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What if RBG Had Her Fingers Crossed While Making Her Dying Wish?
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It’s a tragedy Justice Ginsburg is no longer with us to help the Supreme Court deliberate over the many fascinating legal issues raised by her Dying Wish, such as: What if Justice Ginsburg had her fingers crossed while making her Dying Wish? Does it still count, legally speaking?

Also, when, exactly, did the United States of America adopt the Dying Wish form of government in the movie Gladiator in which Emperor Richard Harris is going to adopt General Russell Crowe and make him his heir to the throne, but then Prince Joaquin Phoenix kills the elder and steals the crown?

Ginsburg’s death of course means that when the Supreme Court rules on the Constitutionality of her Dying Wish, as it inevitably must, they will split 4-4.

So civil war is inevitable.

 
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  1. You are an absolute legend, Steve.
    How do you come up with this material?!
    Just keep it coming.

    • Agree: bruce county, V. Hickel
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Max Powers


    How do you come up with this material?!
     
    He's a batter with a trained eye, who keeps being served fat pitches. And this year, the home team has pulled in the fences. His slugging percentage is through the dome roof.
    , @Kronos
    @Max Powers

    What’s the legality of the pinkie-swear?

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-xyJ3BbuuDbs/T6xx9o1_FUI/AAAAAAAAB0E/Woi5W531PH8/s1600/pinky-swear.jpg

  2. You are an LBM, Steve, aswe used to say in Australia: Living Bloody Marvel.
    Keep’em coming.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Max Powers

    This Sailer man writes as if he'd cherish pro Civil War phantasies --- or is he rather for the - once, now, ok - real Ruth Bader Ginsburg and what she did and what she liked and all that - - - - Johann Sebastian Bachian - - - - Jazz at the very top of the Golden Mountain****?


    ****According to a well-spread legend, Graf Hermann Karl von Keyserlingk, a diplomat for the Russian Empire at the court of August III in Dresden and Warsaw, asked Bach to write a few soothing pieces to help him through with his insomnia.

    Now, Keyserlingk's pianist went by the name of Johann Gottlieb Goldberg, and that'd be the reason, why Bach's variations would have been given the title Goldberg Variations. - Minor problem: Nobody ever heard nor read even the smallest hint, that Bach would have called his little cembalo pieces Goldberg Variations. There does really exist an early 19th-century Bach-biographer though, by the name of Johann Nikolaus Forkel, who did say that the title Goldberg-Variations would go back to count Keyserlingk's pianist. Since Glenn Gould's name refers to the gold coin Gulden (engl. guilder) , RBG had good reasons to find that Gould and Goldberg are a fine match. There might even have been some rather - öh - sentimental reasons, that she was delighted with the pairing of these two magic mounters, but that too will now rest an unresolved secret, since RBG - she may rest in peace, - will most likely be - forever - - dead.

  3. Shouldn’t RBG have been allowed to pick her successor?

    • LOL: Twodees Partain
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Father O'Hara

    That's how Roman Emperors did it, so why shouldn't Supreme Court Justices?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @JimDandy

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Father O'Hara


    Shouldn’t RBG have been allowed to pick her successor?
     
    Mephistopheles, one week before RBG’s death, to Ginsburg:

    “One last wish: You may choose any successor you like …”

    “Good. Goooooooood.”

    “So long as that person is Black.”

    “NoooOOoooOooOOOoo!”
     

    And that’s why RBG never named a successor.

    Replies: @donut, @guest

    , @tyrone
    @Father O'Hara

    Do you think they ask Scalia before they smothered him with the pillow?

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

    , @Dan Hayes
    @Father O'Hara

    The precedent has already been set by the Israeli judiciary which names its own successors!

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    , @Buck Ransom
    @Father O'Hara

    I wonder if President Trump will be allowed to choose his successor in 2025.

    Replies: @Cloudbuster

    , @Jack D
    @Father O'Hara

    If Ginsburg really wanted to pick her successor, she could have tried to make a deal with Obama in 2014 - I will step down if you nominate so-and-so to the Court. Otherwise I will keep my seat. This would have been a plausible deal in 2014. In 2020 it is in the realm of complete fantasy.

    In today's NY Times there is an article by Emily Bazelon explaining (attempting to justify) why Ginsburg did not step down when Obama was President and the Senate was in Democrat hands (circa 2014). By then Ginsburg was already past 80 and not in great health (she had a stent put in her coronary arteries that year) and no one would have faulted her for retiring (the man she replaced, Whizzer White, retired at 76 saying that "someone else should be permitted to have a like experience.") One of the excuses that Ginsburg supposedly offered (according to Bazelon) was that her replacement would not have been as liberal as she was, that by then no one that liberal could have gotten confirmed.

    The comment section is not buying it and accuses Ginsburg of being selfish. Instead of getting someone not as liberal as she is, she might very well (despite her dying wish) end up cementing the conservative majority on the Court.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @Boy the way Glenn Miller played

  4. “So civil war is inevitable”.
    Not if the potential rebel ringleaders are all arrested for sedition before it starts.

  5. Of course everyone knows scotus justices don’t value little things like laws or the constitution.

    It’s Dying Wishes and Pinky Promises to planned Parenthood, etc. all the way.

    In fact, it’s the D-I-E ing Wish for America. As long as it didn’t apply to her.

  6. OT – The Lancet finally lays to rest the report which said that chloroquine killed patients. I would really love to know how the story of how the report was produced and funded. My guess would be by whoever produces Remdesivir or possibly a pharma coalition.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/sep/22/the-lancet-reforms-editorial-policy-after-hydroxychloroquine-covid-study-retraction

    “The publication of the Surgisphere study by the Lancet meant well-controlled studies to definitely determine the drug’s efficacy in preventing or treating the virus were stopped prematurely.”

    Job done!

    • Agree: JimDandy
    • Replies: @El Dato
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Yup. Shit's corrupt to the bone.

    The editorial board should be emptied and the people who produced that report and those who funded them should be publicly dispatched in gruesome ways to make sure this bullshit won't happen again.


    Sapan Desai was a co-author of the paper and founder of the Surgisphere database.
     
    That guy.

    The Doctor Behind the Disputed Covid Data


    A college degree at 19. A medical school graduate with a Ph.D. at 27.

    By the time he completed training in vascular surgery in 2014, Dr. Sapan Desai had cast himself as an ambitious physician, an entrepreneur with an M.B.A. and a prolific researcher published in medical journals.
     

    When you read things like that, the fakery level detector is off the scale. No human outside of Hollywood movies is all of the above.

    Also, the Guardina is a liberal rag forever:


    The publication of the Surgisphere study by the Lancet meant well-controlled studies to definitely determine the drug’s efficacy in preventing or treating the virus were stopped prematurely. Given the drug has been highly politicised by figures such as US president Donald Trump, who has made numerous false claims about its usefulness against Covid-19, rigorous studies into the drug remain important.

     

    Do liberals need to believe in the non-efficacy of treatments, the efficacy of lockdowns and facemasks and the coming of the Microsoft Vaccine for some reason?

    Replies: @Ben tillman

  7. Anything that favors Leftist wishes is fair. Now a Leftist judges’ last wish must be respected.

    What if Trump wishes that Ann Coulter or Steve Sailer become the next president. Does that need to be honored?

    What if Trump wishes that US law is applied to Hillary Clinton, Comey, illegal immigants and the ones that harbor and enable them? Should such a wish be granted?

    What if we wish that the supreme court become a constitutional court, as it was meant, not a social justice law maker?
    What if we wished that Whites gain back their earlier constitutional rights of freedom of association? Or equal rights for jobs and University admission?

    Did J Philippe Rushton have a dying wish?

    • Agree: Patrick in SC
    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @SINCERITY.net

    What if Trump wishes that US law is applied to Hillary Clinton, Comey, illegal immigants and the ones that harbor and enable them? Should such a wish be granted?

    Don't be silly. All these ideas are inconsistent with the Prime Directive , Kto Kovo. RBG was one of the anointed so her wishes must be respected. Trump is a deplorable so his wishes must be thwarted. Are you some kind of Wrecker/Saboteur?

  8. @Father O'Hara
    Shouldn't RBG have been allowed to pick her successor?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @tyrone, @Dan Hayes, @Buck Ransom, @Jack D

    That’s how Roman Emperors did it, so why shouldn’t Supreme Court Justices?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer

    You have a great sense of humor, sir. Even when events are discouraging, you lift us up with it.

    There should be a monument to Justice Ginsburg on the National Mall. Since George Washington was a slave owner and a white man, his obelisk could easily just be renamed the Ginsburg Monument.

    That's the least we could do before they kill us all.

    Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost, @guest

    , @JimDandy
    @Steve Sailer

    Her adamant living wish was that The Supreme Court not be expanded, but, I mean, she was probably already dying when she said it, so.

  9. Steve,

    Did RBG Pinky Promise her dying wish was honestly her true wish?

    After all you have to honor a Pinky Promise!

    • Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin
    @mmack

    My youngest sister was a fan of RBG and even has an RBG action figure. Her 5 year old son uses it to play "The Dark Crystal." The kid is onto something.

    https://youtu.be/SpIoPQHYhrw

  10. Another commentator objected to my suggestion that she was America’s equivalent to Queen Elizabeth II. But she did the same decorum uber alles trick in her later years. You can’t ask somebody what she did or what she thought and get an answer because there won’t be one.

    She just kind of existed like the Queen, apart and inhuman, a perfect subject for idolatry. She was a costume and indeed, many people did dress up as her for Halloween.

    She not only was but looked exceptionally Jewish too which certainly helped in making her a big deal back when she was more significant in making political opinions but in the latter years, the last 25 or so, she took on this Queen Elizabeth II posture.

    There are a lot of gentile white women who valorise her without knowing a single thing about her, (Other than they’re supposed to valorise her) it’s fascinating.

    In other news about people you’re supposed to valorise, Zendeya, who pairs an even lighter skin than Beyonce with more Bantu facial features, won the Emmy for best actress against impressive opposition but because BLM she got it since the others were white. This was obviously an upset win and then Twitter had a passive aggressive meltdown as to why a 24 year old Disney actress winning the Emmy was an ‘upset’ victory because ‘who is upset’? Of course she won, she’s the queen!

    https://twitter.com/i/events/1308053324990525441

    Meanwhile at the Tour De France, a 22 year old delivered an upset win that was even more dramatic. Some whispers about doping but nobody has dared to question it being called an upset.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Altai

    Not only is she going to be on display for 2 days at the Supreme Court but yet another day in Congress thanks to Nancy Pelosi. We should be glad that they don't pickle her and put her on permanent display.

    What's shocking to me about this is how far it departs from Jewish custom. It was well known that Ginsburg was not a practicing Jew, having adopted the "tikkun olam" school of Judaism where liberal politics substitutes for any actual religious practice. However, the family did retain some vestiges of Jewishness, such as the fact that her grandchildren called her "Bubbie" (Yinglish for bubbe, grandmother, and not BTW Nana as Steve proposed) although the "dying wish" granddaughter is name Spera for her Italian Catholic father.

    Judaism, like Islam, calls for prompt burial. In a hot Middle Eastern climate you don't want dead bodies hanging around and infecting the living. The dead are given a prompt but respectful burial and the mourning process proceeds with them safely in the ground. Usually, even secular Jews who have fallen away from most religious practice still keep some vestiges of it in connection with important life events.

    But the fact that Ginsburg is being given a funeral that is more in accordance with Communist than with Jewish practice speaks volumes and reinforces how unseemly it was that the family attempted to make political hay out of her death by circulating the "dying wish". I personally don't doubt that Ginsburg said this (nor is it necessary to disbelieve that she did in order to give it the weight which it deserves, which is none) but there was no reason (other than politics) for the family to bring this wish into the public sphere.

    BTW, let us suppose as a law school hypothetical (Ginsburg would have appreciated this) that Ginsburg made the same dying wish but that the year was 2016. Let's say that she asked the same favor from Obama that she is now asking from Trump. Although one would expect her, as a liberal Democrat, to WANT her replacement to be named by the current President (this alone reveals that it was a base partisan sentiment and nothing to do with respect for the Constitution or any such nonsense) she for unknown reasons (maybe she secretly doesn't like shvartzes, maybe she wants Hillary to name her replacement - we will never know because all we have to go on is her cryptic last message that her replacement should be named by the new President) makes this same request to her granddaughter. What would have happened then? Would her wish have been afforded the same publicity and weight or would it perhaps have never even left the hospital room? Would the press and the Democrat establishment (but I repeat myself) be loudly clamoring for this wish to be respected or would it be dismissed as perhaps the delirious words of a dying woman?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Altai, @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Maico450
    @Altai

    Meanwhile at the Tour De France, a 22 year old delivered an upset win that was even more dramatic. Some whispers about doping but nobody has dared to question it being called an upset.

    An upset in the last "real" stage, which was a time trial. His compatriot R. seemed more drugged out to me.

    Doping and cycling have been pals for over a hundred years. If P. was doping it will likely be revealed. It's difficult to hide such tricks nowadays. I like to think that he just kicked ass :)

  11. @Father O'Hara
    Shouldn't RBG have been allowed to pick her successor?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @tyrone, @Dan Hayes, @Buck Ransom, @Jack D

    Shouldn’t RBG have been allowed to pick her successor?

    Mephistopheles, one week before RBG’s death, to Ginsburg:

    “One last wish: You may choose any successor you like …”

    “Good. Goooooooood.”

    “So long as that person is Black.”

    “NoooOOoooOooOOOoo!”

    And that’s why RBG never named a successor.

    • LOL: ChrisZ
    • Replies: @donut
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I wonder if the real reason she didn't retire during Obama's time was that she didn't trust a Negro to pick someone worthy to take her place .

    , @guest
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Wait, was the One-Drop Rule in effect? Because she should have been able to find some Jewess with a fraction of a percent of negro in her.

    Replies: @Gianni in Guernsey

  12. As von Schlieffen literally said on his deathbed: “Keep my Right Wing Strong”

    (Prussian Generals didn’t follow that idea quite as completely as necessary. That was their penultimate mistake.)

    Meanwhile, in Everything is Connected Clown World, restitution of Greek Marbles becomes a US-UK hot button issue

    US Congress members accused of trying to BLACKMAIL UK into returning Elgin Marbles to Greece

    A cross-party group of US Congress members have waded into the Parthenon/Elgin Marbles row to urge the UK government to return the disputed relics to Greece or risk undermining the “special relationship” between the two countries.

    A total of 18 Republican and Democrat members of the House of Representatives signed a letter addressed to UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson imploring that the 2,500-year-old sculptures be returned to Greece by next year.

    The provocative move has been blasted as an attempt at “blackmail” ahead of Britain trying to hammer out a trade deal with the United States.

    Why not just duplicate them with a 3D-scanner and a computer-controlled ciseling tool? We have the tech now!

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @El Dato

    If the British have to give the Elgin Marbles back to the Greeks, does that mean the Turks have to give back Constantinople, too?

    If the white people who created the United States in North America are evil "settler colonists," what are the slave-owning Arab Muslims who colonized Morrocco, Algeria, Al-Andalus, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Trans-Jordan, Iraq/Babylonia/Assyria, and Persia? Do they all have to go home to Arabia Felix and Arabia Deserta?

    , @Paco Wové
    @El Dato

    "Cross-party". Seventeen Democrats and one idiot Republican, Bilirakis, presumably doing this out of misplaced ethnic solidarity (or to shore up votes in Tarpon Springs).

    Replies: @Brutusale

    , @DrWatson
    @El Dato

    You must pity these 18 Congress members. They apparently felt like they lost their marbles. Someone should give it back to them!

  13. I haven’t seen anyone even attempt to explain why she didn’t retire during the six years that the Senate had a Dem majority under Obama. She was already over 80 in 2014, and I certainly don’t think she was the healthiest 80 year old, so what the hell was she waiting for?

    • Replies: @Wyatt
    @AndrewR

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yyAgk9der4

    , @J.Ross
    @AndrewR

    Literally as in the Godfather Part Two, that type of person thinks they will live forever and wants as much control as possible for as long as they are alive.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    , @Walsh2
    @AndrewR

    Hubris.

  14. @Father O'Hara
    Shouldn't RBG have been allowed to pick her successor?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @tyrone, @Dan Hayes, @Buck Ransom, @Jack D

    Do you think they ask Scalia before they smothered him with the pillow?

    • LOL: Twodees Partain
    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    @tyrone

    Did they ask the Emperor Tiberius?

    Replies: @anon

  15. I think we overlook the value of. this Dying Wish thing. After all, it is supposedly white conservatives who are dying out and being replaced by young POC leftists. You can routinely read one leftist or another celebrating just such a thing (e.g., Polly Toynbee). And people are more conservative as they age, in general. So why not install the idea in the Constitution post-haste?

    Ruth Ginsburg gets to keep her seat, and soon to be dead white people get to pre-cast votes in the next 25 presidential elections.

  16. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT - The Lancet finally lays to rest the report which said that chloroquine killed patients. I would really love to know how the story of how the report was produced and funded. My guess would be by whoever produces Remdesivir or possibly a pharma coalition.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/sep/22/the-lancet-reforms-editorial-policy-after-hydroxychloroquine-covid-study-retraction

    "The publication of the Surgisphere study by the Lancet meant well-controlled studies to definitely determine the drug’s efficacy in preventing or treating the virus were stopped prematurely."

     

    Job done!

    Replies: @El Dato

    Yup. Shit’s corrupt to the bone.

    The editorial board should be emptied and the people who produced that report and those who funded them should be publicly dispatched in gruesome ways to make sure this bullshit won’t happen again.

    Sapan Desai was a co-author of the paper and founder of the Surgisphere database.

    That guy.

    The Doctor Behind the Disputed Covid Data

    A college degree at 19. A medical school graduate with a Ph.D. at 27.

    By the time he completed training in vascular surgery in 2014, Dr. Sapan Desai had cast himself as an ambitious physician, an entrepreneur with an M.B.A. and a prolific researcher published in medical journals.

    When you read things like that, the fakery level detector is off the scale. No human outside of Hollywood movies is all of the above.

    Also, the Guardina is a liberal rag forever:

    The publication of the Surgisphere study by the Lancet meant well-controlled studies to definitely determine the drug’s efficacy in preventing or treating the virus were stopped prematurely. Given the drug has been highly politicised by figures such as US president Donald Trump, who has made numerous false claims about its usefulness against Covid-19, rigorous studies into the drug remain important.

    Do liberals need to believe in the non-efficacy of treatments, the efficacy of lockdowns and facemasks and the coming of the Microsoft Vaccine for some reason?

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @El Dato

    Yes, the bit you highlighted is really shocking in this context. The article debunks the basis for claiming Trump made false claims about HCQ, and then the Guardian goes ahead and gratuitously makes the assertion anyway.

  17. Now for some of that ole time Judaism.

    Explained: A Viral Tweet Said RBG Dying on Rosh Hashanah Made Her a ‘Tzaddik.’ Is That True?

    The idea that a Rosh Hashanah death is a mark of righteousness is much less explicit in traditional sources. Yet it appears to have wide currency (I don’t think the article is paywalled)

    https://www.haaretz.com/us-news/a-viral-tweet-said-rbg-dying-on-rosh-hashanah-made-her-a-tzaddik-is-that-true-1.9175914

    • Replies: @Buck Ransom
    @George

    Explained: A Viral Tweet Said RBG Dying on Rosh Hashanah Made Her a ‘Tzaddik.’ Is That True?
    Of course it's true. Any minute now, the NY Times will inform us it is Settled Science.


    And be sure to look for a new RBG meme that is certain to go viral:
    "Look at me, I be Tzaddik now!"

    , @BenKenobi
    @George

    So she's been dead for some time and they decided to trot her out on that specific day. Oy vey.

    Replies: @Buck Ransom

    , @Jack D
    @George

    Even before this came up (I never heard of this tradition) I thought of her dying on the eve of Rosh Hashana and to me it signified her having been outwitted in argument by the Uppermost One.

    According to Jewish tradition, each year on the previous Rosh Hashana, the Almighty pencils everyone into the Book of Life. Joe Blow is having a coronary on July 7. Jane Doe is getting eaten by a shark on Sep. 12. Etc. The ten days between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur are an appeal period - thru prayer and repentance you can get Him to move your expiration date but otherwise He inks you in.

    But the Book of Life is an annual calendar. You can't ask God to put you down for 2048 - it doesn't work that way. So Ruthie makes her appeal to the Highest Court. She stays up late and does the research and marshals the precedents and makes a persuasive argument before the Great Judge - it's unfair for me to die unless you take one of the male Justices too, preferably a Republican. And He says to her, OK Ruthie, you win. I'm taking your name out of the Book for THIS YEAR....

    As I mention in my other comment, the talk about Jewish tradition is just nonsense. If her family had any respect for Jewish tradition she would be in her place of eternal rest next to Marty right now instead of being put on display like some carnival attraction.

    Replies: @George, @Neil Templeton

  18. Mob outside Lindsey Graham’s house raising a ruckus in the middle of the night ……… Lindsey will angryed up for the hearing……should be fun.

  19. We’ll, coincidentally, the Jewish gangster Dutch Schultz also mentioned the Supreme Court in his dying words.

    As recorded by a Newark police stenographer:

    “ Come one, get some money in that treasury. We need it. Come on, please get it. I can’t tell you to. That is not what you have in the book. Oh, please warden. What am I going to do for money? Please put me up on my feet at once. You are a hard boiled man. Did you hear me? I would hear it, the Circuit Court would hear it, and the Supreme Court might hear it. If that ain’t the pay-off. Please crack down on the Chinaman’s friends and Hitler’s commander. I am sore and I am going up and I am going to give you honey if I can. Mother is the best bet and don’t let Satan draw you too fast…
    Come on, open the soap duckets. The chimney sweeps. Talk to the sword. Shut up, you got a big mouth! Please help me up, Henry. Max, come over here. French-Canadian bean soup. I want to pay. Let them leave me alone.”

    https://www.babyfacenelsonjournal.com/last-words.html

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Wilma C.

    If you broke up that paragraph into separate lines, you could call it contemporary poetry.

    Replies: @Wilma C.

  20. @tyrone
    @Father O'Hara

    Do you think they ask Scalia before they smothered him with the pillow?

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

    Did they ask the Emperor Tiberius?

    • LOL: BB753
    • Replies: @anon
    @Verymuchalive

    Since you bring it up, you doubtless know that Robert Graves contended that Tiberius deliberately selected Little Boots because he knew that would make Tiberius look better to posterity, by comparison.

    Only trouble with the theory is that Caligula was sane, competent, and effective early on in his reign. Then he lost it in epic fashion and the rest, as they say, is history.

    Replies: @gent, @Anonymous

  21. There is only hearsay evidence that Ginsberg actually made a dying wish.

    • Agree: Twodees Partain
  22. OT: This week in hate hoaxes. Gravestones at a black cemetery in Austin, Texas, vandalized with words like “Kirk” and “AIDS” spray painted on them. The final picture posted is of a sign that says, “area is under video surveillance, it will be interesting to see if the video is ever released.

    https://www.kvue.com/article/news/local/evergreen-cemetery-headstones-vandalized-in-east-austin/269-bc0c2a48-b95e-4701-80d0-885eea5bddfc

  23. Say it with me, boys and girls:

    Mekka lekka hai, mekka hidey-ho!

    The wish is granted. Long live Jumby.

    Why not? All other signs indicate that we’re living in Pee Wee’s Play House.

  24. @Max Powers
    You are an LBM, Steve, aswe used to say in Australia: Living Bloody Marvel.
    Keep’em coming.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    This Sailer man writes as if he’d cherish pro Civil War phantasies — or is he rather for the – once, now, ok – real Ruth Bader Ginsburg and what she did and what she liked and all that – – – – Johann Sebastian Bachian – – – – Jazz at the very top of the Golden Mountain****?

    ****According to a well-spread legend, Graf Hermann Karl von Keyserlingk, a diplomat for the Russian Empire at the court of August III in Dresden and Warsaw, asked Bach to write a few soothing pieces to help him through with his insomnia.

    Now, Keyserlingk’s pianist went by the name of Johann Gottlieb Goldberg, and that’d be the reason, why Bach’s variations would have been given the title Goldberg Variations. – Minor problem: Nobody ever heard nor read even the smallest hint, that Bach would have called his little cembalo pieces Goldberg Variations. There does really exist an early 19th-century Bach-biographer though, by the name of Johann Nikolaus Forkel, who did say that the title Goldberg-Variations would go back to count Keyserlingk’s pianist. Since Glenn Gould’s name refers to the gold coin Gulden (engl. guilder) , RBG had good reasons to find that Gould and Goldberg are a fine match. There might even have been some rather – öh – sentimental reasons, that she was delighted with the pairing of these two magic mounters, but that too will now rest an unresolved secret, since RBG – she may rest in peace, – will most likely be – forever – – dead.

  25. Bloviator, you will tell me your name.

    My name is Joseph Robinette Biden Junior, Commander of the Armies of the Left, General of the Non-Binary Legions, loyal servant to the true emperor, Obama.”

  26. @Father O'Hara
    Shouldn't RBG have been allowed to pick her successor?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @tyrone, @Dan Hayes, @Buck Ransom, @Jack D

    The precedent has already been set by the Israeli judiciary which names its own successors!

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Dan Hayes

    What if Trump wishes that US law is applied to Hillary Clinton, Comey, illegal immigants and the ones that harbor and enable them? Should such a wish be granted?

    I don't think there is a judicial branch in the Western world more arrogant and obnoxious than the Israeli judiciary. This is primarily the legacy of the widely admired, disgraceful ex-Chief Judge Aharon Barak.

  27. If you get together a bunch of gold star families and they wish on a falling star, you can in theory wish block a dying Associate Justice—assuming you hold the Senate and the President does not say his haruspecy demands a veto as per the Sybiline Books.

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  28. @El Dato
    As von Schlieffen literally said on his deathbed: "Keep my Right Wing Strong"

    (Prussian Generals didn't follow that idea quite as completely as necessary. That was their penultimate mistake.)

    Meanwhile, in Everything is Connected Clown World, restitution of Greek Marbles becomes a US-UK hot button issue

    US Congress members accused of trying to BLACKMAIL UK into returning Elgin Marbles to Greece

    A cross-party group of US Congress members have waded into the Parthenon/Elgin Marbles row to urge the UK government to return the disputed relics to Greece or risk undermining the “special relationship” between the two countries.

    A total of 18 Republican and Democrat members of the House of Representatives signed a letter addressed to UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson imploring that the 2,500-year-old sculptures be returned to Greece by next year.

    The provocative move has been blasted as an attempt at “blackmail” ahead of Britain trying to hammer out a trade deal with the United States.
     
    Why not just duplicate them with a 3D-scanner and a computer-controlled ciseling tool? We have the tech now!

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Paco Wové, @DrWatson

    If the British have to give the Elgin Marbles back to the Greeks, does that mean the Turks have to give back Constantinople, too?

    If the white people who created the United States in North America are evil “settler colonists,” what are the slave-owning Arab Muslims who colonized Morrocco, Algeria, Al-Andalus, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Trans-Jordan, Iraq/Babylonia/Assyria, and Persia? Do they all have to go home to Arabia Felix and Arabia Deserta?

    • Agree: Coemgen
  29. @Father O'Hara
    Shouldn't RBG have been allowed to pick her successor?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @tyrone, @Dan Hayes, @Buck Ransom, @Jack D

    I wonder if President Trump will be allowed to choose his successor in 2025.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    @Buck Ransom

    No, but God Emperor Trump will.

  30. “What if Justice Ginsburg had her fingers crossed while making her Dying Wish?”

    Unlikely. The origin of crossing your fingers while telling a lie is that you KNOW you’re committing a (venial) sin, and you’re asking for forgiveness by remembering Christ on the cross.

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @TomSchmidt

    I had never heard that, but it makes sense. Thanks.

  31. @Father O'Hara
    Shouldn't RBG have been allowed to pick her successor?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @tyrone, @Dan Hayes, @Buck Ransom, @Jack D

    If Ginsburg really wanted to pick her successor, she could have tried to make a deal with Obama in 2014 – I will step down if you nominate so-and-so to the Court. Otherwise I will keep my seat. This would have been a plausible deal in 2014. In 2020 it is in the realm of complete fantasy.

    In today’s NY Times there is an article by Emily Bazelon explaining (attempting to justify) why Ginsburg did not step down when Obama was President and the Senate was in Democrat hands (circa 2014). By then Ginsburg was already past 80 and not in great health (she had a stent put in her coronary arteries that year) and no one would have faulted her for retiring (the man she replaced, Whizzer White, retired at 76 saying that “someone else should be permitted to have a like experience.”) One of the excuses that Ginsburg supposedly offered (according to Bazelon) was that her replacement would not have been as liberal as she was, that by then no one that liberal could have gotten confirmed.

    The comment section is not buying it and accuses Ginsburg of being selfish. Instead of getting someone not as liberal as she is, she might very well (despite her dying wish) end up cementing the conservative majority on the Court.

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Jack D


    By then Ginsburg was already past 80 and not in great health (she had a stent put in her coronary arteries that year) and no one would have faulted her for retiring (the man she replaced, Whizzer White, retired at 76 saying that “someone else should be permitted to have a like experience.”) One of the excuses that Ginsburg supposedly offered (according to Bazelon) was that her replacement would not have been as liberal as she was, that by then no one that liberal could have gotten confirmed.
     
    Speaking of that, wasn't White pretty much a man of the right? Replacing RBG with a right-winger would merely be a swing of the pendulum.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    , @MEH 0910
    @Jack D

    https://twitter.com/DonTillmanPhD/status/1308173361575534592

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Redman

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D


    ... the man she [Justice Ginsburg] replaced, Whizzer White, retired at 76 saying that “someone else should be permitted to have a like experience.”
     
    This is interesting.

    On a visit to friends in D.C. in 1993, I had a week to just wander around and take in things, so I got myself seated in the Surpreme Court one morning.* Whizzer White was there, and I was happy to see him because he was an alumnus from my alma mater.

    You have just reminded me that Ginsburg was not even there yet.

    Years go by quickly.

    *It was so much easier then, before security theater and terror. I walked around inside the Capitol too. Nothing more than metal detectors in any of these buildings. That was the way flying and everything else was then too, my whole damned country!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Boy the way Glenn Miller played
    @Jack D


    The comment section is not buying it and accuses Ginsburg of being selfish. Instead of getting someone not as liberal as she is, she might very well (despite her dying wish) end up cementing the conservative majority on the Court.
     
    She was an intelligent woman. Once she realized that she had bet and lost, couldn't she have approached President Trump? In exchange for her resignation and endorsement of her successor, she could have negotiated a person who was less antagonistic to her point of view. As far as we know, Ginsburg never did so. Instead, she hung on long enough to create the situation that she had to know ( in her last sentient moment) would lead to damned near a civil war.
  32. Imagine being on your deathbed, knowing that the hour is near – and instead of reflecting upon your life and times or spending your last breaths telling your family and friends how much you love them . . . you leave a verbal memo about unfinished business at the office.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Disproves the old expression: no one, on his deathbed, says "I wish I had spent more time at the office."

    , @kaganovitch
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Imagine being on your deathbed, knowing that the hour is near – and instead of reflecting upon your life and times or spending your last breaths telling your family and friends how much you love them . . . you leave a verbal memo about unfinished business at the office.

    Old Yiddish joke.. Levine is dying, and his family is gathered around his bed. Eyes closed, he murmurs weakly, "Are you there, Becky?"

    "I'm here, Jake," says Mrs. Levine, weeping.

    "And Sammy, you're there?"

    "I'm here, Papa," says the oldest son.

    “And mine Toibila?"

    "I'm here, Papa," says his daughter.

    "And you Morris?"

    I'm also here, papa" says Morris

    Levine's eyes open wide, he raises himself to his elbows and cries, and “So who the Hell is minding the store?!"

    , @Bleuteaux
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Exact same amazing coincidence whereby all the 25 year olds dying of upper respiratory coronavirus illnesses but not on ventilators have confessed to their unionized RNs sitting alongside their deathbed that they should not have gone to that "Covid-19 Party(tm)".

    , @Dan Hayes
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    You too would leave such a verbal memo if like her you were a crazed leftist harridan whose prime mission in life was to require unisex bathrooms!

    , @ChrisZ
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Shakespeare gave us the epitaph for a treacherous enemy who still showed a vestige of nobility in death: "Nothing in his life became him like the leaving of it."

    I've never considered what its opposite would be: how you would describe a person whose life appeared admirable, but whose manner of death degraded the qualities you formerly admired. But the developments attending the death of Justice Ginsburg have me thinking about it.

    As you say, Alec, her 'deathbed work memo' is vulgar enough. But the fact that these were (supposedly) the last words she imparted to her granddaughter is a terrible way to treat her own flesh and blood.

    As the Last Calvinist noted, the phrasing of the wish is imprecise and (what's worse) inelegant for a person of reputed literary ability.

    As a jurist who dealt in the concreteness of the written word, her final testament is a hearsay statement conveyed to the world through a clearly interested intermediary.

    That Ginsburg was more avid of mere power than meaningful influence is clear from her decision to hang tenaciously onto her position despite physical incapacity, and her refusal to resign during a sympathetic presidential administration.

    Indeed, this greed for power, and her personal bitterness over President Trump, have now endangered the entire country, with her death coming weeks before a contentious election, at a time of peak disorder and discord in the society.

    This is a ruinous legacy--even if the inauthenticity of her last wish is eventually exposed. Those humane qualities that I found sympathetic in the living Justice Ginsburg, despite her ideology--that she was an educated and refined woman; a scrappy underdog who came up the hard way; a friend to Justice Scalia (and one or two black guys, evidently)--now seem a pathetically small counterweight to the final consquence of her life. The effect of her ill-timed--but hardly unforseen--demise has contributed to the unravelling of America. Nothing exposed her venality like her death.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @John Cunningham
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Everyone carries an audio recorder and a video recorder with them, so it seems ODD that her granddaughter did not make a final recording

  33. The current version of the Republican party is particularly good at choosing judges. Judges was the Republican’s signature issue in 2018 and why they held the Senate. Trump will make his nomination this week, the Senate will probably confirm, and the rest is noise. This nonsense about last wishes is just desperate theatrics that ultimately doesn’t matter.

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Massimo Heitor

    "Trump will make his nomination this week, the Senate will probably confirm, and the rest is noise. This nonsense about last wishes is just desperate theatrics that ultimately doesn’t matter."

    Absolutely. Someone showed Mitt "Butthurt" McRomney his control file over the weekend, so he's fully onboard the Trump Train, meaning the Repubs have 51 senators voting yea. It's a done deal.

  34. OT: Goodfellas considered on its 30th anniversary: It’s a “damning study of masculinity”

    https://www.theguardian.com/film/2020/sep/21/goodfellas-at-30-martin-scorsese-robert-deniro-joe-pesci

    Got that? It’s not a movie about gangsters – it’s about all men.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Mr. Anon

    Had Ginsburg lived longer, she could have worked to have the rules of La Cosa Nostra amended so that women could be "made men". I don't mean a trannie operation. They would have to change the terminology to be gender neutral so a "made man" would become a "made member" or something like that.

    It's true that most women would have no interest in become killers and joining the Mafia, but for the few who are inclined in that way and have the skills and willingness to garrote a snitch, it's unfair that the rules of the organization stand in their way. Had they refused to comply, appropriate Title IX sanctions could have been levied against the Five Families.

    Replies: @Thatgirl

  35. If she were a bestselling author, there would still be 2-3 books in her.

  36. @Jack D
    @Father O'Hara

    If Ginsburg really wanted to pick her successor, she could have tried to make a deal with Obama in 2014 - I will step down if you nominate so-and-so to the Court. Otherwise I will keep my seat. This would have been a plausible deal in 2014. In 2020 it is in the realm of complete fantasy.

    In today's NY Times there is an article by Emily Bazelon explaining (attempting to justify) why Ginsburg did not step down when Obama was President and the Senate was in Democrat hands (circa 2014). By then Ginsburg was already past 80 and not in great health (she had a stent put in her coronary arteries that year) and no one would have faulted her for retiring (the man she replaced, Whizzer White, retired at 76 saying that "someone else should be permitted to have a like experience.") One of the excuses that Ginsburg supposedly offered (according to Bazelon) was that her replacement would not have been as liberal as she was, that by then no one that liberal could have gotten confirmed.

    The comment section is not buying it and accuses Ginsburg of being selfish. Instead of getting someone not as liberal as she is, she might very well (despite her dying wish) end up cementing the conservative majority on the Court.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @Boy the way Glenn Miller played

    By then Ginsburg was already past 80 and not in great health (she had a stent put in her coronary arteries that year) and no one would have faulted her for retiring (the man she replaced, Whizzer White, retired at 76 saying that “someone else should be permitted to have a like experience.”) One of the excuses that Ginsburg supposedly offered (according to Bazelon) was that her replacement would not have been as liberal as she was, that by then no one that liberal could have gotten confirmed.

    Speaking of that, wasn’t White pretty much a man of the right? Replacing RBG with a right-winger would merely be a swing of the pendulum.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Johann Ricke

    White was one of the few, if only, justices he veered from liberalism to moderate conservatism! And more important, he was an All American football player!

  37. @George
    Now for some of that ole time Judaism.

    Explained: A Viral Tweet Said RBG Dying on Rosh Hashanah Made Her a ‘Tzaddik.’ Is That True?

    The idea that a Rosh Hashanah death is a mark of righteousness is much less explicit in traditional sources. Yet it appears to have wide currency (I don't think the article is paywalled)

    https://www.haaretz.com/us-news/a-viral-tweet-said-rbg-dying-on-rosh-hashanah-made-her-a-tzaddik-is-that-true-1.9175914

    Replies: @Buck Ransom, @BenKenobi, @Jack D

    Explained: A Viral Tweet Said RBG Dying on Rosh Hashanah Made Her a ‘Tzaddik.’ Is That True?
    Of course it’s true. Any minute now, the NY Times will inform us it is Settled Science.

    And be sure to look for a new RBG meme that is certain to go viral:
    “Look at me, I be Tzaddik now!”

  38. @Verymuchalive
    @tyrone

    Did they ask the Emperor Tiberius?

    Replies: @anon

    Since you bring it up, you doubtless know that Robert Graves contended that Tiberius deliberately selected Little Boots because he knew that would make Tiberius look better to posterity, by comparison.

    Only trouble with the theory is that Caligula was sane, competent, and effective early on in his reign. Then he lost it in epic fashion and the rest, as they say, is history.

    • Replies: @gent
    @anon

    I am of the opinion that Caligula was actually completely (or at least mostly) sane. The claims of Divinity and sister-marriage can be explained as him imitating the Persians and Egyptians, attempting to make the Emperor divine in life, not only after death. This was as unpopular in Rome as it would be for a president in the US to declare themselves King.

    Replies: @anon, @Jack D

    , @Anonymous
    @anon

    Caligula's problem was that he was young and inexperienced and so senators and generals didn't take him seriously. Augustus and Tiberius had both been substantial political and military leaders before becoming emperors. Caligula had none of this, and so he just didn't get any respect, especially from the senate, which felt it should be running the state, not this kid.

    You can imagine how this situation played itself out: the earnest young emperor, wanting to be a good ruler, but continually frustrated and disrespected by older men--his ostensible subordinates. He would soon have found that he could only get his way by intimidation (i.e. terrorizing everybody around him). And so, against his own inclination, the well meaning young man would have turned into a tyrant.

  39. @El Dato
    As von Schlieffen literally said on his deathbed: "Keep my Right Wing Strong"

    (Prussian Generals didn't follow that idea quite as completely as necessary. That was their penultimate mistake.)

    Meanwhile, in Everything is Connected Clown World, restitution of Greek Marbles becomes a US-UK hot button issue

    US Congress members accused of trying to BLACKMAIL UK into returning Elgin Marbles to Greece

    A cross-party group of US Congress members have waded into the Parthenon/Elgin Marbles row to urge the UK government to return the disputed relics to Greece or risk undermining the “special relationship” between the two countries.

    A total of 18 Republican and Democrat members of the House of Representatives signed a letter addressed to UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson imploring that the 2,500-year-old sculptures be returned to Greece by next year.

    The provocative move has been blasted as an attempt at “blackmail” ahead of Britain trying to hammer out a trade deal with the United States.
     
    Why not just duplicate them with a 3D-scanner and a computer-controlled ciseling tool? We have the tech now!

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Paco Wové, @DrWatson

    “Cross-party”. Seventeen Democrats and one idiot Republican, Bilirakis, presumably doing this out of misplaced ethnic solidarity (or to shore up votes in Tarpon Springs).

    • LOL: El Dato
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Paco Wové

    Ah, Tarpon Springs. The voter turnout there has been a bit spongy.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  40. @Altai
    https://twitter.com/acczibit/status/1308338446864461824

    Another commentator objected to my suggestion that she was America's equivalent to Queen Elizabeth II. But she did the same decorum uber alles trick in her later years. You can't ask somebody what she did or what she thought and get an answer because there won't be one.

    She just kind of existed like the Queen, apart and inhuman, a perfect subject for idolatry. She was a costume and indeed, many people did dress up as her for Halloween.

    She not only was but looked exceptionally Jewish too which certainly helped in making her a big deal back when she was more significant in making political opinions but in the latter years, the last 25 or so, she took on this Queen Elizabeth II posture.

    There are a lot of gentile white women who valorise her without knowing a single thing about her, (Other than they're supposed to valorise her) it's fascinating.

    In other news about people you're supposed to valorise, Zendeya, who pairs an even lighter skin than Beyonce with more Bantu facial features, won the Emmy for best actress against impressive opposition but because BLM she got it since the others were white. This was obviously an upset win and then Twitter had a passive aggressive meltdown as to why a 24 year old Disney actress winning the Emmy was an 'upset' victory because 'who is upset'? Of course she won, she's the queen!

    https://twitter.com/i/events/1308053324990525441

    Meanwhile at the Tour De France, a 22 year old delivered an upset win that was even more dramatic. Some whispers about doping but nobody has dared to question it being called an upset.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Maico450

    Not only is she going to be on display for 2 days at the Supreme Court but yet another day in Congress thanks to Nancy Pelosi. We should be glad that they don’t pickle her and put her on permanent display.

    What’s shocking to me about this is how far it departs from Jewish custom. It was well known that Ginsburg was not a practicing Jew, having adopted the “tikkun olam” school of Judaism where liberal politics substitutes for any actual religious practice. However, the family did retain some vestiges of Jewishness, such as the fact that her grandchildren called her “Bubbie” (Yinglish for bubbe, grandmother, and not BTW Nana as Steve proposed) although the “dying wish” granddaughter is name Spera for her Italian Catholic father.

    Judaism, like Islam, calls for prompt burial. In a hot Middle Eastern climate you don’t want dead bodies hanging around and infecting the living. The dead are given a prompt but respectful burial and the mourning process proceeds with them safely in the ground. Usually, even secular Jews who have fallen away from most religious practice still keep some vestiges of it in connection with important life events.

    But the fact that Ginsburg is being given a funeral that is more in accordance with Communist than with Jewish practice speaks volumes and reinforces how unseemly it was that the family attempted to make political hay out of her death by circulating the “dying wish”. I personally don’t doubt that Ginsburg said this (nor is it necessary to disbelieve that she did in order to give it the weight which it deserves, which is none) but there was no reason (other than politics) for the family to bring this wish into the public sphere.

    BTW, let us suppose as a law school hypothetical (Ginsburg would have appreciated this) that Ginsburg made the same dying wish but that the year was 2016. Let’s say that she asked the same favor from Obama that she is now asking from Trump. Although one would expect her, as a liberal Democrat, to WANT her replacement to be named by the current President (this alone reveals that it was a base partisan sentiment and nothing to do with respect for the Constitution or any such nonsense) she for unknown reasons (maybe she secretly doesn’t like shvartzes, maybe she wants Hillary to name her replacement – we will never know because all we have to go on is her cryptic last message that her replacement should be named by the new President) makes this same request to her granddaughter. What would have happened then? Would her wish have been afforded the same publicity and weight or would it perhaps have never even left the hospital room? Would the press and the Democrat establishment (but I repeat myself) be loudly clamoring for this wish to be respected or would it be dismissed as perhaps the delirious words of a dying woman?

    • Agree: kaganovitch
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Jack D

    "Judaism, like Islam, calls for prompt burial."

    In London a coroner got grief for arranging inquests on a strictly first-come first served basis, which upset a lot of people who considered that the infidels should get to the back of the mortuary, because religion.

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/uk-high-court-orders-london-coroner-to-prioritize-jewish-muslim-burials

    , @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Jack D


    Judaism, like Islam, calls for prompt burial. In a hot Middle Eastern climate you don’t want dead bodies hanging around and infecting the living. The dead are given a prompt but respectful burial and the mourning process proceeds with them safely in the ground. Usually, even secular Jews who have fallen away from most religious practice still keep some vestiges of it in connection with important life events.
     
    Well, how can you make sure that the seemingly deceased isn't merely unconscious, and able to be revived with the liberal application of the water of life?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HWT6XD014I&list=PLtbdC0nF-tf--u5MTIUyb3P0nROuU_bG_&index=16
    , @Altai
    @Jack D

    The average Ashkenazi (Outside Orthodox who are conspicuous in their religiosity, there doesn't seem to be much inbetween anymore) in the US isn't really religious though, least of all Ginsburg. In 2020, any overt displays of religiosity is purely a manifestation of ethnic identity.

    You could say fetishising Ginsburg is part of the new religion in America that the Gen Y/Z equivalents of Ginsburg today are the most enthusiastic participants.

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D


    Judaism, like Islam, calls for prompt burial. In a hot Middle Eastern climate you don’t want dead bodies hanging around and infecting the living. The dead are given a prompt but respectful burial and the mourning process proceeds with them safely in the ground.
     
    This is common sense, even among other peoples. It is the reason why we bury or burn dead people's bodies at all.

    I remember thinking about this during Ronald Reagan's week-long ceremony, during which his dead body was flown and transported across North America. I thought about it again during the John McCain orgy and others.

    I have speculated that the casket is refrigerated. Yes. Why not have a refrigeration system, battery powered, inside the box. Reagan's sure seemed heavy for those big, strong, military pall bearers.

    Once again, thank Willis Carrier.

  41. @Wilma C.
    We’ll, coincidentally, the Jewish gangster Dutch Schultz also mentioned the Supreme Court in his dying words.

    As recorded by a Newark police stenographer:


    “ Come one, get some money in that treasury. We need it. Come on, please get it. I can't tell you to. That is not what you have in the book. Oh, please warden. What am I going to do for money? Please put me up on my feet at once. You are a hard boiled man. Did you hear me? I would hear it, the Circuit Court would hear it, and the Supreme Court might hear it. If that ain't the pay-off. Please crack down on the Chinaman's friends and Hitler's commander. I am sore and I am going up and I am going to give you honey if I can. Mother is the best bet and don't let Satan draw you too fast...
    Come on, open the soap duckets. The chimney sweeps. Talk to the sword. Shut up, you got a big mouth! Please help me up, Henry. Max, come over here. French-Canadian bean soup. I want to pay. Let them leave me alone.”


    https://www.babyfacenelsonjournal.com/last-words.html
     

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    If you broke up that paragraph into separate lines, you could call it contemporary poetry.

    • Replies: @Wilma C.
    @Harry Baldwin


    If you broke up that paragraph into separate lines, you could call it contemporary poetry.
     
    Or if you threw in a “come on, man” a speech by Joe Biden on the Supreme Court.

    Replies: @anon

  42. @Mr. Anon
    OT: Goodfellas considered on its 30th anniversary: It's a "damning study of masculinity"

    https://www.theguardian.com/film/2020/sep/21/goodfellas-at-30-martin-scorsese-robert-deniro-joe-pesci

    Got that? It's not a movie about gangsters - it's about all men.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Had Ginsburg lived longer, she could have worked to have the rules of La Cosa Nostra amended so that women could be “made men”. I don’t mean a trannie operation. They would have to change the terminology to be gender neutral so a “made man” would become a “made member” or something like that.

    It’s true that most women would have no interest in become killers and joining the Mafia, but for the few who are inclined in that way and have the skills and willingness to garrote a snitch, it’s unfair that the rules of the organization stand in their way. Had they refused to comply, appropriate Title IX sanctions could have been levied against the Five Families.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Thatgirl
    @Jack D


    Had they refused to comply, appropriate Title IX sanctions could have been levied against the Five Families.
     
    I used to be a public defender. I liked to joke: "There is no Title IX in crime."

    While that job red-pilled me, most of colleagues will go to their graves believing that women don't rob, rape, murder, and commit general mayhem in the same proportion as men because of "sexism."
  43. So will the Supreme Court need to sit shiva for the first week of its next term?

    https://www.shiva.com/learning-center/sitting-shiva/

    And will the Senate Judiciary Committee observe this tradition, with all of them sitting on cardboard boxes while they grill Amy Coney Barrett on her imaginary 1980s/1990s-vintage scandals?

  44. Only Crying AOC is pushing the Dying Witch’s Dying Wish now, and she’ll move on to bark at the next caravan when she finds out Wishbone has been posthumously canceled by the bitter “she shoulda retired” mob. And the soy boy journos who couldn’t keep up with Wishbone’s strenuous workout routine must feel really stupid right now.

  45. @Jack D
    @Altai

    Not only is she going to be on display for 2 days at the Supreme Court but yet another day in Congress thanks to Nancy Pelosi. We should be glad that they don't pickle her and put her on permanent display.

    What's shocking to me about this is how far it departs from Jewish custom. It was well known that Ginsburg was not a practicing Jew, having adopted the "tikkun olam" school of Judaism where liberal politics substitutes for any actual religious practice. However, the family did retain some vestiges of Jewishness, such as the fact that her grandchildren called her "Bubbie" (Yinglish for bubbe, grandmother, and not BTW Nana as Steve proposed) although the "dying wish" granddaughter is name Spera for her Italian Catholic father.

    Judaism, like Islam, calls for prompt burial. In a hot Middle Eastern climate you don't want dead bodies hanging around and infecting the living. The dead are given a prompt but respectful burial and the mourning process proceeds with them safely in the ground. Usually, even secular Jews who have fallen away from most religious practice still keep some vestiges of it in connection with important life events.

    But the fact that Ginsburg is being given a funeral that is more in accordance with Communist than with Jewish practice speaks volumes and reinforces how unseemly it was that the family attempted to make political hay out of her death by circulating the "dying wish". I personally don't doubt that Ginsburg said this (nor is it necessary to disbelieve that she did in order to give it the weight which it deserves, which is none) but there was no reason (other than politics) for the family to bring this wish into the public sphere.

    BTW, let us suppose as a law school hypothetical (Ginsburg would have appreciated this) that Ginsburg made the same dying wish but that the year was 2016. Let's say that she asked the same favor from Obama that she is now asking from Trump. Although one would expect her, as a liberal Democrat, to WANT her replacement to be named by the current President (this alone reveals that it was a base partisan sentiment and nothing to do with respect for the Constitution or any such nonsense) she for unknown reasons (maybe she secretly doesn't like shvartzes, maybe she wants Hillary to name her replacement - we will never know because all we have to go on is her cryptic last message that her replacement should be named by the new President) makes this same request to her granddaughter. What would have happened then? Would her wish have been afforded the same publicity and weight or would it perhaps have never even left the hospital room? Would the press and the Democrat establishment (but I repeat myself) be loudly clamoring for this wish to be respected or would it be dismissed as perhaps the delirious words of a dying woman?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Altai, @Buzz Mohawk

    “Judaism, like Islam, calls for prompt burial.”

    In London a coroner got grief for arranging inquests on a strictly first-come first served basis, which upset a lot of people who considered that the infidels should get to the back of the mortuary, because religion.

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/uk-high-court-orders-london-coroner-to-prioritize-jewish-muslim-burials

  46. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    Imagine being on your deathbed, knowing that the hour is near - and instead of reflecting upon your life and times or spending your last breaths telling your family and friends how much you love them . . . you leave a verbal memo about unfinished business at the office.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @kaganovitch, @Bleuteaux, @Dan Hayes, @ChrisZ, @John Cunningham

    Disproves the old expression: no one, on his deathbed, says “I wish I had spent more time at the office.”

  47. @George
    Now for some of that ole time Judaism.

    Explained: A Viral Tweet Said RBG Dying on Rosh Hashanah Made Her a ‘Tzaddik.’ Is That True?

    The idea that a Rosh Hashanah death is a mark of righteousness is much less explicit in traditional sources. Yet it appears to have wide currency (I don't think the article is paywalled)

    https://www.haaretz.com/us-news/a-viral-tweet-said-rbg-dying-on-rosh-hashanah-made-her-a-tzaddik-is-that-true-1.9175914

    Replies: @Buck Ransom, @BenKenobi, @Jack D

    So she’s been dead for some time and they decided to trot her out on that specific day. Oy vey.

    • Replies: @Buck Ransom
    @BenKenobi

    And now it's RBG Week in DC, culminating in Yom Kippur which begins sundown on Sunday.

    Seems like they could be doing a concert Saturday on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial or something:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wFtXvt8TOQ

  48. @mmack
    Steve,

    Did RBG Pinky Promise her dying wish was honestly her true wish?

    https://youtu.be/xfUbYx26eIM

    After all you have to honor a Pinky Promise!

    https://media1.tenor.com/images/c4d5cc9a960754531aa26a3731e4f9fd/tenor.gif?itemid=5009699

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin

    My youngest sister was a fan of RBG and even has an RBG action figure. Her 5 year old son uses it to play “The Dark Crystal.” The kid is onto something.

  49. Comprehensive article from National Review about Supreme Court nominations in presidential election years, or in lame-duck sessions following a presidential election.
    Why There Has Never Been a Supreme Court Justice Confirmed in the Fall of a Presidential Election Year
    https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/supreme-court-why-no-justice-has-beenconfirmed-in-the-fall-of-a-presidential-election-year/

    To summarize: there have been 29 such vacancies, and presidents made nominations for all of them, in most cases promptly:

    In 19 cases, the president’s party held the Senate; 17 of the 19 vacancies were filled, the exceptions being the bipartisan filibuster against Lyndon Johnson’s nominees in 1968 and George Washington’s withdrawal and resubmission in the next Congress of a nominee who was ineligible to be confirmed (he’d voted to create the Court, and the Constitution made him wait until there was a new Congress seated). Nine of those 17 were confirmed before the election, and eight after. Three were confirmed in lame duck post-election sessions even though the president had just lost reelection.

    In ten cases, the party opposing the president held the Senate; only one of the ten got a nominee confirmed before the election, two were confirmed after the election when the president’s party won the election, and one (Dwight Eisenhower’s nomination of William Brennan) was a pre-election recess appointment that was confirmed by the new Senate in the new year after Eisenhower was reelected.

    It is, however, true that none of the nominees confirmed before the election passed the Senate later than mid-July. Why? Mostly because the Senate was out of session.

    The rest of the article gives some examples. What I find most interesting is the spin on the headline. Which makes it sound like the article is going to be an argument against confirmation.

    This paper gives a look at how the ideology scores for Trump’s possible replacements (and two of Biden’s) compare to sitting and recent Supreme Court justices. Worth noting that Barrett is shown about halfway between Gorsuch and Alito (Figure 1).
    http://epstein.wustl.edu/research/ReplacingJusticeGinsburg.pdf

    The paper has some other interesting discussions.
    – Four possible scenarios for court balance.
    – Ideological drift after appointment.
    – Argument for using their JCS score vs. other approaches.
    – 101 At-Risk Roberts Court Precedents
    – 34 At-Risk Salient Precedents

    Here is a similar paper about replacing Justice Kennedy.
    http://epstein.wustl.edu/research/ReplacingJusticeKennedy.pdf

    Notice that Kavanaugh was shown as being almost as conservative as Thomas there (Figure 1). A good indicator that YMMV on these analyses.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @res

    There were also good articles at Revolver and the Federalist, but covering the same ground (albeit without a misleading and dishonest headline), and the consensus bring that yes Trump absolutely can do this.

    Replies: @res

  50. Dying wish of Justice Scalia discovered: “Disregard dying wish of Justice Ginsburg.”

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Jonathan Silber

    LOL -- good one!

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Silber


    Dying wish of Justice Scalia discovered: “Disregard dying wish of Justice Ginsburg.”
     
    Unless it's connected to opera.


    https://s.abcnews.com/images/Politics/AP_scalia_ginsburg_01_mm_1650215_16x9_992.jpg

    Or elephants.


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/49/17/a9/4917a95ee6d7d9a5a0d08d9bd19485a6.jpg

    Or elephants in opera:


    https://media.oregonlive.com/ent_impact_performance/photo/-5f45135c46d05eb6.jpg

    Or jackasses.

    , @anon
    @Jonathan Silber

    Pretty sure Justice Scalia's dying wish was something like "I wish I could breathe! I wish this pillow wasn't be held on my face so hard!"

  51. @Jack D
    @Mr. Anon

    Had Ginsburg lived longer, she could have worked to have the rules of La Cosa Nostra amended so that women could be "made men". I don't mean a trannie operation. They would have to change the terminology to be gender neutral so a "made man" would become a "made member" or something like that.

    It's true that most women would have no interest in become killers and joining the Mafia, but for the few who are inclined in that way and have the skills and willingness to garrote a snitch, it's unfair that the rules of the organization stand in their way. Had they refused to comply, appropriate Title IX sanctions could have been levied against the Five Families.

    Replies: @Thatgirl

    Had they refused to comply, appropriate Title IX sanctions could have been levied against the Five Families.

    I used to be a public defender. I liked to joke: “There is no Title IX in crime.”

    While that job red-pilled me, most of colleagues will go to their graves believing that women don’t rob, rape, murder, and commit general mayhem in the same proportion as men because of “sexism.”

  52. @AndrewR
    I haven't seen anyone even attempt to explain why she didn't retire during the six years that the Senate had a Dem majority under Obama. She was already over 80 in 2014, and I certainly don't think she was the healthiest 80 year old, so what the hell was she waiting for?

    Replies: @Wyatt, @J.Ross, @Walsh2

  53. @George
    Now for some of that ole time Judaism.

    Explained: A Viral Tweet Said RBG Dying on Rosh Hashanah Made Her a ‘Tzaddik.’ Is That True?

    The idea that a Rosh Hashanah death is a mark of righteousness is much less explicit in traditional sources. Yet it appears to have wide currency (I don't think the article is paywalled)

    https://www.haaretz.com/us-news/a-viral-tweet-said-rbg-dying-on-rosh-hashanah-made-her-a-tzaddik-is-that-true-1.9175914

    Replies: @Buck Ransom, @BenKenobi, @Jack D

    Even before this came up (I never heard of this tradition) I thought of her dying on the eve of Rosh Hashana and to me it signified her having been outwitted in argument by the Uppermost One.

    According to Jewish tradition, each year on the previous Rosh Hashana, the Almighty pencils everyone into the Book of Life. Joe Blow is having a coronary on July 7. Jane Doe is getting eaten by a shark on Sep. 12. Etc. The ten days between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur are an appeal period – thru prayer and repentance you can get Him to move your expiration date but otherwise He inks you in.

    But the Book of Life is an annual calendar. You can’t ask God to put you down for 2048 – it doesn’t work that way. So Ruthie makes her appeal to the Highest Court. She stays up late and does the research and marshals the precedents and makes a persuasive argument before the Great Judge – it’s unfair for me to die unless you take one of the male Justices too, preferably a Republican. And He says to her, OK Ruthie, you win. I’m taking your name out of the Book for THIS YEAR….

    As I mention in my other comment, the talk about Jewish tradition is just nonsense. If her family had any respect for Jewish tradition she would be in her place of eternal rest next to Marty right now instead of being put on display like some carnival attraction.

    • Thanks: ChrisZ
    • Replies: @George
    @Jack D

    I didn't realize her corpse was on display in the supreme court building.

    Burial is intended to take place in as short an interval of time after death as possible.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bereavement_in_Judaism#Funeral_service

    , @Neil Templeton
    @Jack D

    Of course the current year is the end of time, so she made a pretty good first draft. Better than most of us will make.

  54. @Harry Baldwin
    @Wilma C.

    If you broke up that paragraph into separate lines, you could call it contemporary poetry.

    Replies: @Wilma C.

    If you broke up that paragraph into separate lines, you could call it contemporary poetry.

    Or if you threw in a “come on, man” a speech by Joe Biden on the Supreme Court.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Wilma C.

    Or if you threw in a “come on, man” a speech by Joe Biden on the Supreme Court.

    Perfect solution right there. Trump nominates Biden to fill the SC vacancy immediately!

    https://babylonbee.com/news/genius-trump-nominates-joe-biden-to-supreme-court

  55. What I want to know is what did she wish for when she blew out the candles on her birthday cake. This has important legal ramifications.

    • LOL: sayless
  56. @Buck Ransom
    @Father O'Hara

    I wonder if President Trump will be allowed to choose his successor in 2025.

    Replies: @Cloudbuster

    No, but God Emperor Trump will.

  57. @TomSchmidt
    "What if Justice Ginsburg had her fingers crossed while making her Dying Wish?"

    Unlikely. The origin of crossing your fingers while telling a lie is that you KNOW you're committing a (venial) sin, and you're asking for forgiveness by remembering Christ on the cross.

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    I had never heard that, but it makes sense. Thanks.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  58. @Wilma C.
    @Harry Baldwin


    If you broke up that paragraph into separate lines, you could call it contemporary poetry.
     
    Or if you threw in a “come on, man” a speech by Joe Biden on the Supreme Court.

    Replies: @anon

    Or if you threw in a “come on, man” a speech by Joe Biden on the Supreme Court.

    Perfect solution right there. Trump nominates Biden to fill the SC vacancy immediately!

    https://babylonbee.com/news/genius-trump-nominates-joe-biden-to-supreme-court

  59. @Jack D
    @Altai

    Not only is she going to be on display for 2 days at the Supreme Court but yet another day in Congress thanks to Nancy Pelosi. We should be glad that they don't pickle her and put her on permanent display.

    What's shocking to me about this is how far it departs from Jewish custom. It was well known that Ginsburg was not a practicing Jew, having adopted the "tikkun olam" school of Judaism where liberal politics substitutes for any actual religious practice. However, the family did retain some vestiges of Jewishness, such as the fact that her grandchildren called her "Bubbie" (Yinglish for bubbe, grandmother, and not BTW Nana as Steve proposed) although the "dying wish" granddaughter is name Spera for her Italian Catholic father.

    Judaism, like Islam, calls for prompt burial. In a hot Middle Eastern climate you don't want dead bodies hanging around and infecting the living. The dead are given a prompt but respectful burial and the mourning process proceeds with them safely in the ground. Usually, even secular Jews who have fallen away from most religious practice still keep some vestiges of it in connection with important life events.

    But the fact that Ginsburg is being given a funeral that is more in accordance with Communist than with Jewish practice speaks volumes and reinforces how unseemly it was that the family attempted to make political hay out of her death by circulating the "dying wish". I personally don't doubt that Ginsburg said this (nor is it necessary to disbelieve that she did in order to give it the weight which it deserves, which is none) but there was no reason (other than politics) for the family to bring this wish into the public sphere.

    BTW, let us suppose as a law school hypothetical (Ginsburg would have appreciated this) that Ginsburg made the same dying wish but that the year was 2016. Let's say that she asked the same favor from Obama that she is now asking from Trump. Although one would expect her, as a liberal Democrat, to WANT her replacement to be named by the current President (this alone reveals that it was a base partisan sentiment and nothing to do with respect for the Constitution or any such nonsense) she for unknown reasons (maybe she secretly doesn't like shvartzes, maybe she wants Hillary to name her replacement - we will never know because all we have to go on is her cryptic last message that her replacement should be named by the new President) makes this same request to her granddaughter. What would have happened then? Would her wish have been afforded the same publicity and weight or would it perhaps have never even left the hospital room? Would the press and the Democrat establishment (but I repeat myself) be loudly clamoring for this wish to be respected or would it be dismissed as perhaps the delirious words of a dying woman?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Altai, @Buzz Mohawk

    Judaism, like Islam, calls for prompt burial. In a hot Middle Eastern climate you don’t want dead bodies hanging around and infecting the living. The dead are given a prompt but respectful burial and the mourning process proceeds with them safely in the ground. Usually, even secular Jews who have fallen away from most religious practice still keep some vestiges of it in connection with important life events.

    Well, how can you make sure that the seemingly deceased isn’t merely unconscious, and able to be revived with the liberal application of the water of life?

  60. @AndrewR
    I haven't seen anyone even attempt to explain why she didn't retire during the six years that the Senate had a Dem majority under Obama. She was already over 80 in 2014, and I certainly don't think she was the healthiest 80 year old, so what the hell was she waiting for?

    Replies: @Wyatt, @J.Ross, @Walsh2

    Literally as in the Godfather Part Two, that type of person thinks they will live forever and wants as much control as possible for as long as they are alive.

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @J.Ross

    Yes, RBG as Meyer Lansky. I can see her in her bathrobe and with that tube thing stuck in her nose. "I don't trust a doctor who doesn't speak English!"

    Replies: @guest

  61. @res
    Comprehensive article from National Review about Supreme Court nominations in presidential election years, or in lame-duck sessions following a presidential election.
    Why There Has Never Been a Supreme Court Justice Confirmed in the Fall of a Presidential Election Year
    https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/supreme-court-why-no-justice-has-beenconfirmed-in-the-fall-of-a-presidential-election-year/

    To summarize: there have been 29 such vacancies, and presidents made nominations for all of them, in most cases promptly:

    In 19 cases, the president’s party held the Senate; 17 of the 19 vacancies were filled, the exceptions being the bipartisan filibuster against Lyndon Johnson’s nominees in 1968 and George Washington’s withdrawal and resubmission in the next Congress of a nominee who was ineligible to be confirmed (he’d voted to create the Court, and the Constitution made him wait until there was a new Congress seated). Nine of those 17 were confirmed before the election, and eight after. Three were confirmed in lame duck post-election sessions even though the president had just lost reelection.

    In ten cases, the party opposing the president held the Senate; only one of the ten got a nominee confirmed before the election, two were confirmed after the election when the president’s party won the election, and one (Dwight Eisenhower’s nomination of William Brennan) was a pre-election recess appointment that was confirmed by the new Senate in the new year after Eisenhower was reelected.

    It is, however, true that none of the nominees confirmed before the election passed the Senate later than mid-July. Why? Mostly because the Senate was out of session.
     

    The rest of the article gives some examples. What I find most interesting is the spin on the headline. Which makes it sound like the article is going to be an argument against confirmation.

    This paper gives a look at how the ideology scores for Trump's possible replacements (and two of Biden's) compare to sitting and recent Supreme Court justices. Worth noting that Barrett is shown about halfway between Gorsuch and Alito (Figure 1).
    http://epstein.wustl.edu/research/ReplacingJusticeGinsburg.pdf

    The paper has some other interesting discussions.
    - Four possible scenarios for court balance.
    - Ideological drift after appointment.
    - Argument for using their JCS score vs. other approaches.
    - 101 At-Risk Roberts Court Precedents
    - 34 At-Risk Salient Precedents

    Here is a similar paper about replacing Justice Kennedy.
    http://epstein.wustl.edu/research/ReplacingJusticeKennedy.pdf

    Notice that Kavanaugh was shown as being almost as conservative as Thomas there (Figure 1). A good indicator that YMMV on these analyses.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    There were also good articles at Revolver and the Federalist, but covering the same ground (albeit without a misleading and dishonest headline), and the consensus bring that yes Trump absolutely can do this.

    • Replies: @res
    @J.Ross

    Thanks for the references.

    If this is the Federalist article you meant I found it useful, but less convincing, than the article I linked (which specifically addressed the election year point).
    https://thefederalist.com/2020/09/18/three-supreme-court-justices-were-confirmed-in-less-than-45-days-including-ginsburg/

    Their full coverage can be seen at
    https://thefederalist.com/tag/supreme-court/

    Could you link the Revolver article you had in mind? I am not seeing a good match at
    https://www.revolver.news/

    I see this interesting article at Revolver, but it is about a specific pick, not the process.
    https://www.revolver.news/2020/09/the-case-for-judge-bridget-bade-supreme-court/

    About the misleading headline, I have mixed feelings. I don't like the misdirection, but I do think it substantially increases the chances someone who is anti-Trump might read it and find the argument persuasive.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  62. What!? She didn’t put it in writing? Some lawyer she was.

    • Agree: Coemgen
  63. @SINCERITY.net
    Anything that favors Leftist wishes is fair. Now a Leftist judges' last wish must be respected.

    What if Trump wishes that Ann Coulter or Steve Sailer become the next president. Does that need to be honored?

    What if Trump wishes that US law is applied to Hillary Clinton, Comey, illegal immigants and the ones that harbor and enable them? Should such a wish be granted?

    What if we wish that the supreme court become a constitutional court, as it was meant, not a social justice law maker?
    What if we wished that Whites gain back their earlier constitutional rights of freedom of association? Or equal rights for jobs and University admission?

    Did J Philippe Rushton have a dying wish?

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    What if Trump wishes that US law is applied to Hillary Clinton, Comey, illegal immigants and the ones that harbor and enable them? Should such a wish be granted?

    Don’t be silly. All these ideas are inconsistent with the Prime Directive , Kto Kovo. RBG was one of the anointed so her wishes must be respected. Trump is a deplorable so his wishes must be thwarted. Are you some kind of Wrecker/Saboteur?

  64. what if you stopped posting about this person.

  65. @Dan Hayes
    @Father O'Hara

    The precedent has already been set by the Israeli judiciary which names its own successors!

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    What if Trump wishes that US law is applied to Hillary Clinton, Comey, illegal immigants and the ones that harbor and enable them? Should such a wish be granted?

    I don’t think there is a judicial branch in the Western world more arrogant and obnoxious than the Israeli judiciary. This is primarily the legacy of the widely admired, disgraceful ex-Chief Judge Aharon Barak.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  66. @AndrewR
    I haven't seen anyone even attempt to explain why she didn't retire during the six years that the Senate had a Dem majority under Obama. She was already over 80 in 2014, and I certainly don't think she was the healthiest 80 year old, so what the hell was she waiting for?

    Replies: @Wyatt, @J.Ross, @Walsh2

    Hubris.

  67. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    Imagine being on your deathbed, knowing that the hour is near - and instead of reflecting upon your life and times or spending your last breaths telling your family and friends how much you love them . . . you leave a verbal memo about unfinished business at the office.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @kaganovitch, @Bleuteaux, @Dan Hayes, @ChrisZ, @John Cunningham

    Imagine being on your deathbed, knowing that the hour is near – and instead of reflecting upon your life and times or spending your last breaths telling your family and friends how much you love them . . . you leave a verbal memo about unfinished business at the office.

    Old Yiddish joke.. Levine is dying, and his family is gathered around his bed. Eyes closed, he murmurs weakly, “Are you there, Becky?”

    “I’m here, Jake,” says Mrs. Levine, weeping.

    “And Sammy, you’re there?”

    “I’m here, Papa,” says the oldest son.

    “And mine Toibila?”

    “I’m here, Papa,” says his daughter.

    “And you Morris?”

    I’m also here, papa” says Morris

    Levine’s eyes open wide, he raises himself to his elbows and cries, and “So who the Hell is minding the store?!”

  68. @anon
    @Verymuchalive

    Since you bring it up, you doubtless know that Robert Graves contended that Tiberius deliberately selected Little Boots because he knew that would make Tiberius look better to posterity, by comparison.

    Only trouble with the theory is that Caligula was sane, competent, and effective early on in his reign. Then he lost it in epic fashion and the rest, as they say, is history.

    Replies: @gent, @Anonymous

    I am of the opinion that Caligula was actually completely (or at least mostly) sane. The claims of Divinity and sister-marriage can be explained as him imitating the Persians and Egyptians, attempting to make the Emperor divine in life, not only after death. This was as unpopular in Rome as it would be for a president in the US to declare themselves King.

    • Replies: @anon
    @gent

    I am of the opinion that Caligula was actually completely (or at least mostly) sane.

    Well, ok, maybe so. But what about his horse? Was his horse mostly sane, too?

    Replies: @gent

    , @Jack D
    @gent

    Roman histories were often written by the enemies of the departed Emperor and often long after his death, so tales of debauchery have to be taken addito salis grano (with a grain of salt).

  69. This dying wish business reminds me of the democrats when Ted Kennedy passed away. Ted’s senate seat had to be saved. I was amazed when Scott Brown won.

  70. @J.Ross
    @AndrewR

    Literally as in the Godfather Part Two, that type of person thinks they will live forever and wants as much control as possible for as long as they are alive.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    Yes, RBG as Meyer Lansky. I can see her in her bathrobe and with that tube thing stuck in her nose. “I don’t trust a doctor who doesn’t speak English!”

    • Replies: @guest
    @James O'Meara

    Ginzo: “We’re bigger than U.S. Steel!”

    [Ginsberg’s handler]: “What’s that, Ruthie? You want to talk to Christopher Steele?”

  71. RBG lived in Washington, D.C., and died at her home. Thus, the following statute applies to her oral wish:

    District of Columbia Code § 18–107. Nuncupative will

    A nuncupative will made after January 1, 1902, is not valid in the District of Columbia except that a person in actual military or naval service or a mariner at sea may dispose of his personal property by word of mouth, if:
    (1) his oral disposition of the property is proved by at least two witnesses who were present at the making thereof and were requested by the testator to bear witness that the disposition was his last will; and
    (2) the will is made during the time of the last illness of the deceased; and
    (3) the substance of the will is reduced to writing within 10 days after it was made
    .

    However, this must be read in conjunction with second sentence of Article III, section 1 of the U.S. Constitution, which reads, in relevant part, as follows.

    “The judges, both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behaviour. . ..”

    Since behavior, by any applicable definition, ceases with death, there is a persuasive argument to be made that the seat may not be bequeathed by its holder.

    I hope this helps.

    • Replies: @gent
    @I, Libertine

    She can’t bequeath it. The seat did not belong to her, she was merely the most recent person occupying it.

    Replies: @I, Libertine

  72. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    Imagine being on your deathbed, knowing that the hour is near - and instead of reflecting upon your life and times or spending your last breaths telling your family and friends how much you love them . . . you leave a verbal memo about unfinished business at the office.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @kaganovitch, @Bleuteaux, @Dan Hayes, @ChrisZ, @John Cunningham

    Exact same amazing coincidence whereby all the 25 year olds dying of upper respiratory coronavirus illnesses but not on ventilators have confessed to their unionized RNs sitting alongside their deathbed that they should not have gone to that “Covid-19 Party(tm)”.

  73. @Jack D
    @Father O'Hara

    If Ginsburg really wanted to pick her successor, she could have tried to make a deal with Obama in 2014 - I will step down if you nominate so-and-so to the Court. Otherwise I will keep my seat. This would have been a plausible deal in 2014. In 2020 it is in the realm of complete fantasy.

    In today's NY Times there is an article by Emily Bazelon explaining (attempting to justify) why Ginsburg did not step down when Obama was President and the Senate was in Democrat hands (circa 2014). By then Ginsburg was already past 80 and not in great health (she had a stent put in her coronary arteries that year) and no one would have faulted her for retiring (the man she replaced, Whizzer White, retired at 76 saying that "someone else should be permitted to have a like experience.") One of the excuses that Ginsburg supposedly offered (according to Bazelon) was that her replacement would not have been as liberal as she was, that by then no one that liberal could have gotten confirmed.

    The comment section is not buying it and accuses Ginsburg of being selfish. Instead of getting someone not as liberal as she is, she might very well (despite her dying wish) end up cementing the conservative majority on the Court.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @Boy the way Glenn Miller played

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @MEH 0910

    RBG is a cult figure, so none of the answers to "Why Ruth Bader Ginsburg Refused to Step Down" are going to include an insatiable lust for power, selfishness, inflated ego, etc.

    I really think that lefties - particularly the feminist left which made her this cult figure - shot themselves in the collective foot by inflating Ginsburg's own sense of indispensability with the cultish nonsense. They made someone who should be a rather obscure public figure on the very margins of fame into a bizarre icon and gave her unexpected but addictive feels in her old age.

    So, having had bouts with cancer and in obvious deteriorating health Ginsburg gambled in 2014 that she'd live into another period of a unified Democratic Presidency and Democratic Senate. Her wish could have been a living one, rather than a possibly apocryphal deathbed rattle at the very end. She lost her bet.

    Replies: @hhsiii

    , @Redman
    @MEH 0910

    She writes:

    "To play it out: If Ginsburg and Breyer aren’t replaced by fellow liberal-moderates, Roe v. Wade could fall or wither away. Civil rights generally would surely shrink and corporate rights would grow. We would have more capital punishment and less campaign finance regulation, more government invasion of privacy and less gay marriage."

    She doesn't mention anything about immigration. And on the last three issues, I think her concern is misplaced. Didn't Gorsuch just extend Title VII to transgenders?

  74. Steve,

    Realizing Notorious RBG will be replaced by a judge chosen by ORANGE MAN BAD, the Left has decided a new strategy:

    That’s right, if you don’t like the Supreme Court’s rulings, you can just ignore them.

    https://theweek.com/articles/938865/democrats-have-better-option-than-court-packing

    Awesome 👏🏻 . That means we can ignore:

    Roe v. Wade
    Obergefell v. Hodges
    Miranda v. Arizona
    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka
    Griggs v. Duke Power Co
    Shelley v. Kraemer

    Etc.

    Belatedly the left realizes that Judicial Review thing is a social construct:

    “The weird thing about judicial “originalism” is that the explicit principle of judicial review is nowhere to be found in the Constitution. All of that document’s stipulations on how the courts are to be constructed are contained in one single sentence in Article III: “The judicial Power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish.” Actual judicial review was a product of a cynical power grab from Chief Justice John Marshall, who simply asserted out of nothing in Marbury vs. Madison that the court could overturn legislation — but did it in a way to benefit incoming president Thomas Jefferson politically, so as to neutralize his objection to the principle.”

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @mmack


    The weird thing about judicial “originalism” is that the explicit principle of judicial review is nowhere to be found in the Constitution.
     
    Sure it is. The Supremacy Clause covers it. Moreover, in practice a judge has no choice but to adjudge the constitutionality of statutes in a constitutional government.

    Actual judicial review was a product of a cynical power grab from Chief Justice John Marshall, who simply asserted out of nothing in Marbury vs. Madison that the court could overturn legislation — but did it in a way to benefit incoming president Thomas Jefferson politically, so as to neutralize his objection to the principle.”
     
    Marshall said nothing of the sort, and it was not a power grab. Judicial review is necessary to the decision of some cases and controversies..

    Replies: @Jack D

  75. @J.Ross
    @res

    There were also good articles at Revolver and the Federalist, but covering the same ground (albeit without a misleading and dishonest headline), and the consensus bring that yes Trump absolutely can do this.

    Replies: @res

    Thanks for the references.

    If this is the Federalist article you meant I found it useful, but less convincing, than the article I linked (which specifically addressed the election year point).
    https://thefederalist.com/2020/09/18/three-supreme-court-justices-were-confirmed-in-less-than-45-days-including-ginsburg/

    Their full coverage can be seen at
    https://thefederalist.com/tag/supreme-court/

    Could you link the Revolver article you had in mind? I am not seeing a good match at
    https://www.revolver.news/

    I see this interesting article at Revolver, but it is about a specific pick, not the process.
    https://www.revolver.news/2020/09/the-case-for-judge-bridget-bade-supreme-court/

    About the misleading headline, I have mixed feelings. I don’t like the misdirection, but I do think it substantially increases the chances someone who is anti-Trump might read it and find the argument persuasive.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @res

    I was thinking of this Townhall one which is very clearly argued.
    https://townhall.com/tipsheet/guybenson/2020/09/21/analysis-the-supreme-court-vacancy-n2576511

    Replies: @res

  76. @Steve Sailer
    @Father O'Hara

    That's how Roman Emperors did it, so why shouldn't Supreme Court Justices?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @JimDandy

    You have a great sense of humor, sir. Even when events are discouraging, you lift us up with it.

    There should be a monument to Justice Ginsburg on the National Mall. Since George Washington was a slave owner and a white man, his obelisk could easily just be renamed the Ginsburg Monument.

    That’s the least we could do before they kill us all.

    • Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost
    @Buzz Mohawk

    There’s a great line from the 1980 Schwarzenegger movie -Commando- where he tells one of the henchman who have kidnapped his daughter: you’re funny, I’ll kill you last. (Spoiler alert: when Schwarzenegger gains the upper hand he tells the guy he lied and drops him off a cliff.)

    It feels like most white liberals treat the Great Awokening as if it’s Arnold and that if they bow quickly enough they’ll be killed last. And like Arnold, BLM might promise one thing but will certainly do another.

    , @guest
    @Buzz Mohawk

    So you’re gonna give Ginsberg D.C.’s Giant Penis. Real sensitive.

    Unless she was really into that sort of thing.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  77. “It’s her dying wish!” Once again, the DEMs sound totally desperate.

    I doubt that it was her wish — dying or otherwise — for her demise to be used as a political statement.

    Remember that story about how Jacko’s body wasn’t even in the casket his brothers had carried into that ghastly memorial service? I wonder whether RBG is still above-ground.

    I believe that she died on Friday, after sundown. According to Jewish law, she should have been buried yesterday (immediately following RH).

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Abolish_public_education

    Scattered at the Neverland Ranch, you mean?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FUVCYGEaarI


    According to Jewish law, she should have been buried yesterday (immediately following RH).
     
    Burial at Sea from a Special Forces helicopter according to ancient Jewish Traditions would be appropriate!
  78. @BenKenobi
    @George

    So she's been dead for some time and they decided to trot her out on that specific day. Oy vey.

    Replies: @Buck Ransom

    And now it’s RBG Week in DC, culminating in Yom Kippur which begins sundown on Sunday.

    Seems like they could be doing a concert Saturday on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial or something:

  79. @gent
    @anon

    I am of the opinion that Caligula was actually completely (or at least mostly) sane. The claims of Divinity and sister-marriage can be explained as him imitating the Persians and Egyptians, attempting to make the Emperor divine in life, not only after death. This was as unpopular in Rome as it would be for a president in the US to declare themselves King.

    Replies: @anon, @Jack D

    I am of the opinion that Caligula was actually completely (or at least mostly) sane.

    Well, ok, maybe so. But what about his horse? Was his horse mostly sane, too?

    • Replies: @gent
    @anon

    Actually that dovetails right in with what I was saying. Was the appointing of Incitatus an act of madness or was it an act of willful spite, mockery? Seems like he was personifying ("equisonifying?") the Senate in the act. They are nothing but the beast, the steed of the Emperor. Remember, the Senate is made up of the patricians and EQUESTRIAN orders/classes.

  80. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    Imagine being on your deathbed, knowing that the hour is near - and instead of reflecting upon your life and times or spending your last breaths telling your family and friends how much you love them . . . you leave a verbal memo about unfinished business at the office.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @kaganovitch, @Bleuteaux, @Dan Hayes, @ChrisZ, @John Cunningham

    You too would leave such a verbal memo if like her you were a crazed leftist harridan whose prime mission in life was to require unisex bathrooms!

  81. The only remaining inevitability of American politics:

    • Thanks: JimDandy
    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Ragno

    The new nomination will be LITERALLY GHISLAINE!

  82. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer

    You have a great sense of humor, sir. Even when events are discouraging, you lift us up with it.

    There should be a monument to Justice Ginsburg on the National Mall. Since George Washington was a slave owner and a white man, his obelisk could easily just be renamed the Ginsburg Monument.

    That's the least we could do before they kill us all.

    Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost, @guest

    There’s a great line from the 1980 Schwarzenegger movie -Commando- where he tells one of the henchman who have kidnapped his daughter: you’re funny, I’ll kill you last. (Spoiler alert: when Schwarzenegger gains the upper hand he tells the guy he lied and drops him off a cliff.)

    It feels like most white liberals treat the Great Awokening as if it’s Arnold and that if they bow quickly enough they’ll be killed last. And like Arnold, BLM might promise one thing but will certainly do another.

  83. Meanwhile, a moment of sanity from the UK gov on the trans issue.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-54246686

  84. @Johann Ricke
    @Jack D


    By then Ginsburg was already past 80 and not in great health (she had a stent put in her coronary arteries that year) and no one would have faulted her for retiring (the man she replaced, Whizzer White, retired at 76 saying that “someone else should be permitted to have a like experience.”) One of the excuses that Ginsburg supposedly offered (according to Bazelon) was that her replacement would not have been as liberal as she was, that by then no one that liberal could have gotten confirmed.
     
    Speaking of that, wasn't White pretty much a man of the right? Replacing RBG with a right-winger would merely be a swing of the pendulum.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    White was one of the few, if only, justices he veered from liberalism to moderate conservatism! And more important, he was an All American football player!

  85. OT Again: The animist power of Taking a Knee!

    When black people refuse to take a knee, they’re not helping the whole anti-racism effort

    Taking a knee is important because it drives out the bad spirits of racism.

    Clapping for carers is important because it enhaces the good spirits of COVID resilience

    That chord was struck louder than ever in the UK last weekend, when before a televised football match, both teams elected not to take a knee.

    One of the clubs involved was Queens Park Rangers from London, and afterwards their Director of Football Les Ferdinand said: “The message has been lost. It is now not dissimilar to a fancy hashtag or a nice pin badge.”

    He also compared it to ‘Clap for Carers,’ when people across Britain held a minute of public applause for healthcare workers every Thursday at 8pm during the first few months of lockdown.

    Ferdinand, who is black, added: “Recently, I took the decision not to do any more interviews on racism in football because the debate was going around in circles… People want a nice sound bite when something happens.”

    Eminently reasonable.

    That attitude is disgraceful.

    Oh?

    Maybe at this stage it is worth reminding ourselves of why the BLM campaign has gained so much momentum.

    Soros, Stupidity and the Need to pretend a fad is important to get ahead in the social struggle?

    No. Statistics!

    As an example, in England and Wales, a black person is, on average, 10 times more likely to be stopped by the cops. In some regions, it’s 25 times more likely.

    Churchill’s statue must go and plate glass must become a hot item!

    Over in America, black people are killed by police at more than twice the rate of white people.

    Radio Derb clearly doesn’t reach to the UK, while the Washington Post (where Democracy dies unless you activate JavaScript), does.

    Isn’t it better to take a minute out of your day to show everyone else that you support the cause? There is no downside.

    “A daily oath of fealthy to the cause is required”. It’s good brainwashing. Actually, genuflecting to people who are not victims or your future wife is really bad. Why not do something useful? Rent out a room to black people for starters.

    This is illustrated by a photo:

    People take a knee during a Black Lives Matter protest in Manchester, following the death of George Floyd who died in police custody in Minneapolis, Manchester, Britain, June 7, 2020. © REUTERS/Molly Darlington

    Two black bruisers with a boom box, a megaphone and a 1.5-liter prolebottle of Coke taking a knee as one is taking a selfie, as young masked white females are forming a kneeling guard behind them. 2020 compressed.

  86. Funny how Matty has been going on and on about how the Republicans can be competitive in Puerto Rico, but then the “please don’t throw me in the briar patch” mask drops and he says what he really thinks:

    Matty Yglesias:

    Republicans are 100% right: Winning the presidency and a senate majority with a minority of the votes and using that power to fill court vacancies is unquestionably within the rules of the game.

    So is statehood for USVI, Guam, DC, and Puerto Rico and court expansion.

    https://twitter.com/mattyglesias/status/1308413194285854721

    • Thanks: MEH 0910
    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @syonredux

    Thanks. But how could he forget teh filibusterz, abolishing teh electoral collegez, and reparationz??

    And why isn't he paying his share of reperationz now? What's stopping him?

    Why aren't they all? What's stopping them?

  87. @I, Libertine
    RBG lived in Washington, D.C., and died at her home. Thus, the following statute applies to her oral wish:

    District of Columbia Code § 18–107. Nuncupative will

    A nuncupative will made after January 1, 1902, is not valid in the District of Columbia except that a person in actual military or naval service or a mariner at sea may dispose of his personal property by word of mouth, if:
    (1) his oral disposition of the property is proved by at least two witnesses who were present at the making thereof and were requested by the testator to bear witness that the disposition was his last will; and
    (2) the will is made during the time of the last illness of the deceased; and
    (3) the substance of the will is reduced to writing within 10 days after it was made
    .

    However, this must be read in conjunction with second sentence of Article III, section 1 of the U.S. Constitution, which reads, in relevant part, as follows.

    "The judges, both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behaviour. . .."

    Since behavior, by any applicable definition, ceases with death, there is a persuasive argument to be made that the seat may not be bequeathed by its holder.

    I hope this helps.

    Replies: @gent

    She can’t bequeath it. The seat did not belong to her, she was merely the most recent person occupying it.

    • Replies: @I, Libertine
    @gent

    Ya think?

  88. @Jack D
    @Altai

    Not only is she going to be on display for 2 days at the Supreme Court but yet another day in Congress thanks to Nancy Pelosi. We should be glad that they don't pickle her and put her on permanent display.

    What's shocking to me about this is how far it departs from Jewish custom. It was well known that Ginsburg was not a practicing Jew, having adopted the "tikkun olam" school of Judaism where liberal politics substitutes for any actual religious practice. However, the family did retain some vestiges of Jewishness, such as the fact that her grandchildren called her "Bubbie" (Yinglish for bubbe, grandmother, and not BTW Nana as Steve proposed) although the "dying wish" granddaughter is name Spera for her Italian Catholic father.

    Judaism, like Islam, calls for prompt burial. In a hot Middle Eastern climate you don't want dead bodies hanging around and infecting the living. The dead are given a prompt but respectful burial and the mourning process proceeds with them safely in the ground. Usually, even secular Jews who have fallen away from most religious practice still keep some vestiges of it in connection with important life events.

    But the fact that Ginsburg is being given a funeral that is more in accordance with Communist than with Jewish practice speaks volumes and reinforces how unseemly it was that the family attempted to make political hay out of her death by circulating the "dying wish". I personally don't doubt that Ginsburg said this (nor is it necessary to disbelieve that she did in order to give it the weight which it deserves, which is none) but there was no reason (other than politics) for the family to bring this wish into the public sphere.

    BTW, let us suppose as a law school hypothetical (Ginsburg would have appreciated this) that Ginsburg made the same dying wish but that the year was 2016. Let's say that she asked the same favor from Obama that she is now asking from Trump. Although one would expect her, as a liberal Democrat, to WANT her replacement to be named by the current President (this alone reveals that it was a base partisan sentiment and nothing to do with respect for the Constitution or any such nonsense) she for unknown reasons (maybe she secretly doesn't like shvartzes, maybe she wants Hillary to name her replacement - we will never know because all we have to go on is her cryptic last message that her replacement should be named by the new President) makes this same request to her granddaughter. What would have happened then? Would her wish have been afforded the same publicity and weight or would it perhaps have never even left the hospital room? Would the press and the Democrat establishment (but I repeat myself) be loudly clamoring for this wish to be respected or would it be dismissed as perhaps the delirious words of a dying woman?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Altai, @Buzz Mohawk

    The average Ashkenazi (Outside Orthodox who are conspicuous in their religiosity, there doesn’t seem to be much inbetween anymore) in the US isn’t really religious though, least of all Ginsburg. In 2020, any overt displays of religiosity is purely a manifestation of ethnic identity.

    You could say fetishising Ginsburg is part of the new religion in America that the Gen Y/Z equivalents of Ginsburg today are the most enthusiastic participants.

  89. @Jack D
    @Father O'Hara

    If Ginsburg really wanted to pick her successor, she could have tried to make a deal with Obama in 2014 - I will step down if you nominate so-and-so to the Court. Otherwise I will keep my seat. This would have been a plausible deal in 2014. In 2020 it is in the realm of complete fantasy.

    In today's NY Times there is an article by Emily Bazelon explaining (attempting to justify) why Ginsburg did not step down when Obama was President and the Senate was in Democrat hands (circa 2014). By then Ginsburg was already past 80 and not in great health (she had a stent put in her coronary arteries that year) and no one would have faulted her for retiring (the man she replaced, Whizzer White, retired at 76 saying that "someone else should be permitted to have a like experience.") One of the excuses that Ginsburg supposedly offered (according to Bazelon) was that her replacement would not have been as liberal as she was, that by then no one that liberal could have gotten confirmed.

    The comment section is not buying it and accuses Ginsburg of being selfish. Instead of getting someone not as liberal as she is, she might very well (despite her dying wish) end up cementing the conservative majority on the Court.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @Boy the way Glenn Miller played

    … the man she [Justice Ginsburg] replaced, Whizzer White, retired at 76 saying that “someone else should be permitted to have a like experience.”

    This is interesting.

    On a visit to friends in D.C. in 1993, I had a week to just wander around and take in things, so I got myself seated in the Surpreme Court one morning.* Whizzer White was there, and I was happy to see him because he was an alumnus from my alma mater.

    You have just reminded me that Ginsburg was not even there yet.

    Years go by quickly.

    *It was so much easier then, before security theater and terror. I walked around inside the Capitol too. Nothing more than metal detectors in any of these buildings. That was the way flying and everything else was then too, my whole damned country!

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk


    the Surpreme Court
     
    SCOTUS has been arrogant enough. We don't need a Sur-preme Court above them!

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  90. With America now officially hitting the “grim milestone” of 200,000 COVID victims — at least by the media’s most oft-quoted measure — the Dems are putting the RBG thing on temporary hold and pivoting back to “Blood on Trump’s Hands” because he doesn’t “follow the science.”

    I heard one AP report quote a model predicting the 200,000 will double by year-end. Which seems a little hysterical given current fatality trends, does it not?

  91. @Jack D
    @Altai

    Not only is she going to be on display for 2 days at the Supreme Court but yet another day in Congress thanks to Nancy Pelosi. We should be glad that they don't pickle her and put her on permanent display.

    What's shocking to me about this is how far it departs from Jewish custom. It was well known that Ginsburg was not a practicing Jew, having adopted the "tikkun olam" school of Judaism where liberal politics substitutes for any actual religious practice. However, the family did retain some vestiges of Jewishness, such as the fact that her grandchildren called her "Bubbie" (Yinglish for bubbe, grandmother, and not BTW Nana as Steve proposed) although the "dying wish" granddaughter is name Spera for her Italian Catholic father.

    Judaism, like Islam, calls for prompt burial. In a hot Middle Eastern climate you don't want dead bodies hanging around and infecting the living. The dead are given a prompt but respectful burial and the mourning process proceeds with them safely in the ground. Usually, even secular Jews who have fallen away from most religious practice still keep some vestiges of it in connection with important life events.

    But the fact that Ginsburg is being given a funeral that is more in accordance with Communist than with Jewish practice speaks volumes and reinforces how unseemly it was that the family attempted to make political hay out of her death by circulating the "dying wish". I personally don't doubt that Ginsburg said this (nor is it necessary to disbelieve that she did in order to give it the weight which it deserves, which is none) but there was no reason (other than politics) for the family to bring this wish into the public sphere.

    BTW, let us suppose as a law school hypothetical (Ginsburg would have appreciated this) that Ginsburg made the same dying wish but that the year was 2016. Let's say that she asked the same favor from Obama that she is now asking from Trump. Although one would expect her, as a liberal Democrat, to WANT her replacement to be named by the current President (this alone reveals that it was a base partisan sentiment and nothing to do with respect for the Constitution or any such nonsense) she for unknown reasons (maybe she secretly doesn't like shvartzes, maybe she wants Hillary to name her replacement - we will never know because all we have to go on is her cryptic last message that her replacement should be named by the new President) makes this same request to her granddaughter. What would have happened then? Would her wish have been afforded the same publicity and weight or would it perhaps have never even left the hospital room? Would the press and the Democrat establishment (but I repeat myself) be loudly clamoring for this wish to be respected or would it be dismissed as perhaps the delirious words of a dying woman?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Altai, @Buzz Mohawk

    Judaism, like Islam, calls for prompt burial. In a hot Middle Eastern climate you don’t want dead bodies hanging around and infecting the living. The dead are given a prompt but respectful burial and the mourning process proceeds with them safely in the ground.

    This is common sense, even among other peoples. It is the reason why we bury or burn dead people’s bodies at all.

    I remember thinking about this during Ronald Reagan’s week-long ceremony, during which his dead body was flown and transported across North America. I thought about it again during the John McCain orgy and others.

    I have speculated that the casket is refrigerated. Yes. Why not have a refrigeration system, battery powered, inside the box. Reagan’s sure seemed heavy for those big, strong, military pall bearers.

    Once again, thank Willis Carrier.

  92. Ginsburg’s death of course means that when the Supreme Court rules on the Constitutionality of her Dying Wish, as it inevitably must, they will split 4-4.

    So civil war is inevitable.

    A continental civil war, in the world’s most powerful nation?

    Now that’s a fine how-do-ya-do!

  93. @Paco Wové
    @El Dato

    "Cross-party". Seventeen Democrats and one idiot Republican, Bilirakis, presumably doing this out of misplaced ethnic solidarity (or to shore up votes in Tarpon Springs).

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Ah, Tarpon Springs. The voter turnout there has been a bit spongy.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Brutusale


    Ah, Tarpon Springs. The voter turnout there has been a bit spongy.
     
    Turnout on Easter Eve-- their Easter-- is quite impressive.

    Greek bombs are tradition, trouble for Tarpon Springs on Easter

    Tarpon Springs: Damage, Injuries and a Stolen Ambulance at Greek Easter Celebration

    Greek Man Arrested While Attending Greek Easter Gathering
     

    They really need to install dedicated bike paths, though.


    https://beachresortcondos.com/clearwater-beach/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Tarpon-Springs-Florida.jpg

  94. @gent
    @anon

    I am of the opinion that Caligula was actually completely (or at least mostly) sane. The claims of Divinity and sister-marriage can be explained as him imitating the Persians and Egyptians, attempting to make the Emperor divine in life, not only after death. This was as unpopular in Rome as it would be for a president in the US to declare themselves King.

    Replies: @anon, @Jack D

    Roman histories were often written by the enemies of the departed Emperor and often long after his death, so tales of debauchery have to be taken addito salis grano (with a grain of salt).

    • Thanks: Coemgen
  95. @Steve Sailer
    @Father O'Hara

    That's how Roman Emperors did it, so why shouldn't Supreme Court Justices?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @JimDandy

    Her adamant living wish was that The Supreme Court not be expanded, but, I mean, she was probably already dying when she said it, so.

  96. @Brutusale
    @Paco Wové

    Ah, Tarpon Springs. The voter turnout there has been a bit spongy.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Ah, Tarpon Springs. The voter turnout there has been a bit spongy.

    Turnout on Easter Eve– their Easter– is quite impressive.

    Greek bombs are tradition, trouble for Tarpon Springs on Easter

    Tarpon Springs: Damage, Injuries and a Stolen Ambulance at Greek Easter Celebration

    Greek Man Arrested While Attending Greek Easter Gathering

    They really need to install dedicated bike paths, though.

  97. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Jack D


    ... the man she [Justice Ginsburg] replaced, Whizzer White, retired at 76 saying that “someone else should be permitted to have a like experience.”
     
    This is interesting.

    On a visit to friends in D.C. in 1993, I had a week to just wander around and take in things, so I got myself seated in the Surpreme Court one morning.* Whizzer White was there, and I was happy to see him because he was an alumnus from my alma mater.

    You have just reminded me that Ginsburg was not even there yet.

    Years go by quickly.

    *It was so much easier then, before security theater and terror. I walked around inside the Capitol too. Nothing more than metal detectors in any of these buildings. That was the way flying and everything else was then too, my whole damned country!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    the Surpreme Court

    SCOTUS has been arrogant enough. We don’t need a Sur-preme Court above them!

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar

    http://lovelace-media.imgix.net/uploads/638/4a8cac50-5b20-0133-9e70-0af7184f89fb.gif?w=320

  98. @MEH 0910
    @Jack D

    https://twitter.com/DonTillmanPhD/status/1308173361575534592

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Redman

    RBG is a cult figure, so none of the answers to “Why Ruth Bader Ginsburg Refused to Step Down” are going to include an insatiable lust for power, selfishness, inflated ego, etc.

    I really think that lefties – particularly the feminist left which made her this cult figure – shot themselves in the collective foot by inflating Ginsburg’s own sense of indispensability with the cultish nonsense. They made someone who should be a rather obscure public figure on the very margins of fame into a bizarre icon and gave her unexpected but addictive feels in her old age.

    So, having had bouts with cancer and in obvious deteriorating health Ginsburg gambled in 2014 that she’d live into another period of a unified Democratic Presidency and Democratic Senate. Her wish could have been a living one, rather than a possibly apocryphal deathbed rattle at the very end. She lost her bet.

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    I doubt she cared much about her replacement. Her legacy will be a lengthy stay on the Supreme Court.

    BTW, apropos of Whizzer White, how apropos he wrote the majority in Bowers v Hardwick. Heh heh, Hardwick.

  99. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    Imagine being on your deathbed, knowing that the hour is near - and instead of reflecting upon your life and times or spending your last breaths telling your family and friends how much you love them . . . you leave a verbal memo about unfinished business at the office.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @kaganovitch, @Bleuteaux, @Dan Hayes, @ChrisZ, @John Cunningham

    Shakespeare gave us the epitaph for a treacherous enemy who still showed a vestige of nobility in death: “Nothing in his life became him like the leaving of it.”

    I’ve never considered what its opposite would be: how you would describe a person whose life appeared admirable, but whose manner of death degraded the qualities you formerly admired. But the developments attending the death of Justice Ginsburg have me thinking about it.

    As you say, Alec, her ‘deathbed work memo’ is vulgar enough. But the fact that these were (supposedly) the last words she imparted to her granddaughter is a terrible way to treat her own flesh and blood.

    As the Last Calvinist noted, the phrasing of the wish is imprecise and (what’s worse) inelegant for a person of reputed literary ability.

    As a jurist who dealt in the concreteness of the written word, her final testament is a hearsay statement conveyed to the world through a clearly interested intermediary.

    That Ginsburg was more avid of mere power than meaningful influence is clear from her decision to hang tenaciously onto her position despite physical incapacity, and her refusal to resign during a sympathetic presidential administration.

    Indeed, this greed for power, and her personal bitterness over President Trump, have now endangered the entire country, with her death coming weeks before a contentious election, at a time of peak disorder and discord in the society.

    This is a ruinous legacy–even if the inauthenticity of her last wish is eventually exposed. Those humane qualities that I found sympathetic in the living Justice Ginsburg, despite her ideology–that she was an educated and refined woman; a scrappy underdog who came up the hard way; a friend to Justice Scalia (and one or two black guys, evidently)–now seem a pathetically small counterweight to the final consquence of her life. The effect of her ill-timed–but hardly unforseen–demise has contributed to the unravelling of America. Nothing exposed her venality like her death.

    • Agree: gent, J.Ross, sayless
    • Thanks: bomag
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @ChrisZ


    As the Last Calvinist noted, the phrasing of the wish is imprecise and (what’s worse) inelegant for a person of reputed literary ability.
     
    First of all, Ginsburg's literary abilities were questionable. She was a plodding, if technically correct, writer. She was not a novelist -she wrote legal briefs and later opinions. Her most famous analogy about throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet doesn't even quite make sense. Are you not getting wet because the umbrella is keeping you dry? Why doesn't she say this?

    2nd, we don't know if these were really her exact words or if somewhere along the line the phrasing was "improved" by the granddaughter or by Nina Totenberg or even (as Trump says) by Chuckie Schumer. I don't doubt that she expressed this sentiment in some form but I am less certain that these were her exact words. As someone who was hours away from passing away from pancreatic cancer, she was hardly in top form when she uttered her supposed wish.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Johann Ricke, @danand, @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

  100. …when, exactly, did the United States of America adopt the Dying Wish form of government…

    I don’t get it. Who is saying that we’re obligated to respect her dying wish? Who? Is it possible to simply acknowledge that she had a dying wish and move on from there, or is this the only possible interpretation? Sorry, but you guys seem to be going off the rhetorical deep end here…

  101. @anon
    @gent

    I am of the opinion that Caligula was actually completely (or at least mostly) sane.

    Well, ok, maybe so. But what about his horse? Was his horse mostly sane, too?

    Replies: @gent

    Actually that dovetails right in with what I was saying. Was the appointing of Incitatus an act of madness or was it an act of willful spite, mockery? Seems like he was personifying (“equisonifying?”) the Senate in the act. They are nothing but the beast, the steed of the Emperor. Remember, the Senate is made up of the patricians and EQUESTRIAN orders/classes.

  102. anon[791] • Disclaimer says:

    Say, when did these traveling road show funerals become a thing? I looked up Frank Roosevelt and he died on April 12, 1945 down south & was in the ground in New York by the 15th. So it had to have started sometime after 1950.

    Here’s my guess: given that the traveling road show funeral is garish, inappropriate, tawdry, cheap, vulgar and just down right trashy…there has to have been a Kennedy involved, somehow. Obviously not Mary Jo’s funeral, though. Nope.

    Anyone know for sure?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Abraham Lincoln's funeral train back to Illinois was a very big deal.

    Replies: @syonredux, @Wilma C., @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @anon

    Churchill's funeral in 1965 was pretty big, but state funerals usually are - Nelson's after Trafalgar was huge.

    Lincoln's body went on display/tour from April 18 to May 4, travelling 1500 miles by train through seven states. The poor man's not exactly rested in peace since.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funeral_and_burial_of_Abraham_Lincoln#Other_movements

    "Lincoln's coffin has been moved 17 times and the coffin opened 5 times."

    President (and General) Zachary Taylor didn't get a state funeral, presumably at his family's request, but he did get a sea shanty sung about his funeral.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVtPD0U_gMM

    Is it just me, or has one of the singers got the Innsmouth look?

  103. Well, Donald’s wish came true on Friday but that wasn’t anything the Democrats did for him. Anyway, the Dems have wrecked our economy and set our cities on fire in 2020, was their other wish for more wishes?

    • LOL: bomag
  104. @Max Powers
    You are an absolute legend, Steve.
    How do you come up with this material?!
    Just keep it coming.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Kronos

    How do you come up with this material?!

    He’s a batter with a trained eye, who keeps being served fat pitches. And this year, the home team has pulled in the fences. His slugging percentage is through the dome roof.

  105. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    Imagine being on your deathbed, knowing that the hour is near - and instead of reflecting upon your life and times or spending your last breaths telling your family and friends how much you love them . . . you leave a verbal memo about unfinished business at the office.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt, @kaganovitch, @Bleuteaux, @Dan Hayes, @ChrisZ, @John Cunningham

    Everyone carries an audio recorder and a video recorder with them, so it seems ODD that her granddaughter did not make a final recording

    • Agree: Coemgen
  106. @mmack
    Steve,

    Realizing Notorious RBG will be replaced by a judge chosen by ORANGE MAN BAD, the Left has decided a new strategy:

    https://twitter.com/willwilkinson/status/1308226304509083648?s=20

    That's right, if you don't like the Supreme Court's rulings, you can just ignore them.

    https://theweek.com/articles/938865/democrats-have-better-option-than-court-packing

    Awesome 👏🏻 . That means we can ignore:

    Roe v. Wade
    Obergefell v. Hodges
    Miranda v. Arizona
    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka
    Griggs v. Duke Power Co
    Shelley v. Kraemer

    Etc.

    Belatedly the left realizes that Judicial Review thing is a social construct:

    "The weird thing about judicial "originalism" is that the explicit principle of judicial review is nowhere to be found in the Constitution. All of that document's stipulations on how the courts are to be constructed are contained in one single sentence in Article III: "The judicial Power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish." Actual judicial review was a product of a cynical power grab from Chief Justice John Marshall, who simply asserted out of nothing in Marbury vs. Madison that the court could overturn legislation — but did it in a way to benefit incoming president Thomas Jefferson politically, so as to neutralize his objection to the principle."

    Replies: @ben tillman

    The weird thing about judicial “originalism” is that the explicit principle of judicial review is nowhere to be found in the Constitution.

    Sure it is. The Supremacy Clause covers it. Moreover, in practice a judge has no choice but to adjudge the constitutionality of statutes in a constitutional government.

    Actual judicial review was a product of a cynical power grab from Chief Justice John Marshall, who simply asserted out of nothing in Marbury vs. Madison that the court could overturn legislation — but did it in a way to benefit incoming president Thomas Jefferson politically, so as to neutralize his objection to the principle.”

    Marshall said nothing of the sort, and it was not a power grab. Judicial review is necessary to the decision of some cases and controversies..

    • Disagree: Abolish_public_education
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    The Supremacy Clause covers it how and where?


    This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every state shall be bound thereby, anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding.
     
    Doesn't say anything about judges declaring laws unconstitutional.

    Now you are right that logically it is necessary in order for the Constitutional system to work that someone has have to have the power to review laws enacted by the Congress and the President and declare that they do or do not comply with the Constitution, but it didn't really say (or even imply) that in the Constitution, not in the Supremacy Clause and not anywhere else. To use a computer analogy, the Constitution is the operating system and the laws are programs that run under it and unless you have an error checking mechanism that tests for illegal operations in the programs the OS is going to crash sooner or later. Although the judiciary is the logical one to assume this role, it is not expressly assigned to it in the Constitution.

    Now maybe if Marshall hadn't plugged this logical hole someone else would have had to do so, but as it was, he was the one and he basically invented the doctrine out of whole cloth. I'm not saying it was wrong of him to do so, but he basically took it upon himself and it stuck.
  107. @Ragno
    The only remaining inevitability of American politics:

    https://i.postimg.cc/662vcmvQ/IMG-20200919-WA0000.jpg

    Replies: @El Dato

    The new nomination will be LITERALLY GHISLAINE!

  108. @MEH 0910
    @Jack D

    https://twitter.com/DonTillmanPhD/status/1308173361575534592

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Redman

    She writes:

    “To play it out: If Ginsburg and Breyer aren’t replaced by fellow liberal-moderates, Roe v. Wade could fall or wither away. Civil rights generally would surely shrink and corporate rights would grow. We would have more capital punishment and less campaign finance regulation, more government invasion of privacy and less gay marriage.”

    She doesn’t mention anything about immigration. And on the last three issues, I think her concern is misplaced. Didn’t Gorsuch just extend Title VII to transgenders?

  109. @Jonathan Silber
    Dying wish of Justice Scalia discovered: "Disregard dying wish of Justice Ginsburg."

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Reg Cæsar, @anon

    LOL — good one!

  110. @Abolish_public_education
    “It’s her dying wish!” Once again, the DEMs sound totally desperate.

    I doubt that it was her wish — dying or otherwise — for her demise to be used as a political statement.

    Remember that story about how Jacko’s body wasn’t even in the casket his brothers had carried into that ghastly memorial service? I wonder whether RBG is still above-ground.

    I believe that she died on Friday, after sundown. According to Jewish law, she should have been buried yesterday (immediately following RH).

    Replies: @El Dato

    Scattered at the Neverland Ranch, you mean?

    According to Jewish law, she should have been buried yesterday (immediately following RH).

    Burial at Sea from a Special Forces helicopter according to ancient Jewish Traditions would be appropriate!

  111. anonymous[326] • Disclaimer says:

    O/T

    90% of Indians in tech are upper caste.

    The article focuses on how unfairly low caste Indians immigrants are treated in tech.

    The article makes no mention of older, native whites being bullied by Indian managers then predictably replaced with Indian workers.

    Never forget, once Indians are in this country, the US is responsible for Indian cultural dysfunction.

    https://www.zdnet.com/article/commentary-how-indias-ancient-caste-system-is-ruining-lives-in-silicon-valley/

  112. Does anyone here know the name of the one black person who clerked for Justice Ginsburg?

    I searched online and found nothing.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Jonathan Silber

    Paul Watford. He was one of the 3 finalists along with Merrick Garland and somebody else for Obama's ill-fated 2016 nomination to replace Scalia.

  113. @Jonathan Silber
    Dying wish of Justice Scalia discovered: "Disregard dying wish of Justice Ginsburg."

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Reg Cæsar, @anon

    Dying wish of Justice Scalia discovered: “Disregard dying wish of Justice Ginsburg.”

    Unless it’s connected to opera.


    Or elephants.


    Or elephants in opera:

  114. @ben tillman
    @mmack


    The weird thing about judicial “originalism” is that the explicit principle of judicial review is nowhere to be found in the Constitution.
     
    Sure it is. The Supremacy Clause covers it. Moreover, in practice a judge has no choice but to adjudge the constitutionality of statutes in a constitutional government.

    Actual judicial review was a product of a cynical power grab from Chief Justice John Marshall, who simply asserted out of nothing in Marbury vs. Madison that the court could overturn legislation — but did it in a way to benefit incoming president Thomas Jefferson politically, so as to neutralize his objection to the principle.”
     
    Marshall said nothing of the sort, and it was not a power grab. Judicial review is necessary to the decision of some cases and controversies..

    Replies: @Jack D

    The Supremacy Clause covers it how and where?

    This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every state shall be bound thereby, anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding.

    Doesn’t say anything about judges declaring laws unconstitutional.

    Now you are right that logically it is necessary in order for the Constitutional system to work that someone has have to have the power to review laws enacted by the Congress and the President and declare that they do or do not comply with the Constitution, but it didn’t really say (or even imply) that in the Constitution, not in the Supremacy Clause and not anywhere else. To use a computer analogy, the Constitution is the operating system and the laws are programs that run under it and unless you have an error checking mechanism that tests for illegal operations in the programs the OS is going to crash sooner or later. Although the judiciary is the logical one to assume this role, it is not expressly assigned to it in the Constitution.

    Now maybe if Marshall hadn’t plugged this logical hole someone else would have had to do so, but as it was, he was the one and he basically invented the doctrine out of whole cloth. I’m not saying it was wrong of him to do so, but he basically took it upon himself and it stuck.

    • Thanks: bomag
  115. Disobeying a dying Israeli’s desire on Rush Hosanah is Worse Than Shoah!

  116. It’s time to get out the Cocaine Mitch shirts, guys:

  117. @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk


    the Surpreme Court
     
    SCOTUS has been arrogant enough. We don't need a Sur-preme Court above them!

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    • LOL: Jim Christian
  118. @Jonathan Silber
    Dying wish of Justice Scalia discovered: "Disregard dying wish of Justice Ginsburg."

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Reg Cæsar, @anon

    Pretty sure Justice Scalia’s dying wish was something like “I wish I could breathe! I wish this pillow wasn’t be held on my face so hard!”

  119. Since the Romans have come up on this commenting thread, I give you this as a helpful reminder

    (w/ apologies to Cato the Elder) :

    DELENDA EST WOKETOPIA

  120. What if Justice Ginsburg had her fingers crossed while making her Dying Wish? Does it still count, legally speaking?

    If she’d seen a falling star while making it, yes…but that’s unlikely. Too bad she didn’t die on her birthday so she could make the wish while blowing out her candles. That would’ve worked even better, crossed fingers or not.

  121. @Massimo Heitor
    The current version of the Republican party is particularly good at choosing judges. Judges was the Republican's signature issue in 2018 and why they held the Senate. Trump will make his nomination this week, the Senate will probably confirm, and the rest is noise. This nonsense about last wishes is just desperate theatrics that ultimately doesn't matter.

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    “Trump will make his nomination this week, the Senate will probably confirm, and the rest is noise. This nonsense about last wishes is just desperate theatrics that ultimately doesn’t matter.”

    Absolutely. Someone showed Mitt “Butthurt” McRomney his control file over the weekend, so he’s fully onboard the Trump Train, meaning the Repubs have 51 senators voting yea. It’s a done deal.

  122. The War On Woke begins:

    Read the entire thread.

    • Thanks: J.Ross
  123. @res
    @J.Ross

    Thanks for the references.

    If this is the Federalist article you meant I found it useful, but less convincing, than the article I linked (which specifically addressed the election year point).
    https://thefederalist.com/2020/09/18/three-supreme-court-justices-were-confirmed-in-less-than-45-days-including-ginsburg/

    Their full coverage can be seen at
    https://thefederalist.com/tag/supreme-court/

    Could you link the Revolver article you had in mind? I am not seeing a good match at
    https://www.revolver.news/

    I see this interesting article at Revolver, but it is about a specific pick, not the process.
    https://www.revolver.news/2020/09/the-case-for-judge-bridget-bade-supreme-court/

    About the misleading headline, I have mixed feelings. I don't like the misdirection, but I do think it substantially increases the chances someone who is anti-Trump might read it and find the argument persuasive.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    I was thinking of this Townhall one which is very clearly argued.
    https://townhall.com/tipsheet/guybenson/2020/09/21/analysis-the-supreme-court-vacancy-n2576511

    • Replies: @res
    @J.Ross

    Thanks. That is a good article. It started off basing the reasoning on the National Review article I linked, but then went well beyond that.

  124. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @MEH 0910

    RBG is a cult figure, so none of the answers to "Why Ruth Bader Ginsburg Refused to Step Down" are going to include an insatiable lust for power, selfishness, inflated ego, etc.

    I really think that lefties - particularly the feminist left which made her this cult figure - shot themselves in the collective foot by inflating Ginsburg's own sense of indispensability with the cultish nonsense. They made someone who should be a rather obscure public figure on the very margins of fame into a bizarre icon and gave her unexpected but addictive feels in her old age.

    So, having had bouts with cancer and in obvious deteriorating health Ginsburg gambled in 2014 that she'd live into another period of a unified Democratic Presidency and Democratic Senate. Her wish could have been a living one, rather than a possibly apocryphal deathbed rattle at the very end. She lost her bet.

    Replies: @hhsiii

    I doubt she cared much about her replacement. Her legacy will be a lengthy stay on the Supreme Court.

    BTW, apropos of Whizzer White, how apropos he wrote the majority in Bowers v Hardwick. Heh heh, Hardwick.

  125. @Max Powers
    You are an absolute legend, Steve.
    How do you come up with this material?!
    Just keep it coming.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Kronos

    What’s the legality of the pinkie-swear?

  126. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Father O'Hara


    Shouldn’t RBG have been allowed to pick her successor?
     
    Mephistopheles, one week before RBG’s death, to Ginsburg:

    “One last wish: You may choose any successor you like …”

    “Good. Goooooooood.”

    “So long as that person is Black.”

    “NoooOOoooOooOOOoo!”
     

    And that’s why RBG never named a successor.

    Replies: @donut, @guest

    I wonder if the real reason she didn’t retire during Obama’s time was that she didn’t trust a Negro to pick someone worthy to take her place .

  127. @Jack D
    @George

    Even before this came up (I never heard of this tradition) I thought of her dying on the eve of Rosh Hashana and to me it signified her having been outwitted in argument by the Uppermost One.

    According to Jewish tradition, each year on the previous Rosh Hashana, the Almighty pencils everyone into the Book of Life. Joe Blow is having a coronary on July 7. Jane Doe is getting eaten by a shark on Sep. 12. Etc. The ten days between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur are an appeal period - thru prayer and repentance you can get Him to move your expiration date but otherwise He inks you in.

    But the Book of Life is an annual calendar. You can't ask God to put you down for 2048 - it doesn't work that way. So Ruthie makes her appeal to the Highest Court. She stays up late and does the research and marshals the precedents and makes a persuasive argument before the Great Judge - it's unfair for me to die unless you take one of the male Justices too, preferably a Republican. And He says to her, OK Ruthie, you win. I'm taking your name out of the Book for THIS YEAR....

    As I mention in my other comment, the talk about Jewish tradition is just nonsense. If her family had any respect for Jewish tradition she would be in her place of eternal rest next to Marty right now instead of being put on display like some carnival attraction.

    Replies: @George, @Neil Templeton

    I didn’t realize her corpse was on display in the supreme court building.

    Burial is intended to take place in as short an interval of time after death as possible.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bereavement_in_Judaism#Funeral_service

  128. @ChrisZ
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Shakespeare gave us the epitaph for a treacherous enemy who still showed a vestige of nobility in death: "Nothing in his life became him like the leaving of it."

    I've never considered what its opposite would be: how you would describe a person whose life appeared admirable, but whose manner of death degraded the qualities you formerly admired. But the developments attending the death of Justice Ginsburg have me thinking about it.

    As you say, Alec, her 'deathbed work memo' is vulgar enough. But the fact that these were (supposedly) the last words she imparted to her granddaughter is a terrible way to treat her own flesh and blood.

    As the Last Calvinist noted, the phrasing of the wish is imprecise and (what's worse) inelegant for a person of reputed literary ability.

    As a jurist who dealt in the concreteness of the written word, her final testament is a hearsay statement conveyed to the world through a clearly interested intermediary.

    That Ginsburg was more avid of mere power than meaningful influence is clear from her decision to hang tenaciously onto her position despite physical incapacity, and her refusal to resign during a sympathetic presidential administration.

    Indeed, this greed for power, and her personal bitterness over President Trump, have now endangered the entire country, with her death coming weeks before a contentious election, at a time of peak disorder and discord in the society.

    This is a ruinous legacy--even if the inauthenticity of her last wish is eventually exposed. Those humane qualities that I found sympathetic in the living Justice Ginsburg, despite her ideology--that she was an educated and refined woman; a scrappy underdog who came up the hard way; a friend to Justice Scalia (and one or two black guys, evidently)--now seem a pathetically small counterweight to the final consquence of her life. The effect of her ill-timed--but hardly unforseen--demise has contributed to the unravelling of America. Nothing exposed her venality like her death.

    Replies: @Jack D

    As the Last Calvinist noted, the phrasing of the wish is imprecise and (what’s worse) inelegant for a person of reputed literary ability.

    First of all, Ginsburg’s literary abilities were questionable. She was a plodding, if technically correct, writer. She was not a novelist -she wrote legal briefs and later opinions. Her most famous analogy about throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet doesn’t even quite make sense. Are you not getting wet because the umbrella is keeping you dry? Why doesn’t she say this?

    2nd, we don’t know if these were really her exact words or if somewhere along the line the phrasing was “improved” by the granddaughter or by Nina Totenberg or even (as Trump says) by Chuckie Schumer. I don’t doubt that she expressed this sentiment in some form but I am less certain that these were her exact words. As someone who was hours away from passing away from pancreatic cancer, she was hardly in top form when she uttered her supposed wish.

    • Replies: @newrouter
    @Jack D

    >2nd, we don’t know if these were really her exact words or if somewhere along the line the phrasing was “improved”<

    I don't care. RBG is dead. She should have been buried yesterday. Her successor will be named Saturday. All the rest of this is stupid bs.

    , @Johann Ricke
    @Jack D


    As someone who was hours away from passing away from pancreatic cancer, she was hardly in top form when she uttered her supposed wish.
     
    At 87, she was also presumably not at the peak of her powers.
    , @danand
    @Jack D


    “Her most famous analogy about throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet doesn’t even quite make sense.”
     
    Jack, perhaps it does:

    https://flic.kr/p/2jKjbhK


    Then there are those times when you just have to face the umbrella:

    https://flic.kr/p/2jKnRis


    On second thought, you’re right Jack, Ginsburg makes no sense:

    https://flic.kr/p/2jKnLup


    Especially for a Judge:

    https://flic.kr/p/2jKoARL
    , @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Jack D


    Her most famous analogy about throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet doesn’t even quite make sense. Are you not getting wet because the umbrella is keeping you dry? Why doesn’t she say this?
     
    I suppose in person she would quip "you're not getting wet because you have the umbrella over your goyishe kopf! Oy vey!"

    It's hard to imagine her thinking this, though, since we all know she's not throwing away a perfectly good umbrella in any weather without getting a good price.

    Perhaps she means that the fact that the prophylactic is working as intended is not evidence that the prophylactic is not necessary, delivered in her (curiously) famous dissent in Shelby County v. Holder.

    Of course, I could go about on the streets of Omaha selling ten thousand dollar amulets guaranteed to repel tigers and we could have the same discussion. "No one who has bought one of my anti-tiger amulets has been attacked or harmed in any way by a tiger while wearing it!" The question is not always a black-and-white "are you getting wet," but rather "what is the cost of the thing keeping you dry, is it working as intended, and are there more efficient means to do so?" In her analogy, State Sovereignty is a minor factor that would always get outweighed by whatever were the ends of her current political desires. You don't need evidence of rain to keep an umbrella at all times, I suppose.

    Perhaps a more apt analogy is "why stop radiation therapy when you no longer have cancer?"
  129. @Jack D
    @ChrisZ


    As the Last Calvinist noted, the phrasing of the wish is imprecise and (what’s worse) inelegant for a person of reputed literary ability.
     
    First of all, Ginsburg's literary abilities were questionable. She was a plodding, if technically correct, writer. She was not a novelist -she wrote legal briefs and later opinions. Her most famous analogy about throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet doesn't even quite make sense. Are you not getting wet because the umbrella is keeping you dry? Why doesn't she say this?

    2nd, we don't know if these were really her exact words or if somewhere along the line the phrasing was "improved" by the granddaughter or by Nina Totenberg or even (as Trump says) by Chuckie Schumer. I don't doubt that she expressed this sentiment in some form but I am less certain that these were her exact words. As someone who was hours away from passing away from pancreatic cancer, she was hardly in top form when she uttered her supposed wish.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Johann Ricke, @danand, @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    >2nd, we don’t know if these were really her exact words or if somewhere along the line the phrasing was “improved”<

    I don't care. RBG is dead. She should have been buried yesterday. Her successor will be named Saturday. All the rest of this is stupid bs.

  130. @Jack D
    @ChrisZ


    As the Last Calvinist noted, the phrasing of the wish is imprecise and (what’s worse) inelegant for a person of reputed literary ability.
     
    First of all, Ginsburg's literary abilities were questionable. She was a plodding, if technically correct, writer. She was not a novelist -she wrote legal briefs and later opinions. Her most famous analogy about throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet doesn't even quite make sense. Are you not getting wet because the umbrella is keeping you dry? Why doesn't she say this?

    2nd, we don't know if these were really her exact words or if somewhere along the line the phrasing was "improved" by the granddaughter or by Nina Totenberg or even (as Trump says) by Chuckie Schumer. I don't doubt that she expressed this sentiment in some form but I am less certain that these were her exact words. As someone who was hours away from passing away from pancreatic cancer, she was hardly in top form when she uttered her supposed wish.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Johann Ricke, @danand, @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    As someone who was hours away from passing away from pancreatic cancer, she was hardly in top form when she uttered her supposed wish.

    At 87, she was also presumably not at the peak of her powers.

  131. @syonredux
    Funny how Matty has been going on and on about how the Republicans can be competitive in Puerto Rico, but then the "please don't throw me in the briar patch" mask drops and he says what he really thinks:


    Matty Yglesias:

    Republicans are 100% right: Winning the presidency and a senate majority with a minority of the votes and using that power to fill court vacancies is unquestionably within the rules of the game.

    So is statehood for USVI, Guam, DC, and Puerto Rico and court expansion.
     
    https://twitter.com/mattyglesias/status/1308413194285854721

    Replies: @Mr McKenna

    Thanks. But how could he forget teh filibusterz, abolishing teh electoral collegez, and reparationz??

    And why isn’t he paying his share of reperationz now? What’s stopping him?

    Why aren’t they all? What’s stopping them?

  132. Hmm, maybe she crossed her heart (and hoped to die) instead ?

  133. I’ve been saying for a very long time now that the only women who should be allowed to vote are the ones who are married and have given birth (Divorce and giving birth out of wedlock should mean loss of voting rights, natch).

    Matty Yglesias:

    I mean it is factually true that if all you know about a person is she has a very large family, you can make a fairly reliable inference about her political views — my wife’s quiverfull cousin is a wonderful person but I have very serious political disagreements with her.

    https://twitter.com/mattyglesias/status/1308560656623218688

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @syonredux

    my wife’s quiverfull cousin is a wonderful person but I have very serious political disagreements with her.

    I like her already.

    , @Jack D
    @syonredux

    Wow, I learned a new word. I had never heard of quiverfulls before, but then again I don't travel in those circles. (Nowadays I don't travel at all, but that's another issue.) I know Catholic and Orthodox Jewish families with large #'s of kids but I don't think I have ever met a quiverfull Protestant family with a large brood. Seeing them on TV doesn't count.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

  134. @Jonathan Silber
    Does anyone here know the name of the one black person who clerked for Justice Ginsburg?

    I searched online and found nothing.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Paul Watford. He was one of the 3 finalists along with Merrick Garland and somebody else for Obama’s ill-fated 2016 nomination to replace Scalia.

  135. Nothing has been added to Steve’s blog lately, anyone know if he’s OK?

    • Replies: @bruce county
    @Jim Christian

    Mu guess he's golfing or having a taco with his neighbors. LOL

  136. @anon
    Say, when did these traveling road show funerals become a thing? I looked up Frank Roosevelt and he died on April 12, 1945 down south & was in the ground in New York by the 15th. So it had to have started sometime after 1950.

    Here's my guess: given that the traveling road show funeral is garish, inappropriate, tawdry, cheap, vulgar and just down right trashy...there has to have been a Kennedy involved, somehow. Obviously not Mary Jo's funeral, though. Nope.

    Anyone know for sure?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon

    Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train back to Illinois was a very big deal.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Steve Sailer


    After the April 14, 1865 assassination of Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States, a three-week series of events mourned his death and memorialized his life. Funeral services and lyings in state were held in Washington, D.C., and then in additional cities as a funeral train transported his remains for burial in his hometown of Springfield, Illinois. Lincoln's eldest son Robert Todd rode the train to Baltimore and then disembarked and returned to the White House. Lincoln's wife Mary Todd Lincoln remained at the White House because she was too distraught to make the trip.[1] Robert took a later train to Springfield for his father's final funeral and burial.
     

    The remains of Lincoln's younger son, William Wallace Lincoln (1850–1862)[a] were also placed on the train, which left Washington, D.C., on April 21 at 12:30 pm and traveled 1,654 miles (2,662 km) never exceeding 20 mph to the final stop at Springfield, arriving on May 3. Several stops, in principal cities and state capitals, were made along the way in which ceremonies and processions were held. The train largely retraced the route Lincoln had traveled to Washington as the president-elect on his way to his first inauguration, more than four years earlier. Millions of Americans viewed the train along the route, and participated in the ceremonies and processions.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funeral_and_burial_of_Abraham_Lincoln

    Jacqueline Kennedy explicitly modeled JFK's state funeral after Lincoln's:

    Mrs. Kennedy instructed chief usher J.B. West to follow the protocol and details of Lincoln's 1865 state funeral for her husband. Kennedy's remains were taken to the center of the East Room and set upon the same catafalque used at Lincoln's funeral.
     
    https://www.whitehousehistory.org/john-f-kennedy-funeral

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @Wilma C.
    @Steve Sailer


    Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train back to Illinois was a very big deal.
     
    So was George Floyd’s back to Texas.

    https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/06/10/00/29426510-0-image-a-44_1591744178120.jpg
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train back to Illinois was a very big deal.
     
    As was Horace Greeley's, in complete disregard of his stated wishes. It's almost like his daughters were getting back at him for something.


    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A%2F%2Foldpoliticals.com%2FItemImages%2F000032%2F32_44430_lg.jpeg&imgrefurl=http%3A%2F%2Foldpoliticals.com%2Fhorace_greeley_funeral_exercises_december_4__1872_-lot32019.aspx&tbnid=1MA6V3gkpYsyOM&vet=12ahUKEwiP9bG9tf7rAhUULq0KHfefCw8QMygAegUIARCXAQ..i&docid=ERXrEHt39bd1xM&w=2860&h=1912&itg=1&q=horace%20greeley's%20funeral%20program&ved=2ahUKEwiP9bG9tf7rAhUULq0KHfefCw8QMygAegUIARCXAQ

    He died right after losing one of the nastiest elections in our history-- and his wife-- before his electors had even met. “I have been assailed so bitterly, that I hardly knew whether I was running for the presidency or the penitentiary." However, all was forgiven, and he received apparently sincere plaudits from his enemies.

    You could almost see it happening again this year. Hillary seemed to be asking for it last time, having moved within a mile of Greeley's house.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train back to Illinois was a very big deal.
     
    As were Horace Greeley's services, in complete disregard of his stated wishes. It's almost like his daughters were getting back at him for something.


    https://c8.alamy.com/comp/HJWTN3/sheet-music-cover-image-of-the-song-greeleys-funeral-march-with-original-HJWTN3.jpg

    He died right after losing one of the nastiest elections in our history-- and his wife-- before his electors had even met. “I have been assailed so bitterly, that I hardly knew whether I was running for the presidency or the penitentiary." However, all was forgiven, and he received apparently sincere plaudits from his enemies.

    You could almost see it happening again this year. Hillary seemed to be asking for it last time, having moved within a mile of Greeley's house.

  137. @gent
    @I, Libertine

    She can’t bequeath it. The seat did not belong to her, she was merely the most recent person occupying it.

    Replies: @I, Libertine

    Ya think?

  138. @J.Ross
    @res

    I was thinking of this Townhall one which is very clearly argued.
    https://townhall.com/tipsheet/guybenson/2020/09/21/analysis-the-supreme-court-vacancy-n2576511

    Replies: @res

    Thanks. That is a good article. It started off basing the reasoning on the National Review article I linked, but then went well beyond that.

  139. @syonredux
    I've been saying for a very long time now that the only women who should be allowed to vote are the ones who are married and have given birth (Divorce and giving birth out of wedlock should mean loss of voting rights, natch).


    Matty Yglesias:

    I mean it is factually true that if all you know about a person is she has a very large family, you can make a fairly reliable inference about her political views — my wife’s quiverfull cousin is a wonderful person but I have very serious political disagreements with her.
     
    https://twitter.com/mattyglesias/status/1308560656623218688

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Jack D

    my wife’s quiverfull cousin is a wonderful person but I have very serious political disagreements with her.

    I like her already.

  140. @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Abraham Lincoln's funeral train back to Illinois was a very big deal.

    Replies: @syonredux, @Wilma C., @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    After the April 14, 1865 assassination of Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States, a three-week series of events mourned his death and memorialized his life. Funeral services and lyings in state were held in Washington, D.C., and then in additional cities as a funeral train transported his remains for burial in his hometown of Springfield, Illinois. Lincoln’s eldest son Robert Todd rode the train to Baltimore and then disembarked and returned to the White House. Lincoln’s wife Mary Todd Lincoln remained at the White House because she was too distraught to make the trip.[1] Robert took a later train to Springfield for his father’s final funeral and burial.

    The remains of Lincoln’s younger son, William Wallace Lincoln (1850–1862)[a] were also placed on the train, which left Washington, D.C., on April 21 at 12:30 pm and traveled 1,654 miles (2,662 km) never exceeding 20 mph to the final stop at Springfield, arriving on May 3. Several stops, in principal cities and state capitals, were made along the way in which ceremonies and processions were held. The train largely retraced the route Lincoln had traveled to Washington as the president-elect on his way to his first inauguration, more than four years earlier. Millions of Americans viewed the train along the route, and participated in the ceremonies and processions.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funeral_and_burial_of_Abraham_Lincoln

    Jacqueline Kennedy explicitly modeled JFK’s state funeral after Lincoln’s:

    Mrs. Kennedy instructed chief usher J.B. West to follow the protocol and details of Lincoln’s 1865 state funeral for her husband. Kennedy’s remains were taken to the center of the East Room and set upon the same catafalque used at Lincoln’s funeral.

    https://www.whitehousehistory.org/john-f-kennedy-funeral

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @syonredux

    I have forgotten the name (let alone missed the chance to buy it), but I once saw an old amateur photography magazine. The cover story was about Swiss police, going about their efficient but neutral procedures in the early 60s, but the most striking feature was a series of portraits of ordinary Americans who had come out to the track to witness Kennedy's death train passing by. If this sounds familiar to anybody, they are very striking photographs.

  141. @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Abraham Lincoln's funeral train back to Illinois was a very big deal.

    Replies: @syonredux, @Wilma C., @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train back to Illinois was a very big deal.

    So was George Floyd’s back to Texas.

  142. @Jack D
    @ChrisZ


    As the Last Calvinist noted, the phrasing of the wish is imprecise and (what’s worse) inelegant for a person of reputed literary ability.
     
    First of all, Ginsburg's literary abilities were questionable. She was a plodding, if technically correct, writer. She was not a novelist -she wrote legal briefs and later opinions. Her most famous analogy about throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet doesn't even quite make sense. Are you not getting wet because the umbrella is keeping you dry? Why doesn't she say this?

    2nd, we don't know if these were really her exact words or if somewhere along the line the phrasing was "improved" by the granddaughter or by Nina Totenberg or even (as Trump says) by Chuckie Schumer. I don't doubt that she expressed this sentiment in some form but I am less certain that these were her exact words. As someone who was hours away from passing away from pancreatic cancer, she was hardly in top form when she uttered her supposed wish.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Johann Ricke, @danand, @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    “Her most famous analogy about throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet doesn’t even quite make sense.”

    Jack, perhaps it does:

    34F62AC1-7AAE-49AE-872D-21DF7ABAF03A

    Then there are those times when you just have to face the umbrella:

    9A3563BD-E91D-4BCA-B5F1-1D110CD3A4A1

    On second thought, you’re right Jack, Ginsburg makes no sense:

    4B32F4C9-5A5A-4411-A8D4-C1724DA7B3B0

    Especially for a Judge:

    772D75F9-45B5-44F4-A5F9-46E34412D36B

  143. @Altai
    https://twitter.com/acczibit/status/1308338446864461824

    Another commentator objected to my suggestion that she was America's equivalent to Queen Elizabeth II. But she did the same decorum uber alles trick in her later years. You can't ask somebody what she did or what she thought and get an answer because there won't be one.

    She just kind of existed like the Queen, apart and inhuman, a perfect subject for idolatry. She was a costume and indeed, many people did dress up as her for Halloween.

    She not only was but looked exceptionally Jewish too which certainly helped in making her a big deal back when she was more significant in making political opinions but in the latter years, the last 25 or so, she took on this Queen Elizabeth II posture.

    There are a lot of gentile white women who valorise her without knowing a single thing about her, (Other than they're supposed to valorise her) it's fascinating.

    In other news about people you're supposed to valorise, Zendeya, who pairs an even lighter skin than Beyonce with more Bantu facial features, won the Emmy for best actress against impressive opposition but because BLM she got it since the others were white. This was obviously an upset win and then Twitter had a passive aggressive meltdown as to why a 24 year old Disney actress winning the Emmy was an 'upset' victory because 'who is upset'? Of course she won, she's the queen!

    https://twitter.com/i/events/1308053324990525441

    Meanwhile at the Tour De France, a 22 year old delivered an upset win that was even more dramatic. Some whispers about doping but nobody has dared to question it being called an upset.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Maico450

    Meanwhile at the Tour De France, a 22 year old delivered an upset win that was even more dramatic. Some whispers about doping but nobody has dared to question it being called an upset.

    An upset in the last “real” stage, which was a time trial. His compatriot R. seemed more drugged out to me.

    Doping and cycling have been pals for over a hundred years. If P. was doping it will likely be revealed. It’s difficult to hide such tricks nowadays. I like to think that he just kicked ass 🙂

  144. @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Abraham Lincoln's funeral train back to Illinois was a very big deal.

    Replies: @syonredux, @Wilma C., @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train back to Illinois was a very big deal.

    As was Horace Greeley’s, in complete disregard of his stated wishes. It’s almost like his daughters were getting back at him for something.

    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A%2F%2Foldpoliticals.com%2FItemImages%2F000032%2F32_44430_lg.jpeg&imgrefurl=http%3A%2F%2Foldpoliticals.com%2Fhorace_greeley_funeral_exercises_december_4__1872_-lot32019.aspx&tbnid=1MA6V3gkpYsyOM&vet=12ahUKEwiP9bG9tf7rAhUULq0KHfefCw8QMygAegUIARCXAQ..i&docid=ERXrEHt39bd1xM&w=2860&h=1912&itg=1&q=horace%20greeley’s%20funeral%20program&ved=2ahUKEwiP9bG9tf7rAhUULq0KHfefCw8QMygAegUIARCXAQ

    He died right after losing one of the nastiest elections in our history– and his wife– before his electors had even met. “I have been assailed so bitterly, that I hardly knew whether I was running for the presidency or the penitentiary.” However, all was forgiven, and he received apparently sincere plaudits from his enemies.

    You could almost see it happening again this year. Hillary seemed to be asking for it last time, having moved within a mile of Greeley’s house.

  145. @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Abraham Lincoln's funeral train back to Illinois was a very big deal.

    Replies: @syonredux, @Wilma C., @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train back to Illinois was a very big deal.

    As were Horace Greeley’s services, in complete disregard of his stated wishes. It’s almost like his daughters were getting back at him for something.

    He died right after losing one of the nastiest elections in our history– and his wife– before his electors had even met. “I have been assailed so bitterly, that I hardly knew whether I was running for the presidency or the penitentiary.” However, all was forgiven, and he received apparently sincere plaudits from his enemies.

    You could almost see it happening again this year. Hillary seemed to be asking for it last time, having moved within a mile of Greeley’s house.

  146. @Jack D
    @George

    Even before this came up (I never heard of this tradition) I thought of her dying on the eve of Rosh Hashana and to me it signified her having been outwitted in argument by the Uppermost One.

    According to Jewish tradition, each year on the previous Rosh Hashana, the Almighty pencils everyone into the Book of Life. Joe Blow is having a coronary on July 7. Jane Doe is getting eaten by a shark on Sep. 12. Etc. The ten days between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur are an appeal period - thru prayer and repentance you can get Him to move your expiration date but otherwise He inks you in.

    But the Book of Life is an annual calendar. You can't ask God to put you down for 2048 - it doesn't work that way. So Ruthie makes her appeal to the Highest Court. She stays up late and does the research and marshals the precedents and makes a persuasive argument before the Great Judge - it's unfair for me to die unless you take one of the male Justices too, preferably a Republican. And He says to her, OK Ruthie, you win. I'm taking your name out of the Book for THIS YEAR....

    As I mention in my other comment, the talk about Jewish tradition is just nonsense. If her family had any respect for Jewish tradition she would be in her place of eternal rest next to Marty right now instead of being put on display like some carnival attraction.

    Replies: @George, @Neil Templeton

    Of course the current year is the end of time, so she made a pretty good first draft. Better than most of us will make.

  147. I wonder if Kamala has decided what Biden’s dying wish will be yet.

  148. @syonredux
    @Steve Sailer


    After the April 14, 1865 assassination of Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States, a three-week series of events mourned his death and memorialized his life. Funeral services and lyings in state were held in Washington, D.C., and then in additional cities as a funeral train transported his remains for burial in his hometown of Springfield, Illinois. Lincoln's eldest son Robert Todd rode the train to Baltimore and then disembarked and returned to the White House. Lincoln's wife Mary Todd Lincoln remained at the White House because she was too distraught to make the trip.[1] Robert took a later train to Springfield for his father's final funeral and burial.
     

    The remains of Lincoln's younger son, William Wallace Lincoln (1850–1862)[a] were also placed on the train, which left Washington, D.C., on April 21 at 12:30 pm and traveled 1,654 miles (2,662 km) never exceeding 20 mph to the final stop at Springfield, arriving on May 3. Several stops, in principal cities and state capitals, were made along the way in which ceremonies and processions were held. The train largely retraced the route Lincoln had traveled to Washington as the president-elect on his way to his first inauguration, more than four years earlier. Millions of Americans viewed the train along the route, and participated in the ceremonies and processions.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funeral_and_burial_of_Abraham_Lincoln

    Jacqueline Kennedy explicitly modeled JFK's state funeral after Lincoln's:

    Mrs. Kennedy instructed chief usher J.B. West to follow the protocol and details of Lincoln's 1865 state funeral for her husband. Kennedy's remains were taken to the center of the East Room and set upon the same catafalque used at Lincoln's funeral.
     
    https://www.whitehousehistory.org/john-f-kennedy-funeral

    Replies: @J.Ross

    I have forgotten the name (let alone missed the chance to buy it), but I once saw an old amateur photography magazine. The cover story was about Swiss police, going about their efficient but neutral procedures in the early 60s, but the most striking feature was a series of portraits of ordinary Americans who had come out to the track to witness Kennedy’s death train passing by. If this sounds familiar to anybody, they are very striking photographs.

  149. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Father O'Hara


    Shouldn’t RBG have been allowed to pick her successor?
     
    Mephistopheles, one week before RBG’s death, to Ginsburg:

    “One last wish: You may choose any successor you like …”

    “Good. Goooooooood.”

    “So long as that person is Black.”

    “NoooOOoooOooOOOoo!”
     

    And that’s why RBG never named a successor.

    Replies: @donut, @guest

    Wait, was the One-Drop Rule in effect? Because she should have been able to find some Jewess with a fraction of a percent of negro in her.

    • Replies: @Gianni in Guernsey
    @guest

    Althea Bernstein or journey smollet

  150. @James O'Meara
    @J.Ross

    Yes, RBG as Meyer Lansky. I can see her in her bathrobe and with that tube thing stuck in her nose. "I don't trust a doctor who doesn't speak English!"

    Replies: @guest

    Ginzo: “We’re bigger than U.S. Steel!”

    [Ginsberg’s handler]: “What’s that, Ruthie? You want to talk to Christopher Steele?”

  151. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer

    You have a great sense of humor, sir. Even when events are discouraging, you lift us up with it.

    There should be a monument to Justice Ginsburg on the National Mall. Since George Washington was a slave owner and a white man, his obelisk could easily just be renamed the Ginsburg Monument.

    That's the least we could do before they kill us all.

    Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost, @guest

    So you’re gonna give Ginsberg D.C.’s Giant Penis. Real sensitive.

    Unless she was really into that sort of thing.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @guest

    When it was completed in 1884, the Washington Monument, at 555 feet, was the tallest structure on Earth, which made it the biggest penis in the world. It was superseded in height by the Eiffel Tower in 1889. The wrought-iron lattice tower in Paris, however, is obviously not a penis.

    Giving a woman a very large penis is indeed honorific, and I think we should do it. We should give Ginsburg the shaft.

  152. Anonymous[461] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    @Verymuchalive

    Since you bring it up, you doubtless know that Robert Graves contended that Tiberius deliberately selected Little Boots because he knew that would make Tiberius look better to posterity, by comparison.

    Only trouble with the theory is that Caligula was sane, competent, and effective early on in his reign. Then he lost it in epic fashion and the rest, as they say, is history.

    Replies: @gent, @Anonymous

    Caligula’s problem was that he was young and inexperienced and so senators and generals didn’t take him seriously. Augustus and Tiberius had both been substantial political and military leaders before becoming emperors. Caligula had none of this, and so he just didn’t get any respect, especially from the senate, which felt it should be running the state, not this kid.

    You can imagine how this situation played itself out: the earnest young emperor, wanting to be a good ruler, but continually frustrated and disrespected by older men–his ostensible subordinates. He would soon have found that he could only get his way by intimidation (i.e. terrorizing everybody around him). And so, against his own inclination, the well meaning young man would have turned into a tyrant.

  153. @syonredux
    I've been saying for a very long time now that the only women who should be allowed to vote are the ones who are married and have given birth (Divorce and giving birth out of wedlock should mean loss of voting rights, natch).


    Matty Yglesias:

    I mean it is factually true that if all you know about a person is she has a very large family, you can make a fairly reliable inference about her political views — my wife’s quiverfull cousin is a wonderful person but I have very serious political disagreements with her.
     
    https://twitter.com/mattyglesias/status/1308560656623218688

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Jack D

    Wow, I learned a new word. I had never heard of quiverfulls before, but then again I don’t travel in those circles. (Nowadays I don’t travel at all, but that’s another issue.) I know Catholic and Orthodox Jewish families with large #’s of kids but I don’t think I have ever met a quiverfull Protestant family with a large brood. Seeing them on TV doesn’t count.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Jack D


    Wow, I learned a new word. I had never heard of quiverfulls before, but then again I don’t travel in those circles. (Nowadays I don’t travel at all, but that’s another issue.) I know Catholic and Orthodox Jewish families with large #’s of kids but I don’t think I have ever met a quiverfull Protestant family with a large brood. Seeing them on TV doesn’t count.
     
    Quiverfull was, IIRC, an evangelical Prot movement extolling the joys of large families over material comforts. The feminist cat lady class was especially derisive of it, because they feared it was an attempt to breed conservatives and Evangelicals faster and more frequently than they could corrupt them to take away their theoretical right to thirty lifetime abortions - the former's bareness being a subtext to the visceral reaction to large families.

    Catholics (white) with large families are most often either simply anachronistic ("I had three brothers and five sisters growing up, and it was fun!") or it is evidence of Catholics who take the injunctions of Humanae Vitae to heart and limit the size of their families only with natural methods dependent upon timed sexual continence.

    As a class matter, large families are now considered declasse. Multiple kids interfere with your ability for exotic travel, eat in trendy restaurants, and patronize the arts - while more than one or two means that you can't devote sufficient time and resources for your kids to be trophies in the never-ending American status competition.

    Replies: @Jack D

  154. @Jack D
    @ChrisZ


    As the Last Calvinist noted, the phrasing of the wish is imprecise and (what’s worse) inelegant for a person of reputed literary ability.
     
    First of all, Ginsburg's literary abilities were questionable. She was a plodding, if technically correct, writer. She was not a novelist -she wrote legal briefs and later opinions. Her most famous analogy about throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet doesn't even quite make sense. Are you not getting wet because the umbrella is keeping you dry? Why doesn't she say this?

    2nd, we don't know if these were really her exact words or if somewhere along the line the phrasing was "improved" by the granddaughter or by Nina Totenberg or even (as Trump says) by Chuckie Schumer. I don't doubt that she expressed this sentiment in some form but I am less certain that these were her exact words. As someone who was hours away from passing away from pancreatic cancer, she was hardly in top form when she uttered her supposed wish.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Johann Ricke, @danand, @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Her most famous analogy about throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet doesn’t even quite make sense. Are you not getting wet because the umbrella is keeping you dry? Why doesn’t she say this?

    I suppose in person she would quip “you’re not getting wet because you have the umbrella over your goyishe kopf! Oy vey!”

    It’s hard to imagine her thinking this, though, since we all know she’s not throwing away a perfectly good umbrella in any weather without getting a good price.

    Perhaps she means that the fact that the prophylactic is working as intended is not evidence that the prophylactic is not necessary, delivered in her (curiously) famous dissent in Shelby County v. Holder.

    Of course, I could go about on the streets of Omaha selling ten thousand dollar amulets guaranteed to repel tigers and we could have the same discussion. “No one who has bought one of my anti-tiger amulets has been attacked or harmed in any way by a tiger while wearing it!” The question is not always a black-and-white “are you getting wet,” but rather “what is the cost of the thing keeping you dry, is it working as intended, and are there more efficient means to do so?” In her analogy, State Sovereignty is a minor factor that would always get outweighed by whatever were the ends of her current political desires. You don’t need evidence of rain to keep an umbrella at all times, I suppose.

    Perhaps a more apt analogy is “why stop radiation therapy when you no longer have cancer?”

  155. @El Dato
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Yup. Shit's corrupt to the bone.

    The editorial board should be emptied and the people who produced that report and those who funded them should be publicly dispatched in gruesome ways to make sure this bullshit won't happen again.


    Sapan Desai was a co-author of the paper and founder of the Surgisphere database.
     
    That guy.

    The Doctor Behind the Disputed Covid Data


    A college degree at 19. A medical school graduate with a Ph.D. at 27.

    By the time he completed training in vascular surgery in 2014, Dr. Sapan Desai had cast himself as an ambitious physician, an entrepreneur with an M.B.A. and a prolific researcher published in medical journals.
     

    When you read things like that, the fakery level detector is off the scale. No human outside of Hollywood movies is all of the above.

    Also, the Guardina is a liberal rag forever:


    The publication of the Surgisphere study by the Lancet meant well-controlled studies to definitely determine the drug’s efficacy in preventing or treating the virus were stopped prematurely. Given the drug has been highly politicised by figures such as US president Donald Trump, who has made numerous false claims about its usefulness against Covid-19, rigorous studies into the drug remain important.

     

    Do liberals need to believe in the non-efficacy of treatments, the efficacy of lockdowns and facemasks and the coming of the Microsoft Vaccine for some reason?

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    Yes, the bit you highlighted is really shocking in this context. The article debunks the basis for claiming Trump made false claims about HCQ, and then the Guardian goes ahead and gratuitously makes the assertion anyway.

  156. @Jack D
    @syonredux

    Wow, I learned a new word. I had never heard of quiverfulls before, but then again I don't travel in those circles. (Nowadays I don't travel at all, but that's another issue.) I know Catholic and Orthodox Jewish families with large #'s of kids but I don't think I have ever met a quiverfull Protestant family with a large brood. Seeing them on TV doesn't count.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Wow, I learned a new word. I had never heard of quiverfulls before, but then again I don’t travel in those circles. (Nowadays I don’t travel at all, but that’s another issue.) I know Catholic and Orthodox Jewish families with large #’s of kids but I don’t think I have ever met a quiverfull Protestant family with a large brood. Seeing them on TV doesn’t count.

    Quiverfull was, IIRC, an evangelical Prot movement extolling the joys of large families over material comforts. The feminist cat lady class was especially derisive of it, because they feared it was an attempt to breed conservatives and Evangelicals faster and more frequently than they could corrupt them to take away their theoretical right to thirty lifetime abortions – the former’s bareness being a subtext to the visceral reaction to large families.

    Catholics (white) with large families are most often either simply anachronistic (“I had three brothers and five sisters growing up, and it was fun!”) or it is evidence of Catholics who take the injunctions of Humanae Vitae to heart and limit the size of their families only with natural methods dependent upon timed sexual continence.

    As a class matter, large families are now considered declasse. Multiple kids interfere with your ability for exotic travel, eat in trendy restaurants, and patronize the arts – while more than one or two means that you can’t devote sufficient time and resources for your kids to be trophies in the never-ending American status competition.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)


    the former’s [feminist cat ladies'] bareness being a subtext to the visceral reaction to large families
     
    .

    They take off their clothes when they hear about quiverfulls? Have you ever seen one of those "naked bike rides" populated by feminist cat ladies? I don't want to see them without their clothes.


    As a class matter, large families are now considered declasse.
     
    Actually, having a large family is now a status marker for some rich whites. Unless you are really rich, you are not going to be able to afford to have 8 kids and send them all to private school and private universities. Anything more than 2 or 3 is a stretch.
  157. @Jim Christian
    Nothing has been added to Steve's blog lately, anyone know if he's OK?

    Replies: @bruce county

    Mu guess he’s golfing or having a taco with his neighbors. LOL

  158. @anon
    Say, when did these traveling road show funerals become a thing? I looked up Frank Roosevelt and he died on April 12, 1945 down south & was in the ground in New York by the 15th. So it had to have started sometime after 1950.

    Here's my guess: given that the traveling road show funeral is garish, inappropriate, tawdry, cheap, vulgar and just down right trashy...there has to have been a Kennedy involved, somehow. Obviously not Mary Jo's funeral, though. Nope.

    Anyone know for sure?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon

    Churchill’s funeral in 1965 was pretty big, but state funerals usually are – Nelson’s after Trafalgar was huge.

    Lincoln’s body went on display/tour from April 18 to May 4, travelling 1500 miles by train through seven states. The poor man’s not exactly rested in peace since.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funeral_and_burial_of_Abraham_Lincoln#Other_movements

    “Lincoln’s coffin has been moved 17 times and the coffin opened 5 times.”

    President (and General) Zachary Taylor didn’t get a state funeral, presumably at his family’s request, but he did get a sea shanty sung about his funeral.

    Is it just me, or has one of the singers got the Innsmouth look?

  159. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Jack D


    Wow, I learned a new word. I had never heard of quiverfulls before, but then again I don’t travel in those circles. (Nowadays I don’t travel at all, but that’s another issue.) I know Catholic and Orthodox Jewish families with large #’s of kids but I don’t think I have ever met a quiverfull Protestant family with a large brood. Seeing them on TV doesn’t count.
     
    Quiverfull was, IIRC, an evangelical Prot movement extolling the joys of large families over material comforts. The feminist cat lady class was especially derisive of it, because they feared it was an attempt to breed conservatives and Evangelicals faster and more frequently than they could corrupt them to take away their theoretical right to thirty lifetime abortions - the former's bareness being a subtext to the visceral reaction to large families.

    Catholics (white) with large families are most often either simply anachronistic ("I had three brothers and five sisters growing up, and it was fun!") or it is evidence of Catholics who take the injunctions of Humanae Vitae to heart and limit the size of their families only with natural methods dependent upon timed sexual continence.

    As a class matter, large families are now considered declasse. Multiple kids interfere with your ability for exotic travel, eat in trendy restaurants, and patronize the arts - while more than one or two means that you can't devote sufficient time and resources for your kids to be trophies in the never-ending American status competition.

    Replies: @Jack D

    the former’s [feminist cat ladies’] bareness being a subtext to the visceral reaction to large families

    .

    They take off their clothes when they hear about quiverfulls? Have you ever seen one of those “naked bike rides” populated by feminist cat ladies? I don’t want to see them without their clothes.

    As a class matter, large families are now considered declasse.

    Actually, having a large family is now a status marker for some rich whites. Unless you are really rich, you are not going to be able to afford to have 8 kids and send them all to private school and private universities. Anything more than 2 or 3 is a stretch.

  160. @Jack D
    @Father O'Hara

    If Ginsburg really wanted to pick her successor, she could have tried to make a deal with Obama in 2014 - I will step down if you nominate so-and-so to the Court. Otherwise I will keep my seat. This would have been a plausible deal in 2014. In 2020 it is in the realm of complete fantasy.

    In today's NY Times there is an article by Emily Bazelon explaining (attempting to justify) why Ginsburg did not step down when Obama was President and the Senate was in Democrat hands (circa 2014). By then Ginsburg was already past 80 and not in great health (she had a stent put in her coronary arteries that year) and no one would have faulted her for retiring (the man she replaced, Whizzer White, retired at 76 saying that "someone else should be permitted to have a like experience.") One of the excuses that Ginsburg supposedly offered (according to Bazelon) was that her replacement would not have been as liberal as she was, that by then no one that liberal could have gotten confirmed.

    The comment section is not buying it and accuses Ginsburg of being selfish. Instead of getting someone not as liberal as she is, she might very well (despite her dying wish) end up cementing the conservative majority on the Court.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke, @MEH 0910, @Buzz Mohawk, @Boy the way Glenn Miller played

    The comment section is not buying it and accuses Ginsburg of being selfish. Instead of getting someone not as liberal as she is, she might very well (despite her dying wish) end up cementing the conservative majority on the Court.

    She was an intelligent woman. Once she realized that she had bet and lost, couldn’t she have approached President Trump? In exchange for her resignation and endorsement of her successor, she could have negotiated a person who was less antagonistic to her point of view. As far as we know, Ginsburg never did so. Instead, she hung on long enough to create the situation that she had to know ( in her last sentient moment) would lead to damned near a civil war.

  161. @guest
    @Buzz Mohawk

    So you’re gonna give Ginsberg D.C.’s Giant Penis. Real sensitive.

    Unless she was really into that sort of thing.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    When it was completed in 1884, the Washington Monument, at 555 feet, was the tallest structure on Earth, which made it the biggest penis in the world. It was superseded in height by the Eiffel Tower in 1889. The wrought-iron lattice tower in Paris, however, is obviously not a penis.

    Giving a woman a very large penis is indeed honorific, and I think we should do it. We should give Ginsburg the shaft.

  162. @guest
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Wait, was the One-Drop Rule in effect? Because she should have been able to find some Jewess with a fraction of a percent of negro in her.

    Replies: @Gianni in Guernsey

    Althea Bernstein or journey smollet

  163. @El Dato
    As von Schlieffen literally said on his deathbed: "Keep my Right Wing Strong"

    (Prussian Generals didn't follow that idea quite as completely as necessary. That was their penultimate mistake.)

    Meanwhile, in Everything is Connected Clown World, restitution of Greek Marbles becomes a US-UK hot button issue

    US Congress members accused of trying to BLACKMAIL UK into returning Elgin Marbles to Greece

    A cross-party group of US Congress members have waded into the Parthenon/Elgin Marbles row to urge the UK government to return the disputed relics to Greece or risk undermining the “special relationship” between the two countries.

    A total of 18 Republican and Democrat members of the House of Representatives signed a letter addressed to UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson imploring that the 2,500-year-old sculptures be returned to Greece by next year.

    The provocative move has been blasted as an attempt at “blackmail” ahead of Britain trying to hammer out a trade deal with the United States.
     
    Why not just duplicate them with a 3D-scanner and a computer-controlled ciseling tool? We have the tech now!

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @Paco Wové, @DrWatson

    You must pity these 18 Congress members. They apparently felt like they lost their marbles. Someone should give it back to them!

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