not be too great. Once my daughter began attending weekly sessions, though, there was no end to it. What professionan who provides a service like that, with office rental to cover, doesn't like to have a fully booked calendar? I suppose a therapist who has more work than she can handle can afford to let some patients leave, but undoubtedly others can't.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    What professionan who provides a service like that, with office rental to cover, doesn’t like to have a fully booked calendar? I suppose a therapist who has more work than she can handle can afford to let some patients leave, but undoubtedly others can’t.

    Would this reasoning apply to all health professionals?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Anonymous

    At least where I'm at, physicians tend to be overbooked, and therefore not in need of hyping their services, or holding on to patients too long. There are exceptions, who advertise on the radio, promising miracles.

    , @Roger
    @Anonymous

    No. Physical therapists do not lie like that.

  27. I think I’d feel safer as part of a big group that specifically promises to defend their bloggers when needed.

    The Social Media equivalent of “just the tip.”

  28. @Mr McKenna
    @Dmon

    It's amusing how many people think that all the other pursuits and professions involve habitual liars, with the notable exception of their own. Somewhat less amusing, to me anyway, is the fact that I think the same way. Though in my own (unnamed) profession there are some miscreants of one kind or another, I know of no other which so consistently puts its clients' interests ahead of its own.

    And yet, and yet. There's that little voice which remains persistent.

    Replies: @Drew, @ScarletNumber

    That’s a bit extreme. Some professions have to be honest, like realtors. There a huge penalties for lying if you’re a realtor, and opportunities to check on the veracity of your claims. Other professions, like trash collection, have no reason, or opportunity for dishonesty. In my experience, the most dishonest professions to be centered around home construction and repair, used cars (sales and repair), and high end electronics. A decent number of professions are more or less forced to be honest.

    • Replies: @Zpaladin
    @Drew

    Anything with small frequent transactions where reputation is important and that is easily verifiable would be forced to be honest. The opposite would give opportunity for dishonesty.
    One only buys a few cars in a lifetime and often from different sellers. Cars are complicated enough that it can be hard to evaluate. So, there is likely more dishonesty in used car sales than a greengrocer.
    For sales, religion, alternate medicine or psychotherapy, it would be difficult to distinguish true believers from charlatans. Are there more dishonest palm readers than solar panel salesmen? Well, while solar panels clearly work better than palm readings, perhaps there are lots of true believers.
    It probably has more to do with the audience than the profession. Any get rich quick or easy way to X is likely to have lots of liars.

    , @Mike1
    @Drew

    Realtors lie constantly. I assume you are one to come out with such a bizarre statement. There is almost never a penalty of any kind for lying as a realtor: it has to get into provably criminal behavior before there is an issue.

  29. @RichardTaylor

    ... but there’s no culture of studying these numbers the way America has a huge culture of high IQ guys studying baseball statistics.
     
    We just had a culture of "high IQ" people, including those in HBD, tell us we needed a Covid lockdown, which cost over a trillion dollars and ruined millions of lives based on scant information. And based on some weird neuroticism.

    Intelligence is very important. But many "high IQ" people have the wisdom of a carrot.

    Use them for what they're good for. Don't let them be in control without a little oversight.

    Replies: @Corn

    Intelligence is very important. But many “high IQ” people have the wisdom of a carrot.

    Use them for what they’re good for. Don’t let them be in control without a little oversight.

    I heard it once put like this: Do not be buffaloed by experts. They often possess more data than judgement.

    Wise words I thought.

  30. @Anonymous
    @Hemid

    SA is neither shitlib nor midwit, have you read him? And he gets bullied not because he is autistic but for the opposite reason--he is overempathetic and can't deal with anyone thinking him "a bad person", so he's an easy target. (Ok, I admit this is sort of a shitlib trait)

    Replies: @Anonymous

    From her comment history, Hemid looks to be a woman who’s miffed that non-sexy men get to have opinions.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Hemid is a woman? Hmm. He or she wrote "My wife’s insurance covers more of her expenses than mine does."

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/emergency-legislation/#comment-3766544

    He or she also wrote: "The best place in the world is wherever the finest teenage whores are."

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/thom-maynes-fallout-invasion-of-the-pincer-people/#comment-3716542

    Could be a lesbian, I guess. Or transitioned.
    I enjoyed reading his or her comment history, whatever the case may be.

  31. @Drew
    @Mr McKenna

    That's a bit extreme. Some professions have to be honest, like realtors. There a huge penalties for lying if you're a realtor, and opportunities to check on the veracity of your claims. Other professions, like trash collection, have no reason, or opportunity for dishonesty. In my experience, the most dishonest professions to be centered around home construction and repair, used cars (sales and repair), and high end electronics. A decent number of professions are more or less forced to be honest.

    Replies: @Zpaladin, @Mike1

    Anything with small frequent transactions where reputation is important and that is easily verifiable would be forced to be honest. The opposite would give opportunity for dishonesty.
    One only buys a few cars in a lifetime and often from different sellers. Cars are complicated enough that it can be hard to evaluate. So, there is likely more dishonesty in used car sales than a greengrocer.
    For sales, religion, alternate medicine or psychotherapy, it would be difficult to distinguish true believers from charlatans. Are there more dishonest palm readers than solar panel salesmen? Well, while solar panels clearly work better than palm readings, perhaps there are lots of true believers.
    It probably has more to do with the audience than the profession. Any get rich quick or easy way to X is likely to have lots of liars.

  32. I think he’s deliberately waiting until after the election,

    I think he take NYTs poking around about him as a warning not to fuck with the narrative pre-election,

    I think there’s a fair amount of justification in treating the NYTs actions that way,

    He’s mentioned before that he’s working on a review of Klein’s “Why We’re Polarized”,

    I think he’s hoping Biden’s wins, then he can write from a position of asking Dems not to go crazy with power,

    maybe I’m wrong, but that’s what it seems like to me anyway

  33. @Mr McKenna
    @Dmon

    It's amusing how many people think that all the other pursuits and professions involve habitual liars, with the notable exception of their own. Somewhat less amusing, to me anyway, is the fact that I think the same way. Though in my own (unnamed) profession there are some miscreants of one kind or another, I know of no other which so consistently puts its clients' interests ahead of its own.

    And yet, and yet. There's that little voice which remains persistent.

    Replies: @Drew, @ScarletNumber

    As a teacher, I can tell you that I have to lie every day in order to keep my job. I teach in a STEM field so I don’t have to lie about my material, but if I let my students and bosses know what I thought of them and their dopey ideas, my certificate would be revoked. Telling Phillip that his taking my class is a waste of my time and his and he would be better off dropping out of school might be truthful, but would be hazardous to my continued employment.

    Don’t get me started on the secretaries and the janitors.

    I would imagine that the liberal arts teachers have it even tougher, as they have to lie about their actual material in order to make it politically palatable, in additi0n to the lying I mentioned above.

    • Replies: @Marty
    @ScarletNumber

    https://www.courts.ca.gov/opinions/documents/E071770.PDF

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  34. @Morton's toes
    He posted a comment on the ssc subreddit I saw just a couple days ago. He really does not want to be sitting in a room with a patient and the patient saying something like "all your internet bully buddies have me suicidal." Like he is seriously paranoid about maybe having to deal with that and it aggravates his own anxiety disorders.

    There are tens-thousands of people trying to improve chemical treatment of psychos and a Bill James would not make one teeny tiny itsy bitsy little small difference. Sculpting data sets which are more noise than signal is an enormous amount of work. Medication outcome and baseball performance are like apples and oranges. Or maybe apples and interstellar dust particles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Leonard-White/dp/0898626498/

    This is vastly more dense than a bill james baseball abstract.

    Replies: @SFG, @Moral Stone, @anonymous as usual

    It should also be noted that small armies of people go back and forth about drug value and pricing stuff. They mostly work for drug companies and payers (eg insurers, hospital systems, Medicare/cade). I suppose a neutral transparent entity looking at the data could be helpful, but the negotiations are opaque so it’s unclear what the impact would be. And even in situations where a well run study compares say two drugs, there are usually methodological considerations that make interpretation difficult.

  35. @Drew
    @Mr McKenna

    That's a bit extreme. Some professions have to be honest, like realtors. There a huge penalties for lying if you're a realtor, and opportunities to check on the veracity of your claims. Other professions, like trash collection, have no reason, or opportunity for dishonesty. In my experience, the most dishonest professions to be centered around home construction and repair, used cars (sales and repair), and high end electronics. A decent number of professions are more or less forced to be honest.

    Replies: @Zpaladin, @Mike1

    Realtors lie constantly. I assume you are one to come out with such a bizarre statement. There is almost never a penalty of any kind for lying as a realtor: it has to get into provably criminal behavior before there is an issue.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  36. @ScarletNumber
    @Mr McKenna

    As a teacher, I can tell you that I have to lie every day in order to keep my job. I teach in a STEM field so I don't have to lie about my material, but if I let my students and bosses know what I thought of them and their dopey ideas, my certificate would be revoked. Telling Phillip that his taking my class is a waste of my time and his and he would be better off dropping out of school might be truthful, but would be hazardous to my continued employment.

    Don't get me started on the secretaries and the janitors.

    I would imagine that the liberal arts teachers have it even tougher, as they have to lie about their actual material in order to make it politically palatable, in additi0n to the lying I mentioned above.

    Replies: @Marty

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Marty

    Thank you for posting this. While it isn't directly applicable to me because I don't live in California, my own state has had similar cases that have the same chilling effect on my freedom of speech. My online presence under my real name is practically nil. I think very poorly of Education Realist, but I understand why he posts anonymously.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  37. @Anonymous
    @Dmon


    Besides the fundamental premise of the whole discipline?
     
    I don’t know what you mean by “fundamental premise of the discipline.” Educated people spend hundreds of dollars an hour for therapy. I’d say burden is on you to give a better explanation of your position.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @Dmon

    I’m far from an unstinting admirer of Ludwig Wittgenstein, but I think that this notorious passage from Philosophical Investigations:

    “The confusion and barrenness of psychology is not to be explained by calling it a “young science”; its state is not comparable with that of physics, for instance, in its beginnings… For in psychology there are experimental methods and conceptual confusion… The existence of the experimental method makes us think we have the means of solving the problems which trouble us; though problem and method pass one another by”

    …is as true now as it was in 1951.

  38. “What’s Scott Alexander Up to?”

    pissing in his pants, waiting in terror for the Cancel Squad to dox him after Biden wins.

  39. @Anonymous
    @Dmon


    Besides the fundamental premise of the whole discipline?
     
    I don’t know what you mean by “fundamental premise of the discipline.” Educated people spend hundreds of dollars an hour for therapy. I’d say burden is on you to give a better explanation of your position.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @Dmon

  40. @Anonymous
    @Harry Baldwin


    What professionan who provides a service like that, with office rental to cover, doesn’t like to have a fully booked calendar? I suppose a therapist who has more work than she can handle can afford to let some patients leave, but undoubtedly others can’t.
     
    Would this reasoning apply to all health professionals?

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Roger

    At least where I’m at, physicians tend to be overbooked, and therefore not in need of hyping their services, or holding on to patients too long. There are exceptions, who advertise on the radio, promising miracles.

  41. @Marty
    @ScarletNumber

    https://www.courts.ca.gov/opinions/documents/E071770.PDF

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Thank you for posting this. While it isn’t directly applicable to me because I don’t live in California, my own state has had similar cases that have the same chilling effect on my freedom of speech. My online presence under my real name is practically nil. I think very poorly of Education Realist, but I understand why he posts anonymously.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @ScarletNumber

    There was a similar incident during the Mizzou mayhem where a teacher refused to pass students who skipped exams to go protest. He was forced to resign, but unlike in this case, was later reinstated.

  42. @AKAHorace
    My two favorite blogs are Steve Sailer and Slate Star Codex. They have a very different commenting policy though. Sailer seems to allow pretty much anyone to post (although perhaps he rejects death threats, I don't see what does not get through). Scott is completely the opposite, and bans anyone who even approaches incivility. So once "Wild man Sailer" was banned from Slate Star Codex. Completely unfair given the stuff that he lets through here. I have to admit that I found it funny.

    Replies: @SFG, @anonymous as usual

    He never posted my comments after I explained to him why I believed that he is a mediocre thinker who does not understand his fellow humans.

    well good for him I would have banned me too ….
    that being said I was right and he was wrong.

    He is overweight and he could easily not be overweight, polyamorous when he could easily find a real girlfriend, speaks no language except English, which is sheer laziness on his part, and he has no idea about what the real moral issues of today are (trust me, he does not care about partial birth abortion), and he missed all my erudite references to the great writers who inspired Freud and Jung and Otto Rank.

    You know how you see a pile of newspapers and you never think wow I bet the people who wrote day in and day out for those newspapers were insightful geniuses? While each and every one of them is thinking how fucking brilliant they are, people paid 50 cents to buy a paper with their insights in it?

    think about it.

    Slate Star Codex, imho, was a crap website full of phony observations that pretended to be deep. (I know Steve Sailer disagrees with me on that, but I would not say it if I did not believe it).

    He should drop psychiatry and take up pharmacy or something where unrepentant Spergers like him can do less harm. If he can make a lot of bucks off blogging, good for him, but he is still a clueless unrepentant uneducated phony version of what people pretend he is.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @anonymous as usual

    The also-poly fellow at Putanumonit (another, less known, rationalist blog) said poly appealed to people (probably men the way it read) at both tails of the attractiveness distribution: very attractive guys able to juggle multiple women, and very unattractive guys willing to settle for a partial share in a woman rather than none. I'd guess he falls into the second category, but since he had his own fanboy meetups (I attended one: bunch of twentysomething programmers, probably not a bad way for guys like that to network), perhaps it was the first?

    Replies: @Corn, @ScarletNumber

    , @ScarletNumber
    @anonymous as usual


    He is overweight and he could easily not be overweight, polyamorous when he could easily find a real girlfriend, speaks no language except English, which is sheer laziness on his part, and he has no idea about what the real moral issues of today are (trust me, he does not care about partial birth abortion), and he missed all my erudite references to the great writers who inspired Freud and Jung and Otto Rank.
     
    I thought you were being sarcastic here, but later on in your comment you kept piling on, so now I'm not sure.

    Replies: @anonymous as usual

    , @pirelli
    @anonymous as usual

    Lol. I liked SlateStarCodex and consider Scott Alexander one of the most intelligent, insightful bloggers of the last decade. His “Scissor” concept is extremely useful, although it does always make me think of South Park. That said, when reading his blog, I’d often find myself thinking, “Y’know, Scott’s life is just very, very different from mine.” A lot of what he says doesn’t resonate with me at all, and I don’t think that’s because it’s wrong, but instead because he’s speaking from a side of the tracks that I’ve never lived on. I’ve never been an overweight, spergy guy who doesn’t particularly like sex, who is threatened by people who work out, and who struggles to meet women. So I understand some of your criticisms of him, but I still think the blog had a lot of value.

  43. @Morton's toes
    He posted a comment on the ssc subreddit I saw just a couple days ago. He really does not want to be sitting in a room with a patient and the patient saying something like "all your internet bully buddies have me suicidal." Like he is seriously paranoid about maybe having to deal with that and it aggravates his own anxiety disorders.

    There are tens-thousands of people trying to improve chemical treatment of psychos and a Bill James would not make one teeny tiny itsy bitsy little small difference. Sculpting data sets which are more noise than signal is an enormous amount of work. Medication outcome and baseball performance are like apples and oranges. Or maybe apples and interstellar dust particles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Leonard-White/dp/0898626498/

    This is vastly more dense than a bill james baseball abstract.

    Replies: @SFG, @Moral Stone, @anonymous as usual

    Thanks, I am glad you put this in perspective.

  44. @Anonymous
    @Harry Baldwin


    What professionan who provides a service like that, with office rental to cover, doesn’t like to have a fully booked calendar? I suppose a therapist who has more work than she can handle can afford to let some patients leave, but undoubtedly others can’t.
     
    Would this reasoning apply to all health professionals?

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Roger

    No. Physical therapists do not lie like that.

  45. @Anonymous
    @Dmon


    My immediate thought was, speaking of professions which involve a lot of blatant lying, Scott Alexander is a psychiatrist, right?
     
    What do therapists lie about?

    Replies: @Dmon, @Hypnotoad666, @Harry Baldwin, @Kratoklastes, @Roger

    Just read Scott Alexander’s blog, and you will find some amazing stories of problems in the psychiatric profession. And he is not even trying to make the profession look bad. Yes, it is an inherently dishonest profession.

  46. @Kratoklastes
    @Anonymous


    What do therapists lie about?
     
    Oh, little things - like the ability (or otherwise) of their nonsense to outperform placebo.

    Psych[pick an ending] has the same level of scientific merit as a women's magazine horoscope page, phrenology or homeopathy.

    Babbling away at some charlatan - or worse, taking the pills they prescribe - has as much chance of actually remedying mental/behavioural illness, as cancer patients have of being healed by intercessory prayer.

    Most of the poor bastards who patronise these grifting charlatans, get brow-beaten into believing that their results are unrepresentative.

    My blackest-hearted hatred is reserved for the political class, but the different branches of psych[pick an ending] come in a very close second.

    I despise the psychocharlatans more than I despise the leaders of organised religion - mostly because organised religion mo longer has any meaningful social power: no court would impose a church-ordered mandatory prayer session, but courts routinely listen to fucking nonsense from psych pill-peddlers.

    It will be another decade or so before sufficient reputational damage is done to the psychosophasters, to get to the point where courts (of whom I'm no friend) refuse to countenance forcing an offender to take mind-breaking chemical cocktails.

    Replies: @SFG

    Every society has its way of dealing with mental illness.

    There were some findings primitive tribes dealt better with schizophrenia, but from what I recall it seemed more like they didn’t become outcast and stigmatized, so that was why. Also, apparently similar phenomena happen to normally functioning people sometimes (hearing voices etc), they just ignore them.

    Perhaps 1000 years ago you heard a voice saying someone was plotting against you, figured it was the Devil trying to tempt you into sin, said a rosary, and went on with your life.

    Or you couldn’t ignore them and people thought you had been possessed by demons. I’ve always wondered how much of the Catholic Church’s rules on demons were medieval psychiatry. Anyone here with actual knowledge of Catholicism care to comment?

  47. @anonymous as usual
    @AKAHorace

    He never posted my comments after I explained to him why I believed that he is a mediocre thinker who does not understand his fellow humans.

    well good for him I would have banned me too ....
    that being said I was right and he was wrong.

    He is overweight and he could easily not be overweight, polyamorous when he could easily find a real girlfriend, speaks no language except English, which is sheer laziness on his part, and he has no idea about what the real moral issues of today are (trust me, he does not care about partial birth abortion), and he missed all my erudite references to the great writers who inspired Freud and Jung and Otto Rank.

    You know how you see a pile of newspapers and you never think wow I bet the people who wrote day in and day out for those newspapers were insightful geniuses? While each and every one of them is thinking how fucking brilliant they are, people paid 50 cents to buy a paper with their insights in it?

    think about it.

    Slate Star Codex, imho, was a crap website full of phony observations that pretended to be deep. (I know Steve Sailer disagrees with me on that, but I would not say it if I did not believe it).

    He should drop psychiatry and take up pharmacy or something where unrepentant Spergers like him can do less harm. If he can make a lot of bucks off blogging, good for him, but he is still a clueless unrepentant uneducated phony version of what people pretend he is.

    Replies: @SFG, @ScarletNumber, @pirelli

    The also-poly fellow at Putanumonit (another, less known, rationalist blog) said poly appealed to people (probably men the way it read) at both tails of the attractiveness distribution: very attractive guys able to juggle multiple women, and very unattractive guys willing to settle for a partial share in a woman rather than none. I’d guess he falls into the second category, but since he had his own fanboy meetups (I attended one: bunch of twentysomething programmers, probably not a bad way for guys like that to network), perhaps it was the first?

    • Replies: @Corn
    @SFG


    very attractive guys able to juggle multiple women, and very unattractive guys willing to settle for a partial share in a woman rather than none.
     
    I’m certainly not a well educated or credentialed blogger, but his experience tends to echo my observations in life. Polyamory, swinging and assorted wife sharing tends to attract both ends of the curve. Superconfident, alpha types who basically view women as disposable, and nerdy, low self esteem types who figure that’s what they have to do to keep a woman.

    Guys with a healthy love of both themselves and their partners just live monogamously.
    , @ScarletNumber
    @SFG

    In polyamory the odds are good but the goods are odd.

  48. @SFG
    @anonymous as usual

    The also-poly fellow at Putanumonit (another, less known, rationalist blog) said poly appealed to people (probably men the way it read) at both tails of the attractiveness distribution: very attractive guys able to juggle multiple women, and very unattractive guys willing to settle for a partial share in a woman rather than none. I'd guess he falls into the second category, but since he had his own fanboy meetups (I attended one: bunch of twentysomething programmers, probably not a bad way for guys like that to network), perhaps it was the first?

    Replies: @Corn, @ScarletNumber

    very attractive guys able to juggle multiple women, and very unattractive guys willing to settle for a partial share in a woman rather than none.

    I’m certainly not a well educated or credentialed blogger, but his experience tends to echo my observations in life. Polyamory, swinging and assorted wife sharing tends to attract both ends of the curve. Superconfident, alpha types who basically view women as disposable, and nerdy, low self esteem types who figure that’s what they have to do to keep a woman.

    Guys with a healthy love of both themselves and their partners just live monogamously.

  49. @anonymous as usual
    @AKAHorace

    He never posted my comments after I explained to him why I believed that he is a mediocre thinker who does not understand his fellow humans.

    well good for him I would have banned me too ....
    that being said I was right and he was wrong.

    He is overweight and he could easily not be overweight, polyamorous when he could easily find a real girlfriend, speaks no language except English, which is sheer laziness on his part, and he has no idea about what the real moral issues of today are (trust me, he does not care about partial birth abortion), and he missed all my erudite references to the great writers who inspired Freud and Jung and Otto Rank.

    You know how you see a pile of newspapers and you never think wow I bet the people who wrote day in and day out for those newspapers were insightful geniuses? While each and every one of them is thinking how fucking brilliant they are, people paid 50 cents to buy a paper with their insights in it?

    think about it.

    Slate Star Codex, imho, was a crap website full of phony observations that pretended to be deep. (I know Steve Sailer disagrees with me on that, but I would not say it if I did not believe it).

    He should drop psychiatry and take up pharmacy or something where unrepentant Spergers like him can do less harm. If he can make a lot of bucks off blogging, good for him, but he is still a clueless unrepentant uneducated phony version of what people pretend he is.

    Replies: @SFG, @ScarletNumber, @pirelli

    He is overweight and he could easily not be overweight, polyamorous when he could easily find a real girlfriend, speaks no language except English, which is sheer laziness on his part, and he has no idea about what the real moral issues of today are (trust me, he does not care about partial birth abortion), and he missed all my erudite references to the great writers who inspired Freud and Jung and Otto Rank.

    I thought you were being sarcastic here, but later on in your comment you kept piling on, so now I’m not sure.

    • Replies: @anonymous as usual
    @ScarletNumber

    To be clear - there is no word for what I was doing if you limit yourself to English words - but fortunately I am fluent in Latin and I have a reading knowledge of Greek, and the best way I can describe what I was trying to do is to say: that was in the style of Aristophanes.

    It is not sarcasm ---- there is no one word for it in English - but read some Aristophanes, and think of what Aristophonean would mean in English if it were an English word like "Kafkaesque" or "Orwellian" or "thus said the Dude" (I might have got that last one wrong, I was referring to that John Goodman movie).

    Basically a mix of judiciously limited praise, real disappointment, brutal truth, and only semi-respectful insults (the kind of insults we called locker room talk in high school and college).

    If you know people in real life who suffer from Asperger's or similar disorders, befriend them and help them with some brutal truth, if you think you can do that without harming them emotionally. (Of course be careful - they are fragile people, and who can blame them? They did not ask to be that way).

    Word.

  50. @SFG
    @anonymous as usual

    The also-poly fellow at Putanumonit (another, less known, rationalist blog) said poly appealed to people (probably men the way it read) at both tails of the attractiveness distribution: very attractive guys able to juggle multiple women, and very unattractive guys willing to settle for a partial share in a woman rather than none. I'd guess he falls into the second category, but since he had his own fanboy meetups (I attended one: bunch of twentysomething programmers, probably not a bad way for guys like that to network), perhaps it was the first?

    Replies: @Corn, @ScarletNumber

    In polyamory the odds are good but the goods are odd.

  51. @anonymous as usual
    @AKAHorace

    He never posted my comments after I explained to him why I believed that he is a mediocre thinker who does not understand his fellow humans.

    well good for him I would have banned me too ....
    that being said I was right and he was wrong.

    He is overweight and he could easily not be overweight, polyamorous when he could easily find a real girlfriend, speaks no language except English, which is sheer laziness on his part, and he has no idea about what the real moral issues of today are (trust me, he does not care about partial birth abortion), and he missed all my erudite references to the great writers who inspired Freud and Jung and Otto Rank.

    You know how you see a pile of newspapers and you never think wow I bet the people who wrote day in and day out for those newspapers were insightful geniuses? While each and every one of them is thinking how fucking brilliant they are, people paid 50 cents to buy a paper with their insights in it?

    think about it.

    Slate Star Codex, imho, was a crap website full of phony observations that pretended to be deep. (I know Steve Sailer disagrees with me on that, but I would not say it if I did not believe it).

    He should drop psychiatry and take up pharmacy or something where unrepentant Spergers like him can do less harm. If he can make a lot of bucks off blogging, good for him, but he is still a clueless unrepentant uneducated phony version of what people pretend he is.

    Replies: @SFG, @ScarletNumber, @pirelli

    Lol. I liked SlateStarCodex and consider Scott Alexander one of the most intelligent, insightful bloggers of the last decade. His “Scissor” concept is extremely useful, although it does always make me think of South Park. That said, when reading his blog, I’d often find myself thinking, “Y’know, Scott’s life is just very, very different from mine.” A lot of what he says doesn’t resonate with me at all, and I don’t think that’s because it’s wrong, but instead because he’s speaking from a side of the tracks that I’ve never lived on. I’ve never been an overweight, spergy guy who doesn’t particularly like sex, who is threatened by people who work out, and who struggles to meet women. So I understand some of your criticisms of him, but I still think the blog had a lot of value.

  52. @ScarletNumber
    @anonymous as usual


    He is overweight and he could easily not be overweight, polyamorous when he could easily find a real girlfriend, speaks no language except English, which is sheer laziness on his part, and he has no idea about what the real moral issues of today are (trust me, he does not care about partial birth abortion), and he missed all my erudite references to the great writers who inspired Freud and Jung and Otto Rank.
     
    I thought you were being sarcastic here, but later on in your comment you kept piling on, so now I'm not sure.

    Replies: @anonymous as usual

    To be clear – there is no word for what I was doing if you limit yourself to English words – but fortunately I am fluent in Latin and I have a reading knowledge of Greek, and the best way I can describe what I was trying to do is to say: that was in the style of Aristophanes.

    It is not sarcasm —- there is no one word for it in English – but read some Aristophanes, and think of what Aristophonean would mean in English if it were an English word like “Kafkaesque” or “Orwellian” or “thus said the Dude” (I might have got that last one wrong, I was referring to that John Goodman movie).

    Basically a mix of judiciously limited praise, real disappointment, brutal truth, and only semi-respectful insults (the kind of insults we called locker room talk in high school and college).

    If you know people in real life who suffer from Asperger’s or similar disorders, befriend them and help them with some brutal truth, if you think you can do that without harming them emotionally. (Of course be careful – they are fragile people, and who can blame them? They did not ask to be that way).

    Word.

  53. Anonymous[374] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    From her comment history, Hemid looks to be a woman who's miffed that non-sexy men get to have opinions.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Hemid is a woman? Hmm. He or she wrote “My wife’s insurance covers more of her expenses than mine does.”

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/emergency-legislation/#comment-3766544

    He or she also wrote: “The best place in the world is wherever the finest teenage whores are.”

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/thom-maynes-fallout-invasion-of-the-pincer-people/#comment-3716542

    Could be a lesbian, I guess. Or transitioned.
    I enjoyed reading his or her comment history, whatever the case may be.

  54. @ScarletNumber
    @Marty

    Thank you for posting this. While it isn't directly applicable to me because I don't live in California, my own state has had similar cases that have the same chilling effect on my freedom of speech. My online presence under my real name is practically nil. I think very poorly of Education Realist, but I understand why he posts anonymously.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    There was a similar incident during the Mizzou mayhem where a teacher refused to pass students who skipped exams to go protest. He was forced to resign, but unlike in this case, was later reinstated.

  55. @Dmon
    @Anonymous

    Besides the fundamental premise of the whole discipline? Extending the Bill James analogy a little further, James takes a few pages of his book Popular Crime to discuss some of the more obvious areas where psychiatry has pulled up a little bit short of the finish line in the problem solving department. I believe the phrase he uses is "one of the great failures of the 20th century", or words to that effect.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Jim Don Bob

    I believe the phrase he uses is “one of the great failures of the 20th century”, or words to that effect.

    Yeah, without drugs they’d have nothing to show for a hundred years of work.

  56. @Polynikes
    @Mr McKenna

    I believe guys like Matt Taibi and Glen Greenwald have columns there. I follow them on Twitter, but they’re columns are subscription only.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Glen Greenwald is the only honest liberal left.

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