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From the New York Times news section:

How Hard Is It to Quit Coal? For Germany, 18 Years and $44 Billion

By Somini Sengupta and Melissa Eddy
Jan. 16, 2020

Germany announced on Thursday that it would spend $44.5 billion to quit coal — but not for another 18 years, by 2038.

The move shows how expensive it is to stop burning the world’s dirtiest fossil fuel, despite a broad consensus that keeping coal in the ground is vital to averting a climate crisis, and how politically complicated it is.

Coal, when burned, produces huge amounts of the greenhouse gas emissions that are responsible for global warming.

Germany doesn’t have shale gas, as the United States does, which has led to the rapid decline of coal use in America, despite President Trump’s support for coal. Germany also faces intense opposition to nuclear power. After the Fukushima disaster in 2011, that opposition prompted the government to start shutting down the country’s nuclear plants, a transition that should be complete by 2022.

If Germany really wanted to do the world a huge favor to make up for certain unfortunate events of the 20th Century, it would undertake to show the world how to make nuclear power safe. If anybody can make nuclear power work safely, it is Germans, with their world’s highest combination of engineering skill times neurotic worrywart personalities.

Solar and wind are all very well, but in the long run they will still need to be complemented with an on-demand source of energy, which is either going to be some kind of fossil fuel or some kind nuclear power. Germany ought to be the world leader in resolving exactly how best to use nuclear power. Instead, they are turning their backs on nuclear energy in a cowardly fashion, while continuing to burn coal.

 
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  1. J.Ross says:

    Didn’t they try and fail to give up nuclear power as a kneejerk reaction to Fukushima?
    Isn’t their response to the awful Hitlerian evil of Vladimir Putin to give him money and make him central to their infrastructure?
    Maybe Germans cannot into energy policy any more than Poland can into space.

    • Replies: @ziggurat
  2. If Germany really wanted to do the world a huge favor to make up for certain unfortunate events of the 20th Century

    We are less than 4 months away from the 75th anniversary of VE Day. At a certain point Germany has to let the past be the past and do what’s best for Germany. Also, I don’t think there are too many tsunamis in Germany, so they don’t have to worry about Fukushima.

    • Agree: Desiderius, Lot
  3. Cowardice?

    Or Vanity.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    , @Lagertha
  4. Anonymous[265] • Disclaimer says:

    Why don’t they just turn the coal into synfuel and exhaust all their deposits?

    • Replies: @Rob
  5. Merkel should immediately begin recruiting a crack team of “Syrian” science guys to redeem her boner. Hidden Figures 2 would sweep the oscars.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  6. A123 says:

    Germany is headed into recession due to Merkel’s profound incompetence and mismanagement.

    Despite the obvious failures, German leaders are eager to keep dumping money into efforts that will not work: (2)

    “Those people who accept windmills in their neighbourhood, and so make the expansion of renewable energy possible, should be rewarded,” said SPD environment spokesman Matthias Miersch according to DW.

    The payoff money would be given to local authorities; however, it would have to be spent on direct handouts to citizens. The move was criticised by Uwe Brandl, the president of the German Association of Towns and Municipalities, who described the scheme as hush money.

    ______

    The one U.S. candidate pushing for green nuclear power is Yang. (2)

    To transition the United States from fossil fuels to green energy, Yang wants the government to invest $50 billion in the development of thorium molten-salt nuclear reactors—and he wants them on the grid by 2027.

    “Nuclear isn’t a perfect solution, but it’s a solid solution for now,” Yang’s climate policy page reads. It calls out thorium molten-salt reactors in particular as “a technology we should invest in as a stopgap for any shortfalls we have in our renewable energy sources as we move to a future powered by renewable energy.”

    One wonders if his squishy language about renewables is:

    — Something he believes?
    — Or, is it cover to play nice with the DNC establishment?

    After all, once the country is generating cheap reliable electricity from thorium, intermittent expensive wind and solar will be abandoned.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2020/01/07/germany-offer-hush-money-people-forced-live-wind-farms/

    (2) https://www.wired.com/story/andrew-yang-wants-a-thorium-reactor-by-2027-good-luck-buddy/

  7. Meanwhile in China…

    China Railways close to completion on $30bn coal freight line

    China Railways is close to completing the world’s longest heavy freight line to haul coal from China’s northern mines to its eastern and central provinces.

    Almost a decade in the making, the nearly $30bn Haoji Railway will start around the end of this month and eventually haul as much as 200 million tonnes from key producing regions in the north to consumers in the south

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  8. Elli says:

    I wish Germans (or the Swiss ) would run our healthcare system.

    I wonder how well they could do with a people that weren’t German (or Swiss.)

    • Replies: @Authenticjazzman
  9. in characteristic fashion, Germany had the most advanced reactors by the 80s, when they decided to stop building them.

    reading more nuts and bolts technical history of the Cold War, i wonder how much the Soviets hung in there for decades largely because they took lots of IP from Germany after 1945. the US did too, which advanced lots of American tech. some of those stories about German tech and scientists are famous, lots of them aren’t though.

    i reckon captured IP advanced US tech forward 10 to 20 years in some areas, and Soviet tech forward more like 50 years in some cases. in Korea i think the Soviets would have been totally outclassed in some areas without being able to rely on stuff they got from Germany. they would have been forced to espionage lots of western tech which would be much slower.

    Germany has been out of nuclear for 30 years. think about how much more advanced the global fleet of reactors could be if they had stayed in the entire time.

    instead lots of the world has to rely on SUCKY French reactors, the latest EPR being a total bust. and pretty bad old Soviet and more recent Russian reactors, which were the most dangerous 30 years ago, and are less dangerous now, but i wouldn’t want to trust second world countries operating Russian reactors. the US nuclear industry is stultified, and has barely advanced since the 90s. only a few new US designed reactors get built around the world per decade.

    even Japan can really not be trusted to operate old General Electric reactors, so what does that mean? it probably means that big fission reactors for commercial electricity generation are too dangerous for a world wide application. they really aren’t a solution, barring ze Germans getting back in the game, or a major revival of the US industry, which won’t be happening.

  10. Germans aren’t neurotic. They’re conscientious.

    Those two traits are very different.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conscientiousness

    Conscientiousness is the personality trait of being careful, or diligent. Conscientiousness implies a desire to do a task well, and to take obligations to others seriously. Conscientious people tend to be efficient and organized as opposed to easy-going and disorderly. They exhibit a tendency to show self-discipline, act dutifully, and aim for achievement; they display planned rather than spontaneous behavior; and they are generally dependable. It is manifested in characteristic behaviors such as being neat, and systematic; also including such elements as carefulness, thoroughness, and deliberation (the tendency to think carefully before acting).[1]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuroticism

    Neuroticism is one of the Big Five higher-order personality traits in the study of psychology. Individuals who score high on neuroticism are more likely than average to be moody and to experience such feelings as anxiety, worry, fear, anger, frustration, envy, jealousy, guilt, depressed mood, and loneliness.

    Neuroticism is extremely common among Middle Easterners. To a lesser extent, also East Asians and Subcontinentals.

    Germans and Scandinavians (and to a lesser extent Anglos), are high in conscientiousness and low in neuroticism. So their countries run well and they tend to be mentally evenly-balanced. Life is comfortable and people are normal enough.

    Japanese are high in conscientiousness, but also high in neuroticism. So their homeland is a well-run place. However, when stuff goes wrong, they take it very badly…. Life is good, but people are on edge about dishonoring their family, corporation, country, or themselves.

    Middle Easterners are low in conscientiousness, but high in neuroticism. So they have a slipshod attitude towards almost everything in life, but freak out when their family honor or religion is threatened. So you end up with lots of honor killings, feuds, vendettas, and explosions. Life is very mentally stressful.

    Hispanics are low in both conscientiousness and neuroticism. So people are fatalistic, but they have fun with it. Life isn’t always easy, but you just shrug it off and go to the fiesta anyway.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anon 2
    , @moshe
  11. Hail says: • Website

    Germany ought to be the world leader in resolving exactly how best to use nuclear power

    Madman Merkel’s legacy:

    Energiewende (shutting down nuclear power after an emotional overreaction in 2011);

    – In general, presiding over twenty more years* of modest-scale Invite the World and a fairly aggressively ethnomasochist domestic apparatus (see e.g. the anti-AfD public service announcement that airs on German state-funded broadcaster ZDF) and influence over the EU apparatus in the same direction, paired with anemic fertility (* – she was in senior leadership in the CDU from as early as 1998, and controlled the party outright no later than 2002; has served as Kanzlerin [Chancellorette] from Nov. 2005 to 2021);

    – Ordering the one-time dumping of over 1.5 million Muslims on Germany (75% said to be military-age males), triggering a Europe-wide crisis.

    Though Merkel’s Million Muslim Dumping of 2015–16 was just a ramp-up of business as usual, it was a shocking ramp-up; e.g., on Sept. 11, 2015, she unilaterally declared Keine Obergrenze! [“no limit”] to the number of Muslim migrants she would take in on behalf of the German taxpayer and nation.

    The good news is she was eventually stopped and restrained, and her shocking display of overt ethnomasochism gave birth to the nationalist AfD. By the late 2010s, the CDU was polling down as low as half its historical norm, losing much support to the AfD.

    Portraits of Madman Merkel (from retrospective on the 2010s in Europe):

    [MORE]

  12. songbird says:

    Exiling Merkel to the third world would be a start.

    • Agree: Hail, kevhin
  13. Aren’t they just going to buy a bunch of power from 90%-nuclear France?

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Romanian
  14. In small quantities, radiation can actually be beneficial.

    Due to something called “hormesis.”

    The basic theory is this. Exposing your body to a “small” amount of stress (radiation, sunlight, excercise) is beneficial.

    Dr. Rhonda Patrick has a cool lecture on this.

    • Replies: @Morton's toes
    , @Romanian
  15. Related, I think Fukushima was incredibly damaging to the public perception of nuclear energy precisely because it happened in Japan. This wasn’t a Congolese reactor that had a major screw up but rather one situated in a developed country that is known for its engineering prowess. If they can’t handle it…

    Also related, one thing I find troubling among those highly concerned about AGW is the lack of advocacy for nuclear as a possible solution. If one genuinely believes AGW has the potential to destroy human civilization then the risks posed by expansion of nuclear power would seem small and acceptable by comparison. As of now, the only technology proven to provide carbon free energy, reliably, 24/7 is nuclear. That’s not to say that some combination of renewable energy along with storage couldn’t adequately power the grid at some point, but the technology is simply not developed yet (or at least is not remotely cost competitive). And if we need to do something right now, then presumably we need to deploy proven solutions rather than waiting for technological developments that may or may not materialize.

    The fact that nuclear is not even entertained by many prominent activists indicates for me that their concern is rooted in some sort of psychological aversion to modern industrial society rather than a rational assessment of the situation.

    Just to put things in perspective regarding the current state of energy storage: the current output of the Tesla gigafactory is larger than that of all other sources of lithium batteries combined, and per Elon Musk himself the output of over 100 gigafactories would be needed to provide adequate storage for a completely renewable grid. Presumably as the developing world develops and their energy consumption increases that number goes up. So current capacity is <1% of required.

    A scale up that large certainly isn't physically impossible, but it nonetheless is quite daunting and thus a rational person would probably not want to put all their eggs in that one basket when the stakes are so high and there are so many unknowns.

  16. vhrm says:

    With the exception of Chernobyl, hasn’t everyone made nuclear safe enough even with the relatively ancient (60s and 70s) tech that the industry is running?

    Fukushima was bad, but not THAT bad as industrial accidents go. And the bulk of the social cost was in over-cautious evacuation and public fear. (Not to say that nuclear can’t be super scary and dangerous (e.g. Chernobyl or worse) but it very seldomly is and newer reactors with physical failsafe designs would be even better.)

    Compare this oil train parking brake failure that killed 42 people in Canada in 2013.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lac-M%C3%A9gantic_rail_disaster

  17. TGGP says: • Website

    Nuclear power is ALREADY safer than coal. People died because of the tsunami which hit Fukushima, and one person was killed by a mechanical crane in the reaction to the disaster at the plant, but the same would have happened if it were a coal plant. Three Mile Island didn’t have the casualties of Chernobyl either. As was already pointed out, Germany is not afflicted with tsunamis and earthquakes and like Japan, so they didn’t switch because of safety risks at their own plants. They switched because of low-information voters.

  18. Kronos says:
    @ScarletNumber

    To my knowledge, there has never been any organization dedicated to obtaining funds from guilt ridden Jews who’s ancestors participated in operating Soviet GULAGS and/or owned serfs that were freed only by the order of the Tzar in the mid 19th century.

    Slav Lives Matter! Slave Lives Matter!

  19. No, what Germany does is sadder and more cynical. Less than 100km into the Czech border is Temelín Nuclear Power Plant, which gives Germany terrific access (at low transmission losses) to cheap nuclear power while preening about how cleeeeeeeean and environmental they are. It’s mildly gross.
    France, for all its foibles, sees Nuclear as a huge part of its strategy and owns it, warts and all. Hiding the nukes 90km into the poorer benighted neighbor and lecturing us about Green politics is just tacky

  20. I love that fact that German girls are only bearing Children of Color

    Looks like the so called “superior” blonde haired blue eyes European beauties superhuman won’t exist soon!

    • Replies: @anon
    , @fish
    , @Poco
  21. If Germany really wanted to do the world a huge favor to make up for certain unfortunate events of the 20th Century

    If you converse with Germans you’ll quickly notice that they have zero guilt over the world wars and are specialists in flipping the script — whatabout Vietnam, whatabout the Native Americans, whatabout Iraq whatabout Emmett Till whatabout whatabout. They’re pretty awful people generally, though typical for Europe.

  22. ziggurat says:

    Bill Gates has a company called “TerraPower” which was set to build a new “Generation 4” nuclear power plant in China but was blocked by some new U.S. rules . But maybe he’ll get to build it here in the USA. The major problem has been the regulatory hurdles in the USA, but there has been some positive developments on that front.

    Bill started TerraPower to craft a sustainable, clean energy future. He sees nuclear energy, and in particular advanced nuclear, as a key part of the solution.
    https://terrapower.com/updates/netflix-documentary-on-terrapower-co-founder-and-chairman-released-inside-bills-brain-decoding-bill-gates/

    TerraPower LLC, a nuclear energy venture chaired by Microsoft Corp co-founder Bill Gates, is seeking a new partner for early-stage trials of its technology after new U.S. rules forced it to abandon an agreement with China, company officials told the Wall Street Journal.

    Gates, who co-founded TerraPower, said in his essay that regulations in the United States are currently too restrictive to allow the reactor prototype to be built domestically.
    https://terrapower.com/updates/netflix-documentary-on-terrapower-co-founder-and-chairman-released-inside-bills-brain-decoding-bill-gates/

    Here is Scott Adams praising Mark Schneider and Michael Shellenberger for their work, which led to some recent Congressional testimony that introduced the idea of a “Green Nuclear Deal”.

    Here is Mark Schneider’s website promoting “Generation 4” nuclear power.
    https://genivnuclear.com/

    Even during the Democratic presidential debates, some candidates expressed support for nuclear power. It seems like we could get bipartisan legislation that would actually be good for the country.

  23. Anonymous[199] • Disclaimer says:

    Nuclear will eventually run out too, which is my problem with it. Maybe we need to do something more important (e.g. space colonization) with nuclear fuel. Renewable combined with dams as batteries for storage or chemical batteries seems the way to go.

    • Replies: @newrouter
    , @silviosilver
    , @jsm
  24. Hail says: • Website
    @SimpleSong

    one thing I find troubling among those highly concerned about AGW is the lack of advocacy for nuclear as a possible solution. If one genuinely believes AGW has the potential to destroy human civilization then the risks posed by expansion of nuclear power would seem small and acceptable by comparison

    There are many countries in which pro- or con- on nuclear energy is a salient layer of political division, in many cases one that cross-cuts existing political divisions.

    The US is a rather glaring exception.

    I follow the news regularly but strain to remember when the last time nuclear power was brought up at all, pro or con, in any mainstream political discussion in the US. I’d hazard to say there has been little or no discussion at all on nuclear in this century in the US; it’s possible US voters collectively paid more attention to a ingle Maryland private school’s early-1980s yearbook (the hysteria around the Kavanaugh confirmation) than to nuclear energy in the past five years.

    I’d be curious if you, SimpleSong, or others have some idea on why this is, this glaring US non-interest in nuclear.

    • Replies: @ziggurat
    , @Lot
    , @ScarletNumber
  25. Veracitor says:

    Good idea, Steve, but the Canadians (yes!) already solved that problem pretty well:

    The CANDU reactor (link).

    CANDU’s are great, so of course most Western countries use vastly more dangerous reactors because of political pressure during the Cold War to reuse military propulsion or plutonium-production reactor designs in civilian power plants (to subsidize military reactors by spreading their cost over civilian plants as well and to enrich military contractors). The US Atoms for Peace ‘foreign-aid’ program demanded beneficiaries buy/build dangerous US reactor designs.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Romanian
  26. I live about 45km as the crow flies from two nuclear reactors and I’ve rarely given them a moment’s thought. Nor has anyone else I know, despite a hullabaloo back in the 1980s when construction was announced. Given the air quality here, I’d happily support five more to see the end of coal-related pollutants.

    • Replies: @Bubba
  27. Anonymous[158] • Disclaimer says:

    If anybody can make nuclear power work safely, it is Germans, with their world’s highest combination of engineering skill times neurotic worrywart personalities.

    As anyone who’s owned German cars knows, this is an argument against German nuclear power. German skill combined with neuroticism is why they overengineer everything, resulting in less reliability and high cost. They engineer things that are great in highly specific, ideal conditions and applications, but unreliable when things deviate from the ideal. That’s the opposite of what you want with nuclear power. It also makes their systems less effective outside of a German environment and thus less exportable.

  28. Anonymous[367] • Disclaimer says:

    “ neurotic worrywart personalities”

    Steve please expound on this German trait from a historical and personal perspective….

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  29. Thomas says:

    Solar and wind are all very well, but in the long run they will still need to be complemented with an on-demand source of energy, which is either going to be some kind of fossil fuel or some kind nuclear power.

    Nuclear is not an “on-demand” source. It’s considered a “base load” source that has to be supplemented by other sources to meet peak demand (usually either hydroelectric or natural gas). The economics of nuclear power make for high fixed costs but low marginal costs. And the engineering of nuclear power means that nuclear power plants are basically large heat engines that can take days to get up to their operating temperatures.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Base_load

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dispatchable_generation

    • Replies: @Steve in Greensboro
  30. utu says:

    If anybody can make nuclear power work safely, it is Germans…

    What about the French? 71.6% of the country’s total electricity production. 58 power reactors. France is the world’s largest net exporter of electricity. France exported 38 TWh of electricity to its neighbours in 2017. Thanks to the French electricity UK may claim it is getting green.

    Accidents? Yes, several but very minor.

  31. Anonymous[846] • Disclaimer says:

    Does nuclear power seem all that compelling in a country that’s just invited in a lot of terrorists?

  32. ziggurat says:
    @J.Ross

    Didn’t they try and fail to give up nuclear power as a kneejerk reaction to Fukushima?

    It was Chernobyl. After the nuclear accident, there was an abortion boom, which turns out to have been completely unnecessary. In addition to these abortions, the nuclear industry was aborted too.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chernobyl_disaster

    The events are also credited with strengthening the anti-nuclear movement in Germany, which culminated in the decision to end the use of nuclear power that was made by the 1998–2005 Schröder government

    • Replies: @Fredrik
  33. @Anonymous

    Like my dad: Kelly Johnson designed whiz bang planes like the F-104 then guys like my dad, of Swiss German roots, spent years worrying about how to keep them from killing their pilots.

  34. anonymous[173] • Disclaimer says:

    If someone proposed mass immigration and ‘diversity’ into, Vietnam, it would be dismissed as an obviously stupid idea. Culture clash, lowered wages, lowered trust, higher cost of living, diluted votes, environmental damage, crowding, etc.

    But when someone proposes mass immigration and ‘diversity’ into any white population anywhere, all of those objections are suddenly forgotten.

    Nobody would, under ANY circumstance, deny any other group the right to self preservation and homogeneity.

    They can ignore, deny, or try to justify this. But they can’t say we had a choice. They can’t say we live in a democracy.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
  35. ziggurat says:
    @Hail

    I think interest could really start heating up.

    Mark Schneider has helped to get “generation 4” nuclear power before Congress.
    https://www.linkedin.com/posts/mark-schneider-751107b5_greennucleardeal-gets-traction-from-real-activity-6624123814487871488-R-RT

    Scott Adams is really promoting it.

    There is a Netflix special called “Bill Gates Himself”, in which he promotes nuclear power. Bill Gates started a company called “TerraPower”, which was all set to build a new “generation 4” nuclear power plant in China as of last year. But this endeavor was blocked by new U.S. rules.

    Some of the Democratic candidates for President have agreed that nuclear should be part of the solution.

    Mark Schneider came up with a good, viral marketing slogan: “Green Nuclear Deal”.

    I think that Democrats are genuinely panicked about climate change. So, I can see some potential movement in this area. If enough people keep promoting it, we may see a surge of political support.

  36. Lot says:
    @Hail

    Nuclear power is not price competitive in the USA. We have abundant natural gas especially. The NW also has cheap hydro power and solar will soon be competitive without subsidy in the Desert SW states and most of Central and Southern California, while wind is competitive in many other parts of the middle of America.

    Best thing for Germany is for the US, Ukraine, and Russia to make up and switch to Russian gas imports.

    German coal is dirtier than the higher grade US coal, aside from just the CO2 people are wrongly concerned about.

    Anthracite coal from Pennsylvania is some of the highest quality in the world, and WV is also up there.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @SimpleSong
    , @Hibernian
  37. Bubba says:

    A modern electrical grid needs to be base loaded with reliable nuclear and/or coal plants and then be complemented during peak times with gas turbines or combined cycle plants. Solar and wind are not reliable energy sources and their maximum electrical generation output often occurs outside of peak cycle times.

    Carbon capture is a myth and energy storage only benefits the investors who receive massive tax breaks for building them (like solar plants and wind farms).

    Today energy policy in the U.S.A. is written by radical environmental lobbyists whose main goal is to limit energy use by consumers less and less every year which makes family formation unaffordable and will ultimately make it impossible on its current course. Energy prices have dramatically increased from 6.57 cents/kW-hr in 1990 to 10.58 cents/kW-hr in 2018. There are no plans in Washington, DC to decrease energy prices, only to increase prices with expensive (massive tax breaks) and unreliable solar/wind/energy storage projects.

    • Replies: @Rob
  38. Bubba says:
    @Change that Matters

    Your property taxes are much lower too thanks to the taxes paid by nuke plants. That’s another great benefit of nuclear power to local property owners, school districts and municipalities.

  39. Whiskey says: • Website

    San Onofre nuclear reactor is Exhibit A why nukes suck. Basically leaks under high pressure and corrosive elements cross contaminate hundreds of miles of piping. Had to be shut down.

    There is no way to make it work. No accidents but a toxic waste dump that has to be maintained for 10,000 years.

    Nukes are a very bad idea

    • Replies: @Deadite
  40. Lot says:

    1. Germany already, along with Spain, gifted the world cheap solar power by undertaking gigantic solar power subsidies when solar was still quite expensive. This led to a production boom and help set up a virtuous circle of more R&D and economies of scale that caused prices to fall.

    2. To the extent the German gov wants to intervene in the economy with a huge new program, it should be eugenic and natalist. At the outset, some suburban tract housing is needed. German homeownership rates are the lowest in Western Europe.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    , @AnotherDad
  41. Anonymous[199] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Having driven a VW, I find it practically perfect to drive, of reliability equivalent to Japanese and of moderate cost. I get it serviced religiously. You get what you pay for.

    The beauty of solar now is that the technology is common enough that demand is there and efficiencies and cost benefits keep improving. Electric car batteries are also a way of storing solar energy. Works great in tandem.

    Nuclear… with a world of huge numbers of NAMs, not maintaining German built nuclear designs. No thanks. Even if Kalishnikov were to turn his hand to nuclear power, I doubt a person can dumb down a nuclear reactor enough to make an AK47 out of it.

    • Replies: @vhrm
    , @Redneck farmer
  42. anon[127] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    Nuclear power is not price competitive in the USA. We have abundant natural gas especially.

    Yes.

    The NW also has cheap hydro power

    No new hydro plants will be built in the US NW. What exists is it, unless deep green gets its way and some dams are torn down

    and solar will soon be competitive without subsidy in the Desert SW states and most of Central and Southern California, while wind is competitive in many other parts of the middle of America.

    You do not understand what “base load” means.

    • Replies: @Fluesterwitz
  43. fnn says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Wow, the West Germans lost 110 F-104 pilots.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_F-104_Starfighter#German_service

    Erich Hartmann, the world’s top-scoring fighter ace, commanded one of Germany’s first (post-war) jet fighter-equipped squadrons[140] and deemed the F-104 to be an unsafe aircraft with poor handling characteristics for aerial combat. In Navy service it lacked the safety margin of a twin engine design like the Blackburn Buccaneer. To the dismay of his superiors, Hartmann judged the fighter unfit for Luftwaffe use even before its introduction.[141]

    Hartmann had 352 kills during WW2.

  44. fish says:
    @Money shot

    Oh tinys……time to ride Lensports Wakanda Stick again! Fo teh disiplin!

  45. unit472 says:

    Fukushima was a black comedy of errors and mistakes. Portable generators were brought in but they had no way to ‘plug in’ to the reactor circ pumps. Operators had back up gravity operated cooling systems and could vent excess steam pressure from the pressure vessels but in the panic and chaos these were overlooked or the operators forgot how to use them.

    That said, there is still no place to put radioactive waste and spent fuel rods save in on site storage pools that became the most dangerous aspect of the Fukushima disaster. Since man cannot engineer structures that must last 100 times as long as the pyramids this aspect of current nuclear power plant technology seems beyond our ability

  46. Rob says:
    @Anonymous

    Well, if you believe global warming (as real as HBD), then turning the coal into synthetic liquid fuel, and then burning it puts as much carbon dioxide into the atmosphere as burning the coal and natural gas used to make it separately, less any carbon-containing waste, plus emissions from the fuel burned to run the production process.

    The only rational thing to do is to develop safe thorium nuclear reactors, and leave all the fossil fuels in the ground. Failing that, regular ole uranium reactors are the only way to maintain industrial civilization once we decarbonize.

    It is quite a task ahead of us, and i’m sure blacks and Latinks are up to it, aren’t you?

  47. Neoconned says:
    @Desiderius

    Cowardice, along w the grim sour resignation of their fate as a people.

    The median age of a German woman last time I checked was like 47 yrs old….i wonder if you omit all the Arab and Turkish etc Germans if the median age of GERMAN GERMAN women is probably even higher and thus that much farther along past the child bearing age range.

    • Agree: kevhin
    • Replies: @Desiderius
  48. @william munny

    Merkel should immediately begin recruiting a crack team of “Syrian” science guys to redeem her boner. Hidden Figures 2 would sweep the oscars.

    NASA’s headquarters is now on Hidden Figures Way. If you ask me, that appellation is better reserved for the OMB, GAO, SSA, or any number of other agencies in the capital.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  49. Neoconned says:
    @Lot

    There is no home ownership culture in Germany.

    They’ve been renters for much of the last century.

    “Germany” will be a hodgepodge of small caliphates and African slum shit holes in 30 odd yrs.

    What Schultzes and Brauns are left will be a tiny minority in their own nation. In a sense their old Ottoman allies will take them over in a proxy to probably haunt the UK and France.

  50. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Those cucks can’t even keep the Bundeswehr running anymore:

    Germany discontinued military conscription in 2010, the same year as Sweden. The Swedes have brought it back (Putin scares them, I guess) and now include women.

    Watch the Germans on this. And Washington, for that matter.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
  51. Anon[278] • Disclaimer says:

    The problem with nuclear will come when the first world countries have to tell African countries, No, nuclear is not for you, you need to stick with the idiot-proof energy technologies.

  52. @Steve Sailer

    There was a remarkably trivial solution to the F 104 problem: scrap it.

    The solution to the problem of nuclear safety is remarkably similar.

    There was no knee jerk reaction to Fukushima. That ongoing desaster was just the boulder that tipped the balance.

    I take bets whether a french reactor will be next. They have that very interesting large scale experiment testing steel under long term neutron bombardment.

  53. @Anonymous

    I had the same thought. Germany may already have done the conscientious thing by not setting up a bunch of nuclear reactor piles everywhere to be maintained by future Somali-tier staff.

    • Agree: fish
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  54. @The Wild Geese Howard

    There are more than 4 eurofighters flying, rest assured.
    Anyway, the hysterics in case German defenses actally worked as efficiently as it worked in the past I would not wish to see …

  55. @Thomas

    I worked in electric utility consulting in the last century and can confirm what Thomas says. Nuclear, like coal and hydro provide electricity for the base load. When the demand peaks (e.g. when people get up in the morning), utilities fire up their natural gas fired generators (basically jet engines attached to electrical generators) which start up and get to efficient operation reasonably quickly.

    There is no issue with safety for modern nuclear power plants. For that matter, there was no issue with the plants built by in the 1970s unless you built them in areas susceptible to tsunamis.

    What’s really amusing is that electrical grids with heavy wind and solar have to start-stop their natgas generators more or less randomly depending on wind, clouds, etc. While the natgas generators get up to efficient operation pretty quickly, they don’t get there instantaneously. During the start up period, they generate more NOx gas than after they get warmed up.

    So in the interest of minimizing emissions of carbon dioxide (a beneficial plant fertilizer), we generate much more NOx which irritates human lungs.

    • Thanks: Dissident
  56. @Steve Sailer

    My uncle, a mining engineer working for an insurance company, had to assess the potential damage of a nuclear powerplant failing.

    The results so much angered the nuclear power plant’s owners that, unbeknownst to him and his employers, he was banned from entering the plant again.

    Hilarity ensued when a delegation of the insurance company arrived at the plant to finalize the insurance contract.

  57. utu says:

    Why France is eyeing nuclear power again
    The nation asked its major utility to make plans for six huge reactors. (Oct 16, 2019)

    https://www.technologyreview.com/s/614579/why-france-is-eyeing-nuclear-power-again/

    • Replies: @LondonBob
  58. newrouter says:
    @Anonymous

    >Nuclear will eventually run out too<

    Yea like the Sun

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  59. newrouter says:

    >If Germany really wanted to do the world a huge favor to make up for certain unfortunate events of the 20th Century, it would undertake to show the world how to make nuclear power safe.<

    Nah. Find the most economical way to boil water and run a turbine. Stop listening to the Luddites/Greens.

    • Agree: Bubba
  60. @Hail

    I’d be curious if you … have some idea on why this is, this glaring US non-interest in nuclear.

    Because it is settled. The non-nuclears won. No reason to fight a fight you already lost. In fact, the pressure is now on the currently operated plants to shut down. Indian Point, which is 35 miles from Times Square, will be closing down next year. Oyster Creek, which is 33 miles from Atlantic City, closed two Septembers ago. New Jersey still has three plants operating, all located in the same small town in southwestern New Jersey on Delaware Bay, 43 miles from Philadelphia.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  61. @ScarletNumber

    The big anti-nuke year was 1980, right after Three Mile Island. Ironically, the three top presidential candidates, Carter (a Navy nuke), Anderson (a Rockford Swede), and Reagan were pro-nuke.

    I loved to point out to no-nukers that Reagan was the best on their standard because, while he didn’t oppose it, he was least likely of the three to subsidize it.

    Barry Commoner was the anti-nuclear candidate that year. You can count his vote if you have a microscope. He finished fifth, behind Libertarian Ed Clark. I assume Clark was for nuclear, but against subsidy or protection, like Reagan but ever so much more so.

  62. Fukushima’s still happening, with no end in sight.

    — ( http://www.simplyinfo.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/SimplyInfoOrg_2019_annual_report_Fukushima_finalc.pdf )

    The Earth is vastly over-populated with it apex predator. There’s no work-around for that.

  63. Bill P says:

    The German aversion to nuclear power is due to the fact that Germany would have been completely blanketed by mushroom clouds if the Cold War ever went hot, and they knew it. It’s hard to get people to support technology that that they can imagine having that potential.

    However, there are ways to de-weaponize nuclear power. Unfortunately, US policy for a very long time was to deliberately use nuclear power plants as part of the weapons production program. It will take a while to turn that around.

  64. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Jewish-controlled US wants to turn nuclear power into a pariah. If nuclear power becomes the standard, all nations will want it. That means nations Israel hate will always want them, and that means they might be able to make nukes.

    • Replies: @Anonymouse
  65. Anonymous[206] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The goody-Teutonic-shoes seem badly equipped for the higher baselines of neuroticism even among fellow Europeans. Observe how Germ/so. Scandis speak in man-on-the-street clips, compared to any place else. In a situation typified by insouciance, ranting, or inattention (let alone inventing joke answers or pranking the interviewer) they act like it’s a parole hearing, meting out over-scrutinized and judicious-seeming soundbites to, I guess, further the important research endeavor of this ridiculous stranger with a microphone. Wonder if conscientiousness goes with vanity and credulity?

  66. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr McKenna

    We flare off the natural gas so as to get the oil, which makes little sense, except that natgas supply exceeds the demand. We should be running the vehicles on US nat gas instead of buying Middle Eastern oil and making the Saudis wealthier so they can fund jihadis. It’s insanely stupid.

    • Agree: Charon
  67. Solar and wind are all very well, but in the long run they will still need to be complemented with an on-demand source of energy, which is either going to be some kind of fossil fuel or some kind nuclear power.

    In the true long run – as opposed to, say, just the next 100-200 years – these will be quickly exhausted.

    Solar storage costs could conceivably be reduced, or simply considered worth paying. I don’t think nuclear will be any kind of necessity – just a sensible alternative.

  68. Nuclear power is safe. Fukushima was a worst case scenario where the nuclear plant took a direct hit from both an earthquake AND a tsunami.

    And still, no one died.

    3 mile island didn’t kill anyone.

    France, the US and the UK have never had a single fatality. France gets about half it’s power from nuclear.

    • Replies: @Amerimutt Golems
  69. vhrm says:
    @Anonymous

    Not AK-47 exactly but more like a TOW or Stinger:

    Sealed, self contained reactor concept:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small,_sealed,_transportable,_autonomous_reactor

    OTOH If this ever happens and they’re deployed to, say, Africa i fear it’ll end up having the same effect as other aid over the decades: population growth and government corruption instead of advancement.
    Not great.

  70. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Veracitor

    Also known as “the Ottawa reactor”, the CANDU is a fine design but for the fact it needs a lot of heavy water, which is expensive. They were going to put one in a submarine or a carrier but never did, they should have.

  71. If Germany really wanted to do the world a huge favor to make up for certain unfortunate events of the 20th Century, it would undertake to show the world how to make nuclear power safe.

    Steve, maybe my memory’s fuzzy, but isn’t Germany the land of Merkel’s Boner? You trust them to make things safer for Europe? With nuke plants!?! Lzlzlzlozzzlzlzoollzzol.

    Kebab nuke tech: “Wir schaffen das! Allahu Ackbar!*BLAULICHT*

  72. Fredrik says:
    @ziggurat

    Chernobyl was 30 years ago.

    What happened after Fukushima was that the Germans panicked and would do anything to get rid of nuclear. Quite irrational but beneath the surface that’s a common German trait. As a frequent traveller to Germany I have seen enought to be quite sure that their rigid rulebased society is their way of coping with their own irrationality.

    It doesn’t help that it’s extremely impolite to mention that removing nuclear and replacing it with gas means you’re buying from Russia and other garbage nations.

    The energy transition would be ok provided that it was a way to make yourself independent of rogue nations around the world but it’s not the reason they do it.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  73. @Anonymous

    Nuclear will eventually run out too, which is my problem with it.

    My understanding is that there’s enough uranium in the crust to last some thousands of years, although the price would have to increase substantially to make mining it economically feasible.

    Also, uranium can potentially be extracted from seawater, which would also add thousands of years of supply.

    That should buy us ample time to become a truly space-faring, Kardashev Type II civilization.

    • Replies: @A123
    , @kaganovitch
  74. anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hanoi Paris Hilton

    intellectual property

  75. @Lot

    Yeah, probably part of the issue for why nobody really even discusses nuclear in the US is that natural gas is just astonishingly cheap right now and has been for the last decade or so. Nat gas isn’t carbon free but it’s relatively low carbon compared to other fossil fuels since it’s CH4; more importantly natural gas turbines can be spun up rapidly so they can patch holes in renewable supply or cover demand surges. Thus NG and renewables go together like peanut butter and jelly, and as long as NG stays cheap the US has a realistic route to go low carbon (but not zero carbon) for electricity generation.

    Both sides are relatively happy with this outcome and thus nuclear ends up out in the cold. Because it can be throttled so quickly NG fills the role that would otherwise be filled by batteries or other storage sources (which would markedly markedly increase the cost of renewables.) Rather ironic that renewables are cost competitive in the U.S. in large part due to cheap gas.

    For Europe and parts of Asia obviously the situation is different as 1.) the gas supply is not domestic, raising security issues, 2.) not as cheap, and 3.) renewables are less abundant than the US, thus nuclear would seem to be more in the mix.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  76. Anon[278] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve, my dad worked at Hughes Aircraft, including stuff subcontracted from the Skunk Works. Which outfit did your dad work for?

    Did you ever go to the aerospace night at Disneyland in the late 1960s?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  77. A123 says:
    @silviosilver

    An even better solution is to use Thorium instead of Uranium, most likely in a LFTR. Thorium is a waste by-product from other Rare Earth mining operations, so large quantities are available at reasonable cost. In fact, the USDOE has enough Thorium for centuries buried in the Nevada desert. (1)

    Global supply is sufficient for tens of thousands (10,000+ yr), possibly hundreds of thousands (100,000+ yr) of years of electricity generation.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://energyfromthorium.com/2006/04/29/how-much-thorium-would-it-take-to-power-the-whole-world/

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @J.Ross
  78. @anonymous

    Nobody would, under ANY circumstance, deny any other group the right to self preservation and homogeneity.

    It is true that the idea of deliberately diversifying non-white countries would be scorned by many as obviously stupid and/or denounced evil, but this scorn and denunciation carries considerable domestic political risks – it would be a very bad look for a western politician to praise diversity at home but ridicule or denounce it abroad.

    I don’t think it would take very much for a consistent diversitarian to demand that non-white countries increase their diversity. In fact, consistent diversitarian leftists – internationalist, anti-nationalist in orientation as they are – should be urgently demanding that western countries cease hogging the lion’s share of the world’s diversity flows. After all, diversity is strength, which means western countries are only growing stronger at the expense of less diverse non-western countries.

    A consistent diversitarian rightist, on the other hand, would argue that since diversity flows are dictated by economic opportunity, they are thus a reward for a country’s economic success. Western countries should therefore not apologize for their present stranglehold on this all-important resource, since it was fairly won playing by the same rules all countries are invited to play by.

    Such arguments, of course, are never heard, and the reason is that diversity-boosters are by and large a pack of shysters. Still, taking the claims of diversitarians at face value and extending diversitarian positions to their logical limits helps illustrate the idiocy of diversity ideology. We anti-diveristarians should be at the forefront of efforts to extend diversity logic in this way. Since we are the only ones with any interest in bringing diversity into disrepute, if we don’t do it, nobody else is likely to.

    • Replies: @eugyppius
  79. Building scores of nuclear reactors for Muslims who will demographically dominate Germany in the mid-late 21st century doesn’t seem like a great idea.

    • LOL: Dieter Kief
  80. @Hippopotamusdrome

    Causing unemployment among Western industrial workers is one thing, but burning coal? No wonder the establishment finally realized that China is a threat!

  81. Anonymous[365] • Disclaimer says:

    In a typically stupid decision, Angela Merkel basically ordered the rushed and panicked closure of Germany’s nuclear power program in the wake of the Fukushima disaster.

    Merkel is and was a purely toxic leader for Germany.
    *EVERY* single major policy decision left to her ‘judgement’ resulted not just in a bad decision, but a *catastrophically* bad decision.
    Her ‘nuclear physics’ degree be damned.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  82. Anonymous[199] • Disclaimer says:
    @newrouter

    Depending on how it is done, 200 years to a few thousand. Hardly billions of years let alone millions. If the entire world is using nuclear for 100% of power needs, how many Fukushimas and Chernobyls will the world see before they work out the bugs?

    With cheap power comes profligate consumption, so those estimates might not work out so well. Why not go straight to tapping the energy sources that will be available until the sun actually runs out.

    • Replies: @vhrm
  83. Anon 2 says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Ah, Germany! The eternal bully of Europe – strong but morally retarded.

    1. German history: 3 genocides in 40 years (Southwest Africa in the early
    20th century; Polish Christians in the 1940s; Polish Jews in the 1940s).
    On a per capita basis no country was as thoroughly destroyed by Germany during
    WW II as Poland, even more than Russia if that’s even possible;

    2. Germans practiced slavery as recently as 1945, the civilized countries
    abandoned the practice in the 19th century;

    3. Germany is the only European power that practiced colonialism
    both outside and inside Europe;

    4. No country killed as many Americans as the Germans;

    5. Germans practiced absolute monarchy during much of their history.
    Never matured enough to adopt a democracy (until it was forced down
    their throats);

    6. Germany’s historic modus operandi is a perfect example of rationality in
    the service of madness, that is rationality (i.e., science and technology) in
    service of extreme violence toward its neighbors. Herman Melville in
    Moby-Dick (1851) gave us a classic example of this type in
    the person of Captain Ahab.

    To summarize, Germany – maybe an industrial giant but alas
    also a moral dwarf.

    • LOL: Amerimutt Golems
    • Replies: @Amerimutt Golems
  84. @Anonymous

    “Pebble Bed” reactor is equivalent to an AK. The fuel pellets however, aren’t.

  85. Anonymous[365] • Disclaimer says:

    Of course, a great deal of the ‘coal’ mined and burned in Germany is really lignite, a low grade low calorific, soft peaty product, extracted at a terrible toll to the German countryside. Basically it’s strip mined by enormous bucket wheel machines, destroying vast, vast tracts of fertile and beautiful German farm land. Entire villages, graveyards and all, have had to be evacuated to make way for a worthless, denuded moonscape wasteland. The land, being so defeated is perfectly useless for anything else – in many places it’s simply flooded to form giant ponds and lakes.
    To top it all, lignite is a simply terrible CO2 emitter.

    The irony is that, despite all the bollocks you might hear, nuclear and nuclear waste disposal is a vicarage tea party in comparison, in environmental terms.

    • Replies: @Fluesterwitz
  86. Coemgen says:

    Questions:

    We can send someone to the moon but we can’t figure out a way to extract energy from fossil fuels with out “destroying the earth?”
    When we burn fossils fuels aren’t we just returning CO2 back to the atmosphere?
    Shouldn’t we discount anything said by someone who unquestionably assumes that “climate change” is anthropogenic?
    If something is anthropogenic isn’t the best stop-gap-measure to “stop digging” (i.e., stop the exponential expansion of human population)?
    Isn’t over thirty years of politicized “anthropogenic global warming/climate change” long enough for a pattern of “over promising and under delivering” to be noticed?
    Are the personality traits of “noticing things” and “being popular” mutually exclusive?

  87. @SimpleSong

    Renewable electricity is dependent on tax breaks. Give nuclear a 1.7 cent per kilowatt tax subsidy, and we’d be hearing about the declining price of nuclear generated electricity.

  88. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Another example of surprising German failure is of course the still-unfinished Berlin Brandenburg Airport, featuring bad designs, massive cost overruns, and delays of nearly 10 years.

    At the end of 2011, aviation inspectors began filing into the construction site to check alarm systems and security features. A faulty fire-protection system design first filled experts with doubts, and soon it was clear there were huge problems with major structural elements, such as escalator sizes, ceiling designs and ticket counters.
    The envisioned opening, a splendid display complete with an appearance from German Chancellor Angela Merkel, was canceled just weeks before and morphed into a painful embarrassment for German officials.
    https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/berlin-brandenburg-airport-opening-date/index.html

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  89. Anonymous[976] • Disclaimer says:
    @ScarletNumber

    At a certain point Germany has to let the past be the past and do what’s best for Germany

    .

    It is doing a what’s best for Germany, under the (barely-concealed) pretense of making restitution for World War 2. Germany is the dominant power in the EU. It has the worlds largest trade surplus, and runs huge trade imbalances with most other countries in the EU.

    If it were remotely interested in making amends then it would be more than happy to let the United Kingdom, which for a while stood against the Third Reich all but alone, part ways with the EU amicably, with a generous trade agreement. Instead it is doing everything it can to make the UK suffer after its exit.

    If it wanted to make amends to Jews it could throw its borders wide open to unlimited Jewish immigration and perhaps give Israel some territory, like Bavaria, which Israel certainly wouldn’t mind having. Instead it threw its borders wide open to enemies of Israel and forced all of the countries it savaged in World War 2 – such as Poland – to accept them, as well.

    There are certainly some stupid and/or naive Germans who are under the illusion that all this amounts to restitution for past German sins, but German leaders know exactly what they are doing.

  90. vhrm says:
    @Anonymous

    Well, hopefully in 100 years we’ll have fusion power harnessed commercially and then we should be set for a while.

  91. “they will still need to be complemented with an on-demand source of energy, which is either going to be some kind of fossil fuel or some kind nuclear power”

    As pointed out up-thread, nuclear is base load, so it’s fossil or nowt. And fossil means either gas or diesel, the latter surely being the worst way to use oil. You can’t fire up a coal station in 20 minutes.

    But all over the UK you’ll find, sometimes deep in rural areas, fenced-off “diesel farm” compounds, containing maybe 40 small diesel generators and a lot of fuel tanks. These are designed as on-demand boosters and there’s big money behind them for the tax breaks.

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/dec/06/diesel-farms-national-grid-tax-breaks

    How these sites escape predation by travellers, for whom a large amount of diesel is an irresistible target, beats me. I presume they have top grade cameras and other protections, but that doesn’t save, say, police helicopters.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/5322574/Gypsies-trash-5million-police-helicopter.html

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  92. @JohnnyWalker123

    By this logic a small amount of bashing your head should be a benefit.

    1. the NFL wants to hire you
    2. I am not buying it

    • Replies: @HA
  93. Anonymous[156] • Disclaimer says:

    China is one nation that hasn’t given up on nuclear energy, and continues to build and research apace.

    The Chinese are keenly in the HTGR type reactor, a design that uses no water, has a ‘negative heat/reactivity coefficient’- and thus cannot possibly ‘meltdown’ and a very high thermal efficiency due to the extreme temperature of the outlet gas, and the ceramic formulation of the fuel elements. These are graphite ‘billiard balls’ with nuggets of enriched uranium embedded. The Chinese idea is to strip this design down to factory built ‘modular’ elements which are quick to construct and install.

    I have the faint suspicion that ‘he who masters the HTGR will master the 21st century’.

    Oh, and, ironically, the HTGR was originally devised, researched and developed in Germany.

  94. LondonBob says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Russophobia is strong in Sweden, unsurprising given the defeats they have suffered, but conscription was really reintroduced to integrate their immigrants even if they publicly claimed ‘Putin’.

  95. Anonymous[156] • Disclaimer says:

    Germany signally,ignored US, EU and Economist bullying and went ahead with the ‘Nordstream 2’ gas pipeline with Russia, no doubt prompted to fill the gap left by denuclearization in base load capacity.

    A rare instance of post war Germany actually standing up for itself …

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  96. LondonBob says:
    @utu

    The French built reactors in Finland are wildly over budget and still aren’t operatinal. Bizarrely the French design is supposed to be built in Britain and is already wildly more expensive than gas.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/finland-nuclear/long-delayed-finland-nuclear-reactor-to-start-july-2020-tvo-idUSL8N24I4LH

  97. @Anonymous

    Also, didn’t Putin pretty much buy the soul of former German chancellor Social Democrat Schroeder?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  98. Hibernian says:
    @Lot

    Solar in the desert I can see, but having lived in Mid-America almost my entire life, as windy as our environment is, the winds are not steady and reliable. I’d be surprised if there is any place in the world where they are. The only way to convert fluctuating sources to steady power for base loads, or convert nuclear to variable power, for that matter, is pumped storage, which is inherently inefficient, and has not been implemented except minimally, even though it’s been around for at least half a century.

  99. Anonymous[342] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Perhaps, but Schroeder – distinctly unlike that fool Merkel – instinctively realises that Germany’s only hope of a future lies with forging links, trade and otherwise, with Russia.

    Incidentally, Schroeder’s father died on the Russian front.

  100. @Lars Porsena

    We also have to see how research into fusion will pan out at the ITER facility under construction in France.

  101. @Morris Applebaum IV

    A more material concern is banking on renewable energy sources like solar from a third world country (German-Moroccan Energy Partnership or PAREMA).

    This could be used this as leverage to force entry into European Union and add to the brown and black deluge.

  102. @Anon 2

    In true tribal fashion you went on tangents in response to a mere clarification.

  103. @European-American

    Along those lines, I’ve always felt that Frankfurt Airport (FRA) is where the myth of German efficiency and organization goes to die.

  104. Romanian says:
    @Faraday's Bobcat

    More like 71% nuclear France. 90% is nuclear plus renewables.

    Yes, Germany can pursue a policy of using the unified European energy grid to keep pollution production outside of its administrative borders, just like the West exported polluting industries to China and set themselves up for hollowed production chains.

    The problem is that France is, itself, mulling a reduction of nuclear.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-france-nuclearpower/france-to-cut-nuclear-energy-reliance-by-2035-minister-idUSKCN1NN0OK

    Down to 50% by 2035. This is easy to achieve because their big nuclear boom was in the 70s. Most plants are already reaching the end of their lifetimes. You can extend them with investment but, if you do not have the political will for it, you can just phase them out through attrition and pick up the slack through something else (in theory). I have read about plans to extend nuclear power plant lifetimes by another 30-50 years, specifically because it is so hard to build new ones. We will see, I guess.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  105. Romanian says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Taleb’s antifragility is based on this. Small systemic stressors that decrease the chance and impact of much more destructive shocks. Live having small forest fires to prevent the accumulation of biomass that will allow for a huge forest fire at some point in the future. Or preventing moral hazard by letting banks fail.

  106. Romanian says:
    @Veracitor

    Romania’s two nuclear reactors are CANDU. We even built our own heavy water production facilities, but they were shuttered a few years after Communism fell because our electricity needs went down in the industrial collapse and we never got the four reactors we planned for. Still, any future reactors we will build will be CANDUs. Even the Chinese, when they were after the contract to build new reactors, were offering CANDU reactors.

  107. @Anonymous

    Steve okays Jew hating conspiracy postings. What criterion is in play?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Yngvar
  108. Most people don’t understand the concept of intermittency or how energy storage works. The media lies on this topic are about on par with the invasion of iraq. People think there is existing renewables technology that we can switch to and replace fossil fuel and that only bad evil people in fossil fuel are preventing this transition through their lobbying.

    the narrative is basically controlled by moonbats who, ironically, will make the planet hotter by shutting down cleaner alternatives to coal like nuclear and fracking.

  109. If anybody can make nuclear power work safely, it is Germans, with their world’s highest combination of engineering skill times neurotic worrywart personalities.

    Unfortunately, they’ve imported too many “skilled” foreigners who have set about lowering standards across all industries. They can’t even make the trains run on time anymore.

  110. Arclight says:

    Nuclear power would offer abundant and on-demand energy, but it would impose significantly less economic disruption to our society than widespread use of renewables, and that’s precisely the point for the left. They view the ‘green’ agenda as a way to shackle (at a minimum) capitalism, so they want to employ the most costly and least efficient methods of generating energy.

  111. The dot goes higher Somini.

    Do I have to tell you everything?

  112. Svevlad says:

    they also do the other kind of coal burning…

    To see just how awful lignite is, all you have to look at is ex-Yugoslavia. Past few days we literally looked like Beijing at it’s worst, until the wind blew it all onto the rest of Europe

    Heck, there are talks of some ultra-modern reactors that are still just in design, that would use nuclear waste as fuel, completely eliminating that element too. The byproduct would just be degenerated heavy metals

  113. @SimpleSong

    Also related, one thing I find troubling among those highly concerned about AGW is the lack of advocacy for nuclear as a possible solution. If one genuinely believes AGW has the potential to destroy human civilization then the risks posed by expansion of nuclear power would seem small and acceptable by comparison…

    Bingo!

    The fact that nuclear is not even entertained by many prominent activists indicates for me that their concern is rooted in some sort of psychological aversion to modern industrial society rather than a rational assessment of the situation.

    Double Bingo!

    When you hit the odd AGW proponent who is demanding action to rev up nuclear, you’ve stumbled on someone sincere.

    But the lack of interest in reving up nuclear is clearest demonstration that the Global Warming huffing and puffing is a scam with the usual leftist goals–state power, controlling bad-whites deplorable pickup driving lives–for 99% of the people involved.

    The ravenous desire to order people–esp. white-gentiles–how to live seems to be the constant, unbending core psychological feature of the left.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  114. HA says:
    @Morton's toes

    “By this logic a small amount of bashing your head should be a benefit.”

    Isn’t that exactly what happens when you engage in running and jump-rope? Your head and neck bash into each other with each and every jump., and yet, you’re supposedly healthier as a result, overall.

    That’s admittedly a lot gentler than 300 pounds of tackle crashing into your helmet at top speed, but there’s not much hormesis from walking into the middle of an operational nuclear reactor either.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  115. JoetheHun says:

    I am glad I dont pay any more taxes for the german moron government.

  116. @Anonymous

    “what’s best for Germany”

    They’re not doing what’s best for the German people, though. Living standards have dropped, and that’s before you include less tangibles like your daughter not being as safe when going out.

    Thirty years back you’d see a lot of German tourists in the UK. You still see some, but nowhere near as many.

    • Replies: @RAZ
  117. @Neoconned

    If you don’t think middle-aged Western women are vain, I don’t know what to tell you. It’s not cowardice that moves one to seek out trade that rough, but the opposite extreme.

  118. @HA

    Supposedly.

    It’s all about squats. No head bashing involved.

  119. @ScarletNumber

    “Also, I don’t think there are too many tsunamis in Germany, so they don’t have to worry about Fukushima.” Maybe Germany does have nil geo-physical event risks, but she sure has some high demographic composition risks.

  120. moshe says:

    Hey, commentators are free to make all the anti-jew arguments or similes they want but anyone who thinks that Germany should be encouraged to have additional nuclear or other potentially genocidal and militarily game changing technology is playing the fool.

    Steve is no fool but some misfiring synapses are making him play one despite all that he knows about Germany’s long history and all that he claims to believe about national and ethnical characteristics.

    Do you *really* believe that Germany should be trusted with the potential and the excuse to be closer to a military buildup?

    Stevr, I totally get and support voicing opinions that one thinks should at least get a hearing (especially when part of the reason it doesn’t is due to Taboos) so I’d like to scale back my “playing the fool” charge unless of course this becomes a repeated and obviously serious recommendation of his.

    Again, I invite the commentariot to show their usual perspicacity and wit of the sort mentioned above even though I personally am not likely to see it due to the very helpful “commenters to ignore” function that Ron Unz helpfully included (his recent descent into madness notwithstanding, Ron has done a lot of cool stuff that I appreciate). I am, of course, (((afraid))) of hearing the intelligent and totally non-incel Truths that the likes of J.Ross et. al have been so generous to pen for us. Alas, if only I were less afraid to learn…

    P.S. Points arguing against my argument are of course NOT necessarily based upon an “annoy the jew” instinct and I DO NOT mean or want to silence them or, for that matter, to not-hear them. Germans have long been an interesting species and I welcome information about them. For centuries (even back to Caesar’s first paragraph about the restless natives he was anthropologically fascinated to study before pacifying them into Rome’s cookie-cutter pax) Germans have been a race full of interest to both outsiders and insiders and, whether related to them personally or to other arguments in favor of trusting them despite their rather blatant national subconscious and instincts to “follow the leader” I Absolutely Support the rights and indeed obligations to argue against Free Speech Taboos. Even if it means my missing out on the uniquely brilliant enlightenment offered by J.Ross. Whiskey, Unz, Tiny Duck and other such resident luminaries of Insight.

    p.s. My comments are rarely approved within the order they are posted(rather than later when they are less likely to be seen), or at all, but that’s totally cool with me, both because I accept and approve of Steve’s sovereignty over his own blog and because, like Steve and probably a lot of commentators, I write mainly for my own pleasure rather than to satisfy any delusional belief or care to influence anyone, much less anyone with anyone with actual power.

  121. Rob says:
    @Bubba

    There are nuclear plants in France that do load following, which is intermediate between base load and peak load generation. I don’t know how efficient it would be, but there are gas turbines that can burn hydrogen, so nuclear base load could be used to for electrolyzing water to generate hydrogen to run turbines for peak load. It might be capital-intensive, but it would be carbon-neutral, and could be done with relatively little R&D.

  122. @Reg Cæsar

    Wow. The world turns. Dr. Wernher von Braun wasn’t even mentioned in the ABC and CBS moon landing retrospectives last year. Our American remembrance of history as it was is being erased:

    “My friends they were dancing here in the streets of Huntsville when our first satellite orbited the Earth. They were dancing again when the first Americans landed on the Moon. I’d like to ask you, don’t hang up your dancing slippers.”

    And then they came for Whitey’s money.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  123. moshe says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Before reading the final paragraph I was wondering whether conscientiousness and neuroticism (as defined by what you quoted above) were opposing options because as far as I can tell I don’t have much of either of them.

    The definition of conscientiousness (as opposed to having a conscience) Does make sense in light of what I think I understand about Germans based upon meeting plenty of the more chilled out ones (who travel), a moderate amount of historical knowledge and a willingness to Think Differently than the overriding belief these days that all differences between peoples are the result of cultural upbringing alone (or, for that matter, by the sudden and unexpected appearance of a charasmatic leader with animal magnetism that abilities that simply can not be resisted by an otherwise relaxed and normal volk).

  124. Deadite says:
    @Whiskey

    San Onofre failed because of poor risk assessment and QC of the redesigned boiler. The old one, which wasn’t rushed to market as a one-off, worked great for decades. The new one used faulty fluid dynamics code by Mitsubishi, where they didn’t bother to double check against freely available codes the NRC has made available for decades and which are well QA’d.

    The code gave them a wrong velocity, which then gave an incorrect natural frequency, resulting in supports being placed in areas in the tubes causing maximum wear. The failure was chronic, and was never in danger of being catastrophic.

    The Japanese nuclear industry has not attracted their best people for decades. Fukushima occurred because the design was one that used no risk analysis, and would have required a major overhaul in the US (or France or Germany).

    Following the Fukushima incident, Japan imported the great MIT nuclear risk analyst George Apostolakis, who helped set up the US risk assessment community after 3 mile island, to do the same there.

    Gen IV nukes, including Terrapowers, are orders of magnitude safer than any currently operating plants. Ironically, it was the idiot George Bush who left in place a Clinton holdover in DOE’s nuclear research and approval program that slowed down progress. I’m not a fan of Obama, but he put people in place who got things moving after almost two decades of federal blockage, much of which can be placed at the feet of the Bushies. Whom I hate.

  125. The problem with windmills and solar cells is that they can’t be used to reproduce themselves. Fossil fuels are required to make the resins which bind the glass fibres used to create windmill vanes, plastics required for insulation, oils and greases for lubrication, and even fly ash used in the concrete bases.
    Perhaps vegetable matter can be used as substitutes, but the land area required to grow the required crops will compete with the increased land area required for windmills and solar farms.
    Enormous amounts of energy are also required to convert organic precursors into usable chemicals. This is definitely not sustainable.

  126. @prime noticer

    Nope. Just read up on the history of Nukem (Yes) and Alkem. The problem is not primarily technical. Nuclear and any other important technology is on some level bound to be run by accountants, politicians or, worst case, both.
    Ironically, the US Navy appears to have a rather good run wrt running nuclear power plants. Or, maybe, I should read up on the US Navy.

  127. @Lot

    2. To the extent the German gov wants to intervene in the economy with a huge new program, it should be eugenic and natalist. At the outset, some suburban tract housing is needed. German homeownership rates are the lowest in Western Europe.

    Lot, i completely agree with this as a desirable goal.

    However, the immediate demographic crisis is not their low natality but the foreigners. Their immediate demographic need is to declare the Syrian civil war to be over and deport all these “Syrians” who flooded in 4 or 5 years back.

    If they don’t deport this giant foreign turd very soon … Germany is effectively over. Down the road, these people will have impregnated German women or brought in their own women and the next generation will be have a huge non-German, faster breeding minority. Then barring a race war, camps, forced deportation, Germany will simply cease to exist and morph into something else–a middle easternish Euro slum.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Lot
  128. @Redneck farmer

    Well, we just got that in spades here in NJ. Gov. Murphy just signed legislation that will provide a $5,000 rebate (our tax dollars at “work”) for purchases of electric vehicles, ostensibly “repositioning our economy and state for a clean energy future”. This rebate is on top of an already existing sales tax exemption on such vehicles (so, if you are a rich yuppie who wants to virtue signal, the State underwrites it, but if you are a working class schlub, you get to pay the taxes that underwrite the virtue-signaling of the SJW’s…some social justice that, eh).

    Also, there is a current federal tax credit for such purposes working to advantage one set of buyers and one industry already. But if you are a lower income person, or a millenial just starting out with a low income, who still can’t come up with the scratch (particularly if your credit rating is impaired by proportionally high debt levels), none of this largesse applies to you, as purchase of one of these new cars is out of reach.

    Oh, maybe someday, when there are used electric vehicles to buy, but maybe just before they require a horrendously expensive replacement of the vehicle’s battery.

    And unspoken by this oh so wise governor is where all of the electricity to power these vehicles is to come from in the first place, not to mention the considerable infrastructure required to support their effective and practical utilization. Why, I guess all of the people who don’t own these vehicles will have to be taxed to accomplish these ends, either directly, or through the interest payments on bond sales to finance them. Spend money you don’t have, and all of the other needs can just go hang.

  129. jsm says:
    @Anonymous

    If we were to use thorium (google Kirk Sorensen LFTR), it’s 4x more abundant than uranium and you can extract 100X the energy. So thorium would last 400x longer than uranium. 1000 years, from what I last heard. If that’s not long enough to get fusion and / or asteriod mining up and running, well, then we’ll go extinct.

  130. As others here have mentioned, liquid fueled thorium reactors are the way to go, for many reasons.

    1. The fuel doesn’t lend itself to bomb making (which is why it was abandoned by Nixon), so there is low proliferation risk.

    2. Operates at low pressure, so doesn’t need large containment vessels.

    3. Operates at much higher temperature (since it’s not submerged in water), so far more power efficient.

    4. Fuel can be recharged, refreshed, purified, dynamically while in use.

    5. “Meltdown” is meaningless since fuel is already liquid. If fuel overheats will melt freeze plugs and gravity drain into reaction neutralizing, heat sinked storage vessels.

    6. Thorium is cheap and plentiful.

    • Agree: Philip Owen
  131. @anon

    No new hydro plants will be built in the US NW.

    Why is that? Honest question.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Jack D
    , @anon
  132. J.Ross says:
    @A123

    If the deep state wanted to prove that they’re not just totally worthless equivalents of pinkhair women’s studies majors who happened to be born into connected families and so won lifetime exemption from criticism, law, and work, they would go ahead under a secret military operation, recruit engineers, pile up materials, and build several thorium salt reactors. Locations and procedures to be worked out by the engineers, ignorant disapproval to be handled by censorship and classification, and justification from all the crumbling dangerous future Chernobyls all over our country which the environmentalists forbade to improve for decades. This is the kind of thing the silent and GI generation would recognize as an apolitical necessity.
    But no, they want to start an unendable low-intensity conflict in the mid-Atlantic instead.

    • Troll: A123
    • Replies: @AKAHorace
  133. Germany has invested in the further development of potentially commercial generation of power by nuclear fusion.

    The plan is to sustain a plasma for thirty minutes sometime next year, this will be reckoned a breakthrough if achieved.

  134. @Fluesterwitz

    Their body politic has Alzheimer’s.

  135. @SimpleSong

    If one genuinely believes AGW has the potential to destroy human civilization then the risks posed by expansion of nuclear power would seem small and acceptable by comparison.

    If we look at what the CAGW claimers do, and not what they say, we realize they do not believe CAGW is true.

    • Replies: @Thirdeye
  136. Anonymous[223] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    Effectively, the Germans are tearing up and destroying their Vaterland in lignite mining, just to keep these worthless bumrush opportunists in the standard of living they feel ‘entitled’ to.

  137. Anonymous[976] • Disclaimer says:
    @Morris Applebaum IV

    Building scores of nuclear reactors for Muslims who will demographically dominate Germany in the mid-late 21st century doesn’t seem like a great idea.

    Indeed. And by the time the French government has finished restoring Notre Dame they’ll probably be ready to convert it to a mosque.

  138. @JerseyJeffersonian

    Nothing says I’m better than you than a $200K fully electric APC so I can pick up my on line grocery order curbside at Whole Foods.

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  139. @Anonymous

    There is black coal in Germany. Due to cost, most of it used in energy production is being imported, and has been for decades.

    Concerning the tea party. There is no final disposal site for nuclear waste in Germany. During the 70s, the government of the federal state Niedersachsen was willing to offer a thinly populated locale close to the then border of the then GDR – Gorleben. Since that time, there are bouts of exploration, test storage, litigation, assessments, counter assessments with no end in sight.
    An ex-GDR facility, Morsleben, had been in use into the 90s (under new management). When the local state environmental department tried to close it, the federal environmental secretary, a Ms. Merkel, overruled the decision.

  140. Dan Hayes says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Surprising use of the otherwise forbidden “Gypsy” word!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  141. Jack D says:

    I used to think this about the Japanese. Surely they are the ones who can run nuclear reactors. They have run their bullet train system safely for 50 plus years with perfect safety, including during earthquakes. Then came Fukushima. If the Japanese can’t do it then nobody can.

  142. Jack D says:
    @Fluesterwitz

    Most dam locations are already dammed and environmentalists block the rest.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  143. @Elli

    ” I wish Germans (or the Swiss) would run our healthcare system”

    And this is because you have no clue as to how flawed and inneffective it is

    Years ago I was in the hosp in Deutschland for an emergency operation on my behind, so they told me that the surgeon was not available and I should undress and sit outside the operating room until he arrives, so I placed myself on a bench which was located in a public corridor and I am sitting there completely naked for approx two hours with huge amounts of traffic going past until he finally showed up. I know this sounds like malarky but it is true.

    And a year before this grotesque incident I was divorced from my German MD wife, a surgeon.

    Authenticjazzman “Mensa” qualified since 1973, airborne trained US Army vet, and pro jazz artist.

  144. Fortunately for the Germans, their discontinuation of coal and zero-emission nuclear has opened up their high-consumption nation to Russian natural gas. While NATO allies whine about Trump threatening to scale back NATO in the face of an aggressive Russia, Germany is also building pipelines in the Baltic Sea to Russia to not only get that nice fuel but cut Poland out of any potential issues/profits.

    If there’s anything that’s a Russian plot to advance Russian interests, it’s the climate hysteria movement that pushes for shutting down coal AND nuclear while Russia moves in to supply Europe with energy. Though OPEC would also benefit from Western countries with high energy needs shutting down their domestic production. Of course, we all know that Russia is only involved with hacking elections and not some conspiracy theory like finding new consumers for their top industry, right?

    • Disagree: LondonBob
  145. @Anonymous

    There are certainly some stupid and/or naive Germans who are under the illusion that all this amounts to restitution for past German sins, but German leaders know exactly what they are doing.

    I don’t think this is true at all. They look like stumble bums.

    Merkel in particular had been making “multiculturalism doesn’t work” noises just a few years before. Then she threw open the gates–trashing EU rules and German constitutional constraints–making noises akin to how this is showing Germany is a wonderful caring place. Reasonably sane CDU leadership was appalled but didn’t have the guts to be a “Nazi” by opposing foreigners and standing up for Germans.

    This didn’t look anything like “know exactly what they are doing” but rather the perils of having a
    childless woman who is the daughter of a commie churchman running your nation.

    • Agree: Lot
  146. The safest (and most economical) reactor is the thorium-fueled molten salt reactor. The US ran molten salt reactors at Oak Ridge for several years. The technical problems are largely a matter of engineering instead of new concepts (thus amenable to robust solutions).

    Those wanting to know more about this safe and pracctical solution should look at the You Tube video, “LFTR in Sixteen Minutes.” Here ’tis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWUeBSoEnRk

    The US pioneered the approach, but now the most development is in China. Again, they are taking the US pioneering work and bringing to practical use. Probably sell the tech back to us in the 2030s.

    JP Straley

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  147. anon[210] • Disclaimer says:
    @Fluesterwitz

    There are a finite number of rivers in the US NW, therefore a finite number of places to build hydropower dams. Most of those locations either already have a dam or cannot be touched. The Dalles on the Columbia river is an example of an existing dam, the Columbia river gorge is an example untouchable.

    The same is true in California and other locations: all the really good, relatively easy dam sites have a dam on them, and the rest are a mix of not-so-good geology / topography plus politically unfeasible.

    By the way, the Dalles supplies part of SoCal’s electrical baseload via a high voltage DC power line that dates back decades. That’s one of those modern engineering projects that likely cannot be replicated today for reasons.

    • Thanks: Fluesterwitz
  148. Lot says:
    @AnotherDad

    Sorry to say this, but I think Germany and Sweden are lost causes at this point. They are already seeing international white flight.

    What is especially depressing is that after the immivasion, the government tried to deport the ~2% or so of migrants whose asylum claims were finally heard despite the multiyear backlog and completely rejected.

    The response? The state-level governments and cities passed sanctuary city and state laws and went nuts in general blocking these small numbers of deportations.

    And there is just no sign in the recent elections that there ever will ever be a moderately restrictionist majority of even the Danish or Austrian or BoJo variety.

    And in Germany the migrants are not voting yet. Even the giant and old Turkish population barely votes. That won’t last forever, and eventually there will be all-Afro/Muslim districts with few actual voters but still electing such people, as is the case with the UK. (Pakis just seem to be more political than Arabs and Turks).

    In just two years, Labour MPs went from 32/262 BAME in 2017 to 39/202 in 2019, 12.2% to 19.3%.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  149. Lot says:
    @Anonymous

    German behavior under Mutter Merkel toward the Greeks during the financial crisis was completely vicious. No sign of any Nazi guilt there.

    Greek unemployment and economic contraction was worse than the US Great Depression. “F’em” was the consistent German response the whole time.

    • Agree: Fluesterwitz
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Reg Cæsar
    , @A123
  150. Anonymous[223] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    It’s deliberate internal Labour Party policy to have ‘all BAME (Black And Minority Ethnic) shortlists’ when local constituency Labour Parties are selecting electoral candidates.
    Labour Party high command certainly understand Britain’s demographics – and pander to it.

  151. ” Greek unemployment and economic contraction”

    Yeah Greece the place where economic sanity reigns : Thirteenth month bonus salary for gov employees and retirement at age 54 meaning most retirees receive their pensions longer than then their working careers lasted.

    AJM

  152. @Anonymous

    As anyone who’s owned German cars knows, this is an argument against German nuclear power.

    The oil system in current I4 and I6 BMWs supports this.

    There’s no dipstick, you have to use one of the control stalks to dig into the menus and run an, “engine oil level, ” check. By the time it reports back you could have checked and double-checked the oil level with a dipstick. Who knows how accurate these sensors are?

    On top of this, there are no less than four gaskets that are nearly guaranteed to fail around 30-40k miles requiring $800 to $1500 in parts and labor at a worthwhile independent mechanic. Three of these exist due to the top mounted oil filter and the two-part aluminum heatsinking/circulation block that it screws into.

    Mercedes, on the other hand, has recent V6 engines related to the well-regarded Chrysler Pentastar V6 family:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercedes-Benz_M276_engine

    And yes, it has a dipstick.

  153. Travis says:

    Germany has 84 Coal burning power plants….shutting them down will have almost no effect Global CO2 levels. While Germany currently obtains 33% of their power from coal and burns 200 tonnes of coal each year, China has been building 100 new Coal burning plants each year and plans on building 500 more coal plants over the next decade. China already has more coal burning plants than all of Europe and the United States combined and they will increase their coal burning by 50% over the next decade.

  154. @Redneck farmer

    Give nuclear a 1.7 cent per kilowatt tax subsidy, and we’d be hearing about the declining price of nuclear generated electricity.

    Most wind and solar projects get more than that.

  155. @Joe Stalin

    Von Braun is not mentioned even in the pretty good documentary Apollo 11. Taking Hidden Figures seriously only proves once again the Derb’s point that We Are Doomed.

    • Agree: Bubba
  156. J.Ross says:
    @A123

    What is wrong with what I said? Are you under the impression that this would be allowed to happen in a million years without justified subterfuge? Even as the crumbling old reactors generate problems, popular hysteria will only get worse. Someone has to just go ahead and do it.

    • Replies: @A123
  157. AKAHorace says:
    @J.Ross

    But no, they want to start an unendable low-intensity conflict in the mid-Atlantic instead.

    In the mid-Atlantic ? I don’t understand where you mean. The Azore is the only mid-Atlantic place that I can think of. Sorry if I am obtuse, I genuinely don’t understand, this is not sarcasm.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Reg Cæsar
  158. RAZ says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Still see German tourists vacationing in the Caribbean.

    They stand out as couples since she is topless, he is wearing a too short Speedo, and they both are smoking.

  159. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymouse

    I admit I have no smoking-gun evidence for my suspicions, but isn’t it strange that the US turned anti-nuclear when Jews became the elites?

    There was once a time when a nuclear future was seen as a good thing for most developing nations. Less pollution with cleaner energy.

    Now, there were genuine nuclear scares over the years, to be sure. Three Mile Island and the horror at Chernobyl. And the mess at Fukushima(that could have been avoided if the idiots who built it hadn’t placed it so close to the ocean). It was the flooding that messed it up.

    But could there be a correlation between Jewish elite power and fear-mongering about nuclear energy? It’s like there’s hardly any discussion of nukes in Israel(made with technology stolen from the US) and how Israel gave nuclear tech to apartheid South Africa BUT BUT BUT there is endless fear-mongering about Iran that has NO nukes. The mere fact that Iran has nuclear plants is enough to drive Jewish Power mad.

    Then, isn’t it possible that one reason why the Jewish elites fear the proliferation of nuclear energy is that it might lead to nuclear weaponry in the hands of rivals of Israel?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  160. Anonymous[518] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    German behavior under Mutter Merkel toward the Greeks during the financial crisis was completely vicious. No sign of any Nazi guilt there.

    Exactly. If their aim was to make restitution to their victims they made it to the people as far away and as different from their victims as possible. It’s like a rich man accidentally…wait, *intentionally* totaling a poor man’s car then “paying him back” by buying a car for some random dude halfway around the world. Meanwhile the rich man still goes around talking shit and intentionally harming the poor man, while bragging about all the “restitution” he’s making.

    What kind of f***ed up logic is that?

  161. J.Ross says:
    @AKAHorace

    An Americanism, like how when we say “Vietnam” we reliably refer to “our experience warring with Vietnam.” It refers to the general area of our richest swamp.

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
  162. @Almost Missouri

    Indeed,

    EZ Reactors for Everybody!

    looks like a nuclear powered version of the 737-MAX.

    Please not.

  163. Lot says:
    @JerseyJeffersonian

    “ but if you are a working class schlub, you get to pay the taxes that underwrite the virtue-signaling of the SJW”

    Use of electric cars reduces demand for gas, and that in turn reduces gas prices.

    Just eyeballing the reports below, the effect right now is pretty small, and estimated 11% of new vehicles worldwide this year will be electric or hybrid.

    Let’s say their current on the road share of actual driving is 1.5% now and this has reduced gas demand by 1% below the baseline.

    That probably reduces prices by more than 1% for two reasons. First, supply and demand are both inelastic in the short and medium term. Second, lower demand for gas reduces refining margins. Put these two effects together, and electrics and hybrids probably have resulted in gas prices being roughly 2.5% below what we’d be in a pure ICE world.

    That’s a small effect, but it will go up quickly as electric and hybrid sales are increasing rapidly.

    https://evadoption.com/

  164. A123 says:
    @J.Ross

    What is wrong with what I said?

    From your Post #141:

    …. ignorant disapproval to be handled by censorship and classification ….

    …. justification from all the crumbling dangerous future Chernobyls all over our country …

    …, start an unendable low-intensity conflict in the mid-Atlantic instead.

    There is no need to develop LFTR technology in a conspiratorial or clandestine manner. The original documentation from the ORNL runs are in public domain and available as PDF.

    Chernobyl hazards are not spread “all over our country”. There are a very limited number of high risk points in the U.S., most of which supported early development of nuclear technology (e.g. Hanford)

    The topic of LFTR technology is 100% independent from the totally separate topic of overseas military operations.

    When I read your post it came across as cryptic, conspiratorial, and negative. If I misunderstood your intent, my apologies.

    ______

    Here is a plain language summary about nearly waste free LFTR operation: (1)

    LFTRs produce little or no nuclear waste, and indeed can be significant consumers of actinides, which are the most troubling components of LWR nuclear waste. LFTR waste products reach benign levels of radioactivity after 300 years, but many useful and valuable fission products become safe after a few years, and can be mined from the fission product stream for use in industry. Long half life fission products have uses in medicine, and industry. Thus the fission products from LFTRs can be viewed as material resources rather than nuclear waste.

    _______

    If you want a more detailed technical review of LFTR technology it can be found here:

    https://energyfromthorium.com/lftr-overview/

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://nucleargreen.blogspot.com/2010/09/wht-lftr-is-still-needed.html

  165. anon[417] • Disclaimer says:

    Use of electric cars reduces demand for gas, and that in turn reduces gas prices.

    Increasing the demand for electricity and all the physical plant that goes with it: natural gas pipelines, stationary generation, power lines. Power distribution is another NIMBY problem, few people want a brand new big overhead 15KV power line in their neighborhood.

    Second, lower demand for gas reduces refining margins.

    Refiners also produce diesel and distillates such as propane. Your guess is doubtful. Is it based on actual prices and costs? Or just your own prejudices?

    Put these two effects together, and electrics and hybrids probably have resulted in gas prices being roughly 2.5% below what we’d be in a pure ICE world.

    You do not know that. You are just guessing / wishing. Or repeating someone else’s guess as “fact”.

    Peasants in flyover get to help pay for virtue signallers in their Teslas via taxation, IMO.

  166. @AKAHorace

    But no, they want to start an unendable low-intensity conflict in the mid-Atlantic instead.

    In the mid-Atlantic ? I don’t understand where you mean. The Azore is the only mid-Atlantic place that I can think of. Sorry if I am obtuse, I genuinely don’t understand, this is not sarcasm.

    The Azores aren’t that far west from the Canaries or Madeira. If that counts as “mid-“, then the major mid-Atlantic contribution to America has been the ukulele. Via the mid-Pacific.


    Now St Helena (Nota bene, Montanans: the “Saints” rhyme their island’s name with “subpoena”, which their most famous resident would appreciate)– St Helena is mid-Atlantic, as is Ascension, their nearest alternative for aircraft diversion. On both the east-west and north-south axes.

    St Helena got her first commercial airfield in the past decade. It appears to be another case of “risk compensation”– the dangerous natural conditions (wind shear, in this case) lead to an accident-free record. Even a cancellation-free record.

    ST HELENA: HOW TO FLY INTO THE ‘WORLD’S MOST USELESS AIRPORT’

    Has anyone done a comparison of inherently dangerous and safer airports for safety records? Kai Tak, San Diego (parking ramp in the landing path), Sint Maarten (public beach in the landing path) haven’t been the sites of the spectacular crashes.

    Wendover Productions has a new online documentary on “The World’s Most Useful Airport”, answering the critics.

    https://www.youtube.com/wendoverproductions?uid=9RM-iSvTu1uPJb8X5yp3EQ

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
  167. @Lot

    Greek unemployment and economic contraction was worse than the US Great Depression.

    Even FDR didn’t have the nerve to blame the Germans for that, though.

  168. nebulafox says:
    @JP Straley

    Thorium reactors are currently being tested for usage in Indonesia’s electric grid.

    To say that this is a bit depressing to reflect on, regarding the USA, is a gross understatement. Only a little less so than the fact that you are more likely to step in poop on a San Francisco street than near Jakarta’s slums.

    • Replies: @Dissident
  169. nebulafox says:
    @Romanian

    I always thought citing France would be a clever idea to get reasonable liberals on board with the idea of nuclear power as an interim step away from fossil fuels. It helps that they tend to be the “honest atheist” types who’d be horrified at the idea of having our foreign policy influenced by Middle Eastern theocrats rather than gasping about Islamophobic BadThink.

  170. You can’t have safe nuclear power and Moslems in the same country.

  171. Reactors cooled by molten salt are inherently safer than PWRs, as were the UKs AGRs. There are several Scandanavian start ups developing them. The preferred fuel is Thorium. Thorium has been underdeveloped because there are no weapons grade by products. Indeed, a Thorium based reactor can actually consume spent fuel rods from other types of reactor and render them innocuous. China, India, Russia, Canada and the UK all have companies working on MSRs.

    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
  172. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @JerseyJeffersonian

    Also, there is a current federal tax credit for such purposes working to advantage one set of buyers and one industry already. But if you are a lower income person, or a millenial just starting out with a low income, who still can’t come up with the scratch (particularly if your credit rating is impaired by proportionally high debt levels), none of this largesse applies to you, as purchase of one of these new cars is out of reach.

    Oh, maybe someday, when there are used electric vehicles to buy, but maybe just before they require a horrendously expensive replacement of the vehicle’s battery.

    I drive about thirty miles a day, five days a week. A couple times a month I drive to my other house about 150 miles away, and maybe once a year take a longer trip.

    A hybrid vehicle with regular old lead acid golf cart batteries and an efficient (since it runs at a single speed) piston engine turning a light weight generator end could get me to work and back every day without a drop of gas, charging off peak, and on the long trips I could fire up the engine and get 35-40 mpg at 65, 70 miles per hour. It could be a natural gas engine and I could slow fill the tank in my garage with a cheap small compressor, but would require some CNG infrastructure to be good for that one long trip I take each year. I have driven dedicated propane only vehicles on long trips and you have to plan ahead, but it’s possible-ironically propane is easier to get in podunk rural areas, major cities are propane deserts oftentimes. Nat gas would be the other way around-rural areas use propane precisely because they don’t have nat gas infrastructure so fill stations would be tough in the sticks, but easy in cities. Diesel would be ideal if they would waive the idiotic EPA regs requiring particulate filters and DEF and the other bullshit if you agreed to run the diesel only outside city limits.

    If we really had to get rid of gasoline, we could, but the penis of government regulations up our butt makes it tough except for hard core DIYers who go under the radar.

  173. Fox says:
    @Anonymous

    I think that any and all opinions of and discussions about causes and beginning of both WWI and WWII not officially sanctioned by the beneficiaries of the wars have plainly been missed or bypassed by you.

  174. @Philip Owen

    Garbage. Thorium produces weapons grade isotopes (such as uranium-233) and is an overall piece of shit.

    http://energyskeptic.com/2014/thorium-not-a-near-term-commercial-nuclear-fuel/

    Germany leads the way, as usual.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    , @Rob
    , @A123
  175. Not Raul says:

    Some people might feel uncomfortable about Germany becoming the leader in nuclear technology.

  176. Anonymous[394] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Dams have an absolutely devastating effect on fresh water flora and fauna.
    For example, the damming of the Columbia River system in the USA has had an appalling effect on the populations of trout/salmon family type fish.
    In China the Yangtze Paddle-Fish – an extremely important species from the point of view of the ichthyologist, in that the type preserves ancient characteristics reminiscent of the stem stock of all tetrapods – is believed to be extinct due to damming of the Yangtze. A tragic loss of epic proportions to zoology and biodiversity.

  177. @Fredrik

    How do you reckon Russia a “garbage nation?” It still exists, and looks to go in existing indefinitely, after all, which is more than can be said for the F.U.S.A., Britain, France, Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands (sorry, Mr. Derbyshire!), Belgium, Ireland, Canada, and any number of other nations which are now, or soon will be, mere colonies of Guatelombia, Hindoos doing the Needful, The Han Empire, or Afrorabiastan….

  178. @Anonymous

    A tragic loss of epic proportions to zoology and biodiversity.

    Well, I guess tragic losses of epic proportion aren’t quite what they’re cracked up to be, because here’s little old me calmly not giving much a of a f–k.

    • Agree: danand
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  179. @JohnPlywood

    It depends on the design. Even a thorium reactor optimized for weapons grade material is a lot less effective than a uranium reactor and would suffer penalities in energy production.

    • Replies: @A123
  180. @silviosilver

    That should buy us ample time to become a truly space-faring, Kardashev Type II civilization.

    Unfortunately, a Kardashian Type I seems more likely.

  181. @Anonymous

    In China the Yangtze Paddle-Fish – an extremely important species from the point of view of the ichthyologist, in that the type preserves ancient characteristics reminiscent of the stem stock of all tetrapods – is believed to be extinct due to damming of the Yangtze.

    This being China, it’s just as likely that the last fish was caught and eaten.

  182. Anonymous[342] • Disclaimer says:
    @silviosilver

    Anyone with the remotest interest in human evolution – especially the crucial part of the story from whence fishy type creatures first clambered ashore- should give the proverbial f*ck and not give a dam(n).
    As Neil Shubin, in his excellent ‘Your Inner Fish’ would tell you, the fishy part of the long, long winding tapestry is, well, like 99.99% of it. All the rest is mere trivia and incidentallity.

  183. Don’t have the time to dig through 190 comments right now, but just in case anyone hasn’t gotten the memo: Either a slim majority or a sizable plurality of the world’s coal is burned to MAKE STEEL. You’re dadgum right Trump is favor of American steel, and thus coal.

    • Replies: @anon
  184. Rob says:
    @JohnPlywood

    That article discusses using thorium in existing reactors, not LFTR. Despite breeding U-233, LFTR is much more proliferation-resistant than current reactors. The unsuitability for producing nuclear weapons is why the US did not develop LFTR commercially.

  185. A123 says:
    @JohnPlywood

    Most of the article you cite has no relevance to this discussion. It is about using Thorium as a solid fuel in current LWR’s. Developing a new reactor design in LFTR overcomes the obstacles your author mentions.

    Thorium produces weapons grade isotopes (such as uranium-233)

    The LFTR material cycle consumes U233 as it is created, so the amount on hand at any one time is quite limited. Also, the U233 is dissolved in the lithium beryllium fluoride salt. Any attempt to misappropriate the U233 would involve stealing the total mass contained in the reactor system.
    ____

    LFTR electrical stations will inevitability produce Uranium-232: (1)

    There is less risk of proliferation with LFTR (Thorium) fuel, since Thorium doesn’t fission in of itself, and stolen active LFTR fuel would contain U232 (a natural byproduct of the LFTR process, not required to be added). U232 is very radioactive and would damage electronics and irradiate the people stealing it, and make any stolen material easy to find.

    If you are concerned about nuclear weapons proliferation, replacing the current fleet of LWR reactors with LFTR would be a huge step forward. The presence of U238 in LWR’s leads to the creation of “weapons grade isotope” Pu239, which is a near perfect material for weapons fabrication.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) http://lftrnow.com/about-lftr-liquid-flouride-thorium-reactors/

    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
  186. Wind power + liquid air storage is looking like it will be economical, at scale, in the UK.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-50140110

    The UK has shallow seas eg Dogger Bank where you can place thousands or tens of thousands of 100m wind turbines. The cost of the wind turbines is reducing rapidly with scale.

    The excess power is stored by liquefying air and storing it in tanks. When you need extra power (or in a lull) you re-gassify the air through a turbine, generating electricity, with a very short start-up time.

    The expensive part is the turbine; once you have that, you can cheaply increase the storage by adding more air tanks. It should be possible to store months worth of energy.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Hibernian
  187. A123 says:
    @Philip Owen

    It depends on the design. Even a thorium reactor optimized for weapons grade material is a lot less effective than a uranium reactor and would suffer penalities in energy production.

    How would such optimization work?

    Adding U238 to the fluid so that it captures to Pu239? I do not want to say this is impossible, but it would effectively poison the working fluid with a neutron absorber.

    Another option would be leaving a “window” in the reactor design for intentional neutron escape. That would allow the creation of a “target” chamber. This could be a useful idea for producing small amounts of very high value material (e.g. Mo99), but I am dubious about creation of the quantities needed for weaponization.

    PEACE 😇

  188. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    There was a time when Jews lionized Oppenheimer who wanted the US to share Nuclear Weapon secrets with the USSR and the communist world. Back then, many Jews saw the communist world as pro-Jewish, not least because Jews played a major role in the creation of USSR and Stalin installed many Jewish communists to head Eastern European nations under Soviet domination. And the USSR did most to defeat Nazi Germany. And of course, Rosenbergs and Sobell sent nuke secrets to the USSR, and they’ve been canonized by much of the Jewish Establishment. Back then, many Jews were suspicious of the US as run by right-wing Christian militarists. Also, the US deep state spared many Nazi scientists and the like and had them serve US science/technology. And with the Cold War, US was on good terms with Germany and Japan once again and against the communist world that was still, at the time, associated with Jewish Power. Back then, Jews were for nuclear proliferation because the other superpower was seen as Good for Jews.

    But once Jews came to hate the USSR as the backer of Arab nations against Israel and as their position consolidated in the US, they were no longer into spreading nuclear secrets/technology. US was their empire, and only Israel should have nukes in the region. There was a campaign to vilify nuclear energy(except when it’s in the hands of Zionists in Israel and the US). Something fishy going on here.

  189. A123 says:
    @Lot

    German behavior under Mutter Merkel toward the Greeks during the financial crisis was completely vicious. No sign of any Nazi guilt there.

    Mutti Mullah Merkel is an IslamoGlobalist. Weakening Christian Greece in an attempt to keep it vulnerable and submissive to Muslim rape-ugees was part of her plan.

    While partially effective, Greece is now escaping from the grasp of IslamoGlobalism via the recent signing of the EastMed pipeline deal that will supply Cypus, Greece, Italy, and potentially other southern European countries.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    • Agree: Lot
  190. Thirdeye says:
    @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    Exactly. In northern California one of the best wind power sites got taken off the table under pressure from local NIMBYs and an evidence-free claim that it was traditional sacred ground to an Indian tribe. Of course the tribe never explained how using fossil fuels, electricity, modern health care, indoor plumbing, or running a casino fit into their traditions. In the immediate aftermath of that fiasco, the enviros who opposed the project started spewing all sorts of pie-in-the-sky ideas on how to combat AGW. The obvious conclusion is that concern about AGW is not sincere.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  191. @Anonymous

    In China the Yangtze Paddle-Fish – an extremely important species from the point of view of the ichthyologist, in that the type preserves ancient characteristics reminiscent of the stem stock of all tetrapods

    FFS feller, if the thing was that damn important to ichthyologists, why didn’t they just grab one and stick it in a fish tank? I’m sure the poor thing would have suffered through incalculable trauma being removed from its natural environment – a Kleenex moment for the planet, clearly – but at least its existence would have been preserved.

  192. anon[419] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Only Catholic Unionist

    Either a slim majority or a sizable plurality of the world’s coal is burned to MAKE STEEL.

    Citation, please.

  193. @prime noticer

    reading more nuts and bolts technical history of the Cold War, i wonder how much the Soviets hung in there for decades largely because they took lots of IP from Germany after 1945. the US did too, which advanced lots of American tech. some of those stories about German tech and scientists are famous, lots of them aren’t though.

    The Germans who helped us had a Fed get-out-of-jail-free card. If they messed up, were found out or exposed, OSI stepped in and tried to clean up. This I know because NS called me and set me straight when I became curious 😉

  194. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thirdeye

    If wind power actually worked it would be made anathema. It is supported only because it does not work. Nothing liberals ever want to do ever works.

    Wind power makes sense in Antarctica, on isolated islands to power a radio or a few lights, or for people otherwise very far off the grid. Companies like Wincharger and Jacobs Wind Electric made money before the REA came in and electrified pretty near every square mile of usable ag land in the United States, but it was very expensive power as compared to the grid. Utility power bills are cheaper than the maintenance on any small scale system if your skilled labor is properly valued.

    Otherwise, wind is bullshit. Solar is very marginal and would involve a lot of maintenance also, but could theoretically be marginally effective in a few cases. Hydro works which is why it’s bad. But hydro is already about as utilized as it can be in the US.

    Nuclear works and that’s why they hate it. Of course, nuclear can be a big disaster if done wrong, but that’s not their actual concern. It’s just the best handle they have to oppose it.

    The only angle from which US energy policy seems to make any sense is to keep us dependent on Middle Eastern light sweet crude like a heroin addict so we will have a handle that the proles and the middle class can be fired up about to monkey around in the Middle East.

    • Troll: silviosilver
  195. Anonymous[249] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    In a typically stupid decision, Angela Merkel basically ordered the rushed and panicked closure of Germany’s nuclear power program in the wake of the Fukushima disaster.

    Merkel and her stringpullers are not stupid, whatever else they may be. Merkel was never her own person, but always a convenient cut-out for organized interests, first in her native East Germany, then on the international stage.

    As Hail noted above:

    – [Merkel ordered] one-time dumping of over 1.5 million Muslims on Germany (75% said to be military-age males), triggering a Europe-wide crisis.

    De-nuclearization, just like the mass importation of Muslim men from all over the world, is part of a policy of de-industrialization. The question, as always, is: cui bono?

  196. Lagertha says:
    @Desiderius

    Germany made a deal with Putin (Nord Stream) to get their natural gas to run their manufacturing plants. So, Germany is sort of Putin’s Bitch, now. Germany and France are slowly being neutered….and it is high time for that.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  197. Thirdeye says:
    @prime noticer

    ….. the US nuclear industry is stultified, and has barely advanced since the 90s. only a few new US designed reactors get built around the world per decade.

    China has embarked on a major construction program with Westinghouse AP1000 type passive safety system reactors.

  198. AKAHorace says:
    @J.Ross

    An Americanism, like how when we say “Vietnam” we reliably refer to “our experience warring with Vietnam.” It refers to the general area of our richest swamp.

    So mid-Atlantic means Washington and New York. Mid way between Maine and Florida on the Atlantic coast ?

  199. Anonymous[328] • Disclaimer says:
    @jimmyriddle

    Of course the analogy of this sort of set up is very familiar one of rainfall, in times of abundance, being stored in reservoirs for gradual release in times of scarcity.
    Both systems rely on the caprice of weather patterns: the water storage and distribution scheme works, and has worked for centuries. Therefore, there is no reason to think that large scale wind energy storage cannot be made to work.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  200. AKAHorace says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Hi Reg Ceasar,

    a bit off topic to what you wrote (which was a bit off topic of what I posted). Do you think that islands like Saint Helena or the Kerguelans could become strategically important ? If aircraft carriers are more and more vulnerable to missiles and anti ship missiles become more powerful and improve their range then islands that are distant from continents (and owned by powers like the UK and France) could become useful missile bases.

  201. J.Ross says:
    @Anonymous

    One of the prepper/semi-offgrid bloggers I used to follow closely posted a Popular Mechanics cover story from the 70s about how your house of the future would have a huge heavy energy-storing flywheel underneath it, to make green but inconstant energy generation practical. The guy was asking, have we really not figured out how to do this since the cover story was published? The recent un-recalled-and-crushed spasm of electric cars was made possible by advances in battery technology.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  202. J.Ross says:
    @Lagertha

    This is the image that will clarify all mainstream media behavior in our time, but it also applies to Europeans verbally attacking Putin as they hand him a giant kill switch.
    https://postimg.cc/gL2Pvk1F

  203. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    Flywheel storage is a thing for uninterruptable power supplies, these are a fiber wound rotor that spins in a vacuum chamber and if there is a vacuum fail the spool flywheel comes apart in a containable mess in a steel flask or scattershield. It is a short term thing to give gensets time to come up to speed.

  204. @A123

    It doesn’t overcome the obstacles the author mentions, because the paper makes clear that bulilding LFTR’s is not economically viable.

  205. Dissident says:
    @nebulafox

    Only a little less so than the fact that you are more likely to step in poop on a San Francisco street than near Jakarta’s slums.

    Is there a U.S. city more iconic of buggery than San Francisco? To paraphrase (“The Reverend”) Jesse Jackson’s exhortation against electing George W. Bush as President,
    Stay out of the Bushes feces!

    Those who for decades defiantly, recklessly and brazenly played in it— and all those who self-righteously championed and enabled such degenerate, grossly unsanitary, inordinately disease-promoting, parasitic behavior– now find themselves stepping in it.

    Homophobic to expose and condemn buggery for the dangerous, anatomically unsound, brutal, inherently predatory act that it manifestly is?

    [MORE]
    Can there be someone more emphatically pro-homoerotic than Man2Man Alliance (GRAPHIC CONTENT) founder Bill Weintraub? Weintraub coined the term FROT for the non-penetrative, mutually genital, egalitarian act that he promotes not only as a vastly safer alternative to buggery, but as the true and ultimate form of male homosexual intercourse.

  206. Hibernian says:
    @jimmyriddle

    The UK has shallow seas eg Dogger Bank where you can place thousands or tens of thousands of 100m wind turbines. The cost of the wind turbines is reducing rapidly with scale.

    Placing windmills on platforms in the ocean. No chance that’ll be tied up in environmental lawsuits!

  207. Poco says:
    @Money shot

    Here is what you need to retain in that tiny pea-sized brain, tiny dick. When the White Man is either too few or too enervated to protect and pay for your shuffle-butt ass the Chinese are going to pay a prolonged visit upon you and your kind. Once the genetic experiments are done there won’t be any of your kind.
    Having learned how to manipulate said genetics everyone will choose to be born blond-haired, blue-eyed with caucasian features. That is the future.

  208. eugyppius says:
    @silviosilver

    European-descended peoples within the Diversity Paradigm are constructed as not having ethnic or racial characteristics. Thus they are blank, white. This reveals the basically Euro-centered founding perspective of the Diversity Brigade. Your own ethnicity is invisible to you, particularly when you are surrounded mostly by coethnics. In your homeland only Diverse foreigners are racially or ethnically salient. Browns and blacks are happy to play along with this ridiculous scheme even though most of them have heightened tribalist characteristics and see immediately that Euros are a distinct race.

    … the idea of deliberately diversifying non-white countries would be scorned by many as obviously stupid and/or denounced … but this scorn … carries considerable domestic political risks – it would be a very bad look for a western politician to praise diversity at home but ridicule or denounce it abroad.

    Unless those of Euro descent can take down this paradigm and conceive of themselves as an actual race of people, and not just as a flat featureless population devoid of race, politicians would indeed get away with praising domestic diversity and demanding whites stay out of brown countries. Domestically, whites are blank. They have no racial content. Adding blacks or browns means you get Ethnicity which you didn’t have before. Whites sent abroad would merely dilute the Ethnicity of brown/black countries, which is an abomination.

    In fact, consistent diversitarian leftists – internationalist, anti-nationalist in orientation as they are – should be urgently demanding that western countries cease hogging the lion’s share of the world’s diversity flows.

    On the one hand, there is basically an infinite supply of African immigrants and I think even the Diversity Brigade knows this. On the other hand, Diversity is most often discussed as an issue of admixture, rather than numbers, so even if Africans were scarce nobody would be worried about this: Importing Africans is fine, because however many you bring in, Africa remains an undiluted 100% (or near enough) black. Meanwhile America gets browner as its admixture of people with racial or ethnic features who are not merely blank is increased. Everybody, uh, wins.

    This whole thing is so absurd, it explains why the managers of the narrative attack any flicker of Euro racial consciousness. If that gets off the ground, the ideological machine stops working and the contradictions become openly apparent.

  209. Anonymous[589] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dan Hayes

    That’s because they’re not real gypsies but Irish travellers. It’s OK to call them gypsies because that’s what they call themselves.

    It’s the real gypsies who take offense at being called gypsies.

    • Thanks: Dan Hayes
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