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From my new column in Taki’s Magazine:

Science Says
Steve Sailer

April 29, 2020

When faced with a new conundrum with no certain answer, the single most valuable political principle is precisely what many people simply can’t abide at this moment: freedom of speech.

During the novel coronavirus crisis, when nobody has proved infallible, we need, more than ever, an open marketplace of ideas in which opposing strategies are fiercely debated. …

Unfortunately, censorship is growing, along with elite enthusiasm for making emergency rules permanent. …

But, precisely because in this unprecedented situation nobody knows for sure what to do, many Americans find dissent distressing, much like Germans in 1933 found the Führerprinzip an appealing alternative to all that arguing in the Reichstag.

Many now wish everybody who disagrees with them could be forced to shut up and do as they are told. After all, they have, whatever their views, Science on their side and their enemies have not.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. Kyle-Sidell refusing to shut up about this discovery meant that the biggest fear about the current pandemic—that hospitals would be overwhelmed by coronavirus, leaving patients with conventional ailments such as heart attacks and strokes to die in the parking lot—was less realistic than had been feared.

    Instead, hospitals were underwhelmed, leaving patients with conventional ailments such as heart attacks and strokes to die at home.

    #stayhomesavelives

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    In the UK, usually 30,000 patients a month are diagnosed with cancer. Last month the figure was maybe 5,000.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/29/extra-18000-cancer-patients-in-england-could-die-in-next-year-study


    Urgent referrals by GPs for cancer tests have fallen by 76% and appointments for chemotherapy by 60% since the pandemic arrived in February despite NHS England insisting cancer treatment “should continue unaffected”. The health service hopes to resume cancer operations this week but faces a large backlog.
     
    https://twitter.com/ProfKarolSikora/status/1253003690816012289
  2. What We Now Need Most: Free Speech

    You don’t understand, Steve.

    There’s a whole new normal: The New Normal

    And free speech isn’t part of it.

    • Replies: @Tiny Duck
    I know this is suposed to be a cut at preogressives but it does nothold up

    We progressives value free speech but not hate speech. Learn the difference.

    It is conservatives and right wingers that are against the first amendment. Every time a Person of Color dares speak out white people disagree with them, mock them, argue with them and do other things that stifle the Free Expression of the Person of Color.

    We progressives are sick of you people. We remeber the rapist on the supreme court, we remmber the racism

    We will win this fall and we will make you guys keel over with the changes that we will put in place

    Say goodbye to your guns white boys!

    So hello to hate speech laws!
  3. Thanks for writing in defense of the First Amendment. I’m concerned over the continuing erosion of freedom of speech from Big Tech.

    And we already have enough data points to start seeing the side down the slippery slope. At first it was banning bad-thinking on fringe stuff like transexuals.

    Then it was “far right” politicians.

    Now it’s discussion of literally the biggest story on the world.

    Facebook is literally banning anti-government protest organizers at the request of state governments. Over the past several years there’s been concern that tech companies might help Egypt or China or Iran to suppress dissent and censor speech.
    But we’re seeing it in the US right now.

    • Replies: @Hail

    Facebook is literally banning anti-government protest organizers
     
    Facebook is also deleting Knut Wittkowski's interviews that people post, and I know for a fact it has also attached "fake news"-style warnings to links people post to Dr. Ioannidis and others.

    Facebook’s censors are now the arbiters of reality and decide what is right and not, rather than PhDs; welcome to Big Tech-filtered reality…
     
    "Take your decades of experience, expertise, PhDs, and shove 'em! We in charge now."
    -- Google, Facebook, Youtube; the GooFY Coalition for Corona-Heresy Suppression
  4. Feminists are the people most opposed to free speech, try reading MGTOW on Reddit and see what happens.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    Winner for most irrelevant comment on this post award.

    Actually, incels and feminists (a true match made in heaven even if they don’t know it themselves) bickering on an Internet forum is an example of free speech still existing somewhere.
  5. ” . . . [M]any Americans find dissent distressing, much like Germans in 1933 found the Führerprinzip an appealing alternative to all that arguing in the Reichstag.”

    Steve, check the November 1932 German election, and I believe 2/3 of the German electorate voted something other than Nationalist Socialist. Even the Nationalist Socialist vote can surely be parsed to distinguish those who voted along nationalist lines, those who voted along socialist lines, and probably a tiny minority who voted along Hitler’s-a-bloody-genius lines.

    You’re right, by implication I guess, that the empty quarelling of democracies, channelled through well-fattened elected toe-rags and bureaucratic lickspittles, is profoundly disgusting.

    ” . . . [M]any Americans find dissent distressing . . .”. You’d better believe it, buddy! God bless, bro’. Most Americans are okay with sacrificing “fundamental values” (religiosity, family, social decorum?) for immediate or near-term economic advantage. That’s just reality.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    This is my favourite example for people who stupidly believe in 'democracy' (and particularly, in parliamentary, 'representative' democracy).

    The March 1933 election is the election most-aligned with the putative principles of democracy:
     • high level of voter registration (44.7m voters in a population of ~67m);
     • large turnout (88.7%).
     • full-franchise;
     • no hint of gerrymandering, voter-suppression or other jiggery-pokery;
     • genuinely multi-party.

    The NSDAP got 43.9% of the vote, so overall it got a larger proportion of the eligible vote (38.9%) than any US President since the Civil War (and let's just say that the US did not have a full-franchise for the vast bulk of that time; women didn't get to vote in Presidential elections after WWI).

    The NSDAP's result did not get them a majority of the seats (so they didn't have the power to form a government).

    A list of governments who didn't get anywhere near that:
     • UK: every government since 1951 (not genuinely full-franchise)
     • US: every President since 1876 (no women until 1920)
     • Australia: every government since Federation (fake system: compulsory);
     • New Zealand: every government ever formed;
     • France: ditto;
     • Germany: ditto;

    Things to note:
     ∘ In the 1951 UK election, 18 year olds didn't have the right to vote, but they were subject to conscription: if you can be sent to die for a government in whose selection you play no part, the franchise is incomplete).
     ∘ Australia requires its herd to vote, resulting in forced preference expression for people who are hesitant to break the law. This means that there is no discernible 'mandate' that emerges from the aggregation of votes (and there isn't anyway, because of Arrow's Impossibility Theorem).


    inb4 some midwit claims 'Voting is not compulsory in Australia: all that's required is that you get your name marked off the roll. There is no requirement to mark the paper'.

    That's a deliberately false representation made by people who want to squirm out of what the law says.

    s245(15) of the Electoral Act 1918 makes it an offence to fail to vote; s245(14) says that religious objection is the sole guaranteed excuse. s239 and s240 of the same act list the requirements for marking the ballot paper; the voter is required to mark the paper in accordance with those sections.

    It's an offence with a very low probability of detection, but it's an offence nonetheless.

    Another offence with a low probability of detection: driving drunk at 130km/hr on a deserted country road at 3am. I doubt that pro-democracy dimwads think that their bullshit argument applies to such a case.

    It takes a very skewed worldview to pick and choose which offences are OK so long as the risk of detection is low.

    TL;DR: Don't vote. It doesn't matter who you vote for, you wind up being ruled by parasitic, megalomaniacal sociopaths: if not at that specific election, then at some stage thereafter. There are no exceptions, ever... no backsies, no returns infinity.
  6. @Mr. Anon

    Kyle-Sidell refusing to shut up about this discovery meant that the biggest fear about the current pandemic—that hospitals would be overwhelmed by coronavirus, leaving patients with conventional ailments such as heart attacks and strokes to die in the parking lot—was less realistic than had been feared.
     
    Instead, hospitals were underwhelmed, leaving patients with conventional ailments such as heart attacks and strokes to die at home.

    #stayhomesavelives

    In the UK, usually 30,000 patients a month are diagnosed with cancer. Last month the figure was maybe 5,000.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/29/extra-18000-cancer-patients-in-england-could-die-in-next-year-study

    Urgent referrals by GPs for cancer tests have fallen by 76% and appointments for chemotherapy by 60% since the pandemic arrived in February despite NHS England insisting cancer treatment “should continue unaffected”. The health service hopes to resume cancer operations this week but faces a large backlog.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I really wouldn't skip a chemotherapy session.
    , @Anon
    Looks like we're in the middle of a natural experiment testing Robin Hanson's thesis that a lot of medical care is useless. We'll find out in a few years.
    , @guest007
    However, is one is immune compromised in a jurisdiction that has decided on herd immunity instead of suppression, then the cancer cure could end up as fatal as the cancer.
  7. Great column, and you stuck the landing with the conclusion this time.

    • Agree: Abe
    • Replies: @moshe
    Not his fault. Taki became a billianaore through being one of the greediest bastards alive. He has people truncate all of Steve's columns around the 70% mark in the hopes of scaring one of his readers into clicking one of the pictorially grotesque advertised elixirs he promotes.

    Every so often Steve either outsmarts him or accidentally appears to.
    , @AnotherDad

    Great column, and you stuck the landing with the conclusion this time.
     
    Well said big Dave. My thoughts exactly.

    Excellent column Steve--end to end.

    Managing the China virus is precisely proving the value of free speech--if there was ever any doubt--as the establishment has bounced around between incompetence, outright lying, stupidity, sheer silliness and of course grasping for power.
  8. @YetAnotherAnon
    In the UK, usually 30,000 patients a month are diagnosed with cancer. Last month the figure was maybe 5,000.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/29/extra-18000-cancer-patients-in-england-could-die-in-next-year-study


    Urgent referrals by GPs for cancer tests have fallen by 76% and appointments for chemotherapy by 60% since the pandemic arrived in February despite NHS England insisting cancer treatment “should continue unaffected”. The health service hopes to resume cancer operations this week but faces a large backlog.
     
    https://twitter.com/ProfKarolSikora/status/1253003690816012289

    I really wouldn’t skip a chemotherapy session.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    I know two people with bladder cancer, one has had his operation postponed and one has had his chemo postponed. I think this was driven by the hospitals, not patients, no one with any sense is skipping chemo.

    18 cancer centres have been set up in hospitals where no CV19 patients are sent, so someone is thinking about risks to immuno-compromised people.

    I know a fair few medics, and everywhere the story is the same - relatively empty hospitals (some admittedly newly set up) while the CV19 avalanche is awaited. The pub and club closures mean A&E departments are mainly dealing with kids trampoline injuries.

    They are just starting to realise that the avalanche isn't coming (at least not this minute), and that meanwhile a lot of people who DIDN'T ski the Dolomites this year are suffering.

    In London, meanwhile, the usual suspects are adapting.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/apr/28/nhs-worker-david-gomoh-stabbed-death-before-father-funeral-london


    A gang believed to be wearing medical-style face masks and gloves stabbed an NHS worker to death in an attack just days before his father’s funeral.

    David Gomoh, 24, was set upon by a gang of four to five males moments after he left his home in east London, close to the NHS Nightingale field hospital at the Excel centre, on Sunday evening.

    Police say the attack was unprovoked and against a wholly innocent victim by a gang that went out armed and looking for a target.
     

    PS - Boris is a dad - again.
    , @jim jones
    The NHS is the Marxist flagship and the Guardian churns out agitprop to portray the Labour Party as the only people who can save it
    , @Buzz Mohawk

    I really wouldn’t skip a chemotherapy session.
     
    The people who do, and all the others who will die because of shutdowns -- and those who already have -- can be added to the "excess deaths" number to further pad the total, as you are doing here:

    Nationally, up through April 4, excess deaths were about twice official coronavirus deaths in the U.S., so we are likely up to 100,000 deaths by now.
     
    Why don't you subtract all the deaths attributed to your favorite illness because of coexistence with other causes or because doctors are being encouraged to use covid-19 as cause of death when they don't know?

    "Let's argue about this."

    Another thing this big story is exposing is people's confirmation bias. Some of us are biased the other way.

    My wife an I now know two families, parents with children, in which everyone has tested positive. Out of those, only one person, a grandmother, went into a hospital. She is home now and okay.

    We live in one of the outer rings around the New York City epicenter and the New Rochelle ground zero first explosion. We live next to the first town in our state that had its own explosion of cases brought over immediately from the epicenter. That happened quite some time before masks, distancing and shutdowns, so your friend Corona-chan was here long before we did anything about her.

    There has been no random test that I am aware of, but no doubt many of us have the virus or antibodies. Yet those families are the only cases we know, and they are all fine.

    Kudos to you, Steve, for remembering free speech and dialectic. You did not deserve my one really shitty comment to you. I apologize. (Now my wife's father is in hospice care, ready to join his wife in heaven, and we still can't get there. In good marriages, people often leave together. They are leaving together, while we can't go anywhere.)

    I lost a filling weeks ago but can't get it replaced, so the tooth will just decay for awhile. My colonoscopy was canceled weeks ago, so if there are any cancerous polyps in my gut, they will stay there and grow and grow... Maybe I can someday be added to the excess deaths total. They can bury me minus one tooth.

    , @Mr. Anon

    I really wouldn’t skip a chemotherapy session.
     
    For a lot of the people doing so, it's not up to them. The decision was made for them.

    After 911, the word "security" came to be used alot. After awhile few words left me feeling less secure than "security".

    Now we here the word "safe" alot. Stay "safe at home". "Frontline workers" (shades of "our boys on the Malabar Front") are supposedly "keeping us safe" (in between those tik-tok dance videos they seem to have time to choreograph and film). Now I can't hardly think of a word that makes me feel less safe than "safe", nor can I think of people who make me feel less safe than people who are ostensibly "keeping me safe".
    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "I really wouldn’t skip a chemotherapy session."

    And it shows.

    #linearvirus
  9. Good column, Steve, as always. Do you think this huge flow of agenda-driven information on COVID-19 affected you more than is usually the case, say for articles about wonderful open-borders, redlining, and Emmitt Till? You usually are very good about filtering out the BS from the Lyin’ Press outlets, especially your very favorites, The NY Times, Atlantic magazine, etc.

    I just don’t know how some very savvy, appropriately-cynical people thought that THIS ONE TIME, the Infotainment “industry” was out there serving a noble purpose, showing the appropriate level of concern about this purported epic crisis of this epidemic. Did the talking heads on TV, who nodded in agreement that, yes, Michael Bloomberg’s $500 million of campaign money could have been used to give each American a million bucks, or showed us fake gas tank explosions in pick-up trucks, suddenly snap out of their retardation and get some ethics, so that they could give you the true picture this time, 24/7?

    Do you think the agenda magically stops for a viral epidemic? The stupidity stops for no man!

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Far from it being a matter of not being able to arrest organizational momentum, they openly desire to wreck the economy and the lives of millions just to be able to have a little political tit-for-tat on Bad Orange Man. Some of them have openly said this: that the "silver lining" is the damage to the Trump economy. I hope that the growing class-crossing consensus that the lockdown was disproportionate and unwarranted* will become a terrible revenge.



    *I'm not disputing the existence of the virus, I'm asking why in the name of social distancing were places where people are physically far apart closed while places where people bump into each other were left open. The criterion should not just have been what a law school graduate arbitrates as "essential" but also square footage.
    , @Mr. Anon
    The massive propaganda campaign accompanying the lockdown should be an indicator of what's behind it. Every other TV ad campaign is now built around the lockdown. Everyone who can is now selling their product - cable internet access, KFC, Pizza Hut, automobiles, whatever - using the lockdown as a hook. FANG is relentlessly promoting the propaganda on all its platforms, elevating pronouncements from the WHO and the CDC as if they were revelations from God. Hollywood, the so-called news media, and the "music industry" are all in line. Virtually every talking head on TV is in lockstep. There is no publicly expressed dissent against the CoV narrative.
  10. Could we please move all the people saying “China is better” to say, Puerto Rico and American Samoa? Let’s see if the CCP enthusiasts can get those areas roaring.

  11. With Science On Our Side, Who Can Be Against Us?

    (With apologies to Romans 8:31)

    That Atlantic article is pretty shocking. Communist China knows better than to let people just say whatever they want! We could learn a thing or two from them!

    I also note that the Atlantic is peddling the Russia Collusion hoax as though we haven’t learned a single thing about it. Which may well be accurate for most of their readers.

    It’s weird how enthralled our “bien pensants” are with China and how virulent their hatred is for Russia.

    • Replies: @anonymous

    It’s weird how enthralled our “bien pensants” are with China and how virulent their hatred is for Russia.
     
    Is it not weird how many who see through Russiadidit are out front in the Chinadidit parade?
    , @Mr. Anon

    It’s weird how enthralled our “bien pensants” are with China and how virulent their hatred is for Russia.
     
    We have always been at peace with China. We have always been at war with Russia.
    , @ben tillman

    That Atlantic article is pretty shocking. Communist China knows better than to let people just say whatever they want! We could learn a thing or two from them!
     
    T^he argument was pretty crazy:

    A. Censorship has helped to secure the power of an evil communist government.
    B. Edward Snowden showed that the USG is surveilling th ehell out of Americans.
    C. Russia interfered with the 2016 election.

    Therefore we should censor the speech of Americans.


    A is something bad.
    B is bizarrely irrelevant.
    C is false and irrelevant.

    And that's the argument.
    , @prime noticer
    "That Atlantic article is pretty shocking."

    the Atlantic is run by jews now. it's not a WASP publication anymore. of course the new owners think China has a better system. jews don't want european peoples to be able to talk freely, associate freely, or get together and share ideas and realize what's happening or who's taking their country away from them.

    go ahead and block as usual, Steve.

    Steve thinks he's clever when he brings up Who, Whom? but he won't tolerate any discussion of it when it's (you know who).
    , @vinteuil

    It’s weird how enthralled our “bien pensants” are with China and how virulent their hatred is for Russia.
     
    It's not weird at all. Russia turned it's back on communism. It is now, officially, at least, a Christian, anti-communist country.

    China, on the other hand, remains, officially, at least, an atheist, communist country.

    Our bien pensants hate Christianity, even when it's only in name, and love communism, even when it's only in name.

    You might find it hard to believe that they're that stupid & that shallow. But they are. They really, truly, are.
    , @Pop Warner
    The tribe is making money in dealing with China but they'll never let go of the centuries-old blood libel against Russia and Russians. As long as they're in the media and government (as politicians or benefactors) the Russia hate will never stop. They only loved Russia in the first 30 years of Bolshevik rule because the Bolsheviks were very good at killing Russians
  12. @Steve Sailer
    I really wouldn't skip a chemotherapy session.

    I know two people with bladder cancer, one has had his operation postponed and one has had his chemo postponed. I think this was driven by the hospitals, not patients, no one with any sense is skipping chemo.

    18 cancer centres have been set up in hospitals where no CV19 patients are sent, so someone is thinking about risks to immuno-compromised people.

    I know a fair few medics, and everywhere the story is the same – relatively empty hospitals (some admittedly newly set up) while the CV19 avalanche is awaited. The pub and club closures mean A&E departments are mainly dealing with kids trampoline injuries.

    They are just starting to realise that the avalanche isn’t coming (at least not this minute), and that meanwhile a lot of people who DIDN’T ski the Dolomites this year are suffering.

    In London, meanwhile, the usual suspects are adapting.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/apr/28/nhs-worker-david-gomoh-stabbed-death-before-father-funeral-london

    A gang believed to be wearing medical-style face masks and gloves stabbed an NHS worker to death in an attack just days before his father’s funeral.

    David Gomoh, 24, was set upon by a gang of four to five males moments after he left his home in east London, close to the NHS Nightingale field hospital at the Excel centre, on Sunday evening.

    Police say the attack was unprovoked and against a wholly innocent victim by a gang that went out armed and looking for a target.

    PS – Boris is a dad – again.

  13. Anonymous[243] • Disclaimer says:

    That great colossus he bestrode both the 19th and 20th centuries like a giant, George Bernard Shaw, once remarked something like, (I’m paraphrasing here), ” The English make a great big show of their devotion to free speech and democracy, but when in times of extremis, when they are really needed, they are very quick to drop both”. This remark was made either during the first or second world wars.

    Now, no one can be a harsher critic of an Englishman than an Irishman, but another quote of GBS is extremely if not sublimely apt:

    “When one Englishman opens his mouth to speak, the moment he utters a word, another Englishman on hearing him instantly despises him”.

    – this refers to the importance of accents in England which are *exact* markers of social class.

  14. @YetAnotherAnon
    In the UK, usually 30,000 patients a month are diagnosed with cancer. Last month the figure was maybe 5,000.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/29/extra-18000-cancer-patients-in-england-could-die-in-next-year-study


    Urgent referrals by GPs for cancer tests have fallen by 76% and appointments for chemotherapy by 60% since the pandemic arrived in February despite NHS England insisting cancer treatment “should continue unaffected”. The health service hopes to resume cancer operations this week but faces a large backlog.
     
    https://twitter.com/ProfKarolSikora/status/1253003690816012289

    Looks like we’re in the middle of a natural experiment testing Robin Hanson’s thesis that a lot of medical care is useless. We’ll find out in a few years.

  15. Along these lines, I think it’s a good thing that states are being allowed to make their own decisions as to when and how to lift the restrictions. Nobody really knows what approach is best — which aspects of social distancing are important to keep in place, and which aren’t. Only trial and error can resolve those questions. If each state can go its own way, it amounts to a particular experiment.

    It’s a serious mistake to insist that, at this stage, we must settle as a nation on one overarching solution.

    Let 50 blossoms bloom.

    • Agree: Mark G., donut, AnotherDad
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    That's one consolation, C.O., and I think with a D in office even that little bit of lip service to the Constitution wouldn't have been granted. Yes, the 50 states were supposed to be "experiments in democracy". One acts like more of a Police State and taxes the ever-lovin' out of you, say, I dunno, Massachusetts, and , well, you move to a more Libertarian State (Nevada USED TO be tops).

    What I think happened with the Kung Flu panic is that Governors enjoyed this chance to display their power, as they also all wanted to CYA (and get in good with the teachers/ teachers' unions, BTW). "Hey, the Governor of N. Carolina closed the boat ramps. I'll show who's the real leader around these parts. We're closing the beaches AND the boat ramps!"

    Due to the flow of the tax money in this country, the Peak Stupidity #1 pick of the 5 evils of the income tax, it still comes down to: when the head of US Feral Gov. ABC agency says "jump", the Governor says "how high?"
  16. Can a country based on a “proposition” ever have free speech?

    Because if you question that proposition, you are a traitor to the creed.

    It’s funny, we’ve gone from originally being loyal to ourselves and our posterity, to being loyal to the proposition that “all men are created equal”, and now, from I can tell, we are to be loyal to the WHO and a smattering of New York Times airheads.

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @dfordoom

    Can a country based on a “proposition” ever have free speech?

    Because if you question that proposition, you are a traitor to the creed.
     
    Yep. A proposition nation must eventually become totalitarian. It's baked into the cake.

    But not just totalitarian. Totalitarian in a particularly nasty way. Dissenters end up being regarded as both traitors and heretics. Dissent becomes not just a political crime but a moral crime. Dissenters are not regarded as people who are misguided - they are regarded as people who are morally evil.

    And this has nothing to do with liberals. Whatever ideology becomes the dominant ideology, whether it be right-wing or left-wing, liberal or conservative, the result will be that that ideology will be enforced by totalitarian means. If libertarianism became the dominant ideology then any dissent from libertarianism would be enforced by totalitarian means.
  17. @Inverness
    With Science On Our Side, Who Can Be Against Us?

    (With apologies to Romans 8:31)

    That Atlantic article is pretty shocking. Communist China knows better than to let people just say whatever they want! We could learn a thing or two from them!

    I also note that the Atlantic is peddling the Russia Collusion hoax as though we haven't learned a single thing about it. Which may well be accurate for most of their readers.

    It's weird how enthralled our "bien pensants" are with China and how virulent their hatred is for Russia.

    It’s weird how enthralled our “bien pensants” are with China and how virulent their hatred is for Russia.

    Is it not weird how many who see through Russiadidit are out front in the Chinadidit parade?

  18. Well done sir, well done.

  19. An old marketing maxim holds that, down deep, people are begging to be led. The in-vogue religion is scientism, and scientism holds no room for the mortal sin of the alternate hypothesis. The alternate hypothesis necessarily implies that the null hypothesis is not law, and that’s highly unsettling — probability must be taken into account. One recalls Nate Silver of 538 facing attack from the left for listing the probability of a Hillary 2016 win at only 70% (“it should be 99%! it should be 99%!”) So it is that we now have the two California physicians’ one-hour commentary on the actual mortality rate removed from YouTube. Spot-on article, Steve.

    • Agree: Travis
  20. The estimated economic contraction for this year is estimated to be about 10%, which is on the same order as healthcare expenditures in developed countries. The usual health expenditures on average are much more cost effective in terms of saving QALYs, take for example type I diabetics who are mostly young and have their medication and care to thank for their decent lifespans.

    Our collective response seems overdriven even when comparing with marginal healthcare expenditures. In Nordic countries the target is less than 100 000 $ per saved life year.

    Compare with the scenario where the present economical devastation would help us save 0.7% of the population, with 5 years saved on average:

    (0.1 * 40 000 $ GDP per capita)/ (0.007*5 years) =

    114 k per year of life maybe not worth living.

    We need a permanent solution to ensure that international travelers can’t prank us a second time.

  21. I was at the local bread line today, filming the horrible people not wearing masks and coming within 6 ft of other humans, so they may be appropriately punished by the authorities.
    Free speech is counter to the greater good.

  22. @Steve Sailer
    I really wouldn't skip a chemotherapy session.

    The NHS is the Marxist flagship and the Guardian churns out agitprop to portray the Labour Party as the only people who can save it

  23. In other news, Late Obama Age Collapse continues at increasing pace.

    https://nypost.com/2020/04/28/video-shows-how-extensive-nyc-subway-homeless-problem-is/

    The video is something. Warning: it’s got annoying autoplay.

    From the Stem the Collapse file, Trump floats another great idea, which probably won’t happen.

    President Trump on Tuesday suggested that new federal payments to help states deal with the coronavirus pandemic could depend on whether or not they were home to sanctuary cities.

    “If it is COVID related, we can talk about it. We want things including sanctuary city adjustments,” the president said during an event in the East Room of the White House.

    In any case, for those still considering not voting for Trump, the many, many incremental improvements Trump has made on the immigration front will be dismantled within the first hour of the Biden (or whoever) administration. Keep that in mind when you stupidly prattle that Trump hasn’t worked miracles so you’re not voting for him. Trump has delivered more on immigration than any President since Calvin Coolidge signed the Immigration Act in 1924.

    PS – Something I just saw about that 1924 temporary life-saving measure for America:

    There were nine dissenting votes in the Senate and a handful of opponents in the House, the most vigorous of whom was freshman Brooklyn Representative and Jewish-American Emanuel Celler.

    Wow. And Celler beetled on about it for forty more years until he finally got what he wanted. It’s difficult to defeat mono-maniacs.

    • Replies: @Manfred Arcane
    Well said. Anyone who claims to care about immigration restriction but announces he's not voting for Trump is equivalent to a critically ill cancer patient who fires the doctor who'd been keeping him alive but bedridden, then hires Dr. Kevorkian instead.
    , @Anonymous
    Voting for Trump means sending a message to Republican politicians everywhere that they don't need to accomplish anything. We'll get more of what we've been getting for decades: talk and no action.

    Plus, in some ways Trump is worse than Biden. His re-election would see another mass purge of dissident websites just as his election did. And for the sanctuary cities, where do you think Trump's tax cut went? New York, San Fransisco, and Los Angeles.
    , @ben tillman

    In any case, for those still considering not voting for Trump, the many, many incremental improvements Trump has made on the immigration front will be dismantled within the first hour of the Biden (or whoever) administration.
     
    Of course. Last year's immigration number is the lowest in 30 years. The Supreme Court appointments will probably be huge disappointments like almost all of those selected by the GOP, but they'll still be better than the Trotskies Biden will want to appoint, and the seditious conspirators in the DOJ/FBI and CIA/State may not -- or may -- get some justice meted out to them.
  24. Agree.
    And I add that the terrorist unlearned in medicine who heads the WHO has decided perplexingly enough to admonish his world that we ought to have listened to him back when he was, according to the record, downplaying everything. Free speech and recordkeeping lets you know when the great and the good are talking nonsense, which is why they hate it.

  25. @Achmed E. Newman
    Good column, Steve, as always. Do you think this huge flow of agenda-driven information on COVID-19 affected you more than is usually the case, say for articles about wonderful open-borders, redlining, and Emmitt Till? You usually are very good about filtering out the BS from the Lyin' Press outlets, especially your very favorites, The NY Times, Atlantic magazine, etc.

    I just don't know how some very savvy, appropriately-cynical people thought that THIS ONE TIME, the Infotainment "industry" was out there serving a noble purpose, showing the appropriate level of concern about this purported epic crisis of this epidemic. Did the talking heads on TV, who nodded in agreement that, yes, Michael Bloomberg's $500 million of campaign money could have been used to give each American a million bucks, or showed us fake gas tank explosions in pick-up trucks, suddenly snap out of their retardation and get some ethics, so that they could give you the true picture this time, 24/7?

    Do you think the agenda magically stops for a viral epidemic? The stupidity stops for no man!

    Far from it being a matter of not being able to arrest organizational momentum, they openly desire to wreck the economy and the lives of millions just to be able to have a little political tit-for-tat on Bad Orange Man. Some of them have openly said this: that the “silver lining” is the damage to the Trump economy. I hope that the growing class-crossing consensus that the lockdown was disproportionate and unwarranted* will become a terrible revenge.

    *I’m not disputing the existence of the virus, I’m asking why in the name of social distancing were places where people are physically far apart closed while places where people bump into each other were left open. The criterion should not just have been what a law school graduate arbitrates as “essential” but also square footage.

    • Agree: Hail
  26. with NYC deaths at 14,000 the fatality rate is actually well below 1% since 2.3 million New Yorkers were already infected with CV and recovered. Antibody testing in NYC indicates 25% have the antibodies to CV. The true number is actually higher, since the test will fail to detect antibodies in 15% of recovered CV patients. In some antibody tests they only detect antibodies in 40% of CV patients, but I am assuming that NY is using the test developed at Columbia University which is one of the more reliable tests and has a failure rate of 15%, which they bragged about. https://www.medpagetoday.com/infectiousdisease/covid19/86084

    The true number of New Yorkers who have had CV is much closer to 30%, since 6% of recovered patients do not have any antibodies. These tend to be those under the age of 40 who can fight off this virus with their innate immune system, thus they do not need to produce antibodies (which takes 5 – 14 days to produce). Many adults can fight off this virus in a few days time. Children are practically immune from this coronavirus. They get infected , but show no symptoms. , as do most adults under the age of 40. Of the estimated 14,000 New York City residents who succumbed to CV , less than 200 are under the age of 30. Pretty remarkable that the schools will remained closed when children are immune from CV.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Travis, the fact that children seem to be immune is great news to those that indoctrinate them. No sense trying to change the minds of those old enough to think for themselves.
  27. @candid_observer
    Along these lines, I think it's a good thing that states are being allowed to make their own decisions as to when and how to lift the restrictions. Nobody really knows what approach is best -- which aspects of social distancing are important to keep in place, and which aren't. Only trial and error can resolve those questions. If each state can go its own way, it amounts to a particular experiment.

    It's a serious mistake to insist that, at this stage, we must settle as a nation on one overarching solution.

    Let 50 blossoms bloom.

    That’s one consolation, C.O., and I think with a D in office even that little bit of lip service to the Constitution wouldn’t have been granted. Yes, the 50 states were supposed to be “experiments in democracy”. One acts like more of a Police State and taxes the ever-lovin’ out of you, say, I dunno, Massachusetts, and , well, you move to a more Libertarian State (Nevada USED TO be tops).

    What I think happened with the Kung Flu panic is that Governors enjoyed this chance to display their power, as they also all wanted to CYA (and get in good with the teachers/ teachers’ unions, BTW). “Hey, the Governor of N. Carolina closed the boat ramps. I’ll show who’s the real leader around these parts. We’re closing the beaches AND the boat ramps!”

    Due to the flow of the tax money in this country, the Peak Stupidity #1 pick of the 5 evils of the income tax, it still comes down to: when the head of US Feral Gov. ABC agency says “jump”, the Governor says “how high?”

  28. Anonymous[297] • Disclaimer says:

    When they have compared Viet Nam war dead with CCP virus dead, I have to wonder how many quality of life adjusted years have really been taken by CV19. They aren’t making more years in your twenties, that’s for sure.

    As I age though I find my desire to remain alive is mostly undiminished. Somehow I am just a little sceptical about others views on that – who I am I to want these extra years, what do I need them for anyway, couldn’t they be given to some random brown person who is ipso facto underpriveleged, just look at him! QED I rest my case.

  29. “That’s why we have a First Amendment.”

    No it’s not. The First Amendment has to do with whether or not the Congress can make laws restricting speech or assembly.

    Our problem is that we’ve allowed a culture that fosters personality disorders in tens of millions of people. What if a person went to a therapist and said the following: “Look, I get anxiety, I get nervous, I get fearful. I turn to the people around me and say “Goddamn it, you people need to behave in a way that makes me feel better!” I can’t be expected to control my own interior emotions, can I? I rely on other people and on society to help me feel better, and avoid anxiety.”

    Any decent shrink would tell that person that they have a disordered personality. Each person needs to accept responsibility for their own internal states; they can’t turn to the rest of us and say “Shut up! I can’t stand it when you express your opinion that’s different from mine! You’re spreading hate! You should be arrested for WrongThink!”

    Dominic Frisby gets it:

    • Agree: Jonathan Silber
  30. At present, there is a huge spat over whether local governments should allow citizens to go to the beach

    You write this and yet talk about freedom as if it’s still a real thing.

  31. Being an adherent of Critical Rationalism (or Fallibilism), I have for a long time wondered about the development in Epistemology. After (and sometimes next to) Critical Rationalism there was a wave of Cultural Relativism, which led to a feud between Fallibilists (like Popper and his adherents) vs Relativists (like Wittgenstein and his adherents).

    Well, Clutural Relativism survived in a way by reframing itself as Social Constructivism or Postmodernism. But on the whole there was a heavy blowback from the Neocon camp which denounced Cultural Relativism as a stupid adoration of backwardness.

    But, insterestingly, this didn’t lead to a reappraisal of Fallibilism. The Neocon camp instead initiated a return to Dogmatic Rationalism – the kind of thinking which was already so obsolete in the 1920s that Popper didn’t take much time to criticise it, but which had been the leading ideology of the French Third Republic – and had in fact been adopted by the Bolshevists (whose style of arguing is often identical with the style of the French Republicans).

    The basic idea here is that science delivers final results and an authoritarian progressive government has to assert those results by education, fighting against the “superstitious” rural population and the foes of the state like Orthodoxy and Catholicism. This of course deligitimates Freedom of Speech. But it allows all sorts of cranks to smuggle in their social ideas by pretending them to be “scientifical” (the Durkheim school in France was as reputed for that as the Marxist-Leninists in Russia), and of course just this is one of the motives why Dogmatical Rationalism as a belief in the infallibility of science is so popular in certain political circles. (Vaccination must never be questioned, because that means that our social ideas can claim infallibility, too.)

  32. @Mr. Anon

    What We Now Need Most: Free Speech
     
    You don't understand, Steve.

    There's a whole new normal: The New Normal

    And free speech isn't part of it.

    I know this is suposed to be a cut at preogressives but it does nothold up

    We progressives value free speech but not hate speech. Learn the difference.

    It is conservatives and right wingers that are against the first amendment. Every time a Person of Color dares speak out white people disagree with them, mock them, argue with them and do other things that stifle the Free Expression of the Person of Color.

    We progressives are sick of you people. We remeber the rapist on the supreme court, we remmber the racism

    We will win this fall and we will make you guys keel over with the changes that we will put in place

    Say goodbye to your guns white boys!

    So hello to hate speech laws!

    • LOL: William Badwhite
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    Welcome back TD!
    If you are back, then other features of our old normal world must not be too far behind.
    We all hope you didn't suffer any long term damage from your time on the ventilator. This comment was letter perfect, right down to a mis-pelling in only two words, and the perfect moon-bat PC selection of which words to capitalize, so your hospital stay doesn't seem to have had any permanent effect.
    , @Mr. Anon

    I know this is suposed to be a cut at preogressives but it does nothold up
     
    Does Nothold - wasn't he a character in Game of Thrones?

    We progressives value free speech but not hate speech. Learn the difference.
     
    There is no difference. If you are not free to say "I hate you", you are not free to speak.

    But I supose a preogressive would not understand that, would they, ducky?
    , @MEH 0910
    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/PkJbkvov9Xc/hqdefault.jpg
  33. O/T…

    Meanwhile yesterday in Brooklyn, one community collectively says they flat-out don’t give AF about anyone else.

    A zoom lens wasn’t necessary for this one.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    137, what was that?
  34. Our ruling class, comfortably lounging at home with full pay and benefits and confident their generous government pensions will be available when they reach their 50s, to us peasants: “Sit down, shut up, and pay your taxes!”

    We are not all in the same boat. We are in the same storm, but the ruling class is in a yacht, and we peasants are often on rafts.

    • Agree: Dtbb
  35. We lost our right to free speech years ago when the government passed hate crime legislation which bans political discourse. Over the last decade it has worsened as the oligarchs controlling the media and public speech outlets like YouTube , Twitter and Facebook have censured politically incorrect speech concerning everything from climate change to Coronavirus. Unorthodox opinions are now banned , those who speak out are blacklisted , lose their jobs , careers and are ostracized.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes

    ostracized
     
    Ostracism is psychological death only when imposed on the weak-willed. Those doing the ostracising are almost never actually thinking for themselves: the very word evokes groupthink. Such people have no place in any decent man's Hieroclean circles of give-a-fuck'.

    Archaeologists have examined the ostraka that they have for the ostracism of Themistocles (in ~470BCE). It turns out that a very large number of them were fabricated by about a dozen people. These ostraka were mass-produced for distribution to illiterate citizens, in order to influence the vote to exile the guy who was a thorn in the side of the families who considered themselves the natural owners of Athens.

    This is yet another historical episode that casts doubt on the putative benefits of democracy: parasitic megalomaniacs will find a way to undermine elections (and even if they don't: Arrow's Impossibility Theorem guarantees that the elections themselves do not reliably choose a social optimum).

    Anyway... after his exile, Themistocles went on to become governor of the province of Magnesia for the Persian empire under Ataxerxes.

    The first coin that we know of that bears the image of a ruler, dates to less than a decade after Themistocles was ostracised from Athens. It has Themistocles on it.

    I'm not a fan of politicians - in any age - but Themistocles appears to have been self-made, both in Athens and under the Achaemenids.

    Nobody knows the names of the 14 (at least) who rigged his downfall. I'm sure they profited handsomely.
    , @dfordoom

    We lost our right to free speech years ago when the government passed hate crime legislation which bans political discourse. Over the last decade it has worsened as the oligarchs controlling the media and public speech outlets like YouTube , Twitter and Facebook have censured politically incorrect speech concerning everything from climate change to Coronavirus.
     
    Free speech was lost when private media corporations (including social media) gained so much power and influence that they could control political debate. At that point the First Amendment became irrelevant.

    Censorship is overwhelming carried out by corporations, not government.

    Conservatives were too dumb to see this coming and too committed to muh free enterprise to be willing to do anything about it. Most of them are still unwilling to do anything about it.
    , @SFG
    As dfordoom says, this is due to control by big corporations, which conservatives were fine with, thanks to the donors. Hate crimes legislation has made various sorts of speech illegal in Europe, but not in America--it just raises penalties for actions that are already crimes.
  36. @Inverness
    With Science On Our Side, Who Can Be Against Us?

    (With apologies to Romans 8:31)

    That Atlantic article is pretty shocking. Communist China knows better than to let people just say whatever they want! We could learn a thing or two from them!

    I also note that the Atlantic is peddling the Russia Collusion hoax as though we haven't learned a single thing about it. Which may well be accurate for most of their readers.

    It's weird how enthralled our "bien pensants" are with China and how virulent their hatred is for Russia.

    It’s weird how enthralled our “bien pensants” are with China and how virulent their hatred is for Russia.

    We have always been at peace with China. We have always been at war with Russia.

  37. @YetAnotherAnon
    In the UK, usually 30,000 patients a month are diagnosed with cancer. Last month the figure was maybe 5,000.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/apr/29/extra-18000-cancer-patients-in-england-could-die-in-next-year-study


    Urgent referrals by GPs for cancer tests have fallen by 76% and appointments for chemotherapy by 60% since the pandemic arrived in February despite NHS England insisting cancer treatment “should continue unaffected”. The health service hopes to resume cancer operations this week but faces a large backlog.
     
    https://twitter.com/ProfKarolSikora/status/1253003690816012289

    However, is one is immune compromised in a jurisdiction that has decided on herd immunity instead of suppression, then the cancer cure could end up as fatal as the cancer.

    • Replies: @vhrm
    That's not really true.
    From the immunocompromised person's POV the choice is 3 months hiding out while everyone else gets Covid-19 vs years of hiding out while everyone else gets Covid-19 slowly.
  38. Free speech is good for us, and good for “everyone” in general.

    But it’s bad specifically for people that have the most money/power. A lot of them will lose out under free speech. You have to peel off a faction somehow.

    So who is already rich or powerful, that could get more power or more money by going with free speech?

    Not gonna happen otherwise

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Free speech is good for us, and good for “everyone” in general.

    But it’s bad specifically for people that have the most money/power. A lot of them will lose out under free speech. You have to peel off a faction somehow.

    So who is already rich or powerful, that could get more power or more money by going with free speech?
     
    Donald Trump.
  39. What we need most now is to sort proponents of social theories into governments that test them. aka “protective sequestration” as opposed to “quarantine”, aka “consent” as opposed to “consensus”.

    You can’t have a civil dialogue in the midst of a war and you can’t have peace in a meta-supremacist polity — one that forces everyone, as a matter of self-defense, to become supremacists regardless of their views on society because if they don’t, someone else’s views will be forced on them.

    In such a meta-supremacist polity any pretense that we’re having a civil dialogue toward a “consensus” is like a rapist having a dialogue with his rapee about whether she consents to sex with him.

    Impractical?

    Yeah, right… look around you.

  40. Imposing the consensus of experts by government fiat is pretty much the definition of Progressiveism. So these people have been like pigs in mud during the pandemic.

    The close-mindedness has been amazing.

    One of my favorites examples of a Progressive high-IQ idiot is the always awful Paul Krugman. He recently told his conformist NYT readers that Dr. Oz and others were “quacks” because they aren’t specialized virologists or whatever. How dare “TV Doctors” opine about hydrochloroquine as a promising treatment.

    This, he said, is the whole problem with “the right:” they believe in nonconformist “quacks” while the Left is science-based. Only panels of experts with “International,” or “World” in their title are to be followed.

    • Agree: vhrm
    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Imposing the consensus of experts by government fiat is pretty much the definition of Progressiveism. So these people have been like pigs in mud during the pandemic.
     
    Yet John Dewey explicitly opposed the idea of expertocracy as advanced by Lippmann.
    , @Hail

    This, he said, is the whole problem with “the right:” they believe in nonconformist “quacks” while the Left is science-based
     
    Right and Left were out the window, as the pro-Panic Corona Coalition was led by extremists, Doomers, fanatics, quacks, and apocalypse-cultists....leading the blind. We'd have been better off with a plain-old "the blind leading the blind."
    , @Mr. Anon

    One of my favorites examples of a Progressive high-IQ idiot is the always awful Paul Krugman. He recently told his conformist NYT readers that Dr. Oz and others were “quacks” because they aren’t specialized virologists or whatever. How dare “TV Doctors” opine about hydrochloroquine as a promising treatment.

    This, he said, is the whole problem with “the right:” they believe in nonconformist “quacks” while the Left is science-based. Only panels of experts with “International,” or “World” in their title are to be followed.
     
    I wonder if Krugman has considered the implications of the fact that people like Hunter Wallace and Richard Spencer are suddenly on his side.
    , @S. Anonyia
    It’s interesting that they believe ordinary people or “lesser” experts can’t be trusted to use the scientific method anymore.

    No hypothesis forming, observation, testing, and conclusions...just listen to what the SCIENCE (TM) tells you. You cannot be trusted.
    , @Kratoklastes

    Progressive high-IQ idiot [snip] awful Paul Krugman
     
    This 'IYI' trope is what marks Taleb out as profoundly lacking in depth of analysis.

    Krugman does not write what he writes as a result of deeply-held conviction. He writes what he writes because it's a very low-effort way of getting handsomely rewarded across all identifiable components of remuneration: money, popularity, fame etc.

    At some point, the amount of reward on offer was enough to get him to set aside his principles (assuming he had any).

    People really need to read "The Inner Ring".

    The money shot:

    And the prophecy I make is this. To nine out of ten of you the choice which could lead to scoundrelism will come, when it does come, in no very dramatic colours. Obviously bad men, obviously threatening or bribing, will almost certainly not appear. Over a drink, or a cup of coffee, disguised as triviality and sandwiched between two jokes, from the lips of a man, or woman, whom you have recently been getting to know rather better and whom you hope to know better still—just at the moment when you are most anxious not to appear crude, or naïf or a prig—the hint will come. It will be the hint of something which the public, the ignorant, romantic public, would never understand: something which even the outsiders in your own profession are apt to make a fuss about: but something, says your new friend, which “we”—and at the word “we” you try not to blush for mere pleasure—something “we always do.”

    And you will be drawn in, if you are drawn in, not by desire for gain or ease, but simply because at that moment, when the cup was so near your lips, you cannot bear to be thrust back again into the cold outer world. It would be so terrible to see the other man’s face—that genial, confidential, delightfully sophisticated face—turn suddenly cold and contemptuous, to know that you had been tried for the Inner Ring and rejected. And then, if you are drawn in, next week it will be something a little further from the rules, and next year something further still, but all in the jolliest, friendliest spirit. It may end in a crash, a scandal, and penal servitude; it may end in millions, a peerage and giving the prizes at your old school. But you will be a scoundrel.
     
  41. Isn’t it weird how all the people who were anti-Establishment and in favor of free speech 50 years ago are the same ones who are the Establishment today and hate free speech?

    • Replies: @dfordoom

    Isn’t it weird how all the people who were anti-Establishment and in favor of free speech 50 years ago are the same ones who are the Establishment today and hate free speech?
     
    And isn't it weird how all the people who supported the Establishment back then were not at all keen on free speech and now suddenly they say it's the most important thing there is.

    Both sides have been equally cynical and dishonest.
  42. Good stuff, Steve. The American elite’s desire to impose the Chinese model predates Trump, but gained rocket momentum December 2016 when Trump became Blumpft! Big Tech in league with the Chinese; authoritarians in the U.S. national security state in league with Big Tech. I’m trying to remain optimistic.

  43. Speaking of suppression of free speech:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8268521/Three-open-America-protest-ringleaders-arrested-clashing-healthcare-workers.html#comments

    Get a load of the craven submission to authority displayed in this Daily Mail article – the blatant shilling for a police state.

  44. Steve. . .You might check out Amesh Adalja’s Twitter and interviews on YouTube. He is a MD with John Hopkins and has the best track record I have seen on predicting how COVID will unfold. He has consistently said since late January that the virus won’t be contained in the US. . .it can only be spread out enough that the hospitals are not crushed. He said the China travel ban was too late . . . the virus was already here and is not a big fan of extensive business and school shutdowns. He predicts about 0.3 – 0.7 percent of people who get virus will die and the virus will likely spread till about 60 – 70 percent of US citizens have been infected. He basically seems to advocate sheltering the old/vulnerable as best as possible with the rest of us deciding for ourselves how much social distancing we want to do. Based on his comments, it looks like a minimum US COVID death toll is about 500K occurring over the next 12 – 18 months, with a worst case of ~1 million.

    I was onboard with your original approach of nuking the curve, but since that failed. . .it appears to me that Sweden’s approach of letting the virus quickly run through the healthy until herd immunity is reached will result in the least loss of life. It seems feasible to isolate the old/vulnerable for a few months but I am skeptical about 18 months. I suspect that goal at this point for the US should not be getting the infection rate of the young/healthy as low as possible but rather have it as high as possible rate that does not crush the hospitals. This sounds crazy but I suspect it is true.

  45. @Inverness
    With Science On Our Side, Who Can Be Against Us?

    (With apologies to Romans 8:31)

    That Atlantic article is pretty shocking. Communist China knows better than to let people just say whatever they want! We could learn a thing or two from them!

    I also note that the Atlantic is peddling the Russia Collusion hoax as though we haven't learned a single thing about it. Which may well be accurate for most of their readers.

    It's weird how enthralled our "bien pensants" are with China and how virulent their hatred is for Russia.

    That Atlantic article is pretty shocking. Communist China knows better than to let people just say whatever they want! We could learn a thing or two from them!

    T^he argument was pretty crazy:

    A. Censorship has helped to secure the power of an evil communist government.
    B. Edward Snowden showed that the USG is surveilling th ehell out of Americans.
    C. Russia interfered with the 2016 election.

    Therefore we should censor the speech of Americans.

    A is something bad.
    B is bizarrely irrelevant.
    C is false and irrelevant.

    And that’s the argument.

    • Replies: @res
    It might be above average for current year arguments in the MSM. Only one of the three premises is false.
  46. Many now wish everybody who disagrees with them could be forced to shut up and do as they are told. After all, they have, whatever their views, Science on their side and their enemies have not.

    That passage is confusing because it uses the pronoun “they” several times, without clear antecedents, for two very different groups of people (first the “many” and then the “everybody who disagrees with them [the many]”). I suggest you replace the highlighted words “do as they are told” with ”obey” so that the words “they” and “their” in the following sentence about the self-proclaimed adherents of Science and their enemies will clearly refer to the “many” rather than to the “everybody who.”

    Suggested edit:

    Many now wish everybody who disagrees with them could be forced to shut up and obey. After all, they have, whatever their views, Science on their side and their enemies have not.

  47. @Hypnotoad666
    Imposing the consensus of experts by government fiat is pretty much the definition of Progressiveism. So these people have been like pigs in mud during the pandemic.

    The close-mindedness has been amazing.

    One of my favorites examples of a Progressive high-IQ idiot is the always awful Paul Krugman. He recently told his conformist NYT readers that Dr. Oz and others were "quacks" because they aren't specialized virologists or whatever. How dare "TV Doctors" opine about hydrochloroquine as a promising treatment.

    This, he said, is the whole problem with "the right:" they believe in nonconformist "quacks" while the Left is science-based. Only panels of experts with "International," or "World" in their title are to be followed.

    Imposing the consensus of experts by government fiat is pretty much the definition of Progressiveism. So these people have been like pigs in mud during the pandemic.

    Yet John Dewey explicitly opposed the idea of expertocracy as advanced by Lippmann.

    • Replies: @res
    Thanks. A reference for anyone who wants to follow that thread.
    The Popularization of Knowledge: John Dewey on Experts and American Democracy
    https://www.jstor.org/stable/369690?seq=1
    , @prime noticer
    "Yet John Dewey explicitly opposed the idea of expertocracy as advanced by Lippmann."

    probably because Dewey was a WASP, descendant of the people who created America and most of the good things on this planet, and Walter Lippmann was a jew, trying to subvert all that for his group's own gain. as usual.

    seeing the trend here? today in 2020, you can enjoy the WASP created, but now jew run Atlantic telling you that experts from the government know better about what you're allowed to say, and the largely WASP created, but now largely jew controlled world wide web will be their media enforcement arm, as many of the biggest sites on the internet delete things contrary to central government decree.

    block as usual Steve. you're so interested in truth, aren't you.
  48. Hail says: • Website
    @vhrm
    Thanks for writing in defense of the First Amendment. I'm concerned over the continuing erosion of freedom of speech from Big Tech.

    And we already have enough data points to start seeing the side down the slippery slope. At first it was banning bad-thinking on fringe stuff like transexuals.

    Then it was "far right" politicians.

    Now it's discussion of literally the biggest story on the world.

    Facebook is literally banning anti-government protest organizers at the request of state governments. Over the past several years there's been concern that tech companies might help Egypt or China or Iran to suppress dissent and censor speech.
    But we're seeing it in the US right now.

    Facebook is literally banning anti-government protest organizers

    Facebook is also deleting Knut Wittkowski’s interviews that people post, and I know for a fact it has also attached “fake news”-style warnings to links people post to Dr. Ioannidis and others.

    Facebook’s censors are now the arbiters of reality and decide what is right and not, rather than PhDs; welcome to Big Tech-filtered reality…

    “Take your decades of experience, expertise, PhDs, and shove ’em! We in charge now.”
    — Google, Facebook, Youtube; the GooFY Coalition for Corona-Heresy Suppression

    • Replies: @moshe
    Since reading this from Scott Alexander of Slate Star Codex I have more understanding for, mosy especially the Google Twins, they, like so many others, are being held hostage:

    https://slatestarcodex.com/2019/02/22/rip-culture-war-thread/

    Really and truly.

    Thr enemies aren't necessarily the people acting badly in public but the sick demented individuals who threaten and harrass anyone and everyone connected to them behind the scenes.

    As an aside, this is why you want to read Scott's stuff from before 2018 in his archivesm.
    , @Luke Lea
    Wittkowski's second video is up, by the way, and is highly informative in my humble opinion. He argues that the epidemic peaked in mid-March in NYC, even before lockdowns began, and will, like all upper respiratory influenzas, soon be over in all countries currently infected, though a little later in those that practiced more social distancing, which only protracts the process.

    One interesting point he makes is that Fauci is an infectious disease expert, not an epidemiologist, let alone an epidemiologist specializing in upper respiratory viral contagious. Doctors naturally want to cure their patients, hence their emphasis on testing to identify the germ, whereas epidemiologist want to predict the course and magnitude of an epidemic, which requires wide-scale antibody testing. The latter not the former, he argues, is where the whole emphasis should have been from the beginning. Too bad Trump was never informed. (I'm afraid Tucker Carlson, among others, has a great deal to answer for.)

    Anyway here is the link: https://youtu.be/k0Q4naYOYDw
    , @vhrm
    Yeah, absolutely.
    I was too terse in my original comment.

    I meant first that they're squashing discussion on various Covid-19 topics ("the biggest issue in the world"), which prevents actual progress in understanding.

    Second that they're banning organization of anti-government protests. This second one I brought up specifically just because preventing organized dissent is such a hallmark of totalitarianism that anyone at all familiar with modern history, whether right, left or center, should know to tread particularly lightly there.

    (not that i support Ferguson style riots under the protest banner)
  49. Hail says: • Website
    @Hypnotoad666
    Imposing the consensus of experts by government fiat is pretty much the definition of Progressiveism. So these people have been like pigs in mud during the pandemic.

    The close-mindedness has been amazing.

    One of my favorites examples of a Progressive high-IQ idiot is the always awful Paul Krugman. He recently told his conformist NYT readers that Dr. Oz and others were "quacks" because they aren't specialized virologists or whatever. How dare "TV Doctors" opine about hydrochloroquine as a promising treatment.

    This, he said, is the whole problem with "the right:" they believe in nonconformist "quacks" while the Left is science-based. Only panels of experts with "International," or "World" in their title are to be followed.

    This, he said, is the whole problem with “the right:” they believe in nonconformist “quacks” while the Left is science-based

    Right and Left were out the window, as the pro-Panic Corona Coalition was led by extremists, Doomers, fanatics, quacks, and apocalypse-cultists….leading the blind. We’d have been better off with a plain-old “the blind leading the blind.”

  50. @Steve Sailer
    I really wouldn't skip a chemotherapy session.

    I really wouldn’t skip a chemotherapy session.

    The people who do, and all the others who will die because of shutdowns — and those who already have — can be added to the “excess deaths” number to further pad the total, as you are doing here:

    Nationally, up through April 4, excess deaths were about twice official coronavirus deaths in the U.S., so we are likely up to 100,000 deaths by now.

    Why don’t you subtract all the deaths attributed to your favorite illness because of coexistence with other causes or because doctors are being encouraged to use covid-19 as cause of death when they don’t know?

    “Let’s argue about this.”

    Another thing this big story is exposing is people’s confirmation bias. Some of us are biased the other way.

    My wife an I now know two families, parents with children, in which everyone has tested positive. Out of those, only one person, a grandmother, went into a hospital. She is home now and okay.

    We live in one of the outer rings around the New York City epicenter and the New Rochelle ground zero first explosion. We live next to the first town in our state that had its own explosion of cases brought over immediately from the epicenter. That happened quite some time before masks, distancing and shutdowns, so your friend Corona-chan was here long before we did anything about her.

    There has been no random test that I am aware of, but no doubt many of us have the virus or antibodies. Yet those families are the only cases we know, and they are all fine.

    Kudos to you, Steve, for remembering free speech and dialectic. You did not deserve my one really shitty comment to you. I apologize. (Now my wife’s father is in hospice care, ready to join his wife in heaven, and we still can’t get there. In good marriages, people often leave together. They are leaving together, while we can’t go anywhere.)

    I lost a filling weeks ago but can’t get it replaced, so the tooth will just decay for awhile. My colonoscopy was canceled weeks ago, so if there are any cancerous polyps in my gut, they will stay there and grow and grow… Maybe I can someday be added to the excess deaths total. They can bury me minus one tooth.

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @res
    The situation with your in-laws is terrible. I am sorry you and your wife (not to mention her parents) are going through that.

    Regarding your tooth, I was recently having trouble with something near a tooth (abscess? whatever it was was painful and annoying) and letting a xylitol lozenge dissolve in my mouth next to it before sleep seemed to help a great deal (though hard to be sure exactly what makes something get better). Might be worth a try.
    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324155#uses
    , @North Carolina Resident
    Can you travel out of state for medical care?
    In North Carolina, some dentists are treating emergencies.
    Next week, my gastro will resume performing routine colonoscopies.

    You may find closer providers. If not, Raleigh NC is 550 miles from New Rochelle. Good luck.
    , @Peter Frost
    Why don’t you subtract all the deaths attributed to your favorite illness because of coexistence with other causes or because doctors are being encouraged to use covid-19 as cause of death when they don’t know?

    Those deaths wouldn't show up as excess deaths.
    , @moshe
    Keep the tooth under your pillow. The fairy is delayed but as soon as her elective genital reassignment surgery is complete she will arrive to exchange the leavings of your mouth for her money.

    So rest assured. :)

    As an aside, I've praised Steve enough but what he does indeed deserve criticism for is not his scaredy-cat beliefs regarding this nonsense but his advocacy for less freedoms of other sorts. He was one of the first to fantasize about a day when we all get to wear masks all day. And his constant demands that people's personal medical information be made public I would not consider to be to his credit. Like everyone else was claimed freedom as their flag, he has shown that as soon as he bought into the nonsense about coronavirus, he was ready to burn the flag as quickly as anybody else. with the most notable exception of course being that he continue to publish and to allow comments that opposed his belief of the central thesis, that the quarantine was a necessary and useful thing.

    , @Buffalo Joe
    Buzz, if you take the time to look, the CDC never counted seasonal flu deaths in those over 65. Those were sttributed to other underlying causes. A few thousand here, a few thousand there and you have a pandemic. Stay safe.
    , @theMann
    Still on hold for prostate surgery, but I did take out my own ingrown toenail with pliers, a pry bar, Hydrogen peroxide, and uhm, medicinal brandy.

    I am beginning to wonder just how much we can all do without doctors, especially if it involves a respiratory illness.
    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "My colonoscopy was canceled weeks ago, so if there are any cancerous polyps in my gut, they will stay there and grow and grow… Maybe I can someday be added to the excess deaths total."

    They will shove a respirator down your rigor-mortised throat and code you COVID for a cool $39,000 - it's not like anyone will question the dx.

    CDC sez: All your deaths are belong to kungflu!

    #linearvirus
  51. Fifty percent of the deaths in New York City attributed to coronavirus were of persons 75 and older.

    These persons would have been born in 1945 or earlier.

    Average life expectancy of persons born in 1945: males, 63.6; females, 67.9.

  52. Anon[232] • Disclaimer says:

    Cultures go through cycles. As cultures build broad consensus on issues, they tend to become more censorious as a way of reinforcing these social norms. Liberal ideology is all over our schools and the news, and imbedded in both east and west coasts. These places complain shrilly about conservatives because conservative speech breaks this consensus, and liberals are afraid of losing the power to shape the narrative. Liberals hate a free internet because it works against them.

    Basically, it’s a contest to see which side wins more followers.

  53. @Steve Sailer
    I really wouldn't skip a chemotherapy session.

    I really wouldn’t skip a chemotherapy session.

    For a lot of the people doing so, it’s not up to them. The decision was made for them.

    After 911, the word “security” came to be used alot. After awhile few words left me feeling less secure than “security”.

    Now we here the word “safe” alot. Stay “safe at home”. “Frontline workers” (shades of “our boys on the Malabar Front”) are supposedly “keeping us safe” (in between those tik-tok dance videos they seem to have time to choreograph and film). Now I can’t hardly think of a word that makes me feel less safe than “safe”, nor can I think of people who make me feel less safe than people who are ostensibly “keeping me safe”.

    • Agree: Dtbb
  54. @Hypnotoad666
    Imposing the consensus of experts by government fiat is pretty much the definition of Progressiveism. So these people have been like pigs in mud during the pandemic.

    The close-mindedness has been amazing.

    One of my favorites examples of a Progressive high-IQ idiot is the always awful Paul Krugman. He recently told his conformist NYT readers that Dr. Oz and others were "quacks" because they aren't specialized virologists or whatever. How dare "TV Doctors" opine about hydrochloroquine as a promising treatment.

    This, he said, is the whole problem with "the right:" they believe in nonconformist "quacks" while the Left is science-based. Only panels of experts with "International," or "World" in their title are to be followed.

    One of my favorites examples of a Progressive high-IQ idiot is the always awful Paul Krugman. He recently told his conformist NYT readers that Dr. Oz and others were “quacks” because they aren’t specialized virologists or whatever. How dare “TV Doctors” opine about hydrochloroquine as a promising treatment.

    This, he said, is the whole problem with “the right:” they believe in nonconformist “quacks” while the Left is science-based. Only panels of experts with “International,” or “World” in their title are to be followed.

    I wonder if Krugman has considered the implications of the fact that people like Hunter Wallace and Richard Spencer are suddenly on his side.

  55. @ben tillman

    That Atlantic article is pretty shocking. Communist China knows better than to let people just say whatever they want! We could learn a thing or two from them!
     
    T^he argument was pretty crazy:

    A. Censorship has helped to secure the power of an evil communist government.
    B. Edward Snowden showed that the USG is surveilling th ehell out of Americans.
    C. Russia interfered with the 2016 election.

    Therefore we should censor the speech of Americans.


    A is something bad.
    B is bizarrely irrelevant.
    C is false and irrelevant.

    And that's the argument.

    It might be above average for current year arguments in the MSM. Only one of the three premises is false.

    • LOL: ben tillman
  56. @ben tillman

    Imposing the consensus of experts by government fiat is pretty much the definition of Progressiveism. So these people have been like pigs in mud during the pandemic.
     
    Yet John Dewey explicitly opposed the idea of expertocracy as advanced by Lippmann.

    Thanks. A reference for anyone who wants to follow that thread.
    The Popularization of Knowledge: John Dewey on Experts and American Democracy
    https://www.jstor.org/stable/369690?seq=1

  57. @Buzz Mohawk

    I really wouldn’t skip a chemotherapy session.
     
    The people who do, and all the others who will die because of shutdowns -- and those who already have -- can be added to the "excess deaths" number to further pad the total, as you are doing here:

    Nationally, up through April 4, excess deaths were about twice official coronavirus deaths in the U.S., so we are likely up to 100,000 deaths by now.
     
    Why don't you subtract all the deaths attributed to your favorite illness because of coexistence with other causes or because doctors are being encouraged to use covid-19 as cause of death when they don't know?

    "Let's argue about this."

    Another thing this big story is exposing is people's confirmation bias. Some of us are biased the other way.

    My wife an I now know two families, parents with children, in which everyone has tested positive. Out of those, only one person, a grandmother, went into a hospital. She is home now and okay.

    We live in one of the outer rings around the New York City epicenter and the New Rochelle ground zero first explosion. We live next to the first town in our state that had its own explosion of cases brought over immediately from the epicenter. That happened quite some time before masks, distancing and shutdowns, so your friend Corona-chan was here long before we did anything about her.

    There has been no random test that I am aware of, but no doubt many of us have the virus or antibodies. Yet those families are the only cases we know, and they are all fine.

    Kudos to you, Steve, for remembering free speech and dialectic. You did not deserve my one really shitty comment to you. I apologize. (Now my wife's father is in hospice care, ready to join his wife in heaven, and we still can't get there. In good marriages, people often leave together. They are leaving together, while we can't go anywhere.)

    I lost a filling weeks ago but can't get it replaced, so the tooth will just decay for awhile. My colonoscopy was canceled weeks ago, so if there are any cancerous polyps in my gut, they will stay there and grow and grow... Maybe I can someday be added to the excess deaths total. They can bury me minus one tooth.

    The situation with your in-laws is terrible. I am sorry you and your wife (not to mention her parents) are going through that.

    Regarding your tooth, I was recently having trouble with something near a tooth (abscess? whatever it was was painful and annoying) and letting a xylitol lozenge dissolve in my mouth next to it before sleep seemed to help a great deal (though hard to be sure exactly what makes something get better). Might be worth a try.
    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324155#uses

    • Thanks: Buzz Mohawk
  58. @Achmed E. Newman
    Good column, Steve, as always. Do you think this huge flow of agenda-driven information on COVID-19 affected you more than is usually the case, say for articles about wonderful open-borders, redlining, and Emmitt Till? You usually are very good about filtering out the BS from the Lyin' Press outlets, especially your very favorites, The NY Times, Atlantic magazine, etc.

    I just don't know how some very savvy, appropriately-cynical people thought that THIS ONE TIME, the Infotainment "industry" was out there serving a noble purpose, showing the appropriate level of concern about this purported epic crisis of this epidemic. Did the talking heads on TV, who nodded in agreement that, yes, Michael Bloomberg's $500 million of campaign money could have been used to give each American a million bucks, or showed us fake gas tank explosions in pick-up trucks, suddenly snap out of their retardation and get some ethics, so that they could give you the true picture this time, 24/7?

    Do you think the agenda magically stops for a viral epidemic? The stupidity stops for no man!

    The massive propaganda campaign accompanying the lockdown should be an indicator of what’s behind it. Every other TV ad campaign is now built around the lockdown. Everyone who can is now selling their product – cable internet access, KFC, Pizza Hut, automobiles, whatever – using the lockdown as a hook. FANG is relentlessly promoting the propaganda on all its platforms, elevating pronouncements from the WHO and the CDC as if they were revelations from God. Hollywood, the so-called news media, and the “music industry” are all in line. Virtually every talking head on TV is in lockstep. There is no publicly expressed dissent against the CoV narrative.

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Alexander Turok
    There's also a complete lack of dissent against this "round Earth" theory.
    , @Hail
    The partial commercialization of the lockdown has been disturbing. Lots more money has also been dumped into companies running "we're not selling anything, we just want to say Be Strong" commercials.

    The double-message of these commercials is: "[Our mega-company] is patriotic!" and "Obey the Lockdowns, peons. We're in charge now." (Cf. Corona Coup d'Etat Theory.)

  59. In Detroit a black state rep said that Trump’s advice for chinavirus treatment worked for her. She has been stripped of her committee assignments for being a race traitor.

    In the Democratic nearby city of Royal Oak a republican city councilwoman was caught going to a GOP protest of the democratic governor. She was formally censured by the council and stripped of all her committee assignments as punishment for protesting a democrat. The media is demanding she resign, as well.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    I had to look this one up, and found a Detroit Free Press article mentioning the vote to censure her, but nothing about committee assignments. How many committees can the city government of a Detroit suburb have? Being removed from them sounds like it would be a blessing.
  60. Is this really happening?
    Steve wrote, “Chinese in America who methodically stripped all the N95s from the shelves of American retailers and mailed them home to China.”

    • Replies: @vhrm
    This particular Chinese woman (and her white American husband) certainly bought out the supplies in retail stores in some parts of Florida.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQtGvcsrHpM

    I believe she sold them online, on a Chinese focused web store, but don't know for sure.

    There was a white guy who did the same in the Appalachian States driving a U-haul around (he was profiled in the nytimes). He sold his stuff on Amazon and eBay until they banned him.

    Overall i don't think these had a big impact on mask availability since the demand is hundreds of times the available supply, but it's definitely not a good look.
    , @vhrm
    This particular Chinese woman (and her white American husband) certainly bought out the supplies in retail stores in some parts of Florida.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQtGvcsrHpM

    I believe she sold them online, on a Chinese focused web store, but don't know for sure.

    There was a white guy who did the same in the Appalachian States driving a U-haul around (he was profiled in the nytimes). He sold his stuff on Amazon and eBay until they banned him.

    Overall i don't think these had a big impact on mask availability since the demand is hundreds of times the available supply, but it's definitely not a good look.
  61. OT: Official death figures just crossed 60K. IHME revised estimate now is 74K. http://www.healthdata.org/covid/updates

  62. @Buzz Mohawk

    I really wouldn’t skip a chemotherapy session.
     
    The people who do, and all the others who will die because of shutdowns -- and those who already have -- can be added to the "excess deaths" number to further pad the total, as you are doing here:

    Nationally, up through April 4, excess deaths were about twice official coronavirus deaths in the U.S., so we are likely up to 100,000 deaths by now.
     
    Why don't you subtract all the deaths attributed to your favorite illness because of coexistence with other causes or because doctors are being encouraged to use covid-19 as cause of death when they don't know?

    "Let's argue about this."

    Another thing this big story is exposing is people's confirmation bias. Some of us are biased the other way.

    My wife an I now know two families, parents with children, in which everyone has tested positive. Out of those, only one person, a grandmother, went into a hospital. She is home now and okay.

    We live in one of the outer rings around the New York City epicenter and the New Rochelle ground zero first explosion. We live next to the first town in our state that had its own explosion of cases brought over immediately from the epicenter. That happened quite some time before masks, distancing and shutdowns, so your friend Corona-chan was here long before we did anything about her.

    There has been no random test that I am aware of, but no doubt many of us have the virus or antibodies. Yet those families are the only cases we know, and they are all fine.

    Kudos to you, Steve, for remembering free speech and dialectic. You did not deserve my one really shitty comment to you. I apologize. (Now my wife's father is in hospice care, ready to join his wife in heaven, and we still can't get there. In good marriages, people often leave together. They are leaving together, while we can't go anywhere.)

    I lost a filling weeks ago but can't get it replaced, so the tooth will just decay for awhile. My colonoscopy was canceled weeks ago, so if there are any cancerous polyps in my gut, they will stay there and grow and grow... Maybe I can someday be added to the excess deaths total. They can bury me minus one tooth.

    Can you travel out of state for medical care?
    In North Carolina, some dentists are treating emergencies.
    Next week, my gastro will resume performing routine colonoscopies.

    You may find closer providers. If not, Raleigh NC is 550 miles from New Rochelle. Good luck.

    • Replies: @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    You may not be a NASCAR fan, but since you are an avowed North Carolinian I wish you a very happy Dale Earnhardt's birthday. He was a real man's man.
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    Thank you.
  63. @Hypnotoad666
    Imposing the consensus of experts by government fiat is pretty much the definition of Progressiveism. So these people have been like pigs in mud during the pandemic.

    The close-mindedness has been amazing.

    One of my favorites examples of a Progressive high-IQ idiot is the always awful Paul Krugman. He recently told his conformist NYT readers that Dr. Oz and others were "quacks" because they aren't specialized virologists or whatever. How dare "TV Doctors" opine about hydrochloroquine as a promising treatment.

    This, he said, is the whole problem with "the right:" they believe in nonconformist "quacks" while the Left is science-based. Only panels of experts with "International," or "World" in their title are to be followed.

    It’s interesting that they believe ordinary people or “lesser” experts can’t be trusted to use the scientific method anymore.

    No hypothesis forming, observation, testing, and conclusions…just listen to what the SCIENCE (TM) tells you. You cannot be trusted.

  64. @jim jones
    Feminists are the people most opposed to free speech, try reading MGTOW on Reddit and see what happens.

    Winner for most irrelevant comment on this post award.

    Actually, incels and feminists (a true match made in heaven even if they don’t know it themselves) bickering on an Internet forum is an example of free speech still existing somewhere.

    • Replies: @SFG
    They quarantined TRP (the red pill) as well as MGTOW.

    MensRights is still active last time I checked.

    And yes, the MRAs and feminists often seem like mirror images of each other. But only one is having their sites knocked down.

  65. @Dave Pinsen
    Great column, and you stuck the landing with the conclusion this time.

    Not his fault. Taki became a billianaore through being one of the greediest bastards alive. He has people truncate all of Steve’s columns around the 70% mark in the hopes of scaring one of his readers into clicking one of the pictorially grotesque advertised elixirs he promotes.

    Every so often Steve either outsmarts him or accidentally appears to.

  66. What are N95s?

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    masks with n95 rating
  67. @Buzz Mohawk

    I really wouldn’t skip a chemotherapy session.
     
    The people who do, and all the others who will die because of shutdowns -- and those who already have -- can be added to the "excess deaths" number to further pad the total, as you are doing here:

    Nationally, up through April 4, excess deaths were about twice official coronavirus deaths in the U.S., so we are likely up to 100,000 deaths by now.
     
    Why don't you subtract all the deaths attributed to your favorite illness because of coexistence with other causes or because doctors are being encouraged to use covid-19 as cause of death when they don't know?

    "Let's argue about this."

    Another thing this big story is exposing is people's confirmation bias. Some of us are biased the other way.

    My wife an I now know two families, parents with children, in which everyone has tested positive. Out of those, only one person, a grandmother, went into a hospital. She is home now and okay.

    We live in one of the outer rings around the New York City epicenter and the New Rochelle ground zero first explosion. We live next to the first town in our state that had its own explosion of cases brought over immediately from the epicenter. That happened quite some time before masks, distancing and shutdowns, so your friend Corona-chan was here long before we did anything about her.

    There has been no random test that I am aware of, but no doubt many of us have the virus or antibodies. Yet those families are the only cases we know, and they are all fine.

    Kudos to you, Steve, for remembering free speech and dialectic. You did not deserve my one really shitty comment to you. I apologize. (Now my wife's father is in hospice care, ready to join his wife in heaven, and we still can't get there. In good marriages, people often leave together. They are leaving together, while we can't go anywhere.)

    I lost a filling weeks ago but can't get it replaced, so the tooth will just decay for awhile. My colonoscopy was canceled weeks ago, so if there are any cancerous polyps in my gut, they will stay there and grow and grow... Maybe I can someday be added to the excess deaths total. They can bury me minus one tooth.

    Why don’t you subtract all the deaths attributed to your favorite illness because of coexistence with other causes or because doctors are being encouraged to use covid-19 as cause of death when they don’t know?

    Those deaths wouldn’t show up as excess deaths.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    Those deaths wouldn’t show up as excess deaths.
     
    They would if the people died because they missed a doctor's appointment that otherwise would have saved them (cf. the first comment on the thread by Mr. Anon).

    Many of these people are probably like the ones dying of coronavirus , i.e. they are the ones in death's waiting room and their passing away has been pulled forward a few months or years. The point is not to do a utilitarian analysis, but there is something wrong with a healthcare system that creates iatrogenic deaths because of arbitrary shifts in policy. There is no reason for the public to trust our health institutions again.

    , @anonymous
    Why are your comments highlighted in the creamy yellow that, AFAIK, is reserved for this website’s Authors? (I was unable just now to find you on that roster.) And, if you’re not an Author, does this highlighting outrank The Gold Star?
  68. yet Steve keeps blocking my posts about (who) is making sure there is no free speech, or any other Founding Father idea about how America should be run and what freedoms we should have. then Steve makes a stupid post about handshakes down thru the centuries. idiotic nonsense topics.

    Steve Sailer, not a serious blogger anymore. satisfied to snark blog about America going away, not interested in talking about why or how it’s happening. he makes sure the trolls can post their usual dumb stuff though. he sure doesn’t block them.

    “Thanks for writing in defense of the First Amendment.”

    when did Steve ever do that? all Steve does is make sure there is no discussion here about (who) is actually eliminating free speech, and what to do about it. no discussing of, reacting to, or planning to fix the actual situation is allowed here. only snark blogging as (you know who) achieves all their goals and eventually eliminates America.

    Steve doesn’t mind because his life is mostly lived, he just wants to retire in peace and comfort, who cares if the rest of us are effectively mules to the new (rulers) of America 2.0.

    he’ll block this post too. basically there’s little difference now between Steve Sailer, who used to be the best blogger on the entire internet, and Jared Kushner and company. any topic is allowed except (you know who).

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Prime Noticer sad that Steve does not allow him to post his anti-Semitic rants when they cross the line into god knows what (since he lets thru most of the milder ones). Steve not a serious blogger anymore in noticer's opinion because Steve's blog is not devoted to anti-Semitism 24/7.

    Look, we get it. The Joos are the root of all evil in your humble opinion. You said it a million times so saying it a few more times is not going to change anyone's mind. If you want a blog that is devoted to anti-Semitic ranting, get your own.

    he’ll block this post too.
     
    Wrong again.
  69. @Hail

    Facebook is literally banning anti-government protest organizers
     
    Facebook is also deleting Knut Wittkowski's interviews that people post, and I know for a fact it has also attached "fake news"-style warnings to links people post to Dr. Ioannidis and others.

    Facebook’s censors are now the arbiters of reality and decide what is right and not, rather than PhDs; welcome to Big Tech-filtered reality…
     
    "Take your decades of experience, expertise, PhDs, and shove 'em! We in charge now."
    -- Google, Facebook, Youtube; the GooFY Coalition for Corona-Heresy Suppression

    Since reading this from Scott Alexander of Slate Star Codex I have more understanding for, mosy especially the Google Twins, they, like so many others, are being held hostage:

    https://slatestarcodex.com/2019/02/22/rip-culture-war-thread/

    Really and truly.

    Thr enemies aren’t necessarily the people acting badly in public but the sick demented individuals who threaten and harrass anyone and everyone connected to them behind the scenes.

    As an aside, this is why you want to read Scott’s stuff from before 2018 in his archivesm.

  70. @Inverness
    With Science On Our Side, Who Can Be Against Us?

    (With apologies to Romans 8:31)

    That Atlantic article is pretty shocking. Communist China knows better than to let people just say whatever they want! We could learn a thing or two from them!

    I also note that the Atlantic is peddling the Russia Collusion hoax as though we haven't learned a single thing about it. Which may well be accurate for most of their readers.

    It's weird how enthralled our "bien pensants" are with China and how virulent their hatred is for Russia.

    “That Atlantic article is pretty shocking.”

    the Atlantic is run by jews now. it’s not a WASP publication anymore. of course the new owners think China has a better system. jews don’t want european peoples to be able to talk freely, associate freely, or get together and share ideas and realize what’s happening or who’s taking their country away from them.

    go ahead and block as usual, Steve.

    Steve thinks he’s clever when he brings up Who, Whom? but he won’t tolerate any discussion of it when it’s (you know who).

  71. @Buzz Mohawk

    I really wouldn’t skip a chemotherapy session.
     
    The people who do, and all the others who will die because of shutdowns -- and those who already have -- can be added to the "excess deaths" number to further pad the total, as you are doing here:

    Nationally, up through April 4, excess deaths were about twice official coronavirus deaths in the U.S., so we are likely up to 100,000 deaths by now.
     
    Why don't you subtract all the deaths attributed to your favorite illness because of coexistence with other causes or because doctors are being encouraged to use covid-19 as cause of death when they don't know?

    "Let's argue about this."

    Another thing this big story is exposing is people's confirmation bias. Some of us are biased the other way.

    My wife an I now know two families, parents with children, in which everyone has tested positive. Out of those, only one person, a grandmother, went into a hospital. She is home now and okay.

    We live in one of the outer rings around the New York City epicenter and the New Rochelle ground zero first explosion. We live next to the first town in our state that had its own explosion of cases brought over immediately from the epicenter. That happened quite some time before masks, distancing and shutdowns, so your friend Corona-chan was here long before we did anything about her.

    There has been no random test that I am aware of, but no doubt many of us have the virus or antibodies. Yet those families are the only cases we know, and they are all fine.

    Kudos to you, Steve, for remembering free speech and dialectic. You did not deserve my one really shitty comment to you. I apologize. (Now my wife's father is in hospice care, ready to join his wife in heaven, and we still can't get there. In good marriages, people often leave together. They are leaving together, while we can't go anywhere.)

    I lost a filling weeks ago but can't get it replaced, so the tooth will just decay for awhile. My colonoscopy was canceled weeks ago, so if there are any cancerous polyps in my gut, they will stay there and grow and grow... Maybe I can someday be added to the excess deaths total. They can bury me minus one tooth.

    Keep the tooth under your pillow. The fairy is delayed but as soon as her elective genital reassignment surgery is complete she will arrive to exchange the leavings of your mouth for her money.

    So rest assured. 🙂

    As an aside, I’ve praised Steve enough but what he does indeed deserve criticism for is not his scaredy-cat beliefs regarding this nonsense but his advocacy for less freedoms of other sorts. He was one of the first to fantasize about a day when we all get to wear masks all day. And his constant demands that people’s personal medical information be made public I would not consider to be to his credit. Like everyone else was claimed freedom as their flag, he has shown that as soon as he bought into the nonsense about coronavirus, he was ready to burn the flag as quickly as anybody else. with the most notable exception of course being that he continue to publish and to allow comments that opposed his belief of the central thesis, that the quarantine was a necessary and useful thing.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Equally disappointing is Ron Unz not letting this exaggerated crisis go to waste, using it to further beat his anti-American, pro-China drum. He is non-stop "stupid, evil United States < superior, honest China" with regard to the Wuhan Flu.

    So we have Ron pushing the geopolitical part in favor of a communist dictatorship that monitors and controls its people, and we have Steve blowing air into the hypochondriacal balloon to inflate the medical significance.

    If I didn't trust, admire and respect these guys, I'd think it was all a deep state/globalist/Davos set/pre-planned act. Now, if you will excuse me, I am going to put on my tin foil hat.

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1365/2497/files/IMG_3053-ANIMATION_large.gif?v=1522242950
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    If we're gonna pile on iSteve here, yeah, he never said he's a big defender of the US Constitution. (This article may be one of the few exceptions in which he brought up a basic principle.) I like his Conservatism, the anti-PC, and the great insight and analysis, so I've blown off that lack of support for liberty vs. his pragmatism. To pile on though, yeah, I don't see how one can defend Affirmative Action, in any form, and be a Conservative.

    Yes, our host here is always very fair with the comments and commenters.
  72. @ben tillman

    Imposing the consensus of experts by government fiat is pretty much the definition of Progressiveism. So these people have been like pigs in mud during the pandemic.
     
    Yet John Dewey explicitly opposed the idea of expertocracy as advanced by Lippmann.

    “Yet John Dewey explicitly opposed the idea of expertocracy as advanced by Lippmann.”

    probably because Dewey was a WASP, descendant of the people who created America and most of the good things on this planet, and Walter Lippmann was a jew, trying to subvert all that for his group’s own gain. as usual.

    seeing the trend here? today in 2020, you can enjoy the WASP created, but now jew run Atlantic telling you that experts from the government know better about what you’re allowed to say, and the largely WASP created, but now largely jew controlled world wide web will be their media enforcement arm, as many of the biggest sites on the internet delete things contrary to central government decree.

    block as usual Steve. you’re so interested in truth, aren’t you.

    • Replies: @Jack D

    jew controlled world wide web
     
    And don't forget your jew controlled toaster - that's what's causing your toast to burn.
    , @ben tillman
    Dewey had a similar disagreement with Trotsky, with the same ethnic dimensions.

    There’s a remarkable little book called “Their Morals and Ours” documenting an exchange between Trotsky and the progressive John Dewey. Dewey advocated class cooperation while Trotsky advocated class conflict and the pursuit of a morality determined by the answer to the following question: Is it good for the revolution? Class conflict, apparently, was good for the revolution.

    Exchanges like the Dewey-Trotsky and Dewey-Lippmann exchanges reflect fundamental differences in the Jewish and non-Jewish conceptualization of the “leftist” or "progressive" project.

    Lippmann (author of Public Opinion and The Phantom Public) contended that democracy (self-government) was impossible in an age of increasing complexity. He advocated government by a technocratic elite with “journalists” acting as intermediaries generating public support for the policies of the elite. Dewey rejected this idea and preferred the construction of a functioning democracy through education and uplifting of the public and through a focus on politics at the level of the local community.
    , @S. Anonyia
    If you don’t like Jews, it doesn’t make any sense to praise WASPs or think they created “most of what is wonderful in the world.” Or to think WASPs and Jews are opposite ends of a spectrum. Really, WASPs are basically the closest in mentality of all European people’s to Jews- just without the same degree of ethnocentrism. Probably helps explain why both groups dominate the upper echelons of the modern world, for better or for ill...

    Commonalities: Emphasis on money-making, pedantic obsessions with abstract ideologies, love of the Old Testament, disdain of art and community traditions, rootlessness...

    , @Anonymous
    probably because Dewey was a WASP, descendant of the people who created America and most of the good things on this planet, and Walter Lippmann was a jew, trying to subvert all that for his group’s own gain. as usual.


    Careful. Based on what John Taylor Gatto has said about him, Dewey was trying to subvert the American educational system, too, but for his own nefarious purpose:

    Exactly what John Dewey heralded at the onset of the twentieth century has indeed happened.
    Our once highly individualized nation has evolved into a centrally managed village, an agora made
    up of huge special interests which regard individual voices as irrelevant.


    Someone in a later post said, in effect, that Dewey was in favour of democracy. Well, that may have been so, but I suspect that Dewey's definition of "democracy" would be at variance with yours (and mine for that matter).
  73. @Buzz Mohawk

    I really wouldn’t skip a chemotherapy session.
     
    The people who do, and all the others who will die because of shutdowns -- and those who already have -- can be added to the "excess deaths" number to further pad the total, as you are doing here:

    Nationally, up through April 4, excess deaths were about twice official coronavirus deaths in the U.S., so we are likely up to 100,000 deaths by now.
     
    Why don't you subtract all the deaths attributed to your favorite illness because of coexistence with other causes or because doctors are being encouraged to use covid-19 as cause of death when they don't know?

    "Let's argue about this."

    Another thing this big story is exposing is people's confirmation bias. Some of us are biased the other way.

    My wife an I now know two families, parents with children, in which everyone has tested positive. Out of those, only one person, a grandmother, went into a hospital. She is home now and okay.

    We live in one of the outer rings around the New York City epicenter and the New Rochelle ground zero first explosion. We live next to the first town in our state that had its own explosion of cases brought over immediately from the epicenter. That happened quite some time before masks, distancing and shutdowns, so your friend Corona-chan was here long before we did anything about her.

    There has been no random test that I am aware of, but no doubt many of us have the virus or antibodies. Yet those families are the only cases we know, and they are all fine.

    Kudos to you, Steve, for remembering free speech and dialectic. You did not deserve my one really shitty comment to you. I apologize. (Now my wife's father is in hospice care, ready to join his wife in heaven, and we still can't get there. In good marriages, people often leave together. They are leaving together, while we can't go anywhere.)

    I lost a filling weeks ago but can't get it replaced, so the tooth will just decay for awhile. My colonoscopy was canceled weeks ago, so if there are any cancerous polyps in my gut, they will stay there and grow and grow... Maybe I can someday be added to the excess deaths total. They can bury me minus one tooth.

    Buzz, if you take the time to look, the CDC never counted seasonal flu deaths in those over 65. Those were sttributed to other underlying causes. A few thousand here, a few thousand there and you have a pandemic. Stay safe.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    I saw that, and it doesn't matter. The bigger number still isn't anything like what predictors were scaring us with. It isn't enough to merit the terrible costs of what we are doing to hold it down, and as the article itself says, all the causes of those annual numbers are not known.

    Some of them can even come as unintended consequences of the panic itself. More definitely will.

    And remember the doctors who are telling us that they are being urged to put Covid-19 down as cause of death when they really don't know. A lot of people want to find any way they can to claim higher numbers. Certainly the Washington Post and some folks at Yale are happy to facilitate that effort.

    Bottom line is it doesn't matter, because the number is too small and not even close to what people like Ron Unz were using a short while ago. All the math in the world can't change garbage variables and give you a good answer.

    This is the Comet Kohoutek of pandemics.

  74. @Peter Frost
    Why don’t you subtract all the deaths attributed to your favorite illness because of coexistence with other causes or because doctors are being encouraged to use covid-19 as cause of death when they don’t know?

    Those deaths wouldn't show up as excess deaths.

    Those deaths wouldn’t show up as excess deaths.

    They would if the people died because they missed a doctor’s appointment that otherwise would have saved them (cf. the first comment on the thread by Mr. Anon).

    Many of these people are probably like the ones dying of coronavirus , i.e. they are the ones in death’s waiting room and their passing away has been pulled forward a few months or years. The point is not to do a utilitarian analysis, but there is something wrong with a healthcare system that creates iatrogenic deaths because of arbitrary shifts in policy. There is no reason for the public to trust our health institutions again.

    • Replies: @Peter Frost
    They would if the people died because they missed a doctor’s appointment that otherwise would have saved them

    That's the main criticism of estimating the death toll from excess mortality. You get an overestimate because you're including deaths due to disease-related disruptions, and not just the disease itself. On the other hand, you get an underestimate because more people are staying home and there are consequently fewer traffic deaths.

    There is no reason for the public to trust our health institutions again.

    Hindsight is a wonderful thing. Yes, this pandemic could have been handled a lot better. We could have restricted international travel a lot earlier. We could have ensured a domestic supply of masks and other protective gear. We could have prepared ourselves beforehand for this kind of thing in many ways.

    But we didn't. If you could lend me your time machine, I could go back and see what I could do. I suspect, however, that most people would ignore me.

  75. Anonymous[739] • Disclaimer says:

  76. One of your best columns, Steve.

  77. ” the single most valuable political principle is precisely what many people simply can’t abide at this moment: freedom of speech.”

    Hilarious coming from a website that restricts selected commenters to 1 comment per day because they don’t drink the Kovid Koo-laid.

  78. @prime noticer
    yet Steve keeps blocking my posts about (who) is making sure there is no free speech, or any other Founding Father idea about how America should be run and what freedoms we should have. then Steve makes a stupid post about handshakes down thru the centuries. idiotic nonsense topics.

    Steve Sailer, not a serious blogger anymore. satisfied to snark blog about America going away, not interested in talking about why or how it's happening. he makes sure the trolls can post their usual dumb stuff though. he sure doesn't block them.

    "Thanks for writing in defense of the First Amendment."

    when did Steve ever do that? all Steve does is make sure there is no discussion here about (who) is actually eliminating free speech, and what to do about it. no discussing of, reacting to, or planning to fix the actual situation is allowed here. only snark blogging as (you know who) achieves all their goals and eventually eliminates America.

    Steve doesn't mind because his life is mostly lived, he just wants to retire in peace and comfort, who cares if the rest of us are effectively mules to the new (rulers) of America 2.0.

    he'll block this post too. basically there's little difference now between Steve Sailer, who used to be the best blogger on the entire internet, and Jared Kushner and company. any topic is allowed except (you know who).

    Prime Noticer sad that Steve does not allow him to post his anti-Semitic rants when they cross the line into god knows what (since he lets thru most of the milder ones). Steve not a serious blogger anymore in noticer’s opinion because Steve’s blog is not devoted to anti-Semitism 24/7.

    Look, we get it. The Joos are the root of all evil in your humble opinion. You said it a million times so saying it a few more times is not going to change anyone’s mind. If you want a blog that is devoted to anti-Semitic ranting, get your own.

    he’ll block this post too.

    Wrong again.

  79. @prime noticer
    "Yet John Dewey explicitly opposed the idea of expertocracy as advanced by Lippmann."

    probably because Dewey was a WASP, descendant of the people who created America and most of the good things on this planet, and Walter Lippmann was a jew, trying to subvert all that for his group's own gain. as usual.

    seeing the trend here? today in 2020, you can enjoy the WASP created, but now jew run Atlantic telling you that experts from the government know better about what you're allowed to say, and the largely WASP created, but now largely jew controlled world wide web will be their media enforcement arm, as many of the biggest sites on the internet delete things contrary to central government decree.

    block as usual Steve. you're so interested in truth, aren't you.

    jew controlled world wide web

    And don’t forget your jew controlled toaster – that’s what’s causing your toast to burn.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    I notice our toaster works best with bagels, so I think it might be Jew controlled.

    We recently bought an honest-to-goodness bagel slicer. It's a guillotine type, so it makes me think about handshake connections to Marie Antoinette. I highly recommend one.

  80. @Lawyer Guy
    In Detroit a black state rep said that Trump's advice for chinavirus treatment worked for her. She has been stripped of her committee assignments for being a race traitor.

    In the Democratic nearby city of Royal Oak a republican city councilwoman was caught going to a GOP protest of the democratic governor. She was formally censured by the council and stripped of all her committee assignments as punishment for protesting a democrat. The media is demanding she resign, as well.

    I had to look this one up, and found a Detroit Free Press article mentioning the vote to censure her, but nothing about committee assignments. How many committees can the city government of a Detroit suburb have? Being removed from them sounds like it would be a blessing.

  81. @Hail

    Facebook is literally banning anti-government protest organizers
     
    Facebook is also deleting Knut Wittkowski's interviews that people post, and I know for a fact it has also attached "fake news"-style warnings to links people post to Dr. Ioannidis and others.

    Facebook’s censors are now the arbiters of reality and decide what is right and not, rather than PhDs; welcome to Big Tech-filtered reality…
     
    "Take your decades of experience, expertise, PhDs, and shove 'em! We in charge now."
    -- Google, Facebook, Youtube; the GooFY Coalition for Corona-Heresy Suppression

    Wittkowski’s second video is up, by the way, and is highly informative in my humble opinion. He argues that the epidemic peaked in mid-March in NYC, even before lockdowns began, and will, like all upper respiratory influenzas, soon be over in all countries currently infected, though a little later in those that practiced more social distancing, which only protracts the process.

    One interesting point he makes is that Fauci is an infectious disease expert, not an epidemiologist, let alone an epidemiologist specializing in upper respiratory viral contagious. Doctors naturally want to cure their patients, hence their emphasis on testing to identify the germ, whereas epidemiologist want to predict the course and magnitude of an epidemic, which requires wide-scale antibody testing. The latter not the former, he argues, is where the whole emphasis should have been from the beginning. Too bad Trump was never informed. (I’m afraid Tucker Carlson, among others, has a great deal to answer for.)

    Anyway here is the link:

    • Replies: @res

    He argues that the epidemic peaked in mid-March in NYC, even before lockdowns began
     
    There is data here which partially supports that.
    https://www.kinsahealth.co/early-social-distancing-measures-reduce-the-spread-of-illness-in-new-york-city/

    https://www.kinsahealth.co/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/New-York-County-Share-of-Population-with-Flu-Like-Illness.png

    Assuming a five day incubation period I think that indicates the 3/12 restrictions on public gatherings had a positive effect. The 3/16 school closings and 3/17 restaurant and bar closings may have had an effect (notice the decline steepening after 3/20). The trend indicated things were coming under control before the stay at home order had a chance to take effect.

    Their data from other localities (the various countermeasure timings vary) support the idea that the stay at home orders did not make the important difference.

    Current data for New York County is available at
    https://healthweather.us/?regionId=36061&mode=Observed

    The model for NY state at https://rt.live/ suggests a similar timing using different data.
    , @Hail

    He argues that the epidemic peaked in mid-March in NYC, even before lockdowns began, and will, like all upper respiratory influenzas, soon be over in all countries currently infected

     

    That the epidemic's transmission phase peaked before the shutdowns has become clear in many countries.

    For example:

    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/coronavirus-r0-in-germany-march-6-to-april-9.png

    The same finding has come out of multiple European countries, and not just the "hard hit" ones but those relatively lightly hit like Germany. The epidemic was already running its natural course, and the shutdowns were a terrible idea.

    The Wittkowski second interview (April 28) is good. See also here for a series of written updates Wittkowski gave during the period April 14-27, including answering many of the criticisms of his ideas (which are standard in epidemiology but dare not speak their name during a witchfract-panic).
  82. @Not my economy
    Free speech is good for us, and good for “everyone” in general.

    But it’s bad specifically for people that have the most money/power. A lot of them will lose out under free speech. You have to peel off a faction somehow.

    So who is already rich or powerful, that could get more power or more money by going with free speech?

    Not gonna happen otherwise

    Free speech is good for us, and good for “everyone” in general.

    But it’s bad specifically for people that have the most money/power. A lot of them will lose out under free speech. You have to peel off a faction somehow.

    So who is already rich or powerful, that could get more power or more money by going with free speech?

    Donald Trump.

  83. @moshe
    Keep the tooth under your pillow. The fairy is delayed but as soon as her elective genital reassignment surgery is complete she will arrive to exchange the leavings of your mouth for her money.

    So rest assured. :)

    As an aside, I've praised Steve enough but what he does indeed deserve criticism for is not his scaredy-cat beliefs regarding this nonsense but his advocacy for less freedoms of other sorts. He was one of the first to fantasize about a day when we all get to wear masks all day. And his constant demands that people's personal medical information be made public I would not consider to be to his credit. Like everyone else was claimed freedom as their flag, he has shown that as soon as he bought into the nonsense about coronavirus, he was ready to burn the flag as quickly as anybody else. with the most notable exception of course being that he continue to publish and to allow comments that opposed his belief of the central thesis, that the quarantine was a necessary and useful thing.

    Equally disappointing is Ron Unz not letting this exaggerated crisis go to waste, using it to further beat his anti-American, pro-China drum. He is non-stop “stupid, evil United States < superior, honest China" with regard to the Wuhan Flu.

    So we have Ron pushing the geopolitical part in favor of a communist dictatorship that monitors and controls its people, and we have Steve blowing air into the hypochondriacal balloon to inflate the medical significance.

    If I didn't trust, admire and respect these guys, I'd think it was all a deep state/globalist/Davos set/pre-planned act. Now, if you will excuse me, I am going to put on my tin foil hat.

    • Agree: Inverness
    • Thanks: Hail
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    That's weird about Ron Unz, Buzz. He is the biggest stalwart for free speech I've heard of in the modern era, putting his money, but more like years of his effort, where his mouth is too, about this. Free speech may not be just an American concept, but we are the only country that ever held to a Constitution in which it was enshrined, pretty damn well for arguable over 200 years.

    Yet, the guy is so anti-American and Anti-Americans as to sound like a Commie straight outta the 1950's USSR or Chairman Mao's press secretary. He has been full of shit on this Kung Flu thing from the get-go. Don't expect any apologies, but as he is, after all, the creator and proprietor of this site, so be it.
    , @Hail
    I find it odd that there is no major writer anywhere at the Unz Review -- someone correct me if I am wrong -- who is, and has been, decisively and actively on the anti-Panic side on the Corona Question.

    (Some writers here are pro-Panic, some are neutral or don't much talk about it. None afaict are hitting hard against this thing, even now as it is clearly not what they said it was when the Corona Coup d'Etat was underway in March. Maybe Michelle Malkin is in the strong anti-Panic category, if you count her.)

    Yet the commenteriat here, including most regulars, is mainly anti-Panic.

    This is like a version of that old idea that comment sections always end up more radical than the main article (leading to somebody's quip that 2016 Trump vs. Hillary was "the comment section against the main article.") Somehow, it even happened here.

  84. @Tiny Duck
    I know this is suposed to be a cut at preogressives but it does nothold up

    We progressives value free speech but not hate speech. Learn the difference.

    It is conservatives and right wingers that are against the first amendment. Every time a Person of Color dares speak out white people disagree with them, mock them, argue with them and do other things that stifle the Free Expression of the Person of Color.

    We progressives are sick of you people. We remeber the rapist on the supreme court, we remmber the racism

    We will win this fall and we will make you guys keel over with the changes that we will put in place

    Say goodbye to your guns white boys!

    So hello to hate speech laws!

    Welcome back TD!
    If you are back, then other features of our old normal world must not be too far behind.
    We all hope you didn’t suffer any long term damage from your time on the ventilator. This comment was letter perfect, right down to a mis-pelling in only two words, and the perfect moon-bat PC selection of which words to capitalize, so your hospital stay doesn’t seem to have had any permanent effect.

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
  85. @North Carolina Resident
    Can you travel out of state for medical care?
    In North Carolina, some dentists are treating emergencies.
    Next week, my gastro will resume performing routine colonoscopies.

    You may find closer providers. If not, Raleigh NC is 550 miles from New Rochelle. Good luck.

    You may not be a NASCAR fan, but since you are an avowed North Carolinian I wish you a very happy Dale Earnhardt’s birthday. He was a real man’s man.

  86. @Jack D

    jew controlled world wide web
     
    And don't forget your jew controlled toaster - that's what's causing your toast to burn.

    I notice our toaster works best with bagels, so I think it might be Jew controlled.

    We recently bought an honest-to-goodness bagel slicer. It’s a guillotine type, so it makes me think about handshake connections to Marie Antoinette. I highly recommend one.

  87. @Intelligent Dasein

    Those deaths wouldn’t show up as excess deaths.
     
    They would if the people died because they missed a doctor's appointment that otherwise would have saved them (cf. the first comment on the thread by Mr. Anon).

    Many of these people are probably like the ones dying of coronavirus , i.e. they are the ones in death's waiting room and their passing away has been pulled forward a few months or years. The point is not to do a utilitarian analysis, but there is something wrong with a healthcare system that creates iatrogenic deaths because of arbitrary shifts in policy. There is no reason for the public to trust our health institutions again.

    They would if the people died because they missed a doctor’s appointment that otherwise would have saved them

    That’s the main criticism of estimating the death toll from excess mortality. You get an overestimate because you’re including deaths due to disease-related disruptions, and not just the disease itself. On the other hand, you get an underestimate because more people are staying home and there are consequently fewer traffic deaths.

    There is no reason for the public to trust our health institutions again.

    Hindsight is a wonderful thing. Yes, this pandemic could have been handled a lot better. We could have restricted international travel a lot earlier. We could have ensured a domestic supply of masks and other protective gear. We could have prepared ourselves beforehand for this kind of thing in many ways.

    But we didn’t. If you could lend me your time machine, I could go back and see what I could do. I suspect, however, that most people would ignore me.

    • LOL: Sean
    • Replies: @ben tillman
    Ha ha -- nice punch line!
    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "Hindsight is a wonderful thing. Yes, this pandemic could have been handled a lot better....
    But we didn’t. If you could lend me your time machine, I could go back and see what I could do."

    Encourage oldsters to self-quarantine and let everyone else live life normally.

    Over two months ago I penned the Maqick Qungflu Quatrain:

    If your lungs are diseased,
    Self-quarantine please;
    If your health is okay,
    Go on about your day!

    But I do own a time machine: it travels at the velocity of 60 minutes per hour.

    #linearvirus

    , @Intelligent Dasein
    It does not require hindsight or a time machine to know that when the political class plays games with the healthcare system and people lose their lives, it destroys public trust. That's why responsible politicians don't do that.

    And for you to Boomerpost about it with your "Sorry I don't have a time machine, junior" shtick is callous and obtuse. There is no excuse for ever telling the whole public that they have to stay at home, that they cannot visit their sick relatives, and that they must close their business and grovel for government peanuts. This kind of authority does not exist. It is pure tyranny and abuse and an outrage to God and man.
  88. @prime noticer
    "Yet John Dewey explicitly opposed the idea of expertocracy as advanced by Lippmann."

    probably because Dewey was a WASP, descendant of the people who created America and most of the good things on this planet, and Walter Lippmann was a jew, trying to subvert all that for his group's own gain. as usual.

    seeing the trend here? today in 2020, you can enjoy the WASP created, but now jew run Atlantic telling you that experts from the government know better about what you're allowed to say, and the largely WASP created, but now largely jew controlled world wide web will be their media enforcement arm, as many of the biggest sites on the internet delete things contrary to central government decree.

    block as usual Steve. you're so interested in truth, aren't you.

    Dewey had a similar disagreement with Trotsky, with the same ethnic dimensions.

    There’s a remarkable little book called “Their Morals and Ours” documenting an exchange between Trotsky and the progressive John Dewey. Dewey advocated class cooperation while Trotsky advocated class conflict and the pursuit of a morality determined by the answer to the following question: Is it good for the revolution? Class conflict, apparently, was good for the revolution.

    Exchanges like the Dewey-Trotsky and Dewey-Lippmann exchanges reflect fundamental differences in the Jewish and non-Jewish conceptualization of the “leftist” or “progressive” project.

    Lippmann (author of Public Opinion and The Phantom Public) contended that democracy (self-government) was impossible in an age of increasing complexity. He advocated government by a technocratic elite with “journalists” acting as intermediaries generating public support for the policies of the elite. Dewey rejected this idea and preferred the construction of a functioning democracy through education and uplifting of the public and through a focus on politics at the level of the local community.

    • Replies: @anon
    There’s a remarkable little book called “Their Morals and Ours” documenting an exchange between Trotsky and the progressive John Dewey.

    Are you referring to this?
    https://www.marxists.org/archive/trotsky/1938/morals/morals.htm
    It is more of an essay than a book.

    Now I'm reading my way through it. I wonder if Trotsky wrote in English or if it is a translation? There's a passive-aggressive, butthurt, snarky tone that would fit right in with leftardism in the Current Year.

    Search on Trotsky and see his face from early to later years, it remains consistently punchable.
  89. @Buzz Mohawk

    I really wouldn’t skip a chemotherapy session.
     
    The people who do, and all the others who will die because of shutdowns -- and those who already have -- can be added to the "excess deaths" number to further pad the total, as you are doing here:

    Nationally, up through April 4, excess deaths were about twice official coronavirus deaths in the U.S., so we are likely up to 100,000 deaths by now.
     
    Why don't you subtract all the deaths attributed to your favorite illness because of coexistence with other causes or because doctors are being encouraged to use covid-19 as cause of death when they don't know?

    "Let's argue about this."

    Another thing this big story is exposing is people's confirmation bias. Some of us are biased the other way.

    My wife an I now know two families, parents with children, in which everyone has tested positive. Out of those, only one person, a grandmother, went into a hospital. She is home now and okay.

    We live in one of the outer rings around the New York City epicenter and the New Rochelle ground zero first explosion. We live next to the first town in our state that had its own explosion of cases brought over immediately from the epicenter. That happened quite some time before masks, distancing and shutdowns, so your friend Corona-chan was here long before we did anything about her.

    There has been no random test that I am aware of, but no doubt many of us have the virus or antibodies. Yet those families are the only cases we know, and they are all fine.

    Kudos to you, Steve, for remembering free speech and dialectic. You did not deserve my one really shitty comment to you. I apologize. (Now my wife's father is in hospice care, ready to join his wife in heaven, and we still can't get there. In good marriages, people often leave together. They are leaving together, while we can't go anywhere.)

    I lost a filling weeks ago but can't get it replaced, so the tooth will just decay for awhile. My colonoscopy was canceled weeks ago, so if there are any cancerous polyps in my gut, they will stay there and grow and grow... Maybe I can someday be added to the excess deaths total. They can bury me minus one tooth.

    Still on hold for prostate surgery, but I did take out my own ingrown toenail with pliers, a pry bar, Hydrogen peroxide, and uhm, medicinal brandy.

    I am beginning to wonder just how much we can all do without doctors, especially if it involves a respiratory illness.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Good luck to you, and good job with the pliers! You have my respect, doctor. My preferred pain medication is bourbon.
  90. @peterike
    In other news, Late Obama Age Collapse continues at increasing pace.

    https://nypost.com/2020/04/28/video-shows-how-extensive-nyc-subway-homeless-problem-is/

    The video is something. Warning: it's got annoying autoplay.

    From the Stem the Collapse file, Trump floats another great idea, which probably won't happen.

    President Trump on Tuesday suggested that new federal payments to help states deal with the coronavirus pandemic could depend on whether or not they were home to sanctuary cities.

    “If it is COVID related, we can talk about it. We want things including sanctuary city adjustments,” the president said during an event in the East Room of the White House.
     
    In any case, for those still considering not voting for Trump, the many, many incremental improvements Trump has made on the immigration front will be dismantled within the first hour of the Biden (or whoever) administration. Keep that in mind when you stupidly prattle that Trump hasn't worked miracles so you're not voting for him. Trump has delivered more on immigration than any President since Calvin Coolidge signed the Immigration Act in 1924.

    PS - Something I just saw about that 1924 temporary life-saving measure for America:

    There were nine dissenting votes in the Senate and a handful of opponents in the House, the most vigorous of whom was freshman Brooklyn Representative and Jewish-American Emanuel Celler.

    Wow. And Celler beetled on about it for forty more years until he finally got what he wanted. It's difficult to defeat mono-maniacs.

    Well said. Anyone who claims to care about immigration restriction but announces he’s not voting for Trump is equivalent to a critically ill cancer patient who fires the doctor who’d been keeping him alive but bedridden, then hires Dr. Kevorkian instead.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Whatever one’s personal feelings about Dr. Kevorkian, there was someone with some interesting connections.
  91. @Peter Frost
    They would if the people died because they missed a doctor’s appointment that otherwise would have saved them

    That's the main criticism of estimating the death toll from excess mortality. You get an overestimate because you're including deaths due to disease-related disruptions, and not just the disease itself. On the other hand, you get an underestimate because more people are staying home and there are consequently fewer traffic deaths.

    There is no reason for the public to trust our health institutions again.

    Hindsight is a wonderful thing. Yes, this pandemic could have been handled a lot better. We could have restricted international travel a lot earlier. We could have ensured a domestic supply of masks and other protective gear. We could have prepared ourselves beforehand for this kind of thing in many ways.

    But we didn't. If you could lend me your time machine, I could go back and see what I could do. I suspect, however, that most people would ignore me.

    Ha ha — nice punch line!

  92. @Luke Lea
    Wittkowski's second video is up, by the way, and is highly informative in my humble opinion. He argues that the epidemic peaked in mid-March in NYC, even before lockdowns began, and will, like all upper respiratory influenzas, soon be over in all countries currently infected, though a little later in those that practiced more social distancing, which only protracts the process.

    One interesting point he makes is that Fauci is an infectious disease expert, not an epidemiologist, let alone an epidemiologist specializing in upper respiratory viral contagious. Doctors naturally want to cure their patients, hence their emphasis on testing to identify the germ, whereas epidemiologist want to predict the course and magnitude of an epidemic, which requires wide-scale antibody testing. The latter not the former, he argues, is where the whole emphasis should have been from the beginning. Too bad Trump was never informed. (I'm afraid Tucker Carlson, among others, has a great deal to answer for.)

    Anyway here is the link: https://youtu.be/k0Q4naYOYDw

    He argues that the epidemic peaked in mid-March in NYC, even before lockdowns began

    There is data here which partially supports that.
    https://www.kinsahealth.co/early-social-distancing-measures-reduce-the-spread-of-illness-in-new-york-city/

    Assuming a five day incubation period I think that indicates the 3/12 restrictions on public gatherings had a positive effect. The 3/16 school closings and 3/17 restaurant and bar closings may have had an effect (notice the decline steepening after 3/20). The trend indicated things were coming under control before the stay at home order had a chance to take effect.

    Their data from other localities (the various countermeasure timings vary) support the idea that the stay at home orders did not make the important difference.

    Current data for New York County is available at
    https://healthweather.us/?regionId=36061&mode=Observed

    The model for NY state at https://rt.live/ suggests a similar timing using different data.

    • Replies: @Luke Lea
    He showed an even better chart graphing the peaks in hospital admissions for flu like symptoms for the nation as a whole in which there were three distinct peaks with sharp points, two for the two strains of flu earlier this season, and one for the current virus: all three were virtually identical in terms of peak and duration, with the last one peaking in March. He said the same chart was featured by Dr. Brix (sp?) on one of Trump's press conferences in March. It's pretty graphic.
  93. @Travis
    with NYC deaths at 14,000 the fatality rate is actually well below 1% since 2.3 million New Yorkers were already infected with CV and recovered. Antibody testing in NYC indicates 25% have the antibodies to CV. The true number is actually higher, since the test will fail to detect antibodies in 15% of recovered CV patients. In some antibody tests they only detect antibodies in 40% of CV patients, but I am assuming that NY is using the test developed at Columbia University which is one of the more reliable tests and has a failure rate of 15%, which they bragged about. https://www.medpagetoday.com/infectiousdisease/covid19/86084

    The true number of New Yorkers who have had CV is much closer to 30%, since 6% of recovered patients do not have any antibodies. These tend to be those under the age of 40 who can fight off this virus with their innate immune system, thus they do not need to produce antibodies (which takes 5 - 14 days to produce). Many adults can fight off this virus in a few days time. Children are practically immune from this coronavirus. They get infected , but show no symptoms. , as do most adults under the age of 40. Of the estimated 14,000 New York City residents who succumbed to CV , less than 200 are under the age of 30. Pretty remarkable that the schools will remained closed when children are immune from CV.

    Travis, the fact that children seem to be immune is great news to those that indoctrinate them. No sense trying to change the minds of those old enough to think for themselves.

  94. anon[369] • Disclaimer says:
    @ben tillman
    Dewey had a similar disagreement with Trotsky, with the same ethnic dimensions.

    There’s a remarkable little book called “Their Morals and Ours” documenting an exchange between Trotsky and the progressive John Dewey. Dewey advocated class cooperation while Trotsky advocated class conflict and the pursuit of a morality determined by the answer to the following question: Is it good for the revolution? Class conflict, apparently, was good for the revolution.

    Exchanges like the Dewey-Trotsky and Dewey-Lippmann exchanges reflect fundamental differences in the Jewish and non-Jewish conceptualization of the “leftist” or "progressive" project.

    Lippmann (author of Public Opinion and The Phantom Public) contended that democracy (self-government) was impossible in an age of increasing complexity. He advocated government by a technocratic elite with “journalists” acting as intermediaries generating public support for the policies of the elite. Dewey rejected this idea and preferred the construction of a functioning democracy through education and uplifting of the public and through a focus on politics at the level of the local community.

    There’s a remarkable little book called “Their Morals and Ours” documenting an exchange between Trotsky and the progressive John Dewey.

    Are you referring to this?
    https://www.marxists.org/archive/trotsky/1938/morals/morals.htm
    It is more of an essay than a book.

    Now I’m reading my way through it. I wonder if Trotsky wrote in English or if it is a translation? There’s a passive-aggressive, butthurt, snarky tone that would fit right in with leftardism in the Current Year.

    Search on Trotsky and see his face from early to later years, it remains consistently punchable.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    The Trotsky essay is in the book.

    This is the book:

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/184450.Their_Morals_and_Ours

  95. @anon
    O/T...

    Meanwhile yesterday in Brooklyn, one community collectively says they flat-out don't give AF about anyone else.

    A zoom lens wasn't necessary for this one.

    https://i.imgur.com/GqXBkm0.png

    137, what was that?

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    Hasidic funeral in Williamsburg, Brooklyn
  96. @baythoven
    What are N95s?

    masks with n95 rating

  97. @Buffalo Joe
    137, what was that?

    Hasidic funeral in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

  98. @Mr. Anon
    The massive propaganda campaign accompanying the lockdown should be an indicator of what's behind it. Every other TV ad campaign is now built around the lockdown. Everyone who can is now selling their product - cable internet access, KFC, Pizza Hut, automobiles, whatever - using the lockdown as a hook. FANG is relentlessly promoting the propaganda on all its platforms, elevating pronouncements from the WHO and the CDC as if they were revelations from God. Hollywood, the so-called news media, and the "music industry" are all in line. Virtually every talking head on TV is in lockstep. There is no publicly expressed dissent against the CoV narrative.

    There’s also a complete lack of dissent against this “round Earth” theory.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    There’s also a complete lack of dissent against this “round Earth” theory.
     
    There are plenty of academics who disagree with you - epidemiologists, virologists, etc. - much more distinguished ones than Anthony Fauci. You guys strike me much more as flat-earthers. In any event, last I checked we weren't supposed to be living in a public health dictatorship, so I don't necessarily care what guys in white lab-coats think. I didn't consent to let somebody dictate the terms of my existence to me just because they wear green scrubs and stand with folded arms.

    You are free to cower in a hole if you like.

  99. @guest007
    However, is one is immune compromised in a jurisdiction that has decided on herd immunity instead of suppression, then the cancer cure could end up as fatal as the cancer.

    That’s not really true.
    From the immunocompromised person’s POV the choice is 3 months hiding out while everyone else gets Covid-19 vs years of hiding out while everyone else gets Covid-19 slowly.

  100. @anon
    There’s a remarkable little book called “Their Morals and Ours” documenting an exchange between Trotsky and the progressive John Dewey.

    Are you referring to this?
    https://www.marxists.org/archive/trotsky/1938/morals/morals.htm
    It is more of an essay than a book.

    Now I'm reading my way through it. I wonder if Trotsky wrote in English or if it is a translation? There's a passive-aggressive, butthurt, snarky tone that would fit right in with leftardism in the Current Year.

    Search on Trotsky and see his face from early to later years, it remains consistently punchable.

    The Trotsky essay is in the book.

    This is the book:

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/184450.Their_Morals_and_Ours

    • Replies: @anon
    Thanks.

    By the way.

    Young Trotsky:

    https://socialistworker.org/sites/default/files/images/2010/09/wide_young_trotsky.jpg

    Older Trotsky:

    https://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Environment/Pix/pictures/2013/8/21/1377088776795/Leon-Trotsky-008.jpg

    Physiognomy is real.
  101. @prime noticer
    "Yet John Dewey explicitly opposed the idea of expertocracy as advanced by Lippmann."

    probably because Dewey was a WASP, descendant of the people who created America and most of the good things on this planet, and Walter Lippmann was a jew, trying to subvert all that for his group's own gain. as usual.

    seeing the trend here? today in 2020, you can enjoy the WASP created, but now jew run Atlantic telling you that experts from the government know better about what you're allowed to say, and the largely WASP created, but now largely jew controlled world wide web will be their media enforcement arm, as many of the biggest sites on the internet delete things contrary to central government decree.

    block as usual Steve. you're so interested in truth, aren't you.

    If you don’t like Jews, it doesn’t make any sense to praise WASPs or think they created “most of what is wonderful in the world.” Or to think WASPs and Jews are opposite ends of a spectrum. Really, WASPs are basically the closest in mentality of all European people’s to Jews- just without the same degree of ethnocentrism. Probably helps explain why both groups dominate the upper echelons of the modern world, for better or for ill…

    Commonalities: Emphasis on money-making, pedantic obsessions with abstract ideologies, love of the Old Testament, disdain of art and community traditions, rootlessness…

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    WASPs and Jews disdainful of art?? I beg your pardon?
  102. @Buffalo Joe
    Buzz, if you take the time to look, the CDC never counted seasonal flu deaths in those over 65. Those were sttributed to other underlying causes. A few thousand here, a few thousand there and you have a pandemic. Stay safe.

    I saw that, and it doesn’t matter. The bigger number still isn’t anything like what predictors were scaring us with. It isn’t enough to merit the terrible costs of what we are doing to hold it down, and as the article itself says, all the causes of those annual numbers are not known.

    Some of them can even come as unintended consequences of the panic itself. More definitely will.

    And remember the doctors who are telling us that they are being urged to put Covid-19 down as cause of death when they really don’t know. A lot of people want to find any way they can to claim higher numbers. Certainly the Washington Post and some folks at Yale are happy to facilitate that effort.

    Bottom line is it doesn’t matter, because the number is too small and not even close to what people like Ron Unz were using a short while ago. All the math in the world can’t change garbage variables and give you a good answer.

    This is the Comet Kohoutek of pandemics.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Buzz, thank you
    , @Jim Don Bob

    This is the Comet Kohoutek of pandemics.
     
    Dude, you are dating yourself. ;-)
  103. @North Carolina Resident
    Can you travel out of state for medical care?
    In North Carolina, some dentists are treating emergencies.
    Next week, my gastro will resume performing routine colonoscopies.

    You may find closer providers. If not, Raleigh NC is 550 miles from New Rochelle. Good luck.

    Thank you.

  104. @JackOH
    " . . . [M]any Americans find dissent distressing, much like Germans in 1933 found the Führerprinzip an appealing alternative to all that arguing in the Reichstag."

    Steve, check the November 1932 German election, and I believe 2/3 of the German electorate voted something other than Nationalist Socialist. Even the Nationalist Socialist vote can surely be parsed to distinguish those who voted along nationalist lines, those who voted along socialist lines, and probably a tiny minority who voted along Hitler's-a-bloody-genius lines.

    You're right, by implication I guess, that the empty quarelling of democracies, channelled through well-fattened elected toe-rags and bureaucratic lickspittles, is profoundly disgusting.

    " . . . [M]any Americans find dissent distressing . . .". You'd better believe it, buddy! God bless, bro'. Most Americans are okay with sacrificing "fundamental values" (religiosity, family, social decorum?) for immediate or near-term economic advantage. That's just reality.

    This is my favourite example for people who stupidly believe in ‘democracy’ (and particularly, in parliamentary, ‘representative’ democracy).

    The March 1933 election is the election most-aligned with the putative principles of democracy:
     • high level of voter registration (44.7m voters in a population of ~67m);
     • large turnout (88.7%).
     • full-franchise;
     • no hint of gerrymandering, voter-suppression or other jiggery-pokery;
     • genuinely multi-party.

    The NSDAP got 43.9% of the vote, so overall it got a larger proportion of the eligible vote (38.9%) than any US President since the Civil War (and let’s just say that the US did not have a full-franchise for the vast bulk of that time; women didn’t get to vote in Presidential elections after WWI).

    The NSDAP’s result did not get them a majority of the seats (so they didn’t have the power to form a government).

    A list of governments who didn’t get anywhere near that:
     • UK: every government since 1951 (not genuinely full-franchise)
     • US: every President since 1876 (no women until 1920)
     • Australia: every government since Federation (fake system: compulsory);
     • New Zealand: every government ever formed;
     • France: ditto;
     • Germany: ditto;

    Things to note:
     &compfn; In the 1951 UK election, 18 year olds didn’t have the right to vote, but they were subject to conscription: if you can be sent to die for a government in whose selection you play no part, the franchise is incomplete).
     &compfn; Australia requires its herd to vote, resulting in forced preference expression for people who are hesitant to break the law. This means that there is no discernible ‘mandate’ that emerges from the aggregation of votes (and there isn’t anyway, because of Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem).

    inb4 some midwit claims ‘Voting is not compulsory in Australia: all that’s required is that you get your name marked off the roll. There is no requirement to mark the paper‘.

    That’s a deliberately false representation made by people who want to squirm out of what the law says.

    s245(15) of the Electoral Act 1918 makes it an offence to fail to vote; s245(14) says that religious objection is the sole guaranteed excuse. s239 and s240 of the same act list the requirements for marking the ballot paper; the voter is required to mark the paper in accordance with those sections.

    It’s an offence with a very low probability of detection, but it’s an offence nonetheless.

    Another offence with a low probability of detection: driving drunk at 130km/hr on a deserted country road at 3am. I doubt that pro-democracy dimwads think that their bullshit argument applies to such a case.

    It takes a very skewed worldview to pick and choose which offences are OK so long as the risk of detection is low.

    TL;DR: Don’t vote. It doesn’t matter who you vote for, you wind up being ruled by parasitic, megalomaniacal sociopaths: if not at that specific election, then at some stage thereafter. There are no exceptions, ever… no backsies, no returns infinity.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    "In the 1951 UK election, 18 year olds didn’t have the right to vote, but they were subject to conscription: if you can be sent to die for a government in whose selection you play no part, the franchise is incomplete)."

    Speaking of incomplete enfranchisement, 18 year olds in Illinois and Florida can be conscripted into the US Armed Forces and yet are DENIED the right to purchase a militia rifle as spelled out in law.


    10 U.S. Code § 246. Militia: composition and classes

    (a) The militia of the United States consists of all able-bodied males at least 17 years of age and, except as provided in section 313 of title 32, under 45 years of age who are, or who have made a declaration of intention to become, citizens of the United States and of female citizens of the United States who are members of the National Guard.
    (b) The classes of the militia are—
    (1) the organized militia, which consists of the National Guard and the Naval Militia; and
    (2) the unorganized militia, which consists of the members of the militia who are not members of the National Guard or the Naval Militia.

    https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/10/246
     

    , @JackOH
    Kratoklastes, thanks.

    The March 1933 German election seems to me a national election concealing a single-issue referendum on whether law enforcement following the burning of the national assembly building, in this case the Reichstag fire scarcely a week or so earlier, is a good thing.

    I pretty much agree about the dubiousness of "representative government". In my local area, it's been common knowledge that the Mafia, to cite just one institution, could put up candidates beholden to it, bribe officeholders, intimidate witnesses in public hearings and criminal proceedings conducted by duly elected officials, the whole enchilada of private, and in this case criminal interest, enjoying the cover of "democratic" legitimacy. (That was true from about the 1930s to the late 1990s, when a tiny number of courageous local officeholders and do-gooders pleaded with the federal government for help.)
  105. @ben tillman
    The Trotsky essay is in the book.

    This is the book:

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/184450.Their_Morals_and_Ours

    Thanks.

    By the way.

    Young Trotsky:

    Older Trotsky:

    Physiognomy is real.

  106. Anonymous[226] • Disclaimer says:
    @peterike
    In other news, Late Obama Age Collapse continues at increasing pace.

    https://nypost.com/2020/04/28/video-shows-how-extensive-nyc-subway-homeless-problem-is/

    The video is something. Warning: it's got annoying autoplay.

    From the Stem the Collapse file, Trump floats another great idea, which probably won't happen.

    President Trump on Tuesday suggested that new federal payments to help states deal with the coronavirus pandemic could depend on whether or not they were home to sanctuary cities.

    “If it is COVID related, we can talk about it. We want things including sanctuary city adjustments,” the president said during an event in the East Room of the White House.
     
    In any case, for those still considering not voting for Trump, the many, many incremental improvements Trump has made on the immigration front will be dismantled within the first hour of the Biden (or whoever) administration. Keep that in mind when you stupidly prattle that Trump hasn't worked miracles so you're not voting for him. Trump has delivered more on immigration than any President since Calvin Coolidge signed the Immigration Act in 1924.

    PS - Something I just saw about that 1924 temporary life-saving measure for America:

    There were nine dissenting votes in the Senate and a handful of opponents in the House, the most vigorous of whom was freshman Brooklyn Representative and Jewish-American Emanuel Celler.

    Wow. And Celler beetled on about it for forty more years until he finally got what he wanted. It's difficult to defeat mono-maniacs.

    Voting for Trump means sending a message to Republican politicians everywhere that they don’t need to accomplish anything. We’ll get more of what we’ve been getting for decades: talk and no action.

    Plus, in some ways Trump is worse than Biden. His re-election would see another mass purge of dissident websites just as his election did. And for the sanctuary cities, where do you think Trump’s tax cut went? New York, San Fransisco, and Los Angeles.

    • Disagree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Voting for Trump means sending a message to Republican politicians everywhere that they don’t need to accomplish anything. We’ll get more of what we’ve been getting for decades: talk and no action.

    Plus, in some ways Trump is worse than Biden. His re-election would see another mass purge of dissident websites just as his election did. And for the sanctuary cities, where do you think Trump’s tax cut went? New York, San Fransisco, and Los Angeles.
     
    You're a moron or a troll. Trump is not running against someone who could conceivably "accomplish anything" other than the acceleration of the genocide of our people. As for the alleged purge of dissident websites, if it is attributable to Trump's election, it's only because the bad guys thought that Trump's election proved them efficacious.
    , @AnotherDad
    You're off base here, 226.

    Trump is Trump. Hitching your hopes to him is chaotic, dispiriting ride. Poor impulse control. Lack of knowledge on the key issue--immigration. And lack of desire to apply butt to chair and study and learn. Some great (Miller) but some absolutely appalling (Kushner) advisors. (If i could press a button and launch Kushner into outer space, i'd probably break a finger smacking it so fast.) But ... Trump has pushed the Overton Window on nationalist issues.

    And contra your point, not only would Biden roll back all the useful gains, but the lesson Republican politicians will get if Trump loses is ... let's not rock the boat, no more nationalism. We'll get nothing but Mitt/Jeb style corporate, globalist, cheap labor goons.

    Bottom line: Trump's the nationalist we've got.

    Trump's our nationalist date to this dance and we've got to stick with him ... even though he keeps stomping on our feet.

  107. @Hail

    Facebook is literally banning anti-government protest organizers
     
    Facebook is also deleting Knut Wittkowski's interviews that people post, and I know for a fact it has also attached "fake news"-style warnings to links people post to Dr. Ioannidis and others.

    Facebook’s censors are now the arbiters of reality and decide what is right and not, rather than PhDs; welcome to Big Tech-filtered reality…
     
    "Take your decades of experience, expertise, PhDs, and shove 'em! We in charge now."
    -- Google, Facebook, Youtube; the GooFY Coalition for Corona-Heresy Suppression

    Yeah, absolutely.
    I was too terse in my original comment.

    I meant first that they’re squashing discussion on various Covid-19 topics (“the biggest issue in the world”), which prevents actual progress in understanding.

    Second that they’re banning organization of anti-government protests. This second one I brought up specifically just because preventing organized dissent is such a hallmark of totalitarianism that anyone at all familiar with modern history, whether right, left or center, should know to tread particularly lightly there.

    (not that i support Ferguson style riots under the protest banner)

    • Replies: @anon
    preventing organized dissent is such a hallmark of totalitarianism that anyone at all familiar with modern history, whether right, left or center, should know to tread particularly lightly there.

    There is an assumption embedded in your comment: "familiar with ... history". I don't think that assumption is at all reasonable for the Trust & Safety group at Facebook or Twitter. Let alone the leadership. Jack Dorsey shows zero evidence of any real learning, just the usual SJW brainwashing.

    These people are NPC's out of the "Manchurian Candidate". One cannot expect self awareness or any knowledge of western civilization from them. Anything more complicated than "Orange Man BAD" and "Wypipo must PAY" is beyond their capabilities.
  108. @S. Anonyia
    If you don’t like Jews, it doesn’t make any sense to praise WASPs or think they created “most of what is wonderful in the world.” Or to think WASPs and Jews are opposite ends of a spectrum. Really, WASPs are basically the closest in mentality of all European people’s to Jews- just without the same degree of ethnocentrism. Probably helps explain why both groups dominate the upper echelons of the modern world, for better or for ill...

    Commonalities: Emphasis on money-making, pedantic obsessions with abstract ideologies, love of the Old Testament, disdain of art and community traditions, rootlessness...

    WASPs and Jews disdainful of art?? I beg your pardon?

  109. @Inverness
    With Science On Our Side, Who Can Be Against Us?

    (With apologies to Romans 8:31)

    That Atlantic article is pretty shocking. Communist China knows better than to let people just say whatever they want! We could learn a thing or two from them!

    I also note that the Atlantic is peddling the Russia Collusion hoax as though we haven't learned a single thing about it. Which may well be accurate for most of their readers.

    It's weird how enthralled our "bien pensants" are with China and how virulent their hatred is for Russia.

    It’s weird how enthralled our “bien pensants” are with China and how virulent their hatred is for Russia.

    It’s not weird at all. Russia turned it’s back on communism. It is now, officially, at least, a Christian, anti-communist country.

    China, on the other hand, remains, officially, at least, an atheist, communist country.

    Our bien pensants hate Christianity, even when it’s only in name, and love communism, even when it’s only in name.

    You might find it hard to believe that they’re that stupid & that shallow. But they are. They really, truly, are.

  110. @North Carolina Resident
    Is this really happening?
    Steve wrote, "Chinese in America who methodically stripped all the N95s from the shelves of American retailers and mailed them home to China."

    This particular Chinese woman (and her white American husband) certainly bought out the supplies in retail stores in some parts of Florida.

    I believe she sold them online, on a Chinese focused web store, but don’t know for sure.

    There was a white guy who did the same in the Appalachian States driving a U-haul around (he was profiled in the nytimes). He sold his stuff on Amazon and eBay until they banned him.

    Overall i don’t think these had a big impact on mask availability since the demand is hundreds of times the available supply, but it’s definitely not a good look.

    • Replies: @black sea
    Am I the only one who found her thrill at purchasing masks in bulk to be almost fetishistic?

    I bet her husband wishes she would get that "sweaty" about activities that don't involve Home Depot.
  111. @North Carolina Resident
    Is this really happening?
    Steve wrote, "Chinese in America who methodically stripped all the N95s from the shelves of American retailers and mailed them home to China."

    This particular Chinese woman (and her white American husband) certainly bought out the supplies in retail stores in some parts of Florida.

    I believe she sold them online, on a Chinese focused web store, but don’t know for sure.

    There was a white guy who did the same in the Appalachian States driving a U-haul around (he was profiled in the nytimes). He sold his stuff on Amazon and eBay until they banned him.

    Overall i don’t think these had a big impact on mask availability since the demand is hundreds of times the available supply, but it’s definitely not a good look.

  112. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    We lost our right to free speech years ago when the government passed hate crime legislation which bans political discourse. Over the last decade it has worsened as the oligarchs controlling the media and public speech outlets like YouTube , Twitter and Facebook have censured politically incorrect speech concerning everything from climate change to Coronavirus. Unorthodox opinions are now banned , those who speak out are blacklisted , lose their jobs , careers and are ostracized.

    ostracized

    Ostracism is psychological death only when imposed on the weak-willed. Those doing the ostracising are almost never actually thinking for themselves: the very word evokes groupthink. Such people have no place in any decent man’s Hieroclean circles of give-a-fuck.

    Archaeologists have examined the ostraka that they have for the ostracism of Themistocles (in ~470BCE). It turns out that a very large number of them were fabricated by about a dozen people. These ostraka were mass-produced for distribution to illiterate citizens, in order to influence the vote to exile the guy who was a thorn in the side of the families who considered themselves the natural owners of Athens.

    This is yet another historical episode that casts doubt on the putative benefits of democracy: parasitic megalomaniacs will find a way to undermine elections (and even if they don’t: Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem guarantees that the elections themselves do not reliably choose a social optimum).

    Anyway… after his exile, Themistocles went on to become governor of the province of Magnesia for the Persian empire under Ataxerxes.

    The first coin that we know of that bears the image of a ruler, dates to less than a decade after Themistocles was ostracised from Athens. It has Themistocles on it.

    I’m not a fan of politicians – in any age – but Themistocles appears to have been self-made, both in Athens and under the Achaemenids.

    Nobody knows the names of the 14 (at least) who rigged his downfall. I’m sure they profited handsomely.

  113. Off topic so delete if you wish.

    WHO lauds lockdown-ignoring Sweden as a ‘model’ for countries going forward

    Well I wondered two things. One – When Sweden would be seen as the model for Covid response (WHO is starting now to recognize them and this is very good news). And 2 – how honest the powers that be would be in admitting the conventional approach was idiotic from the beginning. (not very honest). In this article, WHO highlights the similarities (encouraging social distancing) and completely ignore the differences (no business and school shutdowns; sweden does not do a lot of testing, sweden is allowing infections instead of stamping out, sweden is moving toward herd immunity vs waiting for a vaccine, etc. )

    https://nypost.com/2020/04/29/who-lauds-sweden-as-model-for-resisting-coronavirus-lockdown/

  114. anon[839] • Disclaimer says:
    @vhrm
    Yeah, absolutely.
    I was too terse in my original comment.

    I meant first that they're squashing discussion on various Covid-19 topics ("the biggest issue in the world"), which prevents actual progress in understanding.

    Second that they're banning organization of anti-government protests. This second one I brought up specifically just because preventing organized dissent is such a hallmark of totalitarianism that anyone at all familiar with modern history, whether right, left or center, should know to tread particularly lightly there.

    (not that i support Ferguson style riots under the protest banner)

    preventing organized dissent is such a hallmark of totalitarianism that anyone at all familiar with modern history, whether right, left or center, should know to tread particularly lightly there.

    There is an assumption embedded in your comment: “familiar with … history”. I don’t think that assumption is at all reasonable for the Trust & Safety group at Facebook or Twitter. Let alone the leadership. Jack Dorsey shows zero evidence of any real learning, just the usual SJW brainwashing.

    These people are NPC’s out of the “Manchurian Candidate”. One cannot expect self awareness or any knowledge of western civilization from them. Anything more complicated than “Orange Man BAD” and “Wypipo must PAY” is beyond their capabilities.

  115. @Buzz Mohawk
    I saw that, and it doesn't matter. The bigger number still isn't anything like what predictors were scaring us with. It isn't enough to merit the terrible costs of what we are doing to hold it down, and as the article itself says, all the causes of those annual numbers are not known.

    Some of them can even come as unintended consequences of the panic itself. More definitely will.

    And remember the doctors who are telling us that they are being urged to put Covid-19 down as cause of death when they really don't know. A lot of people want to find any way they can to claim higher numbers. Certainly the Washington Post and some folks at Yale are happy to facilitate that effort.

    Bottom line is it doesn't matter, because the number is too small and not even close to what people like Ron Unz were using a short while ago. All the math in the world can't change garbage variables and give you a good answer.

    This is the Comet Kohoutek of pandemics.

    Buzz, thank you

  116. @Anonymous
    Voting for Trump means sending a message to Republican politicians everywhere that they don't need to accomplish anything. We'll get more of what we've been getting for decades: talk and no action.

    Plus, in some ways Trump is worse than Biden. His re-election would see another mass purge of dissident websites just as his election did. And for the sanctuary cities, where do you think Trump's tax cut went? New York, San Fransisco, and Los Angeles.

    Voting for Trump means sending a message to Republican politicians everywhere that they don’t need to accomplish anything. We’ll get more of what we’ve been getting for decades: talk and no action.

    Plus, in some ways Trump is worse than Biden. His re-election would see another mass purge of dissident websites just as his election did. And for the sanctuary cities, where do you think Trump’s tax cut went? New York, San Fransisco, and Los Angeles.

    You’re a moron or a troll. Trump is not running against someone who could conceivably “accomplish anything” other than the acceleration of the genocide of our people. As for the alleged purge of dissident websites, if it is attributable to Trump’s election, it’s only because the bad guys thought that Trump’s election proved them efficacious.

    • Thanks: Manfred Arcane
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Of course I'm going to seem like a moron or a troll to you: you likely lack the cognitive abilities to understand the concepts that drive my thought process. Probably don't even know what an "incentive" is. So go ahead, keep voting Republican. Keep doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.

    And what "alleged purge?" IT HAPPENED! You probably look at the people who had their careers ruined as a direct result of Trump's election, who Trump didn't lift a finger to help, and ask yourself "golly gee and I wonder why they aren't going to vote for Trump. What a mystery"
  117. @res

    He argues that the epidemic peaked in mid-March in NYC, even before lockdowns began
     
    There is data here which partially supports that.
    https://www.kinsahealth.co/early-social-distancing-measures-reduce-the-spread-of-illness-in-new-york-city/

    https://www.kinsahealth.co/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/New-York-County-Share-of-Population-with-Flu-Like-Illness.png

    Assuming a five day incubation period I think that indicates the 3/12 restrictions on public gatherings had a positive effect. The 3/16 school closings and 3/17 restaurant and bar closings may have had an effect (notice the decline steepening after 3/20). The trend indicated things were coming under control before the stay at home order had a chance to take effect.

    Their data from other localities (the various countermeasure timings vary) support the idea that the stay at home orders did not make the important difference.

    Current data for New York County is available at
    https://healthweather.us/?regionId=36061&mode=Observed

    The model for NY state at https://rt.live/ suggests a similar timing using different data.

    He showed an even better chart graphing the peaks in hospital admissions for flu like symptoms for the nation as a whole in which there were three distinct peaks with sharp points, two for the two strains of flu earlier this season, and one for the current virus: all three were virtually identical in terms of peak and duration, with the last one peaking in March. He said the same chart was featured by Dr. Brix (sp?) on one of Trump’s press conferences in March. It’s pretty graphic.

  118. @Dave Pinsen
    Great column, and you stuck the landing with the conclusion this time.

    Great column, and you stuck the landing with the conclusion this time.

    Well said big Dave. My thoughts exactly.

    Excellent column Steve–end to end.

    Managing the China virus is precisely proving the value of free speech–if there was ever any doubt–as the establishment has bounced around between incompetence, outright lying, stupidity, sheer silliness and of course grasping for power.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    Just remember how absurdly wrong they were about AIDS. It finally occurred to me today that this crown virus thing is not unprecedented in my lifetime; it resembles AIDS in many respects. I got that "pandemic" right thanks to Nancy Padian (and Rolling Stone) in time to salvage the enjoyment of my bachelorhood in the late '80's and early '90's.
  119. @peterike
    In other news, Late Obama Age Collapse continues at increasing pace.

    https://nypost.com/2020/04/28/video-shows-how-extensive-nyc-subway-homeless-problem-is/

    The video is something. Warning: it's got annoying autoplay.

    From the Stem the Collapse file, Trump floats another great idea, which probably won't happen.

    President Trump on Tuesday suggested that new federal payments to help states deal with the coronavirus pandemic could depend on whether or not they were home to sanctuary cities.

    “If it is COVID related, we can talk about it. We want things including sanctuary city adjustments,” the president said during an event in the East Room of the White House.
     
    In any case, for those still considering not voting for Trump, the many, many incremental improvements Trump has made on the immigration front will be dismantled within the first hour of the Biden (or whoever) administration. Keep that in mind when you stupidly prattle that Trump hasn't worked miracles so you're not voting for him. Trump has delivered more on immigration than any President since Calvin Coolidge signed the Immigration Act in 1924.

    PS - Something I just saw about that 1924 temporary life-saving measure for America:

    There were nine dissenting votes in the Senate and a handful of opponents in the House, the most vigorous of whom was freshman Brooklyn Representative and Jewish-American Emanuel Celler.

    Wow. And Celler beetled on about it for forty more years until he finally got what he wanted. It's difficult to defeat mono-maniacs.

    In any case, for those still considering not voting for Trump, the many, many incremental improvements Trump has made on the immigration front will be dismantled within the first hour of the Biden (or whoever) administration.

    Of course. Last year’s immigration number is the lowest in 30 years. The Supreme Court appointments will probably be huge disappointments like almost all of those selected by the GOP, but they’ll still be better than the Trotskies Biden will want to appoint, and the seditious conspirators in the DOJ/FBI and CIA/State may not — or may — get some justice meted out to them.

  120. @AnotherDad

    Great column, and you stuck the landing with the conclusion this time.
     
    Well said big Dave. My thoughts exactly.

    Excellent column Steve--end to end.

    Managing the China virus is precisely proving the value of free speech--if there was ever any doubt--as the establishment has bounced around between incompetence, outright lying, stupidity, sheer silliness and of course grasping for power.

    Just remember how absurdly wrong they were about AIDS. It finally occurred to me today that this crown virus thing is not unprecedented in my lifetime; it resembles AIDS in many respects. I got that “pandemic” right thanks to Nancy Padian (and Rolling Stone) in time to salvage the enjoyment of my bachelorhood in the late ’80’s and early ’90’s.

  121. @Anonymous
    Voting for Trump means sending a message to Republican politicians everywhere that they don't need to accomplish anything. We'll get more of what we've been getting for decades: talk and no action.

    Plus, in some ways Trump is worse than Biden. His re-election would see another mass purge of dissident websites just as his election did. And for the sanctuary cities, where do you think Trump's tax cut went? New York, San Fransisco, and Los Angeles.

    You’re off base here, 226.

    Trump is Trump. Hitching your hopes to him is chaotic, dispiriting ride. Poor impulse control. Lack of knowledge on the key issue–immigration. And lack of desire to apply butt to chair and study and learn. Some great (Miller) but some absolutely appalling (Kushner) advisors. (If i could press a button and launch Kushner into outer space, i’d probably break a finger smacking it so fast.) But … Trump has pushed the Overton Window on nationalist issues.

    And contra your point, not only would Biden roll back all the useful gains, but the lesson Republican politicians will get if Trump loses is … let’s not rock the boat, no more nationalism. We’ll get nothing but Mitt/Jeb style corporate, globalist, cheap labor goons.

    Bottom line: Trump’s the nationalist we’ve got.

    Trump’s our nationalist date to this dance and we’ve got to stick with him … even though he keeps stomping on our feet.

    • Agree: ziggurat
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I haven't seen this "Overton window movement." Polls confirm that immigration enforcement, while still broadly popular, has actually decreased in popularity since Trump took office. It's not hard to see why: everyone can see the man's incompetent.

    There's basically four possibilities:

    1. Nationalists oppose Trump, he wins.
    2. Nationalists oppose Trump, he loses.
    3. Nationalists support Trump, he wins.
    4. Nationalists support Trump, he loses.

    If nationalist support is significantly enough to swing the election, to go from 3. to 2., political scientists will observe that and politicians will realize "hey, if I want to win with nationalist support, I have to actually implement nationalist policies."

    But I don't think our choices are 2. and 3. Our choices are 2. and 4. And what are politicians going to conclude after 4.? They're going to say "maybe I should do the Jeb! stuff on the campaign trail, maybe the Trump stuff on the campaign trail, which after all did win in 2016, but I should do nothing other than the Jeb! stuff in office, for I'll get the nationalist votes regardless."
  122. @Alexander Turok
    There's also a complete lack of dissent against this "round Earth" theory.

    There’s also a complete lack of dissent against this “round Earth” theory.

    There are plenty of academics who disagree with you – epidemiologists, virologists, etc. – much more distinguished ones than Anthony Fauci. You guys strike me much more as flat-earthers. In any event, last I checked we weren’t supposed to be living in a public health dictatorship, so I don’t necessarily care what guys in white lab-coats think. I didn’t consent to let somebody dictate the terms of my existence to me just because they wear green scrubs and stand with folded arms.

    You are free to cower in a hole if you like.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  123. Hail says: • Website
    @Luke Lea
    Wittkowski's second video is up, by the way, and is highly informative in my humble opinion. He argues that the epidemic peaked in mid-March in NYC, even before lockdowns began, and will, like all upper respiratory influenzas, soon be over in all countries currently infected, though a little later in those that practiced more social distancing, which only protracts the process.

    One interesting point he makes is that Fauci is an infectious disease expert, not an epidemiologist, let alone an epidemiologist specializing in upper respiratory viral contagious. Doctors naturally want to cure their patients, hence their emphasis on testing to identify the germ, whereas epidemiologist want to predict the course and magnitude of an epidemic, which requires wide-scale antibody testing. The latter not the former, he argues, is where the whole emphasis should have been from the beginning. Too bad Trump was never informed. (I'm afraid Tucker Carlson, among others, has a great deal to answer for.)

    Anyway here is the link: https://youtu.be/k0Q4naYOYDw

    He argues that the epidemic peaked in mid-March in NYC, even before lockdowns began, and will, like all upper respiratory influenzas, soon be over in all countries currently infected

    That the epidemic’s transmission phase peaked before the shutdowns has become clear in many countries.

    For example:

    The same finding has come out of multiple European countries, and not just the “hard hit” ones but those relatively lightly hit like Germany. The epidemic was already running its natural course, and the shutdowns were a terrible idea.

    The Wittkowski second interview (April 28) is good. See also here for a series of written updates Wittkowski gave during the period April 14-27, including answering many of the criticisms of his ideas (which are standard in epidemiology but dare not speak their name during a witchfract-panic).

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    Hail, this graph you've posted doesn't pass a cursory sanity check.

    There is no reason for R0 to have a peak--certainly not when this thing fires up in the spring and weather changes (northern hemisphere) are helping suppress it.

    Rather the replication rate started at its highest level, then heads down as people reacted--stopped going to clubs, restaurants, movies, talking with strangers, etc. etc.

    The actual graph wouldn't have a peak but would look like a stretched out Z, where you'd pulled both ends. Starts high, drops as people react, plateaus in the "new order". And if that "new order" plateau is below 1--which i think it is--then the epidemic stalls and founders. I would think--hope--every commenter here has a rough sense of that.

    AFAICT the daily deaths peak for Germany seems to have been around April 15th.

    https://coronavirusgraphs.com/?c=ddm&y=linear&t=line&f=0&ct=&co=2,67,89,221

    That would suggest R0 ducked below 1 maybe two weeks earlier around April 1st.

    Though i'd agree that the behavior/measures were probably sufficient earlier, as i've argued that it can take a while to burn through infected households, even after the public measures are sufficient.

    Anyway--graph fail.
  124. @Mr. Anon
    The massive propaganda campaign accompanying the lockdown should be an indicator of what's behind it. Every other TV ad campaign is now built around the lockdown. Everyone who can is now selling their product - cable internet access, KFC, Pizza Hut, automobiles, whatever - using the lockdown as a hook. FANG is relentlessly promoting the propaganda on all its platforms, elevating pronouncements from the WHO and the CDC as if they were revelations from God. Hollywood, the so-called news media, and the "music industry" are all in line. Virtually every talking head on TV is in lockstep. There is no publicly expressed dissent against the CoV narrative.

    The partial commercialization of the lockdown has been disturbing. Lots more money has also been dumped into companies running “we’re not selling anything, we just want to say Be Strong” commercials.

    The double-message of these commercials is: “[Our mega-company] is patriotic!” and “Obey the Lockdowns, peons. We’re in charge now.” (Cf. Corona Coup d’Etat Theory.)

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    The double-message of these commercials is: “[Our mega-company] is patriotic!” and “Obey the Lockdowns, peons. We’re in charge now.” (Cf. Corona Coup d’Etat Theory.)
     
    Flu d'Etat (heard it on Tucker's show)
  125. anon[335] • Disclaimer says:

    Free speech is of value to those who value rational thinking, always a minority of people in any age.
    Free speech is a value to individuals, struggling to form their own opinion.
    For these people, dissent is interesting.

    Individuals struggling to form their own opinion value democracy, since that is the only form of government that at least nominally offers them freedom to think.

    Contrast this with a mother’s point of view.

    Mother’s value safety, security, family cohesiveness, family emotional bonds.
    For them dissent is treason. Dissent is blasphemy.

    The feminization of our politics will always be a force against free speech and for authoritarian government.

    • Agree: anarchyst
  126. @Tiny Duck
    I know this is suposed to be a cut at preogressives but it does nothold up

    We progressives value free speech but not hate speech. Learn the difference.

    It is conservatives and right wingers that are against the first amendment. Every time a Person of Color dares speak out white people disagree with them, mock them, argue with them and do other things that stifle the Free Expression of the Person of Color.

    We progressives are sick of you people. We remeber the rapist on the supreme court, we remmber the racism

    We will win this fall and we will make you guys keel over with the changes that we will put in place

    Say goodbye to your guns white boys!

    So hello to hate speech laws!

    I know this is suposed to be a cut at preogressives but it does nothold up

    Does Nothold – wasn’t he a character in Game of Thrones?

    We progressives value free speech but not hate speech. Learn the difference.

    There is no difference. If you are not free to say “I hate you”, you are not free to speak.

    But I supose a preogressive would not understand that, would they, ducky?

  127. @Hail
    The partial commercialization of the lockdown has been disturbing. Lots more money has also been dumped into companies running "we're not selling anything, we just want to say Be Strong" commercials.

    The double-message of these commercials is: "[Our mega-company] is patriotic!" and "Obey the Lockdowns, peons. We're in charge now." (Cf. Corona Coup d'Etat Theory.)

    The double-message of these commercials is: “[Our mega-company] is patriotic!” and “Obey the Lockdowns, peons. We’re in charge now.” (Cf. Corona Coup d’Etat Theory.)

    Flu d’Etat (heard it on Tucker’s show)

    • Replies: @Hail

    Flu d’Etat (heard it on Tucker’s show)
     
    Good punning but weaker on alliteration.

    I wonder if Tucker had a Corona-Eureka moment (by which I mean an anti-Panic Eureka moment). If so, when, where, how.
  128. anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peter Frost
    Why don’t you subtract all the deaths attributed to your favorite illness because of coexistence with other causes or because doctors are being encouraged to use covid-19 as cause of death when they don’t know?

    Those deaths wouldn't show up as excess deaths.

    Why are your comments highlighted in the creamy yellow that, AFAIK, is reserved for this website’s Authors? (I was unable just now to find you on that roster.) And, if you’re not an Author, does this highlighting outrank The Gold Star?

  129. @theMann
    Still on hold for prostate surgery, but I did take out my own ingrown toenail with pliers, a pry bar, Hydrogen peroxide, and uhm, medicinal brandy.

    I am beginning to wonder just how much we can all do without doctors, especially if it involves a respiratory illness.

    Good luck to you, and good job with the pliers! You have my respect, doctor. My preferred pain medication is bourbon.

  130. @Buzz Mohawk
    Equally disappointing is Ron Unz not letting this exaggerated crisis go to waste, using it to further beat his anti-American, pro-China drum. He is non-stop "stupid, evil United States < superior, honest China" with regard to the Wuhan Flu.

    So we have Ron pushing the geopolitical part in favor of a communist dictatorship that monitors and controls its people, and we have Steve blowing air into the hypochondriacal balloon to inflate the medical significance.

    If I didn't trust, admire and respect these guys, I'd think it was all a deep state/globalist/Davos set/pre-planned act. Now, if you will excuse me, I am going to put on my tin foil hat.

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1365/2497/files/IMG_3053-ANIMATION_large.gif?v=1522242950

    That’s weird about Ron Unz, Buzz. He is the biggest stalwart for free speech I’ve heard of in the modern era, putting his money, but more like years of his effort, where his mouth is too, about this. Free speech may not be just an American concept, but we are the only country that ever held to a Constitution in which it was enshrined, pretty damn well for arguable over 200 years.

    Yet, the guy is so anti-American and Anti-Americans as to sound like a Commie straight outta the 1950’s USSR or Chairman Mao’s press secretary. He has been full of shit on this Kung Flu thing from the get-go. Don’t expect any apologies, but as he is, after all, the creator and proprietor of this site, so be it.

    • Replies: @SFG
    From what little I can tell, he intends his site to be a photographic negative of the media's biases, to counteract them. The media pushes a blank slate, so there are lots of HBD articles of varying quality. The media is biased toward Jews, so there are articles ranging from moderately critical of bias toward Israel to articles blaming the Israelis for 9/11 and the Kennedy assassination.
  131. @moshe
    Keep the tooth under your pillow. The fairy is delayed but as soon as her elective genital reassignment surgery is complete she will arrive to exchange the leavings of your mouth for her money.

    So rest assured. :)

    As an aside, I've praised Steve enough but what he does indeed deserve criticism for is not his scaredy-cat beliefs regarding this nonsense but his advocacy for less freedoms of other sorts. He was one of the first to fantasize about a day when we all get to wear masks all day. And his constant demands that people's personal medical information be made public I would not consider to be to his credit. Like everyone else was claimed freedom as their flag, he has shown that as soon as he bought into the nonsense about coronavirus, he was ready to burn the flag as quickly as anybody else. with the most notable exception of course being that he continue to publish and to allow comments that opposed his belief of the central thesis, that the quarantine was a necessary and useful thing.

    If we’re gonna pile on iSteve here, yeah, he never said he’s a big defender of the US Constitution. (This article may be one of the few exceptions in which he brought up a basic principle.) I like his Conservatism, the anti-PC, and the great insight and analysis, so I’ve blown off that lack of support for liberty vs. his pragmatism. To pile on though, yeah, I don’t see how one can defend Affirmative Action, in any form, and be a Conservative.

    Yes, our host here is always very fair with the comments and commenters.

  132. @Kratoklastes
    This is my favourite example for people who stupidly believe in 'democracy' (and particularly, in parliamentary, 'representative' democracy).

    The March 1933 election is the election most-aligned with the putative principles of democracy:
     • high level of voter registration (44.7m voters in a population of ~67m);
     • large turnout (88.7%).
     • full-franchise;
     • no hint of gerrymandering, voter-suppression or other jiggery-pokery;
     • genuinely multi-party.

    The NSDAP got 43.9% of the vote, so overall it got a larger proportion of the eligible vote (38.9%) than any US President since the Civil War (and let's just say that the US did not have a full-franchise for the vast bulk of that time; women didn't get to vote in Presidential elections after WWI).

    The NSDAP's result did not get them a majority of the seats (so they didn't have the power to form a government).

    A list of governments who didn't get anywhere near that:
     • UK: every government since 1951 (not genuinely full-franchise)
     • US: every President since 1876 (no women until 1920)
     • Australia: every government since Federation (fake system: compulsory);
     • New Zealand: every government ever formed;
     • France: ditto;
     • Germany: ditto;

    Things to note:
     &compfn; In the 1951 UK election, 18 year olds didn't have the right to vote, but they were subject to conscription: if you can be sent to die for a government in whose selection you play no part, the franchise is incomplete).
     &compfn; Australia requires its herd to vote, resulting in forced preference expression for people who are hesitant to break the law. This means that there is no discernible 'mandate' that emerges from the aggregation of votes (and there isn't anyway, because of Arrow's Impossibility Theorem).


    inb4 some midwit claims 'Voting is not compulsory in Australia: all that's required is that you get your name marked off the roll. There is no requirement to mark the paper'.

    That's a deliberately false representation made by people who want to squirm out of what the law says.

    s245(15) of the Electoral Act 1918 makes it an offence to fail to vote; s245(14) says that religious objection is the sole guaranteed excuse. s239 and s240 of the same act list the requirements for marking the ballot paper; the voter is required to mark the paper in accordance with those sections.

    It's an offence with a very low probability of detection, but it's an offence nonetheless.

    Another offence with a low probability of detection: driving drunk at 130km/hr on a deserted country road at 3am. I doubt that pro-democracy dimwads think that their bullshit argument applies to such a case.

    It takes a very skewed worldview to pick and choose which offences are OK so long as the risk of detection is low.

    TL;DR: Don't vote. It doesn't matter who you vote for, you wind up being ruled by parasitic, megalomaniacal sociopaths: if not at that specific election, then at some stage thereafter. There are no exceptions, ever... no backsies, no returns infinity.

    “In the 1951 UK election, 18 year olds didn’t have the right to vote, but they were subject to conscription: if you can be sent to die for a government in whose selection you play no part, the franchise is incomplete).”

    Speaking of incomplete enfranchisement, 18 year olds in Illinois and Florida can be conscripted into the US Armed Forces and yet are DENIED the right to purchase a militia rifle as spelled out in law.

    10 U.S. Code § 246. Militia: composition and classes

    (a) The militia of the United States consists of all able-bodied males at least 17 years of age and, except as provided in section 313 of title 32, under 45 years of age who are, or who have made a declaration of intention to become, citizens of the United States and of female citizens of the United States who are members of the National Guard.
    (b) The classes of the militia are—
    (1) the organized militia, which consists of the National Guard and the Naval Militia; and
    (2) the unorganized militia, which consists of the members of the militia who are not members of the National Guard or the Naval Militia.

    https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/10/246

  133. @RichardTaylor
    Can a country based on a "proposition" ever have free speech?

    Because if you question that proposition, you are a traitor to the creed.

    It's funny, we've gone from originally being loyal to ourselves and our posterity, to being loyal to the proposition that "all men are created equal", and now, from I can tell, we are to be loyal to the WHO and a smattering of New York Times airheads.

    Can a country based on a “proposition” ever have free speech?

    Because if you question that proposition, you are a traitor to the creed.

    Yep. A proposition nation must eventually become totalitarian. It’s baked into the cake.

    But not just totalitarian. Totalitarian in a particularly nasty way. Dissenters end up being regarded as both traitors and heretics. Dissent becomes not just a political crime but a moral crime. Dissenters are not regarded as people who are misguided – they are regarded as people who are morally evil.

    And this has nothing to do with liberals. Whatever ideology becomes the dominant ideology, whether it be right-wing or left-wing, liberal or conservative, the result will be that that ideology will be enforced by totalitarian means. If libertarianism became the dominant ideology then any dissent from libertarianism would be enforced by totalitarian means.

  134. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    We lost our right to free speech years ago when the government passed hate crime legislation which bans political discourse. Over the last decade it has worsened as the oligarchs controlling the media and public speech outlets like YouTube , Twitter and Facebook have censured politically incorrect speech concerning everything from climate change to Coronavirus. Unorthodox opinions are now banned , those who speak out are blacklisted , lose their jobs , careers and are ostracized.

    We lost our right to free speech years ago when the government passed hate crime legislation which bans political discourse. Over the last decade it has worsened as the oligarchs controlling the media and public speech outlets like YouTube , Twitter and Facebook have censured politically incorrect speech concerning everything from climate change to Coronavirus.

    Free speech was lost when private media corporations (including social media) gained so much power and influence that they could control political debate. At that point the First Amendment became irrelevant.

    Censorship is overwhelming carried out by corporations, not government.

    Conservatives were too dumb to see this coming and too committed to muh free enterprise to be willing to do anything about it. Most of them are still unwilling to do anything about it.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite

    Conservatives were too dumb to see this coming and too committed to muh free enterprise to be willing to do anything about it. Most of them are still unwilling to do anything about it.
     
    What did you do about it? What are you doing about it now? Other than calling people names I mean.
  135. @Sgt. Joe Friday
    Isn't it weird how all the people who were anti-Establishment and in favor of free speech 50 years ago are the same ones who are the Establishment today and hate free speech?

    Isn’t it weird how all the people who were anti-Establishment and in favor of free speech 50 years ago are the same ones who are the Establishment today and hate free speech?

    And isn’t it weird how all the people who supported the Establishment back then were not at all keen on free speech and now suddenly they say it’s the most important thing there is.

    Both sides have been equally cynical and dishonest.

  136. @Steve Sailer
    I really wouldn't skip a chemotherapy session.

    “I really wouldn’t skip a chemotherapy session.”

    And it shows.

    #linearvirus

  137. @Buzz Mohawk

    I really wouldn’t skip a chemotherapy session.
     
    The people who do, and all the others who will die because of shutdowns -- and those who already have -- can be added to the "excess deaths" number to further pad the total, as you are doing here:

    Nationally, up through April 4, excess deaths were about twice official coronavirus deaths in the U.S., so we are likely up to 100,000 deaths by now.
     
    Why don't you subtract all the deaths attributed to your favorite illness because of coexistence with other causes or because doctors are being encouraged to use covid-19 as cause of death when they don't know?

    "Let's argue about this."

    Another thing this big story is exposing is people's confirmation bias. Some of us are biased the other way.

    My wife an I now know two families, parents with children, in which everyone has tested positive. Out of those, only one person, a grandmother, went into a hospital. She is home now and okay.

    We live in one of the outer rings around the New York City epicenter and the New Rochelle ground zero first explosion. We live next to the first town in our state that had its own explosion of cases brought over immediately from the epicenter. That happened quite some time before masks, distancing and shutdowns, so your friend Corona-chan was here long before we did anything about her.

    There has been no random test that I am aware of, but no doubt many of us have the virus or antibodies. Yet those families are the only cases we know, and they are all fine.

    Kudos to you, Steve, for remembering free speech and dialectic. You did not deserve my one really shitty comment to you. I apologize. (Now my wife's father is in hospice care, ready to join his wife in heaven, and we still can't get there. In good marriages, people often leave together. They are leaving together, while we can't go anywhere.)

    I lost a filling weeks ago but can't get it replaced, so the tooth will just decay for awhile. My colonoscopy was canceled weeks ago, so if there are any cancerous polyps in my gut, they will stay there and grow and grow... Maybe I can someday be added to the excess deaths total. They can bury me minus one tooth.

    “My colonoscopy was canceled weeks ago, so if there are any cancerous polyps in my gut, they will stay there and grow and grow… Maybe I can someday be added to the excess deaths total.”

    They will shove a respirator down your rigor-mortised throat and code you COVID for a cool $39,000 – it’s not like anyone will question the dx.

    CDC sez: All your deaths are belong to kungflu!

    #linearvirus

    • Troll: R.G. Camara
  138. @Peter Frost
    They would if the people died because they missed a doctor’s appointment that otherwise would have saved them

    That's the main criticism of estimating the death toll from excess mortality. You get an overestimate because you're including deaths due to disease-related disruptions, and not just the disease itself. On the other hand, you get an underestimate because more people are staying home and there are consequently fewer traffic deaths.

    There is no reason for the public to trust our health institutions again.

    Hindsight is a wonderful thing. Yes, this pandemic could have been handled a lot better. We could have restricted international travel a lot earlier. We could have ensured a domestic supply of masks and other protective gear. We could have prepared ourselves beforehand for this kind of thing in many ways.

    But we didn't. If you could lend me your time machine, I could go back and see what I could do. I suspect, however, that most people would ignore me.

    “Hindsight is a wonderful thing. Yes, this pandemic could have been handled a lot better….
    But we didn’t. If you could lend me your time machine, I could go back and see what I could do.”

    Encourage oldsters to self-quarantine and let everyone else live life normally.

    Over two months ago I penned the Maqick Qungflu Quatrain:

    If your lungs are diseased,
    Self-quarantine please;
    If your health is okay,
    Go on about your day!

    But I do own a time machine: it travels at the velocity of 60 minutes per hour.

    #linearvirus

    • Agree: Hail
  139. Free Speech ? LOL . Free Speech is over for us .

  140. @Mr. Anon

    The double-message of these commercials is: “[Our mega-company] is patriotic!” and “Obey the Lockdowns, peons. We’re in charge now.” (Cf. Corona Coup d’Etat Theory.)
     
    Flu d'Etat (heard it on Tucker's show)

    Flu d’Etat (heard it on Tucker’s show)

    Good punning but weaker on alliteration.

    I wonder if Tucker had a Corona-Eureka moment (by which I mean an anti-Panic Eureka moment). If so, when, where, how.

  141. Hail says: • Website
    @Buzz Mohawk
    Equally disappointing is Ron Unz not letting this exaggerated crisis go to waste, using it to further beat his anti-American, pro-China drum. He is non-stop "stupid, evil United States < superior, honest China" with regard to the Wuhan Flu.

    So we have Ron pushing the geopolitical part in favor of a communist dictatorship that monitors and controls its people, and we have Steve blowing air into the hypochondriacal balloon to inflate the medical significance.

    If I didn't trust, admire and respect these guys, I'd think it was all a deep state/globalist/Davos set/pre-planned act. Now, if you will excuse me, I am going to put on my tin foil hat.

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1365/2497/files/IMG_3053-ANIMATION_large.gif?v=1522242950

    I find it odd that there is no major writer anywhere at the Unz Review — someone correct me if I am wrong — who is, and has been, decisively and actively on the anti-Panic side on the Corona Question.

    (Some writers here are pro-Panic, some are neutral or don’t much talk about it. None afaict are hitting hard against this thing, even now as it is clearly not what they said it was when the Corona Coup d’Etat was underway in March. Maybe Michelle Malkin is in the strong anti-Panic category, if you count her.)

    Yet the commenteriat here, including most regulars, is mainly anti-Panic.

    This is like a version of that old idea that comment sections always end up more radical than the main article (leading to somebody’s quip that 2016 Trump vs. Hillary was “the comment section against the main article.”) Somehow, it even happened here.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I find it odd that there is no major writer anywhere at the Unz Review — someone correct me if I am wrong — who is, and has been, decisively and actively on the anti-Panic side on the Corona Question.
     
    There's a writer named Whitney Webb (not to be confused with Mike Whitney) who was right on the money on this issue, Mr. Hail. See: Techno-Tyranny: How the US National Security State Is Using Coronavirus to Fulfill an Orwellian Vision from April 20th. Speaking of "Whitney"s, Mike Whitney just wrote Why Sweden Succeeded While Others Failed without all the numbers and graphs you have complied and explained on your site. However the guy may not be completely anti-panic, from what I see of his previous post. I think he's normally just one of the anti-all-things-American writers that prevail on this site.

    Lastly, these are syndicated columnists, not unz writers, but Mr. Unz does still publish Dr. Ron Paul, who is completely anti-Panic, along with just starting the publishing of Michelle Malkin's great columns. Mrs. Malkin put up a couple of extremely anti-Panic column just after she started, (see The Grand Farce of American Social Distancing with only a small number of comments, as it was before she realized you can't shouldn't comments in moderation for 48 hours!) To me, Michelle Malkin has been the best addition to the Unz Review since A.E. It seems like bad timing on Mr. Unz's part, based on his opinion, but again, he seems to be extremely opposed to censorship of his writers and commenters, with the exception of small, uhh, episodes.
  142. @vhrm
    This particular Chinese woman (and her white American husband) certainly bought out the supplies in retail stores in some parts of Florida.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQtGvcsrHpM

    I believe she sold them online, on a Chinese focused web store, but don't know for sure.

    There was a white guy who did the same in the Appalachian States driving a U-haul around (he was profiled in the nytimes). He sold his stuff on Amazon and eBay until they banned him.

    Overall i don't think these had a big impact on mask availability since the demand is hundreds of times the available supply, but it's definitely not a good look.

    Am I the only one who found her thrill at purchasing masks in bulk to be almost fetishistic?

    I bet her husband wishes she would get that “sweaty” about activities that don’t involve Home Depot.

  143. @Kratoklastes
    This is my favourite example for people who stupidly believe in 'democracy' (and particularly, in parliamentary, 'representative' democracy).

    The March 1933 election is the election most-aligned with the putative principles of democracy:
     • high level of voter registration (44.7m voters in a population of ~67m);
     • large turnout (88.7%).
     • full-franchise;
     • no hint of gerrymandering, voter-suppression or other jiggery-pokery;
     • genuinely multi-party.

    The NSDAP got 43.9% of the vote, so overall it got a larger proportion of the eligible vote (38.9%) than any US President since the Civil War (and let's just say that the US did not have a full-franchise for the vast bulk of that time; women didn't get to vote in Presidential elections after WWI).

    The NSDAP's result did not get them a majority of the seats (so they didn't have the power to form a government).

    A list of governments who didn't get anywhere near that:
     • UK: every government since 1951 (not genuinely full-franchise)
     • US: every President since 1876 (no women until 1920)
     • Australia: every government since Federation (fake system: compulsory);
     • New Zealand: every government ever formed;
     • France: ditto;
     • Germany: ditto;

    Things to note:
     &compfn; In the 1951 UK election, 18 year olds didn't have the right to vote, but they were subject to conscription: if you can be sent to die for a government in whose selection you play no part, the franchise is incomplete).
     &compfn; Australia requires its herd to vote, resulting in forced preference expression for people who are hesitant to break the law. This means that there is no discernible 'mandate' that emerges from the aggregation of votes (and there isn't anyway, because of Arrow's Impossibility Theorem).


    inb4 some midwit claims 'Voting is not compulsory in Australia: all that's required is that you get your name marked off the roll. There is no requirement to mark the paper'.

    That's a deliberately false representation made by people who want to squirm out of what the law says.

    s245(15) of the Electoral Act 1918 makes it an offence to fail to vote; s245(14) says that religious objection is the sole guaranteed excuse. s239 and s240 of the same act list the requirements for marking the ballot paper; the voter is required to mark the paper in accordance with those sections.

    It's an offence with a very low probability of detection, but it's an offence nonetheless.

    Another offence with a low probability of detection: driving drunk at 130km/hr on a deserted country road at 3am. I doubt that pro-democracy dimwads think that their bullshit argument applies to such a case.

    It takes a very skewed worldview to pick and choose which offences are OK so long as the risk of detection is low.

    TL;DR: Don't vote. It doesn't matter who you vote for, you wind up being ruled by parasitic, megalomaniacal sociopaths: if not at that specific election, then at some stage thereafter. There are no exceptions, ever... no backsies, no returns infinity.

    Kratoklastes, thanks.

    The March 1933 German election seems to me a national election concealing a single-issue referendum on whether law enforcement following the burning of the national assembly building, in this case the Reichstag fire scarcely a week or so earlier, is a good thing.

    I pretty much agree about the dubiousness of “representative government”. In my local area, it’s been common knowledge that the Mafia, to cite just one institution, could put up candidates beholden to it, bribe officeholders, intimidate witnesses in public hearings and criminal proceedings conducted by duly elected officials, the whole enchilada of private, and in this case criminal interest, enjoying the cover of “democratic” legitimacy. (That was true from about the 1930s to the late 1990s, when a tiny number of courageous local officeholders and do-gooders pleaded with the federal government for help.)

    • Replies: @anon
    In my local area, it’s been common knowledge that the Mafia, to cite just one institution, could put up candidates beholden to it, bribe officeholders, intimidate witnesses in public hearings and criminal proceedings conducted by duly elected officials, the whole enchilada of private, and in this case criminal interest, enjoying the cover of “democratic” legitimacy.

    It was a mistake to allow large numbers of people from outside the Hajnal line such as Sicilians into the country. We cannot turn the clock back but we can learn from such mistakes. The 1924 immigration act was self-preservation. What should self preservation look like in 2020?

  144. @Hypnotoad666
    Imposing the consensus of experts by government fiat is pretty much the definition of Progressiveism. So these people have been like pigs in mud during the pandemic.

    The close-mindedness has been amazing.

    One of my favorites examples of a Progressive high-IQ idiot is the always awful Paul Krugman. He recently told his conformist NYT readers that Dr. Oz and others were "quacks" because they aren't specialized virologists or whatever. How dare "TV Doctors" opine about hydrochloroquine as a promising treatment.

    This, he said, is the whole problem with "the right:" they believe in nonconformist "quacks" while the Left is science-based. Only panels of experts with "International," or "World" in their title are to be followed.

    Progressive high-IQ idiot [snip] awful Paul Krugman

    This ‘IYI’ trope is what marks Taleb out as profoundly lacking in depth of analysis.

    Krugman does not write what he writes as a result of deeply-held conviction. He writes what he writes because it’s a very low-effort way of getting handsomely rewarded across all identifiable components of remuneration: money, popularity, fame etc.

    At some point, the amount of reward on offer was enough to get him to set aside his principles (assuming he had any).

    People really need to read “The Inner Ring“.

    The money shot:

    And the prophecy I make is this. To nine out of ten of you the choice which could lead to scoundrelism will come, when it does come, in no very dramatic colours. Obviously bad men, obviously threatening or bribing, will almost certainly not appear. Over a drink, or a cup of coffee, disguised as triviality and sandwiched between two jokes, from the lips of a man, or woman, whom you have recently been getting to know rather better and whom you hope to know better still—just at the moment when you are most anxious not to appear crude, or naïf or a prig—the hint will come. It will be the hint of something which the public, the ignorant, romantic public, would never understand: something which even the outsiders in your own profession are apt to make a fuss about: but something, says your new friend, which “we”—and at the word “we” you try not to blush for mere pleasure—something “we always do.”

    And you will be drawn in, if you are drawn in, not by desire for gain or ease, but simply because at that moment, when the cup was so near your lips, you cannot bear to be thrust back again into the cold outer world. It would be so terrible to see the other man’s face—that genial, confidential, delightfully sophisticated face—turn suddenly cold and contemptuous, to know that you had been tried for the Inner Ring and rejected. And then, if you are drawn in, next week it will be something a little further from the rules, and next year something further still, but all in the jolliest, friendliest spirit. It may end in a crash, a scandal, and penal servitude; it may end in millions, a peerage and giving the prizes at your old school. But you will be a scoundrel.

    • Agree: black sea
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    People really need to read “The Inner Ring“.

    I don't know if you will see this or not, but: thank you for the CS Lewis quote. I have most of what he wrote, but I am sorry to say I haven't gone back over his stuff in a while (and Lewis is certainly an author who repays rereading).

    If anyone reading this is interested, The Inner Ring can be found in Transposition, and other addresses by C. S. Lewis.
  145. @S. Anonyia
    Winner for most irrelevant comment on this post award.

    Actually, incels and feminists (a true match made in heaven even if they don’t know it themselves) bickering on an Internet forum is an example of free speech still existing somewhere.

    They quarantined TRP (the red pill) as well as MGTOW.

    MensRights is still active last time I checked.

    And yes, the MRAs and feminists often seem like mirror images of each other. But only one is having their sites knocked down.

  146. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    We lost our right to free speech years ago when the government passed hate crime legislation which bans political discourse. Over the last decade it has worsened as the oligarchs controlling the media and public speech outlets like YouTube , Twitter and Facebook have censured politically incorrect speech concerning everything from climate change to Coronavirus. Unorthodox opinions are now banned , those who speak out are blacklisted , lose their jobs , careers and are ostracized.

    As dfordoom says, this is due to control by big corporations, which conservatives were fine with, thanks to the donors. Hate crimes legislation has made various sorts of speech illegal in Europe, but not in America–it just raises penalties for actions that are already crimes.

  147. @Achmed E. Newman
    That's weird about Ron Unz, Buzz. He is the biggest stalwart for free speech I've heard of in the modern era, putting his money, but more like years of his effort, where his mouth is too, about this. Free speech may not be just an American concept, but we are the only country that ever held to a Constitution in which it was enshrined, pretty damn well for arguable over 200 years.

    Yet, the guy is so anti-American and Anti-Americans as to sound like a Commie straight outta the 1950's USSR or Chairman Mao's press secretary. He has been full of shit on this Kung Flu thing from the get-go. Don't expect any apologies, but as he is, after all, the creator and proprietor of this site, so be it.

    From what little I can tell, he intends his site to be a photographic negative of the media’s biases, to counteract them. The media pushes a blank slate, so there are lots of HBD articles of varying quality. The media is biased toward Jews, so there are articles ranging from moderately critical of bias toward Israel to articles blaming the Israelis for 9/11 and the Kennedy assassination.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    ... he intends his site to be a photographic negative of the media’s biases, to counteract them.
     
    If that's the case, SFG, then why does he go with the Lyin' Press narrative on all of the Kung Flu Infotainment Panic-Fest, with the exception of his theory that America was responsible for the virus itself (but of course!)?
  148. @SFG
    From what little I can tell, he intends his site to be a photographic negative of the media's biases, to counteract them. The media pushes a blank slate, so there are lots of HBD articles of varying quality. The media is biased toward Jews, so there are articles ranging from moderately critical of bias toward Israel to articles blaming the Israelis for 9/11 and the Kennedy assassination.

    … he intends his site to be a photographic negative of the media’s biases, to counteract them.

    If that’s the case, SFG, then why does he go with the Lyin’ Press narrative on all of the Kung Flu Infotainment Panic-Fest, with the exception of his theory that America was responsible for the virus itself (but of course!)?

  149. @Peter Frost
    They would if the people died because they missed a doctor’s appointment that otherwise would have saved them

    That's the main criticism of estimating the death toll from excess mortality. You get an overestimate because you're including deaths due to disease-related disruptions, and not just the disease itself. On the other hand, you get an underestimate because more people are staying home and there are consequently fewer traffic deaths.

    There is no reason for the public to trust our health institutions again.

    Hindsight is a wonderful thing. Yes, this pandemic could have been handled a lot better. We could have restricted international travel a lot earlier. We could have ensured a domestic supply of masks and other protective gear. We could have prepared ourselves beforehand for this kind of thing in many ways.

    But we didn't. If you could lend me your time machine, I could go back and see what I could do. I suspect, however, that most people would ignore me.

    It does not require hindsight or a time machine to know that when the political class plays games with the healthcare system and people lose their lives, it destroys public trust. That’s why responsible politicians don’t do that.

    And for you to Boomerpost about it with your “Sorry I don’t have a time machine, junior” shtick is callous and obtuse. There is no excuse for ever telling the whole public that they have to stay at home, that they cannot visit their sick relatives, and that they must close their business and grovel for government peanuts. This kind of authority does not exist. It is pure tyranny and abuse and an outrage to God and man.

  150. Anonymous[299] • Disclaimer says:
    @ben tillman

    Voting for Trump means sending a message to Republican politicians everywhere that they don’t need to accomplish anything. We’ll get more of what we’ve been getting for decades: talk and no action.

    Plus, in some ways Trump is worse than Biden. His re-election would see another mass purge of dissident websites just as his election did. And for the sanctuary cities, where do you think Trump’s tax cut went? New York, San Fransisco, and Los Angeles.
     
    You're a moron or a troll. Trump is not running against someone who could conceivably "accomplish anything" other than the acceleration of the genocide of our people. As for the alleged purge of dissident websites, if it is attributable to Trump's election, it's only because the bad guys thought that Trump's election proved them efficacious.

    Of course I’m going to seem like a moron or a troll to you: you likely lack the cognitive abilities to understand the concepts that drive my thought process. Probably don’t even know what an “incentive” is. So go ahead, keep voting Republican. Keep doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.

    And what “alleged purge?” IT HAPPENED! You probably look at the people who had their careers ruined as a direct result of Trump’s election, who Trump didn’t lift a finger to help, and ask yourself “golly gee and I wonder why they aren’t going to vote for Trump. What a mystery”

  151. Anonymous[336] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad
    You're off base here, 226.

    Trump is Trump. Hitching your hopes to him is chaotic, dispiriting ride. Poor impulse control. Lack of knowledge on the key issue--immigration. And lack of desire to apply butt to chair and study and learn. Some great (Miller) but some absolutely appalling (Kushner) advisors. (If i could press a button and launch Kushner into outer space, i'd probably break a finger smacking it so fast.) But ... Trump has pushed the Overton Window on nationalist issues.

    And contra your point, not only would Biden roll back all the useful gains, but the lesson Republican politicians will get if Trump loses is ... let's not rock the boat, no more nationalism. We'll get nothing but Mitt/Jeb style corporate, globalist, cheap labor goons.

    Bottom line: Trump's the nationalist we've got.

    Trump's our nationalist date to this dance and we've got to stick with him ... even though he keeps stomping on our feet.

    I haven’t seen this “Overton window movement.” Polls confirm that immigration enforcement, while still broadly popular, has actually decreased in popularity since Trump took office. It’s not hard to see why: everyone can see the man’s incompetent.

    There’s basically four possibilities:

    1. Nationalists oppose Trump, he wins.
    2. Nationalists oppose Trump, he loses.
    3. Nationalists support Trump, he wins.
    4. Nationalists support Trump, he loses.

    If nationalist support is significantly enough to swing the election, to go from 3. to 2., political scientists will observe that and politicians will realize “hey, if I want to win with nationalist support, I have to actually implement nationalist policies.”

    But I don’t think our choices are 2. and 3. Our choices are 2. and 4. And what are politicians going to conclude after 4.? They’re going to say “maybe I should do the Jeb! stuff on the campaign trail, maybe the Trump stuff on the campaign trail, which after all did win in 2016, but I should do nothing other than the Jeb! stuff in office, for I’ll get the nationalist votes regardless.”

  152. @Inverness
    With Science On Our Side, Who Can Be Against Us?

    (With apologies to Romans 8:31)

    That Atlantic article is pretty shocking. Communist China knows better than to let people just say whatever they want! We could learn a thing or two from them!

    I also note that the Atlantic is peddling the Russia Collusion hoax as though we haven't learned a single thing about it. Which may well be accurate for most of their readers.

    It's weird how enthralled our "bien pensants" are with China and how virulent their hatred is for Russia.

    The tribe is making money in dealing with China but they’ll never let go of the centuries-old blood libel against Russia and Russians. As long as they’re in the media and government (as politicians or benefactors) the Russia hate will never stop. They only loved Russia in the first 30 years of Bolshevik rule because the Bolsheviks were very good at killing Russians

  153. @Hail

    He argues that the epidemic peaked in mid-March in NYC, even before lockdowns began, and will, like all upper respiratory influenzas, soon be over in all countries currently infected

     

    That the epidemic's transmission phase peaked before the shutdowns has become clear in many countries.

    For example:

    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/coronavirus-r0-in-germany-march-6-to-april-9.png

    The same finding has come out of multiple European countries, and not just the "hard hit" ones but those relatively lightly hit like Germany. The epidemic was already running its natural course, and the shutdowns were a terrible idea.

    The Wittkowski second interview (April 28) is good. See also here for a series of written updates Wittkowski gave during the period April 14-27, including answering many of the criticisms of his ideas (which are standard in epidemiology but dare not speak their name during a witchfract-panic).

    Hail, this graph you’ve posted doesn’t pass a cursory sanity check.

    There is no reason for R0 to have a peak–certainly not when this thing fires up in the spring and weather changes (northern hemisphere) are helping suppress it.

    Rather the replication rate started at its highest level, then heads down as people reacted–stopped going to clubs, restaurants, movies, talking with strangers, etc. etc.

    The actual graph wouldn’t have a peak but would look like a stretched out Z, where you’d pulled both ends. Starts high, drops as people react, plateaus in the “new order”. And if that “new order” plateau is below 1–which i think it is–then the epidemic stalls and founders. I would think–hope–every commenter here has a rough sense of that.

    AFAICT the daily deaths peak for Germany seems to have been around April 15th.

    https://coronavirusgraphs.com/?c=ddm&y=linear&t=line&f=0&ct=&co=2,67,89,221

    That would suggest R0 ducked below 1 maybe two weeks earlier around April 1st.

    Though i’d agree that the behavior/measures were probably sufficient earlier, as i’ve argued that it can take a while to burn through infected households, even after the public measures are sufficient.

    Anyway–graph fail.

  154. @dfordoom

    We lost our right to free speech years ago when the government passed hate crime legislation which bans political discourse. Over the last decade it has worsened as the oligarchs controlling the media and public speech outlets like YouTube , Twitter and Facebook have censured politically incorrect speech concerning everything from climate change to Coronavirus.
     
    Free speech was lost when private media corporations (including social media) gained so much power and influence that they could control political debate. At that point the First Amendment became irrelevant.

    Censorship is overwhelming carried out by corporations, not government.

    Conservatives were too dumb to see this coming and too committed to muh free enterprise to be willing to do anything about it. Most of them are still unwilling to do anything about it.

    Conservatives were too dumb to see this coming and too committed to muh free enterprise to be willing to do anything about it. Most of them are still unwilling to do anything about it.

    What did you do about it? What are you doing about it now? Other than calling people names I mean.

  155. Anonymous[146] • Disclaimer says:
    @Manfred Arcane
    Well said. Anyone who claims to care about immigration restriction but announces he's not voting for Trump is equivalent to a critically ill cancer patient who fires the doctor who'd been keeping him alive but bedridden, then hires Dr. Kevorkian instead.

    Whatever one’s personal feelings about Dr. Kevorkian, there was someone with some interesting connections.

  156. anon[134] • Disclaimer says:
    @JackOH
    Kratoklastes, thanks.

    The March 1933 German election seems to me a national election concealing a single-issue referendum on whether law enforcement following the burning of the national assembly building, in this case the Reichstag fire scarcely a week or so earlier, is a good thing.

    I pretty much agree about the dubiousness of "representative government". In my local area, it's been common knowledge that the Mafia, to cite just one institution, could put up candidates beholden to it, bribe officeholders, intimidate witnesses in public hearings and criminal proceedings conducted by duly elected officials, the whole enchilada of private, and in this case criminal interest, enjoying the cover of "democratic" legitimacy. (That was true from about the 1930s to the late 1990s, when a tiny number of courageous local officeholders and do-gooders pleaded with the federal government for help.)

    In my local area, it’s been common knowledge that the Mafia, to cite just one institution, could put up candidates beholden to it, bribe officeholders, intimidate witnesses in public hearings and criminal proceedings conducted by duly elected officials, the whole enchilada of private, and in this case criminal interest, enjoying the cover of “democratic” legitimacy.

    It was a mistake to allow large numbers of people from outside the Hajnal line such as Sicilians into the country. We cannot turn the clock back but we can learn from such mistakes. The 1924 immigration act was self-preservation. What should self preservation look like in 2020?

    • Replies: @JackOH
    A134, thanks. I've known plenty of Italian- and Sicilian-Americans who quietly confess to strangers their revulsion with the defects of their traditional culture, which mostly amounts to deference to the Mob, or to those who have adopted Mob-type behaviors in their business practices. You can see that revulsion in some of the Italian TV productions broadcast in the USA.

    There's currently a local corruption trial involving a former mayor who'd been a high school teacher, a property developer who'd somehow got his hooks into water department revenues with the help of pliant city counsels, and a political fixer who encouraged the property developer to "make [Mr. B] happy" with a $25,000 cash bribe. All, except for Mr. B, are Italian-American.

    Italian-Americans have made enormous contributions to America. Enrico Fermi, and massive numbers of Italians in skilled trades, construction, the arts, and all that.

    Still, it may be worth wondering if the benefits of importing Italians with all their massive culture-specific baggage outweigh the costs.

    " . . . [W]e can learn from such mistakes."

    Agree. Big Business wanted impoverished Italians and everyone else to man their factories. Our oligarchs didn't give a good goddamn about the consequences, because the Italians and other cheap stoop labor were insulating them from the consequences by fattening their bank accounts. We need to listen to Big Business a lot less.
  157. On Facebook, I posted a link to your translated Il Tempo article, the one about hydroxychloroquine and infection rates in Italy.

    Facebook removed it as spam.

  158. @anon
    In my local area, it’s been common knowledge that the Mafia, to cite just one institution, could put up candidates beholden to it, bribe officeholders, intimidate witnesses in public hearings and criminal proceedings conducted by duly elected officials, the whole enchilada of private, and in this case criminal interest, enjoying the cover of “democratic” legitimacy.

    It was a mistake to allow large numbers of people from outside the Hajnal line such as Sicilians into the country. We cannot turn the clock back but we can learn from such mistakes. The 1924 immigration act was self-preservation. What should self preservation look like in 2020?

    A134, thanks. I’ve known plenty of Italian- and Sicilian-Americans who quietly confess to strangers their revulsion with the defects of their traditional culture, which mostly amounts to deference to the Mob, or to those who have adopted Mob-type behaviors in their business practices. You can see that revulsion in some of the Italian TV productions broadcast in the USA.

    There’s currently a local corruption trial involving a former mayor who’d been a high school teacher, a property developer who’d somehow got his hooks into water department revenues with the help of pliant city counsels, and a political fixer who encouraged the property developer to “make [Mr. B] happy” with a $25,000 cash bribe. All, except for Mr. B, are Italian-American.

    Italian-Americans have made enormous contributions to America. Enrico Fermi, and massive numbers of Italians in skilled trades, construction, the arts, and all that.

    Still, it may be worth wondering if the benefits of importing Italians with all their massive culture-specific baggage outweigh the costs.

    ” . . . [W]e can learn from such mistakes.”

    Agree. Big Business wanted impoverished Italians and everyone else to man their factories. Our oligarchs didn’t give a good goddamn about the consequences, because the Italians and other cheap stoop labor were insulating them from the consequences by fattening their bank accounts. We need to listen to Big Business a lot less.

  159. @Tiny Duck
    I know this is suposed to be a cut at preogressives but it does nothold up

    We progressives value free speech but not hate speech. Learn the difference.

    It is conservatives and right wingers that are against the first amendment. Every time a Person of Color dares speak out white people disagree with them, mock them, argue with them and do other things that stifle the Free Expression of the Person of Color.

    We progressives are sick of you people. We remeber the rapist on the supreme court, we remmber the racism

    We will win this fall and we will make you guys keel over with the changes that we will put in place

    Say goodbye to your guns white boys!

    So hello to hate speech laws!

  160. @Hail
    I find it odd that there is no major writer anywhere at the Unz Review -- someone correct me if I am wrong -- who is, and has been, decisively and actively on the anti-Panic side on the Corona Question.

    (Some writers here are pro-Panic, some are neutral or don't much talk about it. None afaict are hitting hard against this thing, even now as it is clearly not what they said it was when the Corona Coup d'Etat was underway in March. Maybe Michelle Malkin is in the strong anti-Panic category, if you count her.)

    Yet the commenteriat here, including most regulars, is mainly anti-Panic.

    This is like a version of that old idea that comment sections always end up more radical than the main article (leading to somebody's quip that 2016 Trump vs. Hillary was "the comment section against the main article.") Somehow, it even happened here.

    I find it odd that there is no major writer anywhere at the Unz Review — someone correct me if I am wrong — who is, and has been, decisively and actively on the anti-Panic side on the Corona Question.

    There’s a writer named Whitney Webb (not to be confused with Mike Whitney) who was right on the money on this issue, Mr. Hail. See: Techno-Tyranny: How the US National Security State Is Using Coronavirus to Fulfill an Orwellian Vision from April 20th. Speaking of “Whitney”s, Mike Whitney just wrote Why Sweden Succeeded While Others Failed without all the numbers and graphs you have complied and explained on your site. However the guy may not be completely anti-panic, from what I see of his previous post. I think he’s normally just one of the anti-all-things-American writers that prevail on this site.

    Lastly, these are syndicated columnists, not unz writers, but Mr. Unz does still publish Dr. Ron Paul, who is completely anti-Panic, along with just starting the publishing of Michelle Malkin’s great columns. Mrs. Malkin put up a couple of extremely anti-Panic column just after she started, (see The Grand Farce of American Social Distancing with only a small number of comments, as it was before she realized you can’t shouldn’t comments in moderation for 48 hours!) To me, Michelle Malkin has been the best addition to the Unz Review since A.E. It seems like bad timing on Mr. Unz’s part, based on his opinion, but again, he seems to be extremely opposed to censorship of his writers and commenters, with the exception of small, uhh, episodes.

    • Thanks: Hail

  161. [MORE]

    The Unz Review Retweeted:

    The Unz Review Retweeted:

  162. @Buzz Mohawk
    I saw that, and it doesn't matter. The bigger number still isn't anything like what predictors were scaring us with. It isn't enough to merit the terrible costs of what we are doing to hold it down, and as the article itself says, all the causes of those annual numbers are not known.

    Some of them can even come as unintended consequences of the panic itself. More definitely will.

    And remember the doctors who are telling us that they are being urged to put Covid-19 down as cause of death when they really don't know. A lot of people want to find any way they can to claim higher numbers. Certainly the Washington Post and some folks at Yale are happy to facilitate that effort.

    Bottom line is it doesn't matter, because the number is too small and not even close to what people like Ron Unz were using a short while ago. All the math in the world can't change garbage variables and give you a good answer.

    This is the Comet Kohoutek of pandemics.

    This is the Comet Kohoutek of pandemics.

    Dude, you are dating yourself. 😉

  163. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @prime noticer
    "Yet John Dewey explicitly opposed the idea of expertocracy as advanced by Lippmann."

    probably because Dewey was a WASP, descendant of the people who created America and most of the good things on this planet, and Walter Lippmann was a jew, trying to subvert all that for his group's own gain. as usual.

    seeing the trend here? today in 2020, you can enjoy the WASP created, but now jew run Atlantic telling you that experts from the government know better about what you're allowed to say, and the largely WASP created, but now largely jew controlled world wide web will be their media enforcement arm, as many of the biggest sites on the internet delete things contrary to central government decree.

    block as usual Steve. you're so interested in truth, aren't you.

    probably because Dewey was a WASP, descendant of the people who created America and most of the good things on this planet, and Walter Lippmann was a jew, trying to subvert all that for his group’s own gain. as usual.

    Careful. Based on what John Taylor Gatto has said about him, Dewey was trying to subvert the American educational system, too, but for his own nefarious purpose:

    Exactly what John Dewey heralded at the onset of the twentieth century has indeed happened.
    Our once highly individualized nation has evolved into a centrally managed village, an agora made
    up of huge special interests which regard individual voices as irrelevant.

    Someone in a later post said, in effect, that Dewey was in favour of democracy. Well, that may have been so, but I suspect that Dewey’s definition of “democracy” would be at variance with yours (and mine for that matter).

  164. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kratoklastes

    Progressive high-IQ idiot [snip] awful Paul Krugman
     
    This 'IYI' trope is what marks Taleb out as profoundly lacking in depth of analysis.

    Krugman does not write what he writes as a result of deeply-held conviction. He writes what he writes because it's a very low-effort way of getting handsomely rewarded across all identifiable components of remuneration: money, popularity, fame etc.

    At some point, the amount of reward on offer was enough to get him to set aside his principles (assuming he had any).

    People really need to read "The Inner Ring".

    The money shot:

    And the prophecy I make is this. To nine out of ten of you the choice which could lead to scoundrelism will come, when it does come, in no very dramatic colours. Obviously bad men, obviously threatening or bribing, will almost certainly not appear. Over a drink, or a cup of coffee, disguised as triviality and sandwiched between two jokes, from the lips of a man, or woman, whom you have recently been getting to know rather better and whom you hope to know better still—just at the moment when you are most anxious not to appear crude, or naïf or a prig—the hint will come. It will be the hint of something which the public, the ignorant, romantic public, would never understand: something which even the outsiders in your own profession are apt to make a fuss about: but something, says your new friend, which “we”—and at the word “we” you try not to blush for mere pleasure—something “we always do.”

    And you will be drawn in, if you are drawn in, not by desire for gain or ease, but simply because at that moment, when the cup was so near your lips, you cannot bear to be thrust back again into the cold outer world. It would be so terrible to see the other man’s face—that genial, confidential, delightfully sophisticated face—turn suddenly cold and contemptuous, to know that you had been tried for the Inner Ring and rejected. And then, if you are drawn in, next week it will be something a little further from the rules, and next year something further still, but all in the jolliest, friendliest spirit. It may end in a crash, a scandal, and penal servitude; it may end in millions, a peerage and giving the prizes at your old school. But you will be a scoundrel.
     

    People really need to read “The Inner Ring“.

    I don’t know if you will see this or not, but: thank you for the CS Lewis quote. I have most of what he wrote, but I am sorry to say I haven’t gone back over his stuff in a while (and Lewis is certainly an author who repays rereading).

    If anyone reading this is interested, The Inner Ring can be found in Transposition, and other addresses by C. S. Lewis.

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